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Hispanic link weekly report, September 15, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 15, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian, facing re-election, parts company with fellow state Republican, U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson, on Proposition 63, the “Official English” measure on that state’s November ballot Wilson, not up for re-election, openly supports the proposition; Deukmejian labels it “insensitive to our state’s ethnic diversity” and denounces it as “counterproductive”. . .Ricardo Nieto, former California assistant chief of elections, joins the re-election campaign of U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) as deputy field director.. The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs appoints Marylou Olivarez-Mason of Lansing as executive director. Oliv&rez-Mason is the first woman to head the 11-year-old commission. . .Denver
Mayor Federico Pefta announces the appointment of Juana Maria Bordas to the Denver Election Commission. . . The District of Columbia chapter of the American Society for Public Administration inaugurates its William Medina Memorial Lecture Series. Medina, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, was active in increasing the number of Hispanics at all levels of government.. Modesto, Calif., and three railroad companies agree to pay Robert L6pez, 24, $5 million in an out-of-court settlement for injuries suffered when his motorcycle was struck by a train. L6pez, who was not wearing a helmet, was left braindamaged and quadraplegic... “Santiago” James Chavez dies at the age of 51. A native of Denver, Chdvez was the recipient of the National Defense Service Medal, was instrumental in developing the National Chicano Health Organization and was director for Chicano, Affairs for the Denver Archdiocese...
HISPANIC LINOVEEKL^REPSOT
a
Broadcast Employment Up3.5%
Linda Chavez Wins in Maryland Primary
Former White House aide Linda Ch&vez moved one step closer to becoming the first Hispanic woman elected to the U.S. Senate when she overwhelmed 10 opponents to win the Maryland Republican nomination in the Sept. 9 primary.
Chavez, a former New Mexico resident and ex-Democrat, captured 73% of the vote. Her campaign received a big boost when her major competitor, Baltimore businessman Richard P. Sullivan, dropped out of the race two weeks before the election.
The victory for the 39-year-old Chavez is more impressive given that she has been a resident of Maryland for just 2 1/2 years and a Republican only since last year. In the coming campaign against the Democratic nominee, U.S. Rep. for Maryland Barbara Mikulski, Ch&vez is expected to rely heavily on national GOP support and the personal support of President Reagaa
Mikulski is expected to attack Ch4vez as a political outsider in Maryland and polished opportunist with weak roots in the state. The 50-year-old Mikulski has served the Baltimore area in the House since 1976. The race between the two women is the first all-female senatorial general election campaign since 1960 in Maine.
In New York, former U.S. Congressman Herman Badillo ran unopposed in New York’s Democratic primary for state comptroller and advances to November’s general election.
In Arizona’s 2nd Congressional District, state Senator Luis Gonzales took on popular and long-time incumbent U.S Rep Morris K Udail but failed in his upset bid. With 100% of the precincts reporting, Udail captured 29,734 votes, or 73%, while Gonzales garnered 11,104 votes, or 27%.
The district includes the large Hispanic populated areas of south Phoenix and west Tucson, and observers speculated that Gonzales? run at Udail was an attempt to position himself as the front-runner among Hispanic candidates who will move to replace the ailing, 64-year-old Udail when he decides to retire. Preprimary polls showed Udail ahead by a6-to-1 margin, but the final result was 3-1.
- Phil Garcia
The broadcast industry gained 2,021 employees last year, with Hispanics comprising more than a third of that net gain - 722 persons.
A report released this week by the National Association of Broadcasters showed that 5.2% of the total number of broadcast personnel, or8,907 of 170,767 fulltime industry workers, were Hispanics in 1985.
They included 5,420 Latinos and 3,487 Latinas, increasing the Hispanic percentage from 4.85% the preceding year. Many of the gains were in the more skilled positions.
“If s not surprising to me,” NBC’s vice president for corporate information Jay Rodriguez told Weekly Report. “There are a lot of people who have been preparing themselves and
National Celebrations Set
Events commemorating Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept 14-20, throughout the United States are many and run the gamut A sampling
• The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs and other Hispanic organizations in that state have put together several functions, ranging from one at Tiger Stadium in Detroit honoring the baseball team’s Hispanic players to a burrito contest in Pontiac to a visit from United Farm Workers President C6sar Chavez at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
• A series of special programs will be aired on National Public Radio celebrating several genres of Hispanic music. Included will be traditional Puerto Rican coastal music, boleros, rancheras and Andean folk music -
• The U.S. Marshals Service and federal Hispanic Employment Program coordinators in South Florida are co-hosting a cultural program, featuring music and an artistic exhibition in Miami.
• U.S. Treasurer Katherine Ortega is the keynote speaker at the opening ceremony of the Labor Departments week-long observance.
• The American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress is sponsoring a salsa concert.
• The Omaha Hispanic Coalition is sponsoring a day-long festival, offering music, food and dance.
working their way up the line.”
The NAB report also showed an increase in Hispanic-owned radio stations from 37 in 1985 to 45 in 1986 and a net gain of 10 in Hispanic owners of radio and television stations
HISPANIC-OWNED COMMERCIAL STATIONS
Year RADIO AM FM TV VHF UHF Sta. Own
1986 35 9 0 6 50 43
1985 29 8 2 4 43 33
1984 31 8 2 3 44 34
1983 31 9 2 3 45 35
1982 33 13 2 3 51 41
Sta- Total Stations; Own.-Total Owners.
- from 33 to 43.
Included in its total of six Hispanic-owned UHF television stations were stations in Sacramento, Calif., and McAllen, Texas, for which construction permits have been granted but which are not yet in operation. The other four are in Hartford, Conn., El Paso and Laredo, Texas, and Chicago.
States with Hispanic-owned radio stations are Texas (16), California (10), New Mexico
continued on page 2
$ 250,000 Refugee Aid
Beginning Sept 17, the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation will disburse $250,000 to help undocumented aliens obtain political asylum status.
Although covering all individuals who emigrated here because of violence at home, the Immigration/Asylum Project, introduced by state Senator Jack Backman, is directed to immigrants from El Salvador and Guatemala.
The legal assistance agency will divide the money to cover legal service costs among non-profit legal aid organizations.
According to the Lawyer’s Committee for Human Rights, the Immigration and Naturalization Service granted 7% of the political asylum requests from El Salvador and 2% from Guatemala The comparable rate for requests from Russia was75%. It is estimated that there are at least 20,000 undocumented aliens in Massachusetts from Central America


Friends of Ezell Cheer INS ‘Commando Raid’
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service began a promised series of sweeps of Southern California business areas in the city of Orange Sept. 3.
The area - where day workers congregate to be picked up by employers- was chosen at the request of a group of friends of INS regional director Harold Ezell who formed “Americans for Border Control” with his encouragement.
As INS agents rounded up 123 suspected undocumented workers, the invited press took pictures and some 20 ABC members and friends waved placards with such messages as “Don’t Let the USA Become a Third World Nation,” according to local press reports.
The staged event drew strong criticism from state Sen. Art Torres and other Latino leaders. Torres charged Ezell with “circus stunts.” A local Hispanic group, Los Amigos de Orange County, complained that the INS was making the ABC a “trigger mechanism for Ezeifs commando raids.”
The INS executive responded, “That’s just their smoke screen to discredit the fact that Orange County is running wild with illegals.”
U.S. to Accept 68 Cuban Prisoners
Sixty-eight political prisoners from Cuba were cleared for admission to the United States, announced the Reagan administration on Sept. 5.
The group, to be released late this month or early next month, had been interviewed in Havana by U.S. State Department and Roman Catholic church officials. All 68 have been in Cuban prisons for at least the last 10 years and some more than 25 years.
Admission for the 68 comes at a time when the administration has tightened government restrictions in Cuba-United States immigration policy.
On Aug 22, the administration promulgated to its consulates around the world instructions to refuse visas to Cubans living in other
Latina Joins Dade Board
Florida Gov. Bob Graham named Rosa Castro Feinberg, 47, to the Dade School Board Aug. 29. She replaces Kathleen Magrath, who resigned. A former Spanish and English as a Second Language teacher in the Dade schools, Castro Feinberg currently directs bilingual programs at the University of Miami.
Of Spanish and Colombian descent, she joins Paul Cejas as one of two Hispanics on the seven-member body. Her term will expire in 1988.
Hispanics Gain in Radio, TV Jobs
continued from page 1
(8), Florida(5), Arizonaand Colorado(2 each), and Maryland and Connecticut (1 each).
The report noted lesser gains by other minorities in the industry, with blacks now holding 9% of the jobs, Asians 1.2% and American Indians 0.5%.
“Fifteen years ago, the networks began a consistent effort to recruit minorities,” said Rodriguez, “and it is just now paying dividends across the board. In effect, the system generally works, but it takes time.”
The report revealed that the greatest one-
year increase in the professional ranks was with Hispanic men, with 105 more Latino reporters, announcers and newswriters working in the industry. There were 81 moreLatinas at that level
Eighty new Hispanic station managers, general managers and sales managers brought the H ispanic total of officials and managers to 1,221. Of the 80,30 were Latina In the area of sales, Hispanics increased their count by84-33 males and 51 females-bringing the total to 775.
- John Rosales
Hispanics Working in Broadcasting
Radio Commercial Television Broadcast Headquarters * Total**
1985 1984 1985 1984 1985 1984 1985 1984
Officers
Men 339 318 230 219 . 102 97 785 735
Women 180 174 137 124 41 44 436 406
Professionals
Men 762 727 571 520 91 89 1,666 1,561
Women 220 207 309 265 51 43 704 623
Technicians
Men 239 237 1,092 968: 219 222 1,749 1,599
Women 20 18 162 146 22 23 234 209
Sales Men 272 270 112 91 3 3 455 422
Women 187 165 80 66 2 2 320 269
Total *** 2,845 2,729 3,652 3,277! 1,116 1,063 8,907 8,185
Men 1,726 1,670 2,272 2,077; 661 627 5,420 5,041
Women 1,119 1,059 1,380 1,200 455 436 3,420 3,144
1 - Broadcaster headquarters employees are those housed apart from the stations.
'* - Total includes non-commercial radio and television stations.
>** _ Total includes offlce/clerical, craftsmen, operatives, laborers and service personnel.
Source: "Broadcasting Facts," September 1986, National Association of Broadcasters
Hispanic Link Weakly Report chart
countries. The State Department said that the Cuban government charged emigrants or their families $30,000 a head to migrate to the United States from third countries,
Other policy changes included:
• Greater control of organizations that promote travel to Cuba and reduction from $2,000 to $1,200 the amount of money U.S. residents can send annually to relatives or friends in Cuba
• A crackdown on trading with Cuban-front companies in Panama and elsewhere to step up compliance with the 1960 U.S. Trade Embargo.
Administration officials said that the trade restrictions will remain indefinitely, but the immigration strictures would be lifted if Cuba President Fidel Castro reinstated a 1984 bilateral pact to repatriate 2,700 individuals who came to the United States as part of the Mariel boatlift.
Castro suspended the agreement in May 1985 when Radio Marti, a Voice of America station, began broadcasting to Cuba
Barrera Trails in Texas
In his bid to become the first Hispanic to win a statewide election in Texas, Republican San Antonio District Judge Roy Barrera trails his opponent in the Hispanic and general community, found the latest Texas Poll.
Conducted from July 25 to Aug. 12, the poll showed that 18% of the Hispanic community supported Barrera, while his opponent, incumbent Democrat Jim Mattox, polled favorably with 51% of the state’s Latinos. Thirty-one percent of the H ispanics polled were undecided
Among the general population, Barrera fared better, receiving 28% compared with Mattox’s 44%. Overall, 28% of those polled were undecided.
The Texas Poll surveyed 707 registered voters, 84 of whom were Hispanic. Because of the small Hispanic subsample, the poll had a standard error of plus or minus 12%. The standard of error for the entire sample was plus or minus 4%.
Barrera, 34, will face Mattox in the Nov. 4 general election. Democrat Raul Gonzalez is vying for a seat on the Texas Supreme Court.
Farm Board Reverses Itself
California’s Agricultural Labor Relations Board announced Sept 8 that it will reverse its major decision made last October to permit undocumented workers to receive back pay and reinstatement if they were improperly fired.
The United Farm Workers were given 10 days to respond formally to the notice, which a UFW spokesperson charges will allow farmers to fire workers illegally “with impunity.” In the case which brought the original decision, five workers were fired by a grape grower after they supported the UFW in an unsuccessful 1981 farm election.
The boards reversal came after appointments by Gov. George Deukmejian changed its 3-2 liberal majority toa3-2 conservative majority.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
BROADCASTING FACTS: Hispanic ownership (1986) and employment (1985) in radio and television is detailed, along with that of blacks, Asian Americans and Native Americans, in a 44-page report released this week by the National Association of Broadcasters. Included are owners and addresses of the four Hispanic-owned television stations and 44 Hispanic-owned radio stations currently operating in the United States. For a free copy, contact Dwight Ellis, VP, Special Services, NAB, 1771 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20026-2898. (202) 429-5498.
HISPANIC HERITAGE POSTER: For a free 9X12 color copy of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s poster in recognition of Hispanic Heritage Week write to: CHCI, 504 C St NW, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771.
STATUS REPORT ON PUERTO RICANS: “Puerto Ricans: Growing Problems for a Growing Population” compiles the latest economic and educational indicators on the Puerto Rican community. Authored primarily by the National Puerto Rican Forum in conjunction with the National Committee for Full Employment, the 19-page report can be obtained by sending a 9 X12 self-addressed, stamped envelope with 39$ postage to: NCFE, 815 16th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 393-7415.
HISPANIC POVERTY RISE: A 12-page report analyzing 1985 Hispanic poverty data is available. For a copy, send $1.50 to: Librarian, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 236 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 305, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0591.
HISPANIC PARENTS AND STUDENTS: “Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Attainment of Hispanic Parents and Students” finds that parent and student aspirations are not as important predictors of educational and occupational attainment as previously thought For a copy of the report, send$ 1 to: The Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607.
IMMIGRATION EFFECTS: The full 104-page Rand Corporation report, “Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California,” by Kevin McCarthy and Robert Valdez, is now available. An executive summary was released last December and a Spanish version is planned. For the full report send $10 to Publications Dept., Rand Corporation, 1700 Main St., Santa Monica, Calif. 90406-2138.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
NORTHWESTERN BELL IS CONNECTING
Northwestern Bell Telephone Company counts 160 Hispanics in its 15,000-person work force serving the states of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska But with corporate encouragement, those employees have formed a network - VISTA Hispanic Perspective Organization'-in the past nine months which is demonstrating a reach far beyond its numbers.
It has identified 120 Hispanic groups and leaders in the five-state area and presently makes monthly mailings to the network on educational and employment opportunities, civic and cultural activities, and news of special significance to the Hispanic community.
More information on VISTA’s activities and news from the region may be obtained from its information coordinator, Tom Reyes, at Northwestern Bell Telephone Co., 1314 Douglas on the Mall, 4th floor, Omaha, Neb. 68102 (402) 422-8189.
MOYA, VILLANUEVA TEAM UP
Steve Moya has left Fleishman-Hillard Inc., where he served as vice president in charge of its Hispanic Division, to form Moya, Villanueva & Associates with Daniel Villanueva Jr., whose background is in broadcasting, including KMEX-TV in Los Angelea Their new Hispanic marketing and communications company has established offices at 10100 Santa Monica Blvd., Century City, Calif. 90067.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
Ruben Ramirez, president of H. Olson Distributing Company of Barstow, Calif., was welcomed by Anheuser-Busch Companies as their fifth Hispanic independent franchiser nationally at an Aug. 28 reception in Barstow. Theothersare in Los Angeles, Miami, Farmington, N.M., and San Juan, Puerto Rico. ..In San Juan, Vilma Colon, owner of Corporate Communicators public relations firm, became the first woman elected president of the 73-year-old Chamber of Commerce of Puerto Rico this summer...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FUND-RAISING DINNER Washington, D.C. Sept. 16 Herencia - El Derecho al Futuro will be the theme of the 9 th annual fund-raising banquet of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institutetocontinue programs to educate Hispanics about the political system. Madelyn Serna (202) 543-1771
ECONOMIC AND ELECTORAL PARTICIPATION Atlanta Sept. 17
The Social Security Administration will sponsor a seminar looking at the political and economic growth of Hispanics.
Sylvia Sanchez (404) 752-2896
NATIONAL BUSINESS CONVENTION Denver Sept. 17-21
Federico Peha, Denver mayor, and Polly Baca, Colo, state Senator, are among the speakers who will address the 7th annual convention of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, bringing together Hispanic business leaders from across the nation Sherri Hill (513) 531-6363
ETHNIC THEATER FESTIVAL Miami Sept. 17-21,24-28 3
Teatro Avante will showcase for its 3rd annual theater festival three works - one from a Hispanic, one from a black and another from a Jew-of rising playwrights.
Nora Hernandez (305) 347-3251
HISPANIC FAMILY OF THE YEAR Los Angeles Sept. 19
The three top Hispanic families of the year in Los Angeles County will be honored at a banquet cosponsored by Kraft Inc., with awards going to families who have shown community involvement and teamwork.
Bernie Kemp (818) 500-1309
LAW SCHOOL FORUM New York Sept. 19, 20
Targeting Hispanics, blacks and other minorities, this forum, put on by the Law School Admission Council/Law School Admission Services, is one of a series of four to aid students in choosing the right law school.
Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1176
COMING SOON
MINORITIES AND AIDS National Minority AIDS Council Las Vegas Sept. 28-Oct 2 Gloria Rodriguez (201) 266-1910
PUERTO RICAN MARCH FOR JUSTICE Sept 15, 1986
National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Washington, D.C. Oct. 4 Jimmy Collazo (215) 634-4443
HISPANICS AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS American Council on Education San Francisco Oct 5-8 Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
PEACEMAKERS WEEK San Francisco Community Boards San Francisco Oct. 6-12 Georgia Quinonez (415) 552-1250
NATIONAL HISPANIC LEADERSHIPCONFERENCE Republican National Hispanic Assembly Washington, D.C. Oct 9 Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC LEADERSHIP TRAINING: Titled “Challenging the Future,” this conference by the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project will conduct workshops on how Hispanics can become active and effective in politics through fund raising, bringing youth into the political fold and plenary sessions for women, youth and public officials. The conference will be held in Chicago Oct. 10-12. For further information, contact Mar# Elena Molina at (614) 464-1116.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Doug Martinez, guest columnist
The Futures Market
There’s something I’ve always disliked about the futures market. It doesn’t encourage us to speculate in what I consider this country’s most valuable commodity; its people.
Why, if speculators can gamble millions on the worth of beans, cocoa and pork bellies, can’t they do the same on our precious national human resources?
I bring this subject up during National Hispanic Heritage Week for an ill-disguised reason:
I happen to be high on Hispanics.' Reading the papers today, many may not share my optimism. Latino dropout rates dance dangerously at around 50 percent Our unemployment rate continues in double-idigits, well above the national average. Our poverty rate is now projected to surpass that of blacks.
The media tegularly misconstrue our reasons for supporting bilingual education and bilingual ballots, while nativists and political opportunists raise and spend millions by portraying us as a threat to national unity.
The futures market thrives on rumors, and too often the fortunes of this nation’s Latinos and Latinas have fallen based on others’ perceptions of our abilities and value. If we’re constantly portrayed as a debit, an entry on the left-hand side of the national account, who’s going to invest in us?
SOARING WITH CHANG DIAZ
But we’ve had our good days in the public mind, too.
When Costa Rican native Franklin Chang Diaz journeyed into space two years ago, our futures rocketed with him.
H enry Cisneros’ performance as mayor of San Antonio, the nation’s 10th largest city, is occasionally given national attention, When it does, we gain.
Sports always draws the public’s attention. There, we have had undeniable heroes and role models like Fernando Valenzuela, Nancy Lopez, Tom Flores, Jim Plunkett and Lee Treviho. Their successes have helped boost the futures of all Hispanics.
Perceptions play a critical role. Futures can triumph ortumble on a vague rumor or symbolic event.
The economic revival of Miami so efficiently crafted by its Cuban population was a big plus; the citys more recent portrayal as a hub of U.S. drug trade, a minus. Our futures tumbled again.
So why should anyone want to invest in Hispanics?
HISPANIC INSTITUTIONS JOLTED
As a writer and a sometimes observer/sometimes participant in the Hispanic movement over the past couple decades, I have seen Hispanics lay a foundation for progress in those years which is solid and sound. We have carved ourselves an impressive piece of the small business world. Our social action institutions were jolted, like so many others, when the federal government changed its attitude about supporting such advocates of change six years ago. But they survived and developed a new independence.
A corps of Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban and now Central American leaders has emerged. As it attempts to fend off repeated nativist attacks, it pursues a positive agenda and relies more and more on economic self-help.
We have contributed distinguished men and women to almost every facet of national life - law, the arts, commerce, academia, the public sector - and we continue to do so. We have learned how to work within the two-party system.
My tip this week is that Hispanic futures are about to rise dramatically.
If s just what the futures market needs-a good rumorthat Hipanics are on the way up. That kind of gossip and national recognition could make our futures brighter still.
(Doug Martinez, of Arlington, Va, Is assistant editor of Farmline magazine.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept.
Sin pelos en la lengua
LATE BULLETINS (plus one thafs on time): Here are some items I’ve been collecting in my California funny-file:
ART COLLECTORS; In San Jose last month, an $8,000, 20-foot-tali, red, white, black and blue sculpture mounted on that city’s Market Street was mistaken for trash by construction workers, who “squished it to bits,” lamented California Arts Council member Consuelo Santos-Killins.
“It was not a traditional piece of art, but it was a real nice piece,” conceded the city’s redevelopment director in his apology.
ART REJECTERS: In the same city a month before, a municipal crew painted over a large mural which Dr. Jos6Colchadoand70 Latino and other youths created in 1984.
The workers thought they were getting rid of graffiti.
Complained Colchado. “To me, if s the bureaucracy just rolling along. Someone gives them a slip of paper and says, ‘Go paint a wall,’ and they go paint a wall.”
ANYBODY SEEN JOAQUIN? San Jose businessman Charles Callison, with his wife Marla, led a much-publicized expedition to find the remains of Joaquin Murieta. They gave up after 15 days of shoveling soil in Niles Canyon. (Thafs where historians claim Murieta died two days after a shootout with rangers in 1853).
Callison summarized to the press:
“Beyond a doubt, the dig was still a success. We proved that there was no grave, which is just as important as proving there was one.”
Is that you down in that hole cuing Callison, Yogi?
ANYONE WATCHING TV? Another Berra imposter, whose name I forget, was announcing the televised Little World Series the other weekend. The Tucson, Ariz., team of 12-year-olds was losing in the final inning by something like 15-0 to a team from Taiwan.
So what did the announcer tell us?
“Just remember,” he told us, “The next best thing to being a winner is being a loser.”
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: Dios da pahueio al que no tiene narices. God gives handkerchief to he who has no nose.
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
With Congress, the courts and the Federal Communications Commission reviewing First Chicago Venture Corporation and Hallmark Cards’ $301.5 million bid for five major and five repeater Spanish International Communications Corporation television stations, the hyperbolizing is heightening. To wit LARRY AMAYA, Los Angeles/Orange County regional director of the American Gl Forum, at a Los Angeles press conference of Hispanic leaders protesting the sale:
“If allowed to happen, this sale will tear the tongue out of our Spanish-speaking communities across the country.”
JOHN CANNING, First Chicago president, on his commitment to retain the station’s Spanish-language format:
“Two years is our legal commitment Our intention is forever.”
With Hispanics, blacks and Asians struggling to gain greater representation in television news, two activists react:
HENRY DER, executive director of Chinese for Affirmative Action, commenting on why San Francisco television stations have two Asian women - Wendy Tokuda (KPIX) and Emerald Yeh (KRON) -iworking as co-anchors on their respective stations, but no Asian [males in like positions:
“TV stations have discovered that having an Asian female with a white male is an attractive combination."
MARIO MACHADO, Los Angeles based reporter/producer, analyzed the ‘Connie Chung’ phenomenon.
“They get two ‘minorities’ in one play of the cards They hit the jackpot”
i, 1986 d


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
—
ENGINEERING
CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER
McDonald’s Corporation has an excellent middle management position open fora professional qualified to supervise construction of our restaurants in the Washington, D.C., area You will oversee the work of construction contractors, manage multiple construction projects and secure relevant permits from public officials. You must have a minimum of 3 years construction industry experience with a degree in Architectural or Civil Engineering.
This opportunity offers a salary commensurate with experience. Benefits include medical and dental insurance and a company car. Please send your resume in confidence to: Chris Searles Personnel Recruiter
MCDONALD’S CORPORATION
3015 Williams Drive Fairfax, Virginia 22031 (703) 698-4081
. Minorities & Women are Encouraged to Apply
Powered by People With Pride.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish. Type 60 words per minute, ability to work effectively under pressure Word processing experience desirable. Good writing skills essential. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 668-9600.
REGIONAL ATTORNEY (Liquidation)
(2 positions)
Announcement No.: LD-51 As an Attorney in the Regional Office (New York), of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the incumbent conducts legal research and prepares legal opinions and memoranda-of-law covering non-litigated matters. To qualify, applicants must have successfully completed the requirements for an LLB or JD Degree and have bar membership. In addition, applicants must have progressively responsible legal experience which demonstrates that they possess the knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform the duties of the position. For further information contact Howard Herman (212) 704-1200.
AIR POLLUTION RESEARCHERS California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for Air Pollution Research Specialist exam. Must have 4-year degree with major work in engineering, math or physical/ biological/environmeqtal sciences AND 4 years experience in above-mentioned areas INCLUDING 1 year specialized experience with responsibility for research consultation and determination or research design/methods for studies in air pollution or closely related field. May substitute graduate work on year for year basis for 3 years nonspecialized experience. Salary: $3,266-$3,941/month-benefits. For more information, call (916) 323-4916. Se habla espahol.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
FEDERAL OPPORTUNITIES
The Agricultural Maketing Service has two SUPERVISORY COMPUTER SPECIALIST positions, grade levels GM-13 and GM-14. The current per annum salary range is $37,599 to $48,876 and $44,430 to $57,259 respectively. Both positions are in Washington, D.C. For information contact Laura Heenan, US DA, AMS,
. PED, EFB, Room 1724, South 14th and Independence Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20250 (202)
1447-5209.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks Persons ! wishing to get more information should contact Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C. 20314-1000(202)272-0098.
| Anthropology/American Studies/Sociology: Assistant Professors, tenure track in Anthropology, American Studies or Sociology. Completed Ph.D. required plus demonstrated research in topics related to southwestern His-panics. Joint teaching and research appointments in southwestern Hispanic Studies and , academic department to commence in Fall 1987, contingent upon available funds Deadline: December 1, 1986. Send vitae to Director, Southwestern Hispanic Research Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131. AA/EOE.
Producer, Advertising and Promotion WRC-TV, NBC Washington, D.C.
$27,600 - $36,000
Candidate creates and coordinates production of all WRC-TV promotional advertising material for print radio and TV. Directs performers, technicians and artists in all phases of production and assumes some management responsibilities with establishing work priorities and production budgets.
Significant experience in a promotion capacity with emphasis on copywriting, art direction, production techniques and administration is required.
Qualified applicants should submit a current resume with salary history to: Laurie Hayen, Personnel Administrator, NBC,4001 Nebraska Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20016.
Information on other current job openings can be obtained by calling NBCs Job Line at (202) 885-4058.
r------------------------------------^
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
1
PUBLICATIONS
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010J202) 483-11.40.
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Available now. Call the Chicago Reporter (312) 236-4830 or write us at 18 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60603.
MEDIA DIRECTORY
The 1986 Caminos National Hispanic Media Directory, which lists over 1,000 U.S. Hispanic newspapers, magazines, newsletters, journals, television and radio stations in English, Spanish and bilingual formats, is now available. The cost of the guide is$95, which includes postage and handling For information or to order, contact Caminos'Research & Marketing P.O. Box 54307, Los Angeles, Calif. 90054 (213) 222-1349.
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Arts & Entertainment
ART, FASHION AND EMMYS: A children’s art exhibit and a fashion show are among activities scheduled for Hispanic Heritage Week, and a Latino could wrap up the celebration taking home a second Emmy.
Works by the 30 semifinalists and winners of McDonald’s Emerging Hispanic Artists Contest will be displayed Sept. 15-19 at the Capital Children’s Museum in Washington, D.C.
The two grand prize winners of the contest- Jos§ Javier Acosta, 10, from Tucson, Ariz.,and Monica Morales,6,from Corpus Christi, Texas-will fly to Washington to be honored at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute banquet Sept 16.
On Sept 21, at 7 p.m. (El), the SIN Television Network will broadcast a 90-minute Desfile Anual de Disehadores Hispanos -based on fashion shows held last week in Miami and Washington, D.C.
Cuban designer Adolfo was honored at the shows, with participation by Hispanic peers Oscar de la Renta, Carolina Herrera and Carlota Alfaro, among others
The second annual Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit raised funds for three national Hispanic women’s organizations and gave scholarships to three design student^. This tfeate winners are Milagros Lorca, a Dominican resident of jpjwYork. and Ana Dieguez and Jorge Ponce, both Cuban America rag , _ _ * iUMp
Another Hispanic could become a wig® tKte-wdelt, whlerMitBC broadcasts the 38th Annual Primetime BSjMy Awards Sept. 21. For the second year in a row, actor Edward Jahi«w> Olmos is nominated for his “supporting actor” participation in Miami Vice.
ONE LINERS: Diego Rivera’s mural Sueho de una tarde dominical en la Alameda Central will be moved to a yet-undetermined new site in Mexico City; the mural remains unharmed at its site at the Hotel del Prado, which was seriously damaged by an earthquake Sept. 19, 1985... Argentine pianist/composer Mariano Mores takes his OK Mr. Tango variety show to the Miami Beach Theater for the Performing Arts Sept 19 and 20. . .New Orleans hosts the Festival Anual Hispanoamericano de la Cancion Sept. 21.. .And, according to a story in the Montreal Gazette, Pl&cido Domingo “says he wants to run for mayor of Madrid.”... A photographic exhibit Faces, Places and Traces of Detroit, by Dolores Gonzalez runs through Oct 31 at the Galeria Casa de Unidad in that city... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SEGREGATION STORY: Paul Espinosa’s one-hour documentary/drama The Lemon Grove Incident, the story of a Lemon Grove, Calif., school board’s attempt to segregate its “Mexican” children in 1930, will be telecast on most Public Broadcasting Service stations nationally Sept 17 at 10 p.m.
Espinosa wrote and produced the program at KPBS-TV, San Diego, where it won three local Emmys. It also earned the Gold Award at Houston’s International Film Festival and the national CINE Golden Eagle this year.
Drumming up interest in it, Espinosa worked wtth Hispanic media groups in Los Angeles, New York, Houston and San Antonio, offering advance showings this month. On Sept. 16, he'll be in Washington, D.C., where stations WHMM and WETA join with the Hispanic News Media Association of the capital city in a reception/preview. The following day it airs on WHMM, with showings on WETA
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc 1420 *N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6llx Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejfas-Rentas,
Phil Garcfa, John Rosales.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. â– 
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
scheduled for Sept. 18 and 21.
CALIFORNIA TOMORROW: Latino leaders in California have joined with black, Asian and other leadership there to form the nonprofit “California Tomorrow,” a corporation “committed to California’s future as a fair, working multiracial, multicultural society.”
The group also launched a unique quarterly publication of the same name. Its premiere 36-page issue offers such provocative, thoroughly documented articles as:
• Latino Legislators Look Ahead: This presents potential public policy dilemmas created by non-Hispanics retaining vote-control in an increasingly Hispanic state. By the year 2030, the magazine projects, 46% of California’s children and only 22% of its older population will be Latino.
• The Dropout Drama: This dissects a public school attrition rate in which the 12th grade loss has advanced from 9% in 1977 to 34% in 1983.
• The Mexican Immigration Debate: UCLA demographer Leo Estrada and Kevin McCarthy, author of the Rand Corporation study “Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California,” do the debating.
California Tomorrow, with offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles, awarded eight $12,000 annual fellowships this summer to work on its projects and publication. Two Latinas, Victoria Diaz and Delia Flores,were among those selected.
Its board includes Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defenses Educational Fund; Hugo Morales, Fresno-based head of Radio Bilingue, and Southern California broadcaster Fernando Oaxaca.
Jobless Rate Rises to 11 %
The Hispanic unemployment rate for August rose to 11 % from the previous month’s rate of 10.5%, while the overall rate continued its downward pattern, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
The general unemployment rate for August was6.8%. Blacks continued to have the highest rate - 14.6%. The rate for whites was 5.8%.
Free first-year subscriptions, including the premiere issue, may be obtained by contacting Soledad Ellis, California Tomorrow, 849 S. Broadway, Rm. 831, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
NAMES: Keynoting the Sept 12 California Chicano News Media Association’s 6th annual scholarship banquet was United Press International owner Mario Vasquez Raha... Steve Sanchez has been appointed a senior vice president of advertising firm J. Walter Thompson/West in San Francisco... Frank Newton, executive director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, was named to the board of trustees of the Multi-Media Training Institute in Washington,' D.C....
- Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week 'Mayor Federico Pel\a announces the appointment of Juana Marla Bordas to the Denver Election Commission. . . The District of Columbia chapter of the American Society for Public Administration inaugurates its William Medina Memorial Lecture Series . Medina, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, was active in increasing the number of Hispanics at all levels of government. . . Modesto , Calif . , and three railroad companies agree to pay Robert L6pez, 24, $5 million in an out-of court settlement for injuries suffered when his motorcycle was struck by a train. L6pez, who was not wearing a helmet , was left brain damaged and quadraplegic ... "Santiago" James Chavez dies a t the age of 51. A native of Denver , Chavez was the recipient of the National Defense Service Medal, was instrumental in developing the National Chicano Health Organization and was director for Chicano. Affairs for the Denver Archdiocese ... HISPANIC LIN WEE Linda Chavez,Wins in Maryland Primary Broadcast Employment Up 3.5/o Former White House aide Linda Chavez moved one step closer to becoming the first Hispanic woman elected to the U .S. Senate when she overwhelmed 10 opponent!? to win the Maryland Republican nomination in the Sept. 9 primary . Chavez, a former New Mexico resident and ex-Democrat, captured 73% o( the vote. Her campaign received a big boost when her major competitor, Baltimore businessman Richard P. Sullivan, dropped out of the race two weeks before the election . The victory for the 39. yearold Chavez is more impressive given that she has been a resident of Maryland for just 2 1 /2 years and a Republican only since last year. In the coming campaign against the Democratic nominee, U.S. Rep . for Maryland Barbara Mikulski, Chavez is expected to rely heavily on national GOP support and the personal support of President Reagan. Mikulski is expected to attack Chavez as a political outsider in Maryland and polished opportunist with weak roots in the state. The 50-year old Mikulski has served the Baltimore area in the House since 1976. The race between the two women is the first all-female senatorial general election campaign since 1960 in Maine. . In New York, former U.S. Congressman Herman Badillo ran unopposed in New York's Democratic primary for state comptroller and advances to November's general election. In Arizona's 2nd Congressional District, state Senator Luis Gonzales took on popular and long-time incumbent U.S. Rep Morris K Udall but failed in his upset bid. With 1 00% of the precincts reporting, Udall captured 29,734 votes, or 73%, while Gonzales garnered 11,1 04 votes, or 27% . The district includes the large Hispanic populated areas of south 'Phoenix and west Tucson, and observers speculated that Gonzales' run at Udall was an attempt to position himself as the front-runner among Hispanic candidates who will move to replace the ailing, 64-year old Udall when . he decides . to retire . Pre primary polls showed Udall ahead by a 6-to-1 margin, but the final result was 3. Phil Garcia The broadcast industry gained 2 , 021 employees last year, with Hispanics comprising more than a third of that net gain -722 persons . A report released this week by the National Association of Broadcasters showed that 5 .2% of the -total number of broadcast personnel , or 8,907 of 170,767 fulltime industry workers, were Hispanics in 1985. They included 5,420 Latinos and 3,487 Latinas, increasing the Hispanic percentage from 4.85% the preceding year. Many of the gains were in the more skilled positions. "It's not surprising to me," NBC's vice pres ident for corporate information Jay Rodriguez told Weekly Report . "There are a lot of people who have been preparing themselves and National Celebrations Set Events commemorating Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept. 14, throughout the United States are many and run the gamut A sampling: • The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs and other Hispanic organi zations in that state have put together several functions, ranging from one at Tiger Stadium in Detroit honoring the baseball team's His panic players to a burrito contest in Pontiac to a visit from United Farm Workers Pres ident Cesar Chavez at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. • A series of special programs will be aired on National Public Radio celebrating several genres of HispaniC music. Included will be traditional Puerto Rican coastal music, boleros, rancheras and Andean folk music. e The U .S. Marshals Service and federal Hispanic Employment Program coordinators in South Florida are co-hosting a cultural . program, featuring music and an artistic ex hibition in Miami. • U.S. Treasurer Katherine ortega is the keynote speaker at the opening ceremony of the Labor Department's week long observance. e The American Folklife Center of the Library of . Congress is sponsoring a sa/sa concert. ' e The Omaha Hispanic Coalition is sponsor ing a day-long festival, offering music, food and dance. working their way up the line . " The NAB report also showed an increase in Hispanic-owned radio stations from 37 i n 1985 to 45 in 1986 and a net gain of 10 in Hispanic owners of radio and television sta t ions HISPANIC-OWNED COMMERCIAL STATIONS RADIO TV Year AM FM VHF UHF Sta Own. 1986 35 9 0 6 50 43 1985 29 8 2 4 43 33 1984 31 8 2 3 44 34 1983 31 9 2 3 45 35 1982 33 13 2 3 51 41 Sta . Total Stations; Own. Total Owners. from 33 to 43. Included in its tota1 of six Hispanic-owned UHF television stations were stations in Sacramento , :calif. , and McAllen , Texas, fo r which construction permits have been gra nted but which are not yet in operation. The other four are in Hartford , Conn. , El Paso and Laredo , Texas , and Chicago. States with Hispanic-owned radio stations are Texas (16), California (1 0), New Mexico continued on page 2 $ 250,000 Refugee Aid Beginning Sept. 17, the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation will disburse $250,000 to help undocumented aliens obtain political asylum status . Although covering all individuals who emi ' grated here because of violence at home, the Immigration/ Asylum Project , introduced by state Senator Jack Backman, is directed to immigrants from El Salvador and Guatemala. The legal assistance agency will divide the money to cover legal service costs among non-profit legal aid organizations . According to the Lawyer's Committee for Human Rights, the Immigration and Natural ization Service granted 7% of the politi c al asylum requests from El Salvador and 2 % from Guatemala. The comparable rate for requests from Russia was 75%. It is estimated that there are at least 20,000 undocumented aliens in Massachusetts from Central America

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2 Friend s of Ezell Cheer INS 'Commando Raid' U.S. to Accept 68 Cuban Prisoners The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service began a promised series of sweeps of Southern California business areas in the city of Orange Sept. 3. The area-where day workers congregate to be picked up by employerswas chosen at the request of a group of friends of INS regional director Harold Ezell who formed "Americans for Border Control" with his encouragement. As INS agents rounded up 123 suspected undocumented workers, the invited press took pictures and some 20 ABC members and friend s waved placards with such mes sages as " Don't Let the USA Become a Third World Nation," according to local press reports. Sixty-eight political prisoners from Cuba were cleared for admission to the United States, announced the Reagan administration on Sept. 5 . The group, to be released late this month or early next month, had been interviewed in Havana by U .S. State Department and Roman Catholic church officials . All68 have been in Cuban prisons for at least the last 1 0 years and some more than 25 years . • Admission for the 68 comes at a time when the administration has tightened government restrictions in Cuba-United States immigration policy . On Aug . 22, the administration promulgated to its consulates around the world instructions . to refuse visas to Cubans living in other Latina Joins Dade Board countries. The State Department said that the Cuban government charged emigrants or their families $30,000 a head to migrate to the United States from third countries, Other policy changes included: • Greater control of organizations that promote travel to Cuba and reduction from $2,000 to $1,200 the amount of money U.S. residents can send annually to relatives or friends in Cuba. • A crackdown on trading with Cuban-front companies in Panama and elsewhere to step up compliance with the 1960 U . S . Trade Embargo. Administration officials said that the trade restrictions will remain indefinitely, but the immigration strictures would be lifted if Cuba President F i del Castro reinstated a 1984 bilateral pact to repatriate 2,700 individuals who came to the United States as part of the Mariel boatlift. Castro suspended the agreement in May 1985 when Radio Marti, a Voice of America station , began broadcasting to Cuba . The staged event drew strong criticism from state Sen. Art Torres and other Latino leaders. Torres charged Ezell with "circus stunts. " A local Hispanic group, Los Amigos de Orange County, complained that the INS was making the ABC a "trigger mechanism fo r Ezell ' s commando raids." The INS executive responded, "Thafs just their smoke screen to discredit the fac+ that Orange County is running wild with illegals. " Florida Gov. Bob Graham named Rosa Castro Feinberg, 4 7, to the Dade School Board Aug . 29. She replaces Kathleen Magrath, whoresigned. A former and English as a Second Language teacher in the Dade schools, Castro Feinberg currently directs bilingual programs at the University of Miami. . Barrera Trails in Texas Of Spanish Colombian descent, she joins Paul Cejas as one of two Hispanics on the sevenmember body . Her term wi II expire in 1988. Hispanics Gain in Radio, TV Jobs continued from page 1 (8), Florida (5), Arizona and Colorado (2 each), and Maryland and Connecticut (1 each) . The report noted lesse r gains by other minorities in the industry, with blacks now holding 9% of the jobs, Asians 1.2% and American Indians 0.5%. "Fifteen years ago, the networks began a consistent effort to recruit minorities," said Rodriguez, "and it is just now paying dividends across the board. In effect, the system gen erally _work s , but it takes time." The ' report revealed that the greatest oneyear increase in the professional ranks was with Hispanic men, with 105 more Latino reporters, announcers and newswriters work ing in the industry . Therewere81 more Latinas at that level. Eighty new Hispanic station managers , general managers and sales managers brought the Hispanic total of officials and managers to 1 ,221. Of the 80, 30 were Latina. In the area of sales, Hispan i cs increased their count by84-33 males and 51 females bringing the total to 775. -John Rosales Hispan ics Working in Broadcasting Commercial Broadcast Radio Television Headquarters • Total** 1985 1984 1985 1984 1985 1984 1985 1984 Officers Men 339 318 230 219 102 97 785 735 Women 180 174 137 124 41 .44 436 406 Professionals Men 762 727 571 520 91 89 1,666 1,561 Women 220 207 309 265 51 43 704 623 Technicians Men 239 237 1,092• 968 219 222 1,749 1,599 Women 20 18 . 162 146 22 23 234 209 Sales Men 272 270 112 91 3 3 455 422 Women 187 165 80 66 2 2 320 269 Total*** 2,845 2,729 3,652 3,277: 1,116 1,063 8,907 8 ,185 Men 1,726 1,670 2 ,272 2,077' 661 627 5,420 5,041 Women 1,119 1,059 1,380 1 ,200 455 436 3,420 3,144 • Broadcaster headquarters employees are those housed apart from the stations. ••-Total includes non-commercial radio and television stations. •••Total includes office/clerical , craftsmen , operatives, laborers and service personnel. Source: " Broadcasting Facts , " September 1986 , National Association of Broadcasters. Hispanic Link Weekly Report chert • I' ; In his bid to become the first Hispanic to win a statewide election i n Texas, Republican San Antonio District Judge Roy Barrera trails his opponent in the Hispanic and general community, found the latest Texas Poll. Conducted from July 25 to Aug . 12, the poll showed that 18% of the Hispanic commun it y supported Barrera, while h i s opponent, in cumbent Democrat Jim Mattox. polled favorably with 51% of the state ' s Latinos . Thirty-one percent of the Hispanics polled were undecided Among the general population, Barrera fared better, receiving 28% compared with Mattox's 44% . Overall, 28% of those polled were un decided. The Texas Poll surveyed 707 registered voters, 84 of whom were Hispanic . Because of the small Hispanic subsample, the poll had a standard error of plus or minus 12% . The standard of error for the entire sample was plus or minus 4% . Barrera, 34, will face Mattox i n the Nov. 4 general election . Democrat Raul Gonzalez is vying for a seat on the Texas Supreme Court . Farm Board Reverses Itself California ' s Agricultura l Labor Relations Board announced Sept. 8 that it will reverse its major decision made last October to permit undocumented workers to receive back pay and reinstatement if they were improperly fired . The United Farm Workers were given 10 days to respond formally to the notice, which a U FW spokesperson charges will allow farm ers to fire workers illegally "with impunity." In the case which brought the original dec i sion, five workers were fired by a grape grower after they supported the UFW in an unsuccessful 1981 farm election. The boards reversal came after appointments by Gov. George Deukmej i an changed its 3-2 liberal majority to a3-2 conservative majority . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING BROADCASTING FACTS: Hispanic ownership (1986) and emplo/ment (1985) in radio and television is detailed, along with that of blacks, Asian Americans and Native Americans, in a44-page report released this week by the National Association of Broadcasters. Included are owners and addresses of the four Hispanic-owned television stations and 44 Hispanic-owned radio stations currently operating in the United States. For a free copy, contact: Dwight Ell is, VP, Special Services, NAB, 1771 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20026-2898. (202) 429-5498. HISPANIC HERITAGE POSTER: Fora free9 X 12 color copy of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's poster in recognition of Hispanic Heritage Week, write to: CHCI, 504 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771. STATUS REPORT ON PUERTO RICANS: "Puerto Ricans: Growing Problems for a Growing Population" compiles the latest economic and educational indicators on the Puerto Rican community. Authored primarily by the National Puerto Rican Forum in conjunction with the National Committee for Full Employment, the 19-page report can be obtained by sending a 9 X 12 self-addressed, stamped envelope with 39 postage to: NCFE, 815 16th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20006 (202) 393-7 41 5 . HISPANIC POVERTY RISE: A 12-page report analyzing 1985 Hispanic poverty data is available. For a copy , send $1.50 to: librarian, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 236 Massachusetts Ave. N E, Suite 305, Washington, D .C. 20002 (202) 544-0591. HISPANIC PARENTS AND STUDENTS: "Educationai and Oc cupational Aspirations and Attainment of Hispanic Parents and Students" finds that parent and student aspirations are not as important predictors of educational and occupational attainment as previously thought. For a copy of the report, send $1 to: The Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607. IMMIGRATION EFFECTS: The full 1 04-page Rand Corporation report, "Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California," by Kevin McCarthy and Robert Valdez, is now available. An executive summary was released last December and a Spanish version is planned. For the full report send $10 to Publications Dept., Rand Corporation, 1700 Main St., Santa Monica, Calif. 90406-2138. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) NORTHWESTERN BELL rs CONNECTING Northwestern Bell Telephone Company counts 160 Hispanics in its 15,000-person work force serving the states of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska But with corporate encourage ment, those employees have formed a networkVISTA Hispanic Perspective the past nine months which is demon strating a reach far beyond its numbers. It has identified 120 Hispanic groups and leaders in the five-state area and presently makes monthly mailings to the network on educational and employment opportunities, civic and cultural activities, and news of special significance to the Hispanic community. More information on VISTA's activities and news from the region may be obtained from its information coordinator, Tom Reyes, at Northwestern Bell Telephone Co., 1314 Douglas on the Mall, 4th floor, Omaha, Neb. 581 02 (402) 422-8189. MOYA, VILLANUEVA TEAM UP Steve Moya has left Fleishman-Hillard Inc., where he served as vice president in charge of its Hispanic Division, to form Moya, Villanueva & Associates with Daniel Villanueva Jr., whose background is in broadcasting, including KMEX-TV in Los Angeles. Their new Hispanic marketing and cOmmunications company has established offices at 10100 Santa Monica Blvd., Century City, Calif. 90067. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES Ruben Ramirez, president of H. Olson Distributing Company of Barstow, Calif., was welcomed by Anheuser-Busch Companies as their fifth Hispanic independent franchiser nationally at an Aug. 28 reception in Barstow. The others are in Los Angeles, Miami, Farmington, N.M., and San Juan, Puerto Rico ... In San Juan, Vilma Colon, owner of Corporate Communicators public relations firm, became the first woman elected president of the 73-year-old Chamber of Commerce of Puerto Rico this summer ... Calendar Teatro Avante will showcase for its 3rd annual theater festival three works-one from a Hispanic, one from a black and another from a Jew-of rising playwrights. National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Washington , D.C. Oct. 4 Jimmy Collazo (215) 634-4443 HISPANICS AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS American Council on Education THIS WEEK FUND-RAISING DINNER Washington, D.C. Sept. 16 Herencia-El Derecho a/ Futuro will be the theme of the 9th annual fund-raising banquetoftheCongressional Hispanic Caucus Institute to continue programs to educate Hispanics about the political system. Madelyn Serna (202) 543-1771 ECONOMIC AND ELECTORAL PARTICIPATION Atlanta Sept. 1 7 The Social Security Administration will sponsor a seminar looking at the political and economic growth of Hispanics. Sylvia Sanchez (404) 752-2896 NATIONAL BUSINESS CONVENTION Denver Sept. 1 7-21 Federico Peiia, Denver mayor, and Polly Baca, Colo. state Senator, are among the speakers who will address the 7th annual convention of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, bringing together Hispanic business leaders from across the natior Sherri Hill(513) 531-6363 ETHNIC THEATER FESTIVAL Miami Sept. i7-21, 24-28 3 Nora Hernandez (305) 347-3251 HISPANIC FAMILY OF THE YEAR Los Angeles Sept. 1 9 The three top Hispanic families of the year in Los Angeles County will be honored at a banquet co sponsored by Kraft Inc., with awards going to families who have shown community involvement and teamwork Bernie Kemp (818) 500-1309 LAW SCHOOL FORUM New York Sept. 19, 20 Targeting Hispanics, blacks and other minorities, this forum, put on by the Law School Admission Council/Law School Admission Services, is one of a series of four to aid students in choqsing the right law school. Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1176 COMING SOON MINORITIES AND AIDS National Minority AIDS Council Las Vegas Sept. 28-0ct. 2 Gloria Rodriguez (201) 266-1910 PUERTO RICAN MARCH FOR JUSTICE Sept. 15, 1986 San Francisco Oct. 5-8 Marlene Ross (202) 939-941 0 PEACEMAKERS WEEK San Francisco Community Boards San Francisco Oct. 6-12 Georgia Quinonez (415) 552-1250 NATIONAL HISPANIC LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Republican National Hispanic Assembly Washington, D.C. Oct. 9 Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC LEADERSHIP TRAINING: Titled "Challenging the Future, " this conference by the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project will conduct workshops on how Hispanics can become active and effective in politics through fund raising, bringing youth into the political fold and plenary sessions for women, youth and public officials. The conference will be held in Chicago Oct. 10-12. For further information, contact Mar1e, Elena Molina at (614)464-1116. ' Hispanic Weekly Report

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Doug Martinez, guest columnist The Futures Market There's something I've always disliked about the futures market. It doesn't encourage us to speculate in what I consider this country's most valuable commodity: its people . Why, if speculators can gamble millions on the worth of beans, cocoa and pork bellies , can't they do the same on our precious national human resources , ? I bring this subject up during National Hispanic Heritage Week for an ill-disguised reason: I happen to be high on Hispanics : Reading the papers today, many may not share my optimi sm . Latino dropout rates dance dangerously at around 50 percent. Our unemployment rate cont i nues in double •digits , well above the na t ional average. Our poverty rate is now projected to surpass that of blacks . T he media r dgularly misconstrue our reasons for supporting bilingual education and bilingual ballots, while nativists and political opportunists raise and spen d millions by portraying us as a threat to national unity. The futures market thrives on rumors, and too often the fortunes of this na t ion ' s L atinos and Latinas have fallen based on others' perceptions of our abilities and value . If we're constantly portrayed as a debit, an entry on the left-hand side of the national account, w ho ' s going to in vest in us? SOARING WITH CHANG DIAZ Bu t w e ' ve had ou r good days in the public mind , too. When Costa Rican native Franklin Chang Diaz journeyed into space two years ago, our futures rocketed with him. Henry Cisneros' performance as mayor of San Antonio, the nation's 1Oth largest city, is occasionally given national attention. When it does, we gain . Sports always draws the public's attention. There , we have had undeniable heroes and role models like Fernando Valenzuela , N ancy Lopez, Tom Flores , Jim Plunkett and Lee Trevino. Their succe s ses have helped boost the futures of all H i spanics. 'Percept io ns play a critical role. Futures can triumph odumble on a vag ue rumor or symbolic event. T he economic revival of Miami so efficiently crafted by its Cuban population was a big plus; the citys more recent portrayal as a hub of U . S . drug trade, a minus. Our futures tumbled again . So why should anyone want to invest in Hispanics? HISPANIC INSTITUTIONS JOLTED As a writer and a sometimes observer/sometimes partici pant in the Hispan ic movement over the past couple decades, I have seen Hispanics lay a foundation for progress in those years which is solid and sound. We have carved ourselves an impressive p iece of the small business world . Our social action institutions were jolted, like so many others, when the federal government changed its attitude about supporting such advocates of change six years ago. But they survi v ed and developed a new independence. A corps of Chicano , Puerto Rican , Cuban and now Central American leaders has emerged. As i t attempts to fend off repeated nativist attacks, it pursues a positive agenda and rel i es more and more on economic self-help. We have contributed d istinguished men and women to almost every facet of national life-law, the arts, commerce, academia , the public sectorand we continue to do so. We have learned how to work within the two-party system. My tip this week i s that Hispanic futures are about to rise dramatically . It's just what the futures market needs-a good rumo r that Hi panics are on the way up. That kind of gossip and national recogni tion could make our futures brighter still . (Doug Martinez, of Arlington, Va. , is assistant editor of Farmline magazine.) LATE BULLETINS (plus one t hat's on t ime): Here are som e items I've bee n collecting in my California funny-file : ART COLLECTO RS : In San Jos e last !llOnth , an $8,000, 20foot-tall, red , white, black and blue sculpture mou nted on that city's Market Street w as mistaken for trash b y construction . workers, who "squished it to bits," lam ented California Arts Co u n ci l member Consuelo S a ntos-Killins • . " It was not a traditional piec e of art, b ut it wa s a real nice p i ece," conceded the c i ty's redevelopment director inhis apology . ART REJECTERS: In the same city a month befo r e , a m u nicip al crew painted over a large mural which Dr. Jose Colchado and 70 Latino and other youths c reated in 1984 . • The workers thought t hey were getting rid of gra ff iti. Complained Colchado. " To m e , i t's t he bureaucracy just rollin g along. Someone gives them a slip of pape r and says, ' Go paint a . wall,' and they go p a i n t a wall." ANYBODY SEE N JOAQUIN? San Jose b u si n ess man Charles Callison, with h i s w i f e Marla, led a m uch-p u blicized expedi t ion t o find the remains o f Joaq u i n Murieta. The y gave up after 1 5 days of shoveling soil in Niles C an yon . (Tha t' s w he r e h istori ans claim Murieta died two days after a shootout wi th rangers in 18 53) . Call i son summarized to th e press: ''Beyond a doubt, the dig was still a success. W e prov ed that there was no grave , which is ju s t as important as proving ther e w a s one. " Is that you down i n that hol e cuing Ca llison , Y o gi? ANYONE WATCHING TV? A n o the r Berr a i mposter , whose name I forget , w as annou n cin g the t e lev ised Little W orld Series the other weekend. T he Tucson, Ariz . , t e a m o f 12ye ar-ol {ls wa s losing in the f i nal inni n g by som eth ing like 1 5-0 to a t eam fro m Taiwan. So what did the announcer tell us? "Just remember,'' he told us, " The next best thi"ng t o being a winner is be i ng a loser. " . THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: Dios da pafwelo a/ que no tiene narices. God g i ves handkerchief to he who has no nose. Kay B a rb a ro Quoting ... With Congress , the cou rt s and the Federal Communication s Com mission reviewing Firs t Chicago Venture Corporation and Hall m a rk Cards' $301 . 5 mill i on bid for five major and five repeater Spa n ish International Communica t ions Corporation televi sion sta tions, t he hyperbolizing is heightening. To w it: LARRY AMAYA, Los Angeles/Orange County regional director of the American Gl Forum , at a Los Angeles press conference of Hispanic leade r s protesting t he sale: "If allowed to happen, this sale will tear the tongue out of our Spanish-speaking communities across the country. " JOHN CANNING, First Chicago pres ident, on his commi tment to retain the station's Spanish-language format: " Two years is our legal commitment. Our intention is forever." With Hispanics , blac k s and Asians struggli ng to gain greater representation in television news, two activists react: HENRY DER , execu t i v e director o f Chinese for Affirmative Act i on , commenting on why San Francisco televis i on stations have two Asian women-Wendy Tokuda (KPIX) and Emerald Yeh (KRON)1working as co-anchors on their respec t ive stations, but no Asian in like positions: "TV stations have discovered that having an Asian female with a white male is an attr active combination. " MARIO MACHADO , Los Angeles based reporter/producer , analy z e d the ' Conn i e Chung' phenomenon. " They get two 'minorities' in one pla y of the cards. The y hi t the jackpot." H i spanic Link Weekly Report Sept. 15 , 1986 4

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[CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS] ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER McDonald's Corporation has an excellent middle management position open fora profes sional qualified to supervise construction of our restaurants in the Washington , D . C . , area. You will oversee the work of construction contractors, manage multiple construction projects and secure relevant permits from public officials. You must have a minimum of 3 vears construction industry experience with a degree in Architectural or Civil Engineer ing . This opportunity offers a salary commensurate with e x perience. Benefits include medical and dental insurance and a company car. Please send your resume in confidence to: Chris Searles Personnel Recruiter McDONALD'S CORPORATION 3015 Williams Drive Fairfax, Virginia 22031 ( 7 03) 698-4081 . Minorities & Women are Encouraged to Apply Powered by People With Pride. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish . Type 60 words per minute , ability to work effectively under pressure. Word processing experience desirable. Good writing skills essential . Contact: Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza , 20 F St. NW , 2nd Floor , Washington , D . C . 20001 (202) 668-9600. REGIONAL ATTORNEY (Liquidation) (2 positions) Announcement No.: LD-51 As an Attorney in the Regional Office (New York) , of the Federal Deposit Insurance Cor poration, the incumbent conducts legal research and prepares legal opinions and memoranda of-law covering non-litigated matters. To qualify, applicants must have successfully completed the requirements for an LLB or JD Degree and have bar membership . In addition , applicants must have progressively responsible legal ex perience which demonstrates that they possess the knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform the duties of the position . For further information contact: Howard Herman (212) 704-1200. AIR POLLUTION RESEARCHERS California Air Resources Board is now accept ing applications tor Air Pollution Research Specialist e x am . Must have 4-year degree with major work in engineering, math or physicaV biologicaVenvironme f! tal sciences AND 4 years experience in above-mentioned areas IN CLUDING 1 year specialized experience with responsibility for research consultation and determination or research design/methods for studies in ai r pollution or closely related field . May substitute graduate work on year for year basis for 3 years nonspecia l ized experience . Salary: $3,266-$3,941 /month--benefits . For more information , call (916) 323-491 6 . Se habla espaflol. Hispanic Link Weekly Report FEDERAL OPPORTUNITIES The Agricultural Maketing Service has two SUPERVISORY COMPUTER SPECIALIST po sitions, grade levels GM-13 and GM-14 . The current per annum salary range is $37,599 to $48,876 and $44,430 to $57,259 respectively . Both positions are in Washington , D.C. For : information contact Laura Heenan , USDA, AMS, . PED, EFB, Room 1724, South 14th and lndepend , ence Ave . NW, Washington , D .C. 20250 (202) 1447-5209. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks. Persons I wishing to get more information should contact Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office , U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington , D . C . 20314-1000 (202) 272-0098 . I Anthropology/ American Studleii/Soclology: Assistant Professors , tenure track in Anthro pology , American Studies or Sociology. Com pleted Ph. D . required plus demonstrated re search in topics related to southwestern His panics. Joint teaching and research appoint ments in southwestern Hispanic Studies and , academic department to commence in Fall 1987, contingent upon available funds. Deadline: December 1, 1986. Send vit ae to Director, Southwestern Hispanic Research Inst itute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque , New Mexico 87131. ANEOE. Producer, Advertising and Promotion WRCTV, NBC Washington, D.C . $27,600-$36,000 Candidate creates and coordinates production of all WRC TV promotional advertising material for radio and TV. Directs performers, tech nicians and artists in all phases of production and assumes some management responsibilities with establishing work priorities and production budgets. Significant experience in a promotion capacity with emphasis on copywriting , art direction, production techniques and administration is required . Qualified applicants should submit a current resume with salary history to: Laurie Hayen , Personnel Administrator, NBC , 4001 Nebraska Ave . NW , Washington, D . C . 20016. Information on other current job openings can be obtained by calling NBC ' s Job Line at (2021 885-4058. GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., p r ovides : • Design • Illustration • Type setting e Layout • Silkscreen and e Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington , Q. . . Q . ( PUBLICATIONS I Hispanics in , ___ . Packaged I Discover why demographers were wrong from the start . Hispanics in Chicago uncovers 17 vibrant, distinct communities behind the term "Hispanic." .Published by the award-winning in vestigative monthly, The Chicago Reporter, this new book is invaluable to anyone with an interest in the nation ' s fastest-growing market. Available now. Caii" The Chicago Reporter (312) 236 _or write us at 18 S . Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60603. MEDIA DIRECTORY The 1986 Caminos National Hispanic Media Directory, which lists over 1 ,000 U . S . Hispanic • newspapers, magazines, newsletters, journals, television and radio stations in English, Spanish and bilingual formats, is now available . The cost of the guide is$95, which includes postage and handling. For information or to order, contact & Marketing, P . O . Box 54307, Los Angeles , Calif . 90054 (213) 222-1349. ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST"Washington, D.C. based Will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737 . . . DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR; , No other or system lets you target a 1 national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed 1;of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete, and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, o . c : 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (E1) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. , AD RATES 75 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words : telephone , number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. j DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES 1 (Ads with borders , varied type s i zes) ; $35 per column inch . Ordered Title -----------Area Code & Phone ________ _ Advertiser Name lBiiiTo __ . _ _ _ ____ ______ .. Address ' City, State & Zip--------c--5

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Arts & Entertainment The second annual Hispanic Designer s Fashion Show and Benefit raised funds for three national Hispanic women ' s organizations and gave scholarships to three design students. This .winners are Milagros Lorca, a Dominican resident of York, Ana Dieguez and Jorge Ponce, both Cuban America . . • , 'l 1 -NJ ART, FASHION AND EMMYS: A children's art exhibit and a fashion show are among activities scheduled for Hispanic Heritage Week, and a Latino could wrap up the celebration taking home a second Emmy. Works by the 30 semifinalists and winners of McDonald's Emerging Hispanic Artists Contest will be displayed Sept. 15-19 at the Capital Children's Museum in Washington, D . C . Another Hispanic could become a wi_. ne f i iNhe i--NBC broadcasts the 38th Annual Primetime ErtJh'illlf.Awards Sept. 21. For the second year in a row, actor Edward Jatne Olmos is nominated for his "supporti ng actor" participation in M } ami Vice. The two grand prize winners of the contestJose Javier Acosta, 10, from Tucson , Ariz. , and Monica Morales , 6 , from Corpus Christi, Texas will fly to Washington to be honored at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute banquet Sept. 16. ONE LINERS: Diego Rivera's mural Sueflo de una tardedominical en /a Alameda Central will be moved to a yet-undetermined new site in Mexico City; the mural remains unharmed at its site at the Hotel del Prado, which was seriously damaged by an earthquake Sept. 19, 1985 ... Argentine pianist/composer Mariano M ores takes his OK Mr. Tango variety show to the Miami Beach Theater for the Performing Arts Sept. 19 and 20 ... New Orleans hosts the Festival Anual Hispanoamericano de /a Canci6n Sept. 21 .. . A nd, acco r ding to a story in the Montreal Gazette, Placido Domingo " say s he wants to run for mayor of Madrid." .. . A photographic exhibit , Faces, Places and Traces of Detroit by Dolores Gonzalez runs t hro u gh Oct. 31 at t he Ga/eria Casa de Unidad in that city . . . Antonio Mejias-Rentas On Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. (El), the SIN Television Network will broadcast a 90-minute Desfile Anua/ de Disefladores Hispanos -based on fashion shows held last week in Miami and Washington , D.C. Cuban designer Adolfo was honored at the shows, with participation by Hispanic peers Oscar de Ia Renta , Carolina Herrera and Carlota Alfaro. among others. Media SEGREGATION STORY: Paul Espinosa's one-hour documentary/drama The Lemon Grove Incident, the story of a Lemon Grove, Calif . , school board's attempt to segregate its "Mexican" children in 1930, will be telecast on most Public Broadcasting Service stations nationally Sept. 17 at 10 p.m. Espinosa wrote and produced the program at KPB&TV, San Diego, where it won three local Emmys. It also earned the Gold Award at Houston's International Film Festival and the national CINE Golden Eagle this year. Drumming up interest in it, Espinosa worked wtth Hispanic media groups in Los Angeles, New York, Houston and San Antonio, offering advanc _ e showings this month . On Sept. 1 6 , he ' ll be in Washington, D . C . , where stations WHMM and WETA join with the Hispanic News Media Association of the capital city in a reception/preview. The following day it airs on WHMM, with showings on WETA HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas, , Phil Ga -rda, John Rosales . No port1on ol HISPanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 inues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word . Display ads are $35 percolumn inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 scheduled for Sept. 18 and 21. CALIFORNIA TOMORROW: Latino leaders in California have joined with black, Asian and other leadership there to form the non profit "California Tomorrow," a corporation "committed to California's future as a fair, working multiracial ; multicultural society." The group also launched a unique quarter;Jy publication of the same name. Its premiere 36-page issue offers such provocative, thoroughly documented articles as: • Latino Legislators Look Ahead: This presents potential public policy dilemmas created by non-Hispanics retaining vote control in an increasingly Hispanic state. By the year 2030, the magazine projects, 46% of California's children and only 22% of its older population will be Latino . eThe Dropout Drama: This dissects a public school attrition rate in which the 12th grade loss has advanced from 9% in 1977 t o 34% in 1983. • The Mexican Immigration Debate: UCLA demographer Leo Estrada and Kevin McCarthy , author of the Rand Corporation study" Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California," do the debating . California Tomorrow, with offices in San Francisco and Los . Angeles, awarded eight $12,000 annual fellowships this summer to work on its projects and publication. Two Latinas , Victoria Diaz and Delia Flores,were among those selected. Its board includes Antonia Hernandez , president of the Mexican American Legal Defense& Educational Fund; Hugo Morales, Fresno-based head of Radio Bilingiie, and Southern California broadcaster Fernando baxaca. ' Jobless Rate Rises to 11 /o The Hispanic unemployment rate for August rose to 11% from the previous month's rate of 1 0.5%, while the overall rate continued its downward pattern , according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The general unemployment rate for August was6.8%. Blacks continued to have the highest rate-14.6%. The rate for whites was 5 . 8%. Free first-year s u bscriptions , including the premiere issue, may be ob t a i ned by contacting Soledad Ellis , California T omorrow, 849 S. Broadway, Rm. 831, Los Ang eles, Calif . 90014. NAMES: Keynoti n g th e S e pt. 12 California Chicano News Medi a Association' s 6th annual scholarship banque t was Un ited Press International owner Ma r io Vas quez Raiia ... Steve Sanchez h a s b een appointed a senior vice president o f advertising firm J. Walter Thompson/West in San Francisco ... Frank Newton , executive direc t or of the National Association o f Hispanic Journalists, was named to the board of trustees of the Multi Media Training Institute in Washington ; D . C .... -Charlie Ericksen ; 1 Jlr}N JK' (,AJ,J,'l:') JNSTJTlJTf 1"1(' 0 Titled "Herencia: El Derecho at Futuro," poster by San Antonio artistArmando Sanchez is put out by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. (See Collecting) Hispanic Link Weekly Report