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Hispanic link weekly report, September 22, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 22, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Edward Hidalgo, former U.S. Secretary of the Navy, and Clara Jones, New Mexico Secretary of State, are honored at the 1986 Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute banquet Sept. 16. Hidalgo received CHCl’s role model award, and Jones was selected for the distinguished service award... Alicia Coro, acting assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education, receives an outstanding achievement award from the National Association of Cuban American Women, the National Council of Hispanic Women and the Cuban Circle of Maryland. . . San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros takes a drug test and says the City Council will follow suit.. Joseph Valverde of La Habra is appointed to the California Contractors^
State License Board by Gov. George Deukmejian. . . The Los Angeles County Coroner's Office releases the names of three more victims from the Aug. 31 midair collision of a jetliner and a private plane in Cerritos, Calif. Included among the three was Elizabeth Pena, 11, of Los Angeles... Renowned attorney Melvin Belli files a negligence lawsuit against Aeromexico airlines and the estate of the pilot of the small plane on behalf of two Mexican American families... Six hundred South Floridians salute banker Carlos Arboleya as one of six recipients - from a list of 131 - of the Miami Herald’s spirit of excellence award... Pablo L6pez, a junior offensive tackle with the Florida State University football team, dies Sept. 13 from a gunshot wound to the stomach. He was shot on the Tallahassee campus by a nonstudent during a driving dispute. Lopez, who had been married four days earlier, was a passenger in one of the cars...

Former Top Latino Reagan Official Blasts GOP
Former top level Reagan appointee Frank C. Casillas, a lifelong Republican and a Chicago computer entrepreneur, took the occasion of last weeks annual Hispanic Heritage Week celebration to blast the White House leadership for what he called “the anti-Hispanic bias in the Reagan administration.”
In stinging remarks to a Washington gathering of about 50 people that included representatives from major national Hispanic organizations and Republican Party activists, Casillas, who served as assistant secretary,of labor in 1984-85, shattered the goblet being hoisted in honor of Hispanics by denouncing the Reagan administration’s “insensitivity” to Latino
FCC Questions Its Rule
The Federal Communications Commission told a federal court in Washington, D.C., that its policy of granting preferences to Hispanics, blacks, other minorities and women seeking broadcasting licenses was unconstitutional and should be eliminated,, according to a legal brief released Sept 15.
The FCC filed the brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals in a case involving a Georgia woman who received a radio license because of her gender. The lawyer representing the plaintiff said the FCCs abrupt reversal was too extreme a measure.
Preferences given by the FCC began in 1973 after instructions by a federal appeals court The latest figures from the National Association of Broadcasters showed that there were 45 Hispanic-owned radio and television stations There are about 12,000 stations in all.
Torres to Head Caucus
Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) was elected chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, it was annouced Sept. 12.
The two-term congressman from the34th Congressional District of California follows Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) as its chair. A chairman’s term lasts for one year only. Also elected for the 1986-87 term were: Albert Bustamante, (D-Texas), vice chairman; and Solomon Ortiz, (D-Texas), secretary-treasurer.
Formed in 1976, the caucus now numbers 14, including members from Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Guam.
concerns, its failure to hire Hispanic senior executives in federal agencies and the hypocrisy of its performance given its rhetoric.
Casillas branded the GOPs Hispanic voter outreach program, Project Adelante, a mockery. “I wilj continue to assert publicly that there is no place for Hispanics in the Republican Party.”
His statement came Sept 15 at the beginning of the federal government’s weeklong salute to U.S Hispanics.
“National leaders, led by his administration, have shown an incredible insensitivity to us - in both the international and domestic arenas,” Casillas told a luncheon gathering “This insensitivity ranges from the arrogance displayed by our government in its dealings with Latin countries; to narrow-mindedness over immigration to hostility over bilingual education - an area of extreme importance to us as we attempt to deal with the 50 % dropout rate of our children.”
Noting that he was a Republican Party activist in Illinois, the Korean War veteran and Bronze Star winner said his words “have not come easily” but “I am troubled and I am angry.”
“I think it’s time we acted,” he urged his Latino audience. “At best this administration ignores us But more often, it treats us with outright disdain.”
After Casillas? presentation, the audience was
Anaya Praises Decision
New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya hailed a Sept. 10 decision by a federal district judge to release 1,200 pages of documents detailing for the first time investigations into his finances by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service.
The ruling by Judge Santiago Campos was in response to a lawsuit filed by Anaya which charged that the investigations were a form of harassment by U.S. Attorney William Lutz. The documents, while not offering proof of illegalities, did disclose the existence of several investigations by the two federal agencies for alleged payoffs from contractors and questionable real estate dealings. The judge disagreed, however, that there was harassment
Anaya, who cannot run for another term under state law, said the disclosed papers should put to rest rumors that he would resign before the end of his term on Dec. 31.
near-unanimous in support of taking some unified action to address the concerns Casillas raised The discussion centered on whether to “go public” or try to continue to work within the Republican Party structure
Groups that had individual members or officials in attendance were the League of United Latin American Citizens the countrys largest and oldest Hispanic rights advocacy group; the American Gl Forum; the National Council of La Raza; SER-Jobs for Progress; and Image
Casillas vice president of operations for ShipNet Systems Inc of Glen Ellyn, ML, said his outrage stemmed from the poor participation and progress of Hispanics in the upper levels of management in the federal agencies during the Reagan era
The removal of Dr. Fred Romero as administrator of the Labor Department’s Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Development a key job in the entire department is at the heart of the current discontent Casillas said
continued on page 2
Teacher Reacts to Bennett
The lone Hispanic on Secretary of Education William Bennett’s 21-member task force on 1 elementary education expressed overall satisfaction with his final report and recommendations, but tempered it with concern that not enough attention was devoted to teaching language-minority children.
Jo Gusman, a teacher at the elementary Newcomer School in Sacramento, Calif., told Weekly Report Sept. 9 that Bennett’s “First Lessons” report, released Sept. 2, reflected contributions of the study group, including herself. The group met five times between last fall and this spring.
“We need to look at how we can use bilingual education in a theoretically based curriculum, not just a fast-and-dirty one getting them to speak English”, she said. “We push them into the English language too fast. Those are our dropouts. We need natural communications.”
The 83-page report devoted half a page to language-minority children, with Bennett concluding that “All American children need to speak, read and write English as soon as possible” and the specific methodology should be a matter for local decision.


Puerto Rican Activism on the Rise
A Sept. 27 symposium in Philadelphia on Puerto Rican electoral participation and a civil rights march Oct. 4 in Washington, D.C., are part of a recent surge of activities by Puerto Rican organizations to direct attention to what national and community leaders are characterizing as its dramatically worsening economic and political situation.
The Philadelphia symposium, co-sponsored by the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, will bring together Chicago Deputy Mayor Ben Reyes, a community development specialist top educators from the East Coast and the island to discuss the political future of Puerto Ricans in the United States and in Puerto Rico.
The Puerto Rican March for Justice, according to Philadelphia-based organizer National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, is expected to draw2,000 to3,000 participants from New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Philadelphia, Connecticut and Ohio. NCPRR spokespersons said the march will seek to bring to the attention of policy makers and the public what they termed increased civil rights abuses by the Reagan administration and the disproportionate representation of Puerto Ricans among the unemployed and undereducated.
On Sept 5, the National Puerto Rican Forum released a report on economic and educational indicators of that community. Prepared in conjunction with the National Committee for Full Employment the report recommended that because of their more dire status, Puerto Ricans should not be lumped with the general Hispanic community in developing remedial strategies Julio Barreto, director of the Washington, D.C., office of NPRF, called for an immediate increase in vocational and educational training to help Puerto Ricans adapt to the transition of the U.S. economy from industrially based to service oriented.
NPRFs report showed that while 55% of U.S. Puerto Rican youth were eligible for
New LA. Plan Weighed
The U.S Department of Justice is now considering a redistricting plan for the 15-member Los Angeles City Council which would give H ispanic candidates a chance to capture three council seats The plan, supported by the Mexican American Legal Defense and lEducatldnalTund, was forwarded to the federal body Sept. 12 after the Council overrode a veto of it by Mayor Tom Bradley.
It would retain the East Los Angeles district of lone Latino incumbent Richard Alatorre, add another predominantly Hispanic district adjoining his in the central city and create a 44% Latino district in San Fernando Valley.
The plan, which renumbers the second downtown district Nol 1 to ensure elections in it next year (odd-numbered districts hold elections in odd-numbered years), appears to meet the criteria of the Justice Department The creation of the new Latino districts stems from a lawsuit by the Justice Department agains the city for diluting the voting power of Latinos Among those considering running for the valley district are school board member Larry Gonzdlez and Planning Commission President Dan Garcia 2
college, only 25% of that number enrolled. Of those who went to college, nearly three-quarters did not graduate.
During its 6th annual conference in New York Sept 3-5, the National Puerto Rican Coalition released its 1987 public policy agenda centering on economic self sufficiency. Acknowledging the bleak economic condition of His-panics in general, NPRC emphasized that the status of Puerto Ricans was far worse. President Louis Nuhez pointed to an unemployment rate for Puerto Ricans during the second quarter of this year - 13.4%- substantially higher than that for Mexican Americans or Cubans - 11 % and 6.2%, respectively.
Gerson Borrero, associate director of IPRP, said that while the events were not coordinated, the increase “in activities and activism comes from Puerto Rican leaders at all levels recognizing that the precarious situation of Puerto Ricans is worsening, not improving.”
There was little growth in the number of Hispanic elected officials from 1985 to 1986, but the number of Hispanic mayors increased 29%, according to survey findings released Sept 17 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.-
The number of Hispanic elected officials counted by NALEO went from3,202 to3,204 from November 1985 to September 1986. Forty six percent of these officials - 1,466 -hailed from Texas. If the officials from New Mexico (588), California (451) and Arizona (232) were added to those from Texas, these four states would account for more than four-fifths of the Latinos who hold elective office in the United States.
NALEO’s 1986 report, the National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials, found the greatest growth to be among Hispanic mayors. Their number jumped form 142 in 1985 to 183 in 1986. The report, to be released in November, covered levels of officialdom from school boards to the U.S. Congress.
NALEO, a non-partisan, non-profit organization, highlighted these other findings at its Washington, D.C., press briefing:
• New Jersey had the highest growth rate of any state for Hispanic elected officials-16%.
• Hispanics on school boards declined slightly from 1,159 to 1,142.
•. Latinas comprise 15% of all Hispanic
Casillas Denounces GOP
continued from page 1
Last weeks speech followed Labor Secretary Bill Brocks failure to answer Casillas? personal letter In which he requested a private meeting to review the basis for Romero's dismissal According to Casillas, Romero was replaced in large part for complaining to superiors that there was an anti-Hispanic bias in the Labor Department
“This is the way the (Labor) Department treats its top-level Hispanics and this is the way it handles attempts to remedy biases against Hispanics," Casillas said. “Raise a complaint and you are asked to leave.”
A spokesman at the White House downplayed Casillas? criticisms of Hispanic hiring during the Reagan era saying that many Hispanic appointees “just left for bigger and better things(in the private sector).” He noted that Casillas left the Labor Department when Brock replaced Labor Secretary Raymond Donovan and brought in his own leadership - Phil Garcia
elected officials They held the greatest share of positions in New York(42%), Arizona(21 %) and California (15%).
• A survey of one-quarter of the elected officials revealed that40% were elected after 1980.
• The one-quarter sample also showed that 90% of the officials were Democrats
LATINOS ELECTED BY STATE-1986
Texas 1,466 Ohio 5i
N.M. 588 Pa. 5
Calif. 451 Utah 5'
Ariz. 232 Minn. 4
Colo. 177 Ore. 4I
N.Y. 69 Mass. 4
Fla 45 Wyom. 4
N.J. 29 Mo. 3!
III. 26 Neb. 3
Mich. 16 Nev. 3
Wash. 14 Iowa 2
Conn. 13 Wise. 2
La. 10 R.I. 2
Mont. 8 Hawaii 1
nd. 5 Total 3,204
Source: NALEO Education Fund, 1986
National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials
LATINO ELECTED OFFICIALS IN SELECTED STATES
Level of Office Ariz. Calif. Cola F/a IlL N.M. NY. Texas
U.S. Representatives 0 4 0 0 0 2 1 4
State Executives 0 0 0 0 C 5 0 0
'state Legislators 12 7 9 8 £. 34 7 23
County Officials 9 7 28 1 2 85 1 163
Municipal Officials 99 164 83 25 8 195 4 409
Judiciai/Law Enforcement 30 46 8 7 2 101 2 315
School Board Members 82 223 49 4 12 166 54 552
Total 232 451 177 45 26 588 69 1,466
Source: NALEO Education Fund, 1986 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Latino Mayors Increase 29% in Year


Frank del Olmo, guest columnist
Sour Sweetheart Deal?
Earlier this year, when the federal government moved to break up the nation’s premier Spanish-language television network, Latinos cried foul, claiming that 18 million Latinos would be deprived of a unique and valuable community resource.
I wasn’t convinced. Now some recent actions by its owners and executives are supporting my doubts that the Spanish International Network will vanish from change very much from what it is now.
SIN broadcasts on more than 300 TV stations and cable systems in this country.
But its chief source of wealth and influence are the stations that it owns in major cities j with large Latinos populations - including Los Angeles’ KMEX, Channel 34.
The main cause of SIN’s problems with the government is its close relationship with Televisa, Mexico’s biggest television network, which is owned by media magnate Emilio Azc&rraga.
After investigating the complex financial ties between SIN and Televisa for several years, a Federal Communications Commission judge concluded in January that Azcarraga also controls SIN. Federal law prohibits foreigners from having more than a 20% share in a broadcast license. So the FCC moved to revoke the license of KMEX and the other SIN-owned stations.
It was at this point that prominent Latinos, including Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) and Assemblywoman Gloria Molina (OEast Los Angeles), rushed to defend SIN by pointing to all the good works that its stations do, like broadcasting telethons for worthy causes and promoting voter-registration drives.
NEWS COVERAGE NEGLECTED
That well-intentioned praise overlooked the real weaknesses of SIN. Its programming is lightweight, with the emphasis on maudlin soap operas and tacky variety shows. For all its stature- and profits-in this country, it neglects the best kind of community service: news coverage.
The news departments at SIN stations are badly understaffed and underfunded. KMEX had more than two hours of local news a few years ago. Now it has only an hour each evening. And its main newscast, 24 Horas, is produced in Mexico.
That program has long been a sore point with U.S. Latinos. Its pompous anchorman, Jacobo Zabludovsky, is as famous in Mexico as Walter Cronkite is in this country, with a big difference: Hardly anyone gives credence to what Zabludovsky says. That is because Zabludovsky and his Televisa bosses like Emilio Azcarraga are notoriously close to Mexico’s political leaders and the increasingly corrupt system that they control. Fairly or not, Mexicans regard any news item broadcast on 24 Horas as the version of events that the Mexican government wants to get across. U.S. Latinos share that cynicism.
AZCARRAGA’S MOTIVES QUESTIONED
Last week Zabludovsky surprised his viewers by announcing that he is moving to New York. There, sources in SIN say, he may become SIN’s news director in the United States. The prospect of a man considered to be a shill for the Mexican government running SIN news has caused nothing short of panic in SI N news operations from Miami to Los Angeles. “The man is not a journalist,” a SIN news executive told me angrily. “He’s a vendido (sellout), and everyone knows it.”
Zabludovsky^ announcement is only the latest move by Azcarraga and other executives of SIN that arouses suspicions as to whether they are tryjng to maintain control over Spanish-language television broadcasting in this country. A few weeks ago, for example, Azc&rraga also announced that he is moving to New York City from Mexico to oversee SIN’s “international” operations continued on page six
Sept.;
Sin pelos en la lengua
VOTING FOR THE Z’S: Ex-Congressman Lou Frey, who is opposing former Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez in the Florida Republican gubernatorial runoff, has a problem.
He’s afraid that Dade County's Latino voters will discriminate against him Sept. 30 because his name ends in a y instead of a z.
“If I can’t get the people to go past the (Martinez) name, I’m dead,” he muttered to the media there the other day.
That’s an interesting hypothesis - one worth examining in light of recent word from Texas and California.
In California, political writers are speculating that State Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will be dragged to defeat in his reconfirmation battle because of his Latino name. Joseph Grodin, another justice being tagged by right-wing groups along with Reynoso as a “liberal extremist,” regularly shows up much better in the polls.
In an Aug. 24 report, The Los Angeles Times concluded that Spanish-surnamed candidates running for statewide office would do nine points worse than those not identified by ethnic origin.
It based its conclusion on a telephone poll it conducted using hypothetical gubernatorial candidates.
The poll revealed that bias against Latino candidates was even stronger than that against blacks When a candidate was identified as being of Mexican ancestry, he scored four points worse than a candidate identified as black.
Many Latinos have run, but not a single one has been victorious in a statewide election in California in the last 112 years. In a Democratic landslide there in 1958, the only loser on the ticket was the brilliant attorney/author Enrique (Hank) L6pez, candidate for the then-inconspicuous office of Secretary of State.
The latest Texas Poll offers some percentages which should also console Florida’s Frey. In the race for state Attorney General, incumbent Democrat Jim Mattox leads Republican challenger Roy Barrera Jr., 44% to 28%. But in spite of his surname and a legacy of popularity handed down from his politically active father, Barrera trails Maddox among Hispanic voters, 51% to 18%.
It has long been true that non-Hispanics vote against Latinos simply because they’re turned off by Latino surnames.
But I know of no evidence that Hispanics vote against Anglos just because they’re Anglos.
Candidate Frey, who looks like a loser anyway, should look for a better excuse than saying he was a victim of the “Martinez Syndrome.”
LA RERUN IN DALLAS? The current debate in Dallas on municipal budget cuts (with Hispanics the probable biggest victims) is raising an old issue there: Why haven’t the controlling politicos carved at least one City Council district where its Latino population would have a fighting change to break into the club?
Writes Dallas Morning News editorial page assistant editor Henry Tatum Sept 9:
“If city officials are unwilling to find a way, the federal courts may have to do the job for them.”
Federal action spun off a great soap opera in Los Angeles. Why not Dallas next? -Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
HENRY CISNEROS, on learning that Saturday Review magazine had included him in a two-page spread of “sex symbols.”
“If it was simply on looks, I wouldn’t have made it. Mary Alice (the San Antonio mayor’s wife) will have to answer any other questions on this subject’’
RICHARD RODRIGUEZ, “Hunger of Memory” author, writing in the American Scholar
“The child of immigrant parents goes off to school and comes home knowing more about British Kings than about his grandfather’s travail. (So it was that America happened to me. I turned into you.)...” 1, 1986 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
U.S. screens, or even
3


COLLECTING
LITERACY CHALLENGE: The Gannett Foundation announced Sept 11 a $12 million competitive grant program, with awards in the $40,000 - $100,000 range, to bolster adult literacy efforts. State-level coalitions are encouraged, with groups in Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., welcome to submit Spanish-language components are acceptable and deadline is Dec. 31. Winners to be announced in late February 1987, with programs to start no later than April 1, 1987. For application and more information, contact Marilyn Stein, Vice President/communications, Gannett Foundation, Lincoln Tower, Rochester, N.Y. 14604(716)262-3315.
NATIONAL AGREEMENT REPORT: The 16-page publication “Dialogo" from the Adolph Coors Company details programs developed by the company in 1985 as part of its corporate agreement with the Hispanic community. For a free copy, write Di&iogo, P.O. Box 176, 767 S. Xenon Court, Lakewood, Colo. 80228.
FIRST LESSONS: U.S Secretary of Education William Bennett's new 84-page report on elementary education is available for $4.25. Request “First Lessons,” GPO #065-000-00259-1 from Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
RESEARCH GRANTS FOR LATINAS: The Business and Professional Women’s Foundation offers its Sally Butler Memorial Fund for Latina Research to Hispanas who are doctoral, postdoctoral and predoctoral students. Awards range from $500 to $3,000, with $2,000 being the average. Applications must be postmarked by Jan. 1. For applications write to: BPWF, 2012 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C., 20036 (202) 293-1200.
JOB DISCRIMINATION: EEOC hasafree telephoneservice(800 USA-EEOC) that provides bilingual information on employees’ rights and employers’ obligations under equal opportunity laws. Rotary telephone callers will be connected to EEOC regional offices after the call; touch-tone callers by redialing the number and depressing number 2.
ON LEADERSHIP: The 24-page booklet’The Heart of the Mastei” is the third in a series on leadership development. Fora copy, send$1 to: Independent Sector, Leadership Studies Program, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-8100
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
$1.8 MILLION FOR MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
The Ford Foundation has awarded the Center for Mexican American Studies of the University of Texas at Austin a $1.83 million grant to expand ongoing research activities related to Latino public policy research.
This grant will continue and expand activities of a program jointly sponsored by the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council initiated last year with a $1.3 million grant. It will fund research competitions in 1987 emphasizing employment and economic well-being, income security, the Latino family and the criminal justice system.
Dr. Harriet Romo administers the project Rodolfo O. de la Garza, CMAS director, chairs the IUP/SSRC committee that directs the project
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE FILM FUNDED
In the first such project in the Northeast, the New York State Department of Social Services has funded a bilingual film geared to Hispanics on domestic violence The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families received the $121,000 grant Production work on a 45 minute-to-one hour film will begin in November and the film, to be directed by Pablo Figueroa, should be ready for late spring release.
RESUMES SOUGHT BY OHIO COMMISSION
The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs is implementing a computerized job referral bank and welcomes resumes from Hispanics nationwide. Project Coordinator Julia Arbini-Haywood says her first emphasis is state government, although she already is referring qualified persons for private sector positions as well as in the public sector.
Fewer than 1% of Ohio’s state employees are Hispanic.
Resumes should be sent to Arbini-Haywood at the Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs, 65 South Front St., Columbus, Ohio43215 (614) 466-8333.
Gafendar
THIS WEEK
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER Los Angeles Sept. 23
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will hold its. 7th annual awards banquet to raise money for Latinos interested in pursuing a college education. Ralph Carmona (213) 228-2939
CUBA PROSPECTS Miami Sept 26
Armando Valladares, author and former political prisoner in Cuba for nearly 20 years, will be the speaker at a luncheon by the University of Miami’s Cuban studies program titled “Cuba: Recent Past and Future Prospects.”
Georgina Olano (305) 284-4303
PUERTO RICAN POLITICS Philadelphia Sept. 27
The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy will be a cohost of a symposium titled “Future Directions for Puerto Rican Politics in the United States and Puerto Rico," with Chicago Deputy Mayor Ben Reyes as a participant.
Gerson Borrero(212) 564-2075
AIDS AND MINORITIES
Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 28-Oct. 2
4
How to reach the Hispanic, black and female communities about their growing susceptibility to AIDS will be the subject of the National Minorities AIDS Councirs meeting.
Gloria Rodriguez (201) 266-1910
COMING SOON
WOMEN IN THE CHILEAN CULTURE Mexican American Women’s National Association Washington, D.C. Oct. 2 Luz Marla Prieto (202) 636-4025
HISPANIC LAWYERS CONFERENCE Hispanic National Bar Association Chicago Oct 2-4
Marisel Ayabarreno-Hernandez (312) 277-5902
PUERTO RICAN HUMAN RIGHTS MARCH National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Washington, D.C. Oct. 4 Jimmy Collazo (215) 634-4443
HISPANICS AND EDUCATION Hispanic National Bar Association Chicago Oct 2-4
Marisel Ayabarreho-Herndndez (312) 277-5902
PUERTO RICAN HUMAN RIGHTS MARCH National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Washington, D.C. Oct 4 Jimmy Collazo (215) 634-4443
HISPANICS AND EDUCATION American Council on Education Sept. 22, 1986
San Francisco Oct. 5-8 Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Small Business Administration Washington, D.C. Oct 5-9 Ivette Rodriguez (202) 377-1936
PEACEMAKERS WEEK Community Boards San Francisco Oct. 6-12 Georgia Quinones (415) 552-1250
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE AND PRESIDENTIAL DINNER Republican National Hispanic Assembly Washington, D.C. Oct 9 Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161
CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONFERENCE California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce Palm Springs, Calif. Oct. 9-11 Sergio Banuelos (213) 587-8820
SPOTLIGHT
LAW SCHOOL FORUM: In an effort to recruit more Hispanics, blacks and other minorities into a legal career and help them select a law school, the Law School Admission Council/Law School Admission Services will sponsor three forums across the United States: Oct 10,11 in Chicago; Oct31, Nov. 1 in Boston; and Nov. 14,15 in Los Angeles. For further information, contact Sharon Kemble at(215) 968-1176.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report



CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
][
OPPORTUNITIES IN EDUCATION
ENGINEERING
CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER
McDonald’s Corporation has an excellent middle management position open fora professional qualified to supervise construction of our restaurants in the Washington, D.C., area You will oversee the work of construction contractors, manage multiple construction projects and secure relevant permits from public officials. You must have a minimum of 3 vears construction industry experience with a degree in Architectural or Civil Engineering.
This opportunity offers a salary commensurate with experience. Benefits include medical and dental insurance and a company car. Please send your resume in confidence to: Chris Searles Personnel Recruiter
MCDONALD’S CORPORATION
3015 Williams Drive Fairfax, Virginia 22031 (703) 698-4081
â–  Minorities & Women are Encouraged to Apply
Powered by People With Pride.
m
ri McDonald's
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish. Type 60 words per minute, ability to work effectively under pressure. Word processing experience desirable. Good writing skills essential. Contact: Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
ELIGIBILITY WORKER $18,472 - $20,307 Ann.#65137 ADHS Responsible work in the Bureau of Assistance Programs Determines initial and ongoing eligibility of individuals and families for medical assistance (Medicaid), food stamps or other public assistance plans, reviews cases and determines eligibility based on establishec policies and procedures Requires Bachelor's degree. As the needs of the agency dictate, preference may be given to applicants with fluency in a foreign language for a specific vacancy. Preference may a Iso be given to applicants with experiece in determining eligibility for social services programs
Official Arlington County application form required. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 weekdays between 8:00-5:00. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on Sept 25,1986.
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street North Arlington, Va 22201 EOE
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST- Wasnington, D.C.-based Will do free-lance work at reasonable rates Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
3
PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SPEC B (3 positions available)
Salary Rank: $36,312-$52,650 Closiflfi Date: 10/10/86
QUALIFICATIONS: Master's Degree in Education or in a related field, or equivalent (i.e., the formal education of the person who holds this position needs to have contributed to producing a competent professional who will be regarded as such by members and others, and who is able to organize and to communicate well). Experience in a position of leadership in a public school, college or university and/or related education enterprise. Active involvement in an advocate, membership organization. Skills in group process. Leadership ability with understanding of member advocacy role and competence to deal with diverse groups of staff. Demonstrated skill in organizing ideas, materials and people.
SELECTION CRITERIA: Tier 1 - Extensive experience with educational issues in general and instruction and professional development issues in particular, including analysis and/or research, strategy development, policy formulation and enabling advocate activity in a variety of sectors (e. g., legislative, community, labor relations). Strong leadership capabilities as well as experience in an understanding of effective staff operation in a representative, membership organization. Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively with diverse internal and external audiences on diverse subjects both orally and in writing. Ability to apply to issuesand situations an organizational and advocacy perspective approach.
Tier 2 - Good organizing skills, whether applied to people, ideas or situations. Interpersonal relations skills. Ability to gain access to people and organizations in the larger educational, policy and political communities, at both the state or regional and national levels. Send Resume to:
Malinda Miles, Employment Manager National Education Association 1201 16th St NW Washington, D.C. 20036
MANAGER
Application/Systems Programming
Supervises the programming staff. Responsible for feasibility studies;' systems analysis and design activities; and installation, testing and maintenance of systems software Administrative applications run on an IBM 4341 processor under VM/OS-VS 1. Cullinet DB/DC IDMS used for our TP and data base on-line programming environment Baccalaureate degree and appropriate experience in data processing required. Excellent fringe benefits. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and salary history to:
Director of Data Processing Lehman College The City University of New York Bronx, N.Y. 10468
An Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer
LEHMAN
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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
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Ojeda’s International Inc. is seeking Ojedas throughout the country in preparation for the second annual Ojedas’ reunion to be held in the Los Angeles, Calif., area Please contact Nelda Ojeda, President, Ojeda’s International Inc. P.O. Box 3343, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 387-8326.
BOARD MEMBERS WANTED Washington, D.C., area Hispanic mental health agency seeking qualified applicants for one-and two-year board member terms Contact Peter Valerio (301) 443-2130, Vice Chair, Nominations Committee by 9/26/86.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR State of New Jersey, Dept, of Higher Ed.
$33,426 - $ 46,796
The Assistant Director has the responsibility for coordinating the review of requests for new academic programs at the colleges, participating in the conduct of academic program impact studies and implementing Board of Higher Education policies relating to degree standards, program quality and mission development The individual also will serve as liaison to several county and community colleges, a responsibility that requires him/her to be accepted as a colleague by senior level administrators, presidents and members of Board of Trustees.
Master's degree required Doctorate preferred Five years of progressively responsible experience in academic administration which shall have included academic program development and review and experience as a campus-based faculty member or administrator is also required Resumes and Salary Requirements should be forwarded to: Personnel Office, ADO-AA, N.J. Department of Higher Education, 225 West State Street, Trenton, N.J. 08625.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md, government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35percolumn inch.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts& Entertainment
THIS SONG BROUGHT TO YOU BY: Hispanic musical talent continues touring in the United States, thanks to advertisers seeking Latino buyers.
In New York this week, the Cheer Fiesta Musical brings together four top Latino stars in a four-hour concert. Performers vary in national origin but not necessarily in style: Mexico’s" Prince of Song” Jose Jos6, the Panama-born Cuban singer Lissette and Puerto Ricans Danny Rivera and Yolandita Monge are well-known balladeers.
Concert sponsor Procter & Gamble hopes that reduced ticket prices - as low as $10 - will make the Sept. 28 event “the most popular Latin music concert of the summer.”
Summer has nearly ended, however, and so have a couple of brewery-sponsored national tours.
In Los Angeles, Sept. 13 and 14 dates closed the Miller Maquina Musical tour with free concerts during local Mexican Independence Day celebrations Salsero Willie Colon performed on the 13th; Pandora, El Chicano and Tierra were scheduled for the following day.
The Miller Maquina Musical- two tractor-trailer rigs that convert to 32-foot stages- gave 15 Hispanic concerts across the United States this summer. As the Miller Sound Express, the rigs staged black concerts in 10 cities in 1986.
A seven-city tour sponsored by another beer company came to an early end last week prior to a scheduled Los Angeles show to be headlined by Mexican singer Emmanuel. The Sept. 20 Budweiser
it* c'Qo iyB6
Super Fiesta concert with Tejawo innovators LinreJoe y la Familia, rockers Cruzados and Argentina’s Amanda Miguel, was cancelled due to what the company called “extenuating circumstances.” Reportedly, slow ticket sales were the cause.
The Budweiser Super Fiesta staged concerts in San Antonio, El Paso, Denver and two California cities - Concord and Sacramento. Ironically, press packets circulated for the concert series carried the beer company’s promotional slogan “The music never stops.”
READERS INVITED TO JOIN SURVEY: The Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences will conduct a survey of fall network television programming to determine (1) the number of Latino performers being used by the networks and (2) the types of Hispanic characters being portrayed. Its findings will be reported by Hispanic Link.
HAMAS is inviting Weekly Report readers to aid in the survey by watching “target” programs and completing its survey forms.
Individuals interested in participating may obtain the forms with instructions by contacting me at 8440 Fou ntain Ave., Suite 107, West Hollywood, Calif. 90069 (213) 650-0846.
ONE LINERS: The “first round” of this year’s Emmy Awards in trade and technical categories were announced Sept. 6. Winners included Vicki Sanchez in costuming, Hector Ramirez and John Palacio in camera, and Del Acevedo in makeup... Carmen Zapata stars in Orinoco, Emilio Carballido’s play that opens in Los Angeles Sept.23... VirgilioPihera’sFa/seA/armisoneofthreeplaysatthe3rd annual Ethnic Theatre Festival Sept. 24-28 in Miami. . .
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
DEL OLMO GUEST COLUMN
(continued from page 3)
Another example: Not surprisingly, many U.S. Latinos joined the rush to buy the broadcast licenses that SIN was forced to give up. They were stunned when Azcarraga announced a few weeks ago that the buyer would be Hallmark Cards Inc. One group of Latino bidders, who offered more than the $301 million that Hallmark paid for the licenses, has sued to block the sale. Others have asked Congress to force a sale to Latino buyers.
Amid all this activity, Latinos who once rushed to defend SIN are asking why it was
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going to a Kansas City greeting-card company instead of to “our community”?
Allow me to suggest an admittedly cynical answer^vAzcarraga has hit on a way to obey the FCC and still keep SIN’s influence dominant here.
If U.S. Latinos held the licenses for stations like KMEX they could, probably would, be independent of Mexicans like Azc&rraga. Hallmark, a staid firm from mid-America with minimal knowledge of Latinos, represents no such threat. As long as SIN programming turns a profit, Hallmark can be expected to stick with it, whether it is from Azcarraga in New York or in Mexico City. Hallmark probably also will retain the pliable management that Azcarraga put in charge of stations like KMEX It’s worth noting how quickly KMEX general manager Danny Villanueva, who used to boast
that Latinos owned SIN, became a staunch Hallmark defender.
I can’t help but wonder if SIN’s agreement with Hallmark isn’t a sweetheart deal arranged to allow Azcarraga to remain the czar of Spanish-language television in the United States^ I could be wrong, of course, but there’s one way to find out: The FCC should pursue its case against SIN more aggressively than ever, to determine if its executives are trying to evade the intent - if not the letter- of federal law. After all, making certain that U.S. citizens control Spanish-language broadcasting in this country is a matter of concern not just to the Latino community.
(Frank del Olmo is an editorial writer and columnist for The Los Angeles Times.)
Copyright, 1986, Los Angeles Times. Reprinted by permission.
Former Secretary of the U.S. Navy Edward Hidalgo and New Mexico Secretary of State Clara Jones display their 1986 “Medallions of Excellence” from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. Hidalgo won the role model award and Jones was presented with the distinguished service award.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week State License Board by Gov. George Deukmejian. . . The Los Angeles County Coroner's Office releases the names of three mvre victims from the Aug. 31 midair collision of a jetliner and a private plane in Cerritos, Calif. Included among the three was Elizabeth Peiia, 11, of Los Angeles. .. Renowned attorney Melvin Belli files a negligence lawsuit against Aeromexico airlines and the estate of the pilot of the small plane on behalf of two Mexican American families ... Six hundred South Floridians salute banker Carlos Arboleya as one of six recipients-from a list of 131 -of the Miami Herald's spirit of excellence award ... Pablo L6pez, a junior offensive tackle with the Florida State University football team, dies Sept. 13 from a gunshot wound to the stomach. He was shot on the Tallahassee campus by a nonstudent during a driving dispute. Lopez, who had been married four days earlier, was a passenger in one of the cars ... Edward Hidalgo, former U.S . Secretary of the NiiVy , and Clara Jones, New Mexico Secretary of State, are honored at the 1986 Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute banquet Sept. 16. Hidalgo received CHCI's role model award, and Jones was selected for the distinguished service award. .. Alicia Coro, acting assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education, receives an outstanding achievement award from the National Association of Cuban American Women, the National Council of Hispanic Women and the Cuban Circle of Maryland. . . San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros takes a drug test and says the City Council will follow suit. .. Joseph Valverde of La Habra is appointed to the California Contractors' iiiiiiiiiii Vol. 4 No. 38 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE ORT . Former Top Latino Reagan Offic _ ial GOP Former top level Reagan appointee Frank C. Casillas, a lifelong Republican and a Chicagc computer entrepreneur , took the occasion of last weeKs annual Hispanic Heritage Week celebration to blast the White House leadership for what he called "the bias in the Reagan administration." In stinging remarks to a Washington gathering of about 50 people that included representatives from major national Hispanic organizations and Republican Party activists, Casillas, who served as assistant secretary .of labor in 1984-85, shattered the goblet being hoisted in honor of Hispanics by denouncing the Reagan administration's "insensitivity" to Latino FCC Questions Its Rule The Federal Communications Commission told a federal court in Washington, D .C., that its policy of granting preferences to Hispanics, blacks, other minorities and women seeking broadcasting licenses was unconstitutional and should be eliminated, , according to a legal brief released Sept 15 . ' The FCC filed the brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals in a case involving a Georgia woman who received a radio license because of her gender. The lawyer representing the plaintiff said the FCCs abrupt reversal was too extreme a measure. Preferences given by the FCC began in 1973 after instructions by a federal appeals court The latest figures from the National Association of Broadcasters showed that there were45 Hispanic owned radio and television stations. There are about 12,000 stations in all Torres to Head Caucus Rep . Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) was elected chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, it was annouced Sept. 12. The two-term congressman from the34 th Congressional District of California follows Matthew Martinez (DCalif.) as its chair. A chairman's term lasts for one year only. Also elected for the 1986 term were: Albert Bustamante, (D Texas), vice chairman; and Solomon Ortiz, (D-Texas), secretary-treasurer . Formed in 1976, the caucus now numbers 14, including members from Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Guam. concerns, its failure to hire Hispanic senior executives in federal agencies and the hypocrisy of its performance given its rhetoric. Casillas branded the GOPs Hispanic voter outreach program, Project Adelante, a mockery. "I will continue to assert publicly that there is no place for Hispanics in the Republican Party." His statement came Sept 15 at the beginning of the federal government's weeklong salute to U.S. Hispanics. "National leaders, led by his administration, have shown an incredible insensitivity to us-in both the international and domestic arenas," Casillas told a luncheon gathering. "This insen sitivity ranges from the arrogance displayed by our government in its dealings with Latin countries, to narrow-mindedness over immigration to hostility over bilingual education -an area of extreme importance to us as we attempt to deal with the 50 % dropout rate of our children. " Noting that he was a Republican Party activist in Illinois, the Korean War veteran and Bronze Star winner said his words "have not come easily'' but" I am troubled and I am angry." "I think ifs time we acted," he urged his Latino audience. "At best this administration ignores us. But more often, it treats us with outright disdain." After Casillas' presentation, the audience was Anaya Praises Decision New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya hailed a Sept. 10 decision by a federal district judge to release 1 ,200 pages of documents detailing for the first time investigations into his finances by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. The ruling by Judge Santiago Campos was in response to a lawsuit filed by Anaya which charged that the investigations were a form of harassment by U . S . Attorney William Lutz. The documents, while not offering proof of illegalities, did disclose the existence of several investigations by the two federal agencies for alleged payoffs from contractors and questionable real estate dealings. The judge disagreed, however, that there was harassment Anaya, who cannot run for another term under state law , said the disclosed papers should put to rest rumors that he would resign before the end of his term on Dec. 31. near-unanimous in support of taking some unified action to address the concerns Casillas raised The discussion centered on whether to " go public" or try to continue to work within the Republican Party structure . Groups that had individual members or officials in attendance were the League of United Latin American Citizens, the country's largest and oldest Hispan i c rights advocacy group ; the American Gl Forum ; the National Council of La Raza; SEA Jobs for Progress; and Image. Casillas, vice president of operations for ShipNet Systems Inc. of Glen Ellyn, Ill., said his outrage stemmed from the poor participation and progress of Hispanics in the upper levels of management in the federal agencies during the Reagan era The removal of Dr. Fred Romero as administrator of the Labor Department's Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Development a key job in the entire department, is at the heart of the current discontent Casillas said continued o n page 2 Teacher Reacts to Bennett The lone Hispanic on Secretary of Educa tion William Bennett's 21-member task force on ' elementary education expressed overall satisfaction with his final report and recom mendations, but tempered it with concern that not enough attention was devoted to teaching language-minority children. Jo Gusman, a teacher at the elementary Newcomer School in Sacramento, Calif., told Weekly Report Sept. 9 that Bennett's " First Lessons" report, released Sept. 2, reflected contributions of the study group, including herself. The group met five times between last fall and this spring. " We need to look at how we can use bilingual education in a theoretically based curriculum, not just a fast-and-dirty one getting them to speak English", she said. "We push them into the English language too fast. Those are our dropouts. We need natural communications. " The 83-page report devoted half a page t o language-minority children , with Bennett concluding that " All American children need to speak, read and write English as so o n as possible' ' and the specific methodology should be a matte r for local decision.

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Puerto Rican Activism on the Rise Casillas Denounces GOP A Sept. 27 symposium in Philadelphia on Puerto Rican electoral participation and a civil rights march Oct. 4 in Washington, D .C., are part of a recent surge of activities by Puerto Rican organizations to direct attention to what national and community leaders are characterizing as its dramatically worsening economic and political situation. The Philadelphia symposium, co-sponsored by the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, will bring together Chicago Deputy Mayor Ben Reyes, a community development speci alist, top educators from the East Coast and the island to discuss the political future of Puerto Ricans in the United States and in Puerto Rico. The Puerto Rican March for Justice, accor& ing to Philadelphia-based organizer National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, is expected to draw 2,000 to 3,000 participants from New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Philadelphia, Connecticut and Ohio. NCPRR spokespersons said the march will seek to bring to the attention of policy makers and the public what they termed increased civil rights abuses by the Reagan administration and the dispropor tionate representation of Puerto Ricans among the unemployed and undereducated . On Sept 5, the National Puerto Rican Forum re leased a report on economic and educational indicators of that community. Prepared in conjunction with the National Committee for Full Employment, the report recommended that, because of their more dire status, Puerto Rica ns should not be lumped with the general Hispanic community in developing remedial strategies. Julio Barreto , director of the Wash in gton, D.C. , office of NPRF, called for an . immediate increase in vocational and educational training to help Puerto Ricans adapt to the transition of the U.S. economy from industrially based to service oriented. NPRPs report showed that while 55% of U.S. Puerto Rican youth were eligible for New LA. Plan Weighed The U.S Department of Justice is ncmconsidering a redistricting plan for the 15-member Los Angeles C ity Council which would give Hispanic candidates a chance to capture three council seats. The plan, b}'the Mexican American Legal Delen-se an t:a-ucaTionaTFund,was f orwarded to the federal body Sept. 1 2 afte r t he Council overrode a veto of it by Mayor T om Bradley. It would retain the East Los Angeles district of lone Latino incumbent Richard Alatorre, add another predominantly Hispanic district adjoining his in the central city and create a 44% Latino district in San Fernando Valley . The plan, which renumbers the second downtown district No. 1 to ensure elections in it next year (od&numbered districts hold elections in od& numbered years), appears to meet the criteria of the Justice Department The c reati on of the new Latino districts stemE from a lawsuit by the Justice Department aga i ns . the city for diluting the voting power of Latinos. Among those considering running for the valley district are school board member Larry Gonzalez and Planning Commission President Dan Garcia 2 college , only 25% of that number enrolled. Of those who went to college, nearly three quarters did not graduate . During its 6th annual conference in New York Sept 3-5, the National Puerto Rican Coalition released its 1987 public policy agenda centering on economic se!J.sufficiency . Acknowl edging the bleak economic condition of His panics in general , NPRC emphasized that the status of Puerto Ricans was far worse. President Louis Nunez pointed to an unem ployment rate for Puerto Ricans during the second quarter of this year-13 . 4% sub stantially higher than that for Mexican Americans _ or Cubans-11% and 6.2%, respectively. Gerson Borrero , associate director of I PRP , said that while the events were not coordinated, the increase" in activities and activ i sm comes from Puerto Rican leaders at all levels recog nizing that the precarious situation of Puerto Ricans is worsening, not improving." continued from page 1 Last weeKs speech followed Labor Secretary Bill Brocl
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Frank del Olmo, guest columnist Sour Sweetheart Deal? Earlier this year, when the federal government moved to break up the nation's premier Spanish-language television network, Latinos cried foul, claiming that 18 million Latinos would be deprived of a unique and valuable community resource. I wasn't convinced. Now some recent actions by its owners and executives are supporting my doubts that the Spanish International Network will vanish from U.S. screens, or even change very much from what it is SIN broadcasts on more than 300 TV stations and cable systems in this country. But its chief source of wealth and influence are the stations that it owns in major cities with large Latinos populationsincluding Los Angeles' KMEX, Channel 34. The main cause of SIN's problems with the government is its close relationship with Televisa, Mexico's biggest television network, which is owned by media magnate Emilio Azcarraga. After investigating the complex financial ties between SIN and Televisa for several years, a Federal Communications Commission judge concluded in January that Azcfmaga also controls SIN. Federal law prohibits foreigners from having more than a 20% share in a broadcast license. So the FCC moved to revoke the license of KMEX and the other SIN-owned stations. It was at this point that prominent Latinos, including Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N .Y.) and Assemblywoman Gloria Molina (D-East Los Angeles), rushed to defend SIN by pointing to all the good works that its stations do, like broadcasting telethons for worthy causes and promoting voter-registration drives. NEWS COVERAGE NEGLECTED That well-intentioned praise overlooked the real weaknesses of SIN. Its programming is lightweight, with the emphasis on maudlin soap operas and tacky variety shows. For all its stature-and profitsin this country, it neglects the best kind of community service: news coverage. The news departments at SIN stations are badly understaffed and underfunded. KMEX had more than two hours of local news a few years ago. Now it has only an hour each evening. And its main newscast, 24 Horas, is produced in Mexico. That program has long been a sore point with U.S. Latinos. Its pompous anchorman, Jacobo Zabludovsky, is as famous in Mexico as Walter Cronkite is in this country, with a big difference: Hardly anyone gives credence to what Zabludovsky says. That is because Zabludovsky and his Televisa bosses like Em ilio Azcarraga are notoriously close to Mexico's political leaders and the increasingly corrupt system that they control. Fairly or not, Mexicans regard any news item broadcast on 24 Horas as the version of events that the Mexican government wants to get across. U . S . Latinos share that cynicism. AZCARRAGA'S MOTIVES QUESTIONED Last week Zabludovsky surprised his viewers by announcing that he is moving to New York. There , sources in Sl N say, he may become SIN's news director in the United States. The prospect of a man considered to be a shill for the Mexican government running SIN news has caused nothing short of panic in Sl N news operations from Miami to Los Angeles. "The man is not a journalist," a SIN news executive told me angrily. "He's a vendido (sellout), and everyone knows it." Zabludovsky's announcement is only the latest move by Azcarraga and other executives of SIN that arouses suspicions as to whether they are trying to maintain control over Spanish-language television broadcasting in this country. A few weeks ago, for example, Azcarraga also announced that he is moving to New York City from Mexico to Sin pelos en Ia lengua VOTING FOR THE Z'S: Ex-Congressman Lou Frey , who is opposing former Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez in the Florida Republican gubernatorial runoff, has a problem. He's afraid that Dade County's Latino voters will discriminate against him Sept. 30 because his name ends in a y instead of a z. "If I can't get the people to go past the (Martinez) name, I'm dead," he muttered to the med i a there the other day. Thafs an interesting hypothesis-one worth examining in light of recent word from Texas and California. In California, political writers are speculating that State Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will be dragged to defeat in his reconfirmation battle because of his Latino name . Joseph Grodin, another justice being tagged by right-wing groups along with Reynoso as a "liberal extremist," regularly shows up much better in the polls. In an Aug . 24 report, The Los Angeles Times concluded that Spanish-surnamed candidates running for statewide office would do nine points worse than those not identified by ethnic origin. It based its conclusion on a telephone poll it conducted using hypothetical gubernatorial candidates. The poll revealed that bias against Latino candidates was even stronger than that against blacks. When a candidate was id e ntified as being of Mexican ancestry, he scored four points worse than a candidate identified as black. Many Latinos have run, but not a single one has been victorious in a statewide election in California in the last 112 years. In a Democratic landslide there in 1958, the only loser on the ticket was the brilliant attorney/author Enrique (Hank) L6pez, candidate for the then-inconspicuous office of Secretary of State. The latest Texas Poll offers some percentages which should also console Florida's Frey. In the race for state Attorney General, incumbent Democrat Jim Mattox leads Republican challenger Roy Barrera Jr., 44% to 28%. But in spite of his surname and a legacy of popularity handed down from his politically active father, Barrera trails Maddox among Hispanic voters, 51% to 18%. It has long been true that non-Hispanics vote against Latinos simply because they're turned off by Latino surnames. But I know of no evidence that Hispanics vote against Anglos just because they're Anglos. Candidate Frey, who looks like a loser anyway, should look for a better excuse than saying he was a victim of the "Martinez Syndrome." LA.. RERUN IN DALLAS? The current debate in Dallas on municipal budget cuts (with Hispanics the probable biggest victims) is raising ao old issue there: Why haven't the controlling politicos carved at least one City Council district where its Latino population would have a fighting change to break into the club? Writes Dallas Morning News editorial page assistant editor Henry Tatum Sept. 9 : "If city officials are unwilling to find a way, the federal courts may have to do the job for them." Federal action spun off a great soap opera in Los Angeles. Why not Dallas next? -Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • HENRY CISNEROS, on learning that Saturday Review magazine had included him in a two-page spread of "sex symbols." "If it was simply on looks, I wouldn't have made it. Mary Alice (the San Antonio mayor's wife) will have to answer any other questions on this subject." RICHARD RODRIGUEZ, "Hunger of Memory'' author writing in the American Scholar. ' ' " The child of immigrant parents goes ott to school and comes home knowing more about British Kings than about his grandfather's oversee SIN's "international" operations. continued on page six .travail. (So 1t was that America happened to me . 1 turned into you.) .. . " 3 Sept. 22, 1986 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING LITERACY CHALLENGE: The Gannett Foundation announced Sept. 11 a $12 million competitive grant program, with awards in the $40,000 -$1 00,000 range, to bolster adult literacy efforts. State level coalitions are encouraged, with groups in Puerto Rico and Washington, D .C., welcome to submit. Spanish-language components are acceptable and deadline is Dec. 31. Winners to be announced in late February 1987, with programs to start no later than April 1 , 1987. For application and more information , contact Marilyn Stein , Vice PresidenVcommunications, Gannett Foundation, Lincoln Tower, Rochester, N .Y. 14604 (716) 262331 5 . NATIONAL AGREEMENT REPORT: The 16-page publication . " Dialogo"from the Adolph Coors Company details programs developed by the company in 1985 as part of its corporate agreement with the Hispanic community. For a free copy, write Dialogo , P .O. Box 176, 767 S. Xenon Court, Lakewood, Colo. 80228. FIRST LESSONS: U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennetfs new 84-page report on elementary education is available for $4.25 . Request "First Lessons," GPO #065-{)()()-()()259-1 from Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office , Washington , D.C. 20402. RESEARCH GRANTS FOR LATINAS: The Bus iness arid Profes sional Women's Foundation offers its Sally Butler Memorial Fund for Latina Research to Hispanas who are doctoral, postdoctoral and predoctoral students. Awards range from $500 to $3,000, with $2,000 being the average. Applications must be postmarked by Jan . 1 . For applications write to: BPWF, 2012 Massachusetts Ave. NW , Washington , D .C., 20036 (202) 293-1200. JOB DISCRIMINATION: EEOC fiasafree-teleplione service(800 USA-EEOC) that provides bilingual information on employees ' rights and employers' obligations llnder equal opportunity laws. Rotary telephone callers will be connected to EEOC regional offices after the call ; touch-tone callers by redialing the number and depressing number 2. ON LEADERSHIP: The24-page booklet"The Heart of the Master" is the third in a series on leadership development. For a copy, send $1 to: Independent Sector, Leadership Studies Program , 1828 L St. NW , Washington, D . C .20036 CONNECTING (Late news on what ' s occurring within the U . S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) $1.8 MILLION FOR MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES The Ford Foundation has awarded the Center for Mexican American Studies of the University of Texas at Austin a $1.83 million grant to expand ongoing research activities related to Latino public policy research . This grant will continue and expand acti vities of a program jointly sponsored by the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council initiated last year with a $1.3 million grant. It will fund research competitions in 1987 emphasizing employment and economic well-being, income security , the Latino family and the c r iminal justice system. Dr . Harriet Romo administers the project. Rodolfo 0. de Ia Garza, CMAS director, chairs the IUP/SSRC committee that directs the project. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE FILM FUNDED In the first such project in the Northeast, the New York State Department of Social Services has funded a bilingual film geared to Hispanics on domestic violence . The Committee for Hispanic Chiiciren and Families received the $121 ,000 grant. Production work on a 45 minute-to-one hour film will begin in November and the film, to be directed by Pablo Figueroa , should be ready for late spring release. RESUMES SOUGHT BY OHIO COMMISSION The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs is implementing a computerized job referral bank and welcomes resumes from Hispanics nationwide . Project Coordinator Julia Arbini-Haywood says her first emphasis is state government , although she already is referring qualified persons for private sector positions as well as in the public sector. Fewer than 1% of Oh i o's state employees are Hispanic . Resumes should be sent to Arbini-Haywood at the Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs, 65 South Front St. , Columbus, Ohio43215 _ (9 _1_ 4) 466-8333. ealendar How to reach the Hispanic , black and female com munities about their growing susceptibility to AIDS will be the subject of the National Minorities AIDS Councirs meeting . San Franc i sco Oct. 5-8 Marlene Ross (202) 939-941 0 MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Small Business Administration THIS WEEK SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER los Angeles Sept. 23 The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will hold its . 7th annual awards banquet to raise money for Latinos interested in pursuing a college education . Ralph Carmona (213) 228-2939 CUBA PROSPECTS Miami Sept. 26 Armando Valladares, author and former political prisoner in Cuba for nearly 20 years, will be the speaker at a luncheon by the University of Miami's Cuban studies program titled "Cuba: Recent Past and Future Prospects." • Georgina Olano (305) 284-4303 PUERTO RICAN POLITICS Philadelphia Sept. 27 The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy will be a co host of a symposium titled "Future Directions for Puerto Rican Politics in the United States and . Puerto Rico," with Chicago Deputy Mayor Ben Reyes as a participan .t. Gerson Borrero (212) 564-2075 AIDS AND MINORITIES Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 28-0ct. 2 4 Gloria Rodriguez (201) 266-1910 COMING SOON WOMEN IN THE CHILEAN CULTURE Mexican American Women's National Association Washington, D . C . Oct. 2 luz Maria Prieto (202) 636-4025 HISPANIC LAWYERS CONFERENCE Hispanic National Bar Association ChiCago Oct. 2-4 Marisel Ayabarreno-Hernandez (312) 277-5902 PUERTO RICAN HUMAN RIGHTS MARCH National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Washington, D . C . Oct. 4 J i mmy Collazo (215) 634-4443 HISPANICS AND EDUCATION Hispanic National Bar Association Chicago Oct. 2-4 Marisel Ayabarreno-Hernandez (312) 277-5902 PUERTO RICAN HUMAN RIGHTS MARCH National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights Washington, D.C. Oct. 4 Jimmy Collazo (215) 634-4443 HISPANICS AND EDUCATION American Council on Education Sept. 22 , 1986 Washington, D . C . Oct. 5-9 lvette Rodriguez (202) 377-1936 PEACEMAKERS WEEK Community Boards San Francisco Oct. 6-12 Georgia Quinones (415) 552-1 250 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE AND PRESIDENTIAL DINNER Republican National Hispanic Assembly Washington, D . C . Oct. 9 Carolina Camacho (202) 363 CHAMBERSOFCOMMERCECONFERENCE California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce Palm Springs, Cali( Oct. 9-11 Serg i o Banuelos (213) 587-8820 SPOTLIGHT LAW SCHOOL FORUM: In an effort to recruit more Hispanics , blacks and other minorities into a legal career and help them select a law school , the law School Admission Council/law School Admis sion Services will sponsor three forums across the United States : Oct.1 0 ,11 in Ch icago; Oct31 , Nov . 1 ir. Boston; and Nov . 14,1.5 in los Angeles. For . further information, contact Sharon Kemble at (215) 968-1176. Hispanic unk Weekly Repo r t

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(cORPORATE CLASSIFIEos) ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER McDonald's Corporation has an excellent middle management position open for a profes sional qualified to supervise construction of our restaurants in the Washington, D.C. , area . You will oversee the work of construction contractors, manage multiple construction projects and secure relevant permits from public officials. You must have a minimum of 3 vears construction industry experience with a degree in Architectural or Civil Engineer ing. This opportunity offers a salary commensurate with experience. Benefits include medical and dental insurance and a company car. Please send your resume in confidence to: Chris Searles Personnel Recruiter McDONALD'S CORPORATION 3015 Williams Drive Fairfax, Virginia 22031 (703) 698-4081 . Minorities & Women are Encouraged to Apply Powered by People With Pride. -----f-A: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish . Type 60 words per minute, ability to work effectively under Word processing experience desirable . Good writing skills essential. Contact: Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza , 20 F St. NW , 2nd Floor , Washington , D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. ELIGIBILITY WORKER :$18,472$20,307 Ann.#65137 ADHS Responsible work in the Bureau of Assistance Programs. Determines initial and ongoing bility of individuals and families for medical assistance (Medicaid), food stamps or other public assistance plans, reviews cases and determines eligibility based on establ ishec policies and procedures. Requires Bachelor's degree. As the needs of the agency dictate, preference may be given to applicants with fluency in a foreign language for a specific vacancy. Preference may also be given to applicants with experiece in determining eligibility for social services programs. Official Arlington County application form required To request application materia( please call (703) 558-2167 weekdays between 8 : 005 : 00. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 :00 PM on Sept. 25, 1986. ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street North Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE ILLUSTRATOIVCARTOONISTWasnington, D . C.-based Will po free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737. Hispanic Link Weekly Report OPPORTUNITIES IN EDUCATION PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SPEC B (3 positions available) Salary Rank: $36,312 -$52,650 Clos;, Date: 10/1 0/86 QUALIFICATIONS: Master's Degree in Education or in a related field , or equivalent (i.e., the formal education of the person who holds this position needs to have contributed to producing a competent profess i onal who will be regarded as such by members and others, and who is able to organize and to communicate well) . Experience in a position of leadership in a public school, college or university and/or related education enterprise . Act i ve involvement in an advocate, membership organization . Skills i n group process . Leadership ability with understanding of member advocacy role and competence to deal with diverse groups of staff . Demonstrated skill in organizing ideas, materials and people. SELECTION CRITERIA: Tier 1 Extensive experience with educational issues in geoeral and instruction and professional development issues in particular, including analysis and/or research , strategy development, policy formulation and enabling advocate activity in a variety of sectors (e . g., legislative , community, labor relations) . Strong leadership capabilities as well as experience in an understanding of effective staff operat i on in a representative, membership organization . Demonstrated ability to commun i cate effectively with diverse internal and external audiences on diverse subjects both orally and in writing . Ability to apply to issues and situations an organizational and advocacy perspective approach. Tier 2-Good organizing skills, whether applied to people, ideas or situations. Interpersonal relations skills . Ability to gain access to people and organizations in the larger educational, policy and political communities, at both the state or regional and national levels . Send Resume to : Mal i nda Miles, Employment Manager National Education Association 1201 16th St. NW Washington , D.C. 20036 MANAGER Application/Systems Programming Supervises the programming staff . ResP<>nsible for : feasibility studies; : systems ' analy sis and design activities; and installation, testing and maintenance of systems software Administrative applications run on an IBM 4341 processor under VM/O&VS 1 . Cullinet DB/DC IDMS used for our TP and data base on-line programming environment. Bacca appropriate e!
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Arts & Entertainment THIS SONG BROUGHT TO YOU BY: Hispanic musical talent continues touring in the United States, thanks to advertisers seeking Latino buyers. In New York this week, the Cheer Fiesta Musical brings together four top Latino stars in a four-hour concert. Performers vary in national origin but not necessarily in style: Mexico's"Prince of Song" Jose Jose, the Panama-born Cuban singer Lissette and Puerto Ricans Danny Rivera and Yolandita Monge are well-known balladeers. Concert sponsor Procter & Gamble hopes that reduced ticket prices -as low as $10 will make the Sept. 28 event "the most popular Latin music concert of the summer." Summer has nearly ended, however, and so have a couple of brewery-sponsored national tours. In Los Angeles, Sept. 13 and 14 dates closed the Miller Maquina Musical tour with free concerts during local Mexican Independence Day celebrations. Sa/sera Willie Colon performed on the 13th; Pandora, El Chicano and Tierra were scheduled for the following day. The Miller Maquina Musical-two tractor-trailer rigs that convert to 32-foot stages-gave 15 His panic concerts across the United States this summer. As the Miller Sound Express, the rigs staged black concerts in 10 cities in 1986. A seven-city tour sponsored by another beer company came to an early end last week prior to a scheduled Los Angeles show to be headlined by Mexican singer Emmanuel. The Sept. 20 Budweiser Super Fiesta concert with y Ia Familia, rockers Cruzados and Argent1fja's Amanda Miguel, was cancelled due to what the company called "extenuating circumstances." Re portedly, slow ticket sales were the cause. The Budweiser Super Fiesta staged concerts in San Antonio, El Paso, Denver and two California cities-Concord and Sacramento. I ron icaliy, press packets circu Ia ted for the concert series carried the beer company's promotional slogan "The music never stops." READERS INVITED TO JOIN SURVEY: The Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences will conduct a survey of fall network television programming to determine (1) the number of Latino performers being used by the networks and (2) the types of Hispanic characters being portrayed . Its findings will be reported by Hispanic Link. HAMAS is inviting Weekly Report readers to aid in the survey by watching "target'' programs and completing its survey forms. Individuals interested in participating may obtain the forms with instructions by contacting me at 8440 Fountain Ave., Suite 1 07, West Hollywood , Calif. 90069 (213) 650-0846. ONE LINERS: The "first round" of this year's Emmy Awards in trade and technical categories were announced Sept. 6 . Winners included Vicki Sanchez in costuming, Hector Ramirez and John Palacio in camera, and Del Acevedo in makeup ... Carmen Zapata stars in Orinoco, Emilio Carballido's play that opens in Los Angeles Sept. 23 ... Virgilio Pifiera's False Alarm is one of three playsatthe3rd annual Ethnic Theatre Festival Sept. 24-28 in Miami. .. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report going to a Kansas City greeti ng-card company instead of to "our community' ' ? that Latinos owned SIN, became a staunch Hallmark defender. DEL OLMO GUEST COLUMN (continued from page 3) Another example: Not surprisingly, many U.S. Latinos joined the rush to buy the broadcast licenses that SIN was forced to give up. They were stunned when Azcarraga announced a few weeks ago that the buyer would be Hallmark Cards Inc. One group of Latino bidders, who offered more than the $301 million that Hallmark paid for the licenses, has sued to block the sale . Others have asked Congress to force a sale to Latino buyers. Amid all this activity, Latinos who once rushed to defend SIN are asking why it was 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias Rentas, Phil Garcia, John Rosales. No pon1on of HISPanic Link Weekly Repon may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription ( 13• issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will ,run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on reQuest. Allow me to suggest an admittedly cynical answer"-cAzcarraga has hit on a way to obey the FCC and still keep SIN's influence dominant here . If U.S. Latinos held the licenses for stations like KMEX they could , probably would, be independent of Mexicans like Azcarraga. Hallmark, a staid firm from mid America with minimal knowledge of Latinos, represents no such threat. As long as SIN programming turns a profit, Hallmark can be expected to stick with it , whether it is from Azcarraga in New York or in Mexico City . Hallmark probably also will retain the pliable management that Azcarraga put in charge of stations like KMEX It's worth noting how quickly KMEX general manager Danny Villanueva , who used to boast I can't help but wonder if SIN's agreement with Hallmark isn't a sweetheart deal arranged to allow Azcarraga to remain the czar of Spanish-language television in the United States. I could be wrong ; of course, but there's one way to find out: The FCC should pursue its case against SIN more aggressively than ever, to determine if its executives are trying to evade the intent-if not the letter-of federal law . After all , making certain that U.S. citizens control Spanish-language broadcasting in this country is a matter of concern not just to the Latino community. (Frank del 0/mo is an editorial writer and columnist for The Los Angeles Times) Copyright, 1986, Los Angeles Times. Reprinted by permission . Former Secretary of the U.S. Navy Edward Hidalgo and New Mexico Secretary of State Clara Jones display their 1986 "Medallions of Excellence" from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. Hidalgo won the role model award and Jones was presented with the distinguished service award. Hispanic Link Weekly Report