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Hispanic link weekly report, September 29, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 29, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
U.S. Department of Transportation Deputy Secretary Jim Burnley announces the appointment of Raymond Salazar as director of the Federal Aviation Administration’s National Civil Aviation Security Office. Salazar is a native of California . .United Nations Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar says he is not sure he will seek a second five-year term this fall. De Cuellar says he does not want to preside over the troubled organization. . .The Ford Foundation selects San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros to its recently formed Bilateral Commission on the Future of United States-Mexican Relations. The commission will hold its first meeting Oct. 9-11 in the border cities of San Diego and Tijuana. . .Chicago Mayor Harold
Washington visits Mexico City to, among other things, drum up support among Windy City Hispanics for his re-election campaign back home. . .U.S. District Attorney Mario Merola announces the indictment of three Bronx teenagers for what is believed to be racially motivated beatings of two Puerto Rican youths in that burrough.. Vera Clemente, wife of baseball legend Roberto Clemente, presents the Roberto Clemente Award to Baltimore Orioles Utility player Juan Beniquez. Los Angeles pitcher Fernando Valenzuela won the National League equivalent in June. . .Ace Valenzuela becomes the first professional baseball player of Mexican extraction to win 20 games in the National League. . .Cincinnati Reds first baseman Tony P6rez, 44, announces his retirement at pre-game ceremonies. Perez, completing his 22 nd major league season, had a hit and a walk in the game...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Rep. Torres Demands
New Shows 22, Latino Leads O
Rep. Torres Demands Nakasone Retraction
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairman Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) called on Japan’s Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone Sept 23 to retract comments he made to a political gathering last week that the intelligence level in the United States suffers because of its “considerable number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans”
Nakasone’s remarks that “the level of the United States society is lower” than that of Japan, with its “information-oriented, highly educated society” because of the U.S. black and brown population, was quoted in two Japanese newspapers. A spokesman said later that he was referring to literacy, not intelligence.
“Either way, he should retract that statement,” Torres said, adding that it came “at a time when many of us in Congress are working to improve relationships between the United States and Japan.”
Court Okays LA Remap
Federal court approval of a redistricting plan for the 15-member Lbs Angeles City Council has opened the door for the election of a second Hispanic representative to that body.
Federal District Judge James Ideman approved Sept 22 a Council proposal creating new District No. 1, dominantly Hispanic and without an incumbent, in central Los Angeles.
A special election is expected to be called in late January or early February. Mentioned among several likely candidates for the seat are State Assembly member Gloria Molina and Los Angeles Board of Education member Larry Gonzalez.
Judge Ideman said thatthe plan, which had* been vetoed by Mayor Tom Bradley but overridden by the Council, met all U.S. Justice Department requirements. The department had sued the city for intentionally diluting the voting power of Los Angeles’ 27% Hispanic population.
The plan, supported by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, also creates a district in suburban San Fernando Valley which is 44% Hispanic.
Twenty*two new shows begin the fall television season this month, and none features a Hispanic actor or actress in the lead role. Only two of the new shows have Latinos in prominent, regular roles- both playing Hispanics
The fall season, officially begun Sept. 21, starts with 62 drama and comedy series airing in prime time on the three commercial television networks Less than a dozen of those shows have Latinos in their cast.
Priscilla Lopez, an actress recognized on Broadway with a Tony nomination for her portrayal of Morales in A Chorus Line and a Tony Award for A Day in Hollywood, A Night in the Ukraine, will be seen as Rosa Villanueva on Kay O’Brien, a new series airing on CBS this fall.
Airing this season on NBC is L.A. Law, a series with an ensemble cast that includes the recurring character of Victor Sifuentes played by Jimmy Smits, a Hispanic actor. The drama was created by Steven Bochco.
One show returning to network television this year, ABCs The A Team, will add a Hispanic to its cast. Eddie Velez will play Dishpan, a regular character. Five out pf the six shows with Hispanic performers that began the 1985-86 season will return in 1986-87. Both the 1984-85 and 1983-84 fall seasons began with seven shows featuring Hispanic actors and actresses.
The number of programs with Hispanic cast members at the beginning of a fall season does not reflect an exact count for the year-
Court Upholds Ferre Fine
The Florida Supreme Court on Sept. 18 upheld a lower court ruling that former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre illegally accepted campaign contributions after winning the 1981 mayoral race.
Without comment, the court concurred that Ferre illegally accepted 35 $1,000 contributions from Clinics Asociacion Cubans Health Plan, a health maintenance organization, five weeks after winning the race.
Florida state law requires that contributions received after an election be retu rned. At the time, the health concern was competing for a city contract. Ferr§ was fined $70,000.
especially since “mid-season replacements” virtually have created a second season that generally begins in January.
In 1984, the mid-season introduction of ABCs aka Pablo, which aired only six episodes, upped by 16 the number of Hispanics seen regularly on network television. A short-lived mid-season addition to last year’s schedule, CBS’s Foley Square, featured actor Hector Elizondo in the role of an assistant district attorney.
A survey conducted in 1985 by the League of United Latin American Citizens found that 1 % of the characters presented on television were Hispanic This year, the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences will participate in a survey of the fall season being conducted by Hispanic Link News Service.
continued on page 2
House Acts on Pesticides
The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill, 329 to 4, on Sept 19 that would overhaul for the first time in 14 years the federal pesticide act.
The bill was immediately criticized by environmental groups because of an amendment that prohibits states from imposing standards more stringent than those of the federal government The amendment to preempt states from in effect overriding federal regulations-lobbied for by growers - was passed 214 to 121.
The bill requires chemical companies to complete health and safety tests in 10 years for 600 active ingredients in approximately 35,000 pesticides now on the market The 1972 Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act called for such tests by 1975 as a condition for a license from the Environmental Protection Agency. Congress extended the deadline twice and dropped it in 1978.
The Senate Agriculture Committee on Aug. 13 approved an amendment that created for the first time federal standards to prevent pesticide contamination among farm workers. The Senate amendment also imposed safety and health tests.
The Senate version has a similar provision prohibiting states from setting tougher standards.


Mayors Say Affirmative Action Works
Affirmative action programs throughout the United States have proven to be beneficial and are working successfully, according to a survey of more than 100 cities by the U.S. Conference of Mayors released Sept. 18.
The 121-city survey, conducted over the summer, said there have been general improvements in recruitment procedures, hirings and promotions.
Some of the findings of the report, “Affirmative Action Programs in City Government” included:
• Half of the cities said that the programs have improved the delivery of public services.
• Four-fifths of the municipalities reported . an improvement in recruitment.
. • Fifty cities said the public had a more favorable perception of city services.
• Improved efficiency, production, job satisfaction and labor-management relations were cited in the report.
The 20-page report goes against the philo-
Alien Benefits Targeted
The Immigration Reform Law Institute announced Sept. 18 that it had begun pressuring the U.S. Labor Department to decertify the unemployment insurance program of Texas because of a decision by a U.S. District Court upholding a ruling that undocumented aliens can seek work and unemployment benefits.
The settlement was handed down Aug. 25 in Ibarra vs. the Texas Employment Commission. Judge William Wayne Justice of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern D istrict of Texas rejected an attempt.by the Texas State Attorney General’s Office to strike the settlement.
Decertification could cost Texas $50 million in federal funds to administer the insurance ' program.
Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) on Sept. 18 introduced that chamber’s version of the English Proficiency Act, a measure to establish English literacy programsfor limited-English-proficient adults.
Co-sponsored by Sens. Dennis DeConcini, (D-Ariz.), Paul Simon (D-lll.), Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), Paul Sarbanes(D-Md.), and Patrick i Moynihan (D-N.Y.), the bill would authorize appropriations of $10 million for each of the fiscal years 1987,1988 and 1989. It establishes a grant program within the Office of Adult Education of the Department of Education. The act would also create a national clearinghouse on literacy education to gather and disseminate information on effective remedial measures.
Bingaman, upon introducing the bill, cited a study which found that 56% of Hispanic adults are functionally illiterate - lacking the reading, writing, comprehension and math skills to function beyond the fourth grade.
Rep. Matthew Martinez, (D-Calif.), introduced in the House on June 17 the precursor of the Senate proficiency bill. As of Sept 18, Martinez’s bill had obtained the sponsorship of 59 congressmen.
Some of the organizations expressing their support of the bill are the National Education 2
sophy of the Reagan administration, which believes that affirmative action programs lead f to a stratified society and discrimination against white males.
The U.S. Supreme Court has issued three decisions since May upholding affirmative action plans in three cities.
Prompted by the court decisions, the U.S. Justice Department decided to drop all but three of its challenges to 51 affirmative action plans around the nation. The administration also decided to put off whether to scrap or modify an executive order requiring hiring goals from federal contractors for Hispanics, blacks, other minorities and women.
No New Hispanic Leads
continued from page 1
The Hispanic Link/HAMAS survey will count the number of Hispanic characters portrayed in network television and the number of portrayals - Latino and non-Latino - given by Hispanic artists. Remarks provided by survey participants will be incorporated into a report to be released by Hispanic Link and HAMAS next year. (See Arts and Entertainment)
- Tabulating the Hispanic presence on network television is necessary for the sake of “historical accuracy,” according to Abel Franco: The actor, who will be seen in the role of a Hispanic judge this year on LA Law, is head of the HAMAS “media watch” committee that will oversee the survey.
Franco uses the Korean War to make his point. “Our boys were there and they died in great numbers. But during 11 years of M*A*S*H, with all the show’s critical acclaim, we were lucky if there was a Hispanic seen in it every
Association, the National Parents and Teachers Association, the National Council of La Raza, the Cuban National Planning Council and the National Puerto Rican Coalition.
BETWEEN 17 AND 20 MILLION U.S. ADULTS ARE ILLITERATE
Sources: Bureau of the Census and U.S Department of, Education, English Language Proficiency Survey, 1982.
Latina Tackles Gridiron
One year after a New Jersey court lifted an all-male restriction on high school football, a 14-year-old Latina is vying for a spot as a wide receiver on her Union City high school team.
Lina Garcia, 5 feet 3 inches tall and 120 pounds, and Elizabeth Balsley, a senior, are the only two females in the state on high school teams. It was Balsley’s discrimination lawsuit that forced the court decision.
Garcia, wearing jersey No. 54, plays for the frosh team. Luis Cruz, a running back, said, “We’re trying to teach her how to hit and take a hit”
Garcia Switches Papers
Gerald Garcia, founding president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, joins the Harte-Hanks Communications newspaper group Oct. 1 as publisher of the Bryan-College Station (Texas) Eagle.
Until his resignation last week, Garcia, 43, was editor and publisher of Gannett Newspapers’ Tucson Citizen and vice president of Gannett West.
Both companies own numerous media properties Gannett headquartered in Arlington, Va., owns 92 daily newspapers; Harte-Hanks headquartered in San Antonio, owns 26 dailies and more than 100 non-dailies
Garcia, a native of Beeville, Texas, and journalism graduate of Texas A&M in College Station, said he was making the move in part to allow more time to be with his wife, Joyce, son, Gerry, 18, who is enrolling in Texas A&M next year, and daughter, Wendy, 13. “I want to spend my day differently,” he said.
Lujan Most Conservative
Rep. Manuel Luj£n (R-N.M.) received the highest rating of all voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on issues of importance to the American Conservative Union during the 1985 legislative session, according to a report issued late last month.
The ACU report rated representatives on 19 issues, two of which were double-weighted because of their significance to ACU. Lujan scored a rating of 67%, voting affirmatively on both issues: the authorization of $1.5 billion to procure 21 MX missiles and the repeal of an amendment prohibiting aid to military groups in Angola The cumulative rating for Lujan over his nine terms was 76%.
In descending order, the ratings for the other caucus members were:
1985 Cumulative
Solomon Ortiz(D-Texas) 33% 32%
Kika de la Garza (D-Texas) 24 55
Albert Bustamante 19 19
(D-Texas) Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) 14 15
Esteban Torres(D-Calif.) 10 3
Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) 5 9
Matthew Martinez 5 8
(D-Calif.) Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) 0 . 23
Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) 0 8
Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) 0 6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
once in a while.”
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Literacy Act Introduced in Senate


Ruben Bonilla, guest columnist
Burying a Dead Horse
(Editor's note: This column was syndicated by Hispanic Link News Service in December 1981 when Corpus Christi, Texas, attorney Ruben Bonilla was president of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Congress is presently debating whether to eliminate or drastically reduce funding for the U.S Commission on Civil Rights.)
It’s wasteful - a multimiliion-dollar drain on taxpayers. It’s degrading, devious and divisive to a nation in want of unity. It’s certainly hypocritical. But politically, if s practical.
So President Reagan continues his search | for unqualified, uncommitted and even incompetent minorities to place in positions of power and trust in his administration.
His modus operandi is to put them in charge of governmental bodies he intends, ultimately, to destroy.
By using them, he can come back later, after inertia has set in and the agencies’ constituencies have been turned off by their non-performance, and quietly apply the coup de grace
Seldom is there a great outcry when you bury a long-dead horse.
The ploy is one Reagan practiced while governor of California, trying it on bodies such as the State Office of Economic Opportunity.
Its political benefits are multiple and immediate:
1. He can pretend that “minorities?’ have a voice in his administration.
2. His appointees serve as flak catchers. Minority victims of discrimination and other abuses of constitutional guarantees become less credible when they make accusations against an agency fronted by another minority.
3. When, per plan, the agencies finally founder and fail, the minority appointees become the scapegoats. And the implication has been successfully planted: Minorities are not yet “ready” for leadership positions in America.
WON’T ‘TAKE ON THEIR OWN’
According to initial administration logic, because so few minorities were being named to ANY positions, leaders of black and Hispanic organizations wouldn’t be likely toMtake on their own.”
So the president nominated William Bell, a black with an embarrassing record of failure as president of his own Detroit-based executive search company, to head the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), an agency with an annual budget of $141.2 million.
Bell’s one-man show, which operates rent-free out of his brother’s law office and has total assets of $500, places clients at the rate of one a year. Now 55, he claims to earn $7,000 annually.
Bell’s only apparent qualification for the demanding $55,000-a-year job is that he worked in the Reagan-Bush campaign. (Former top Reagan advisor) Lyn Nofziger comments: “To me, the most important thing in politics is loyalty and we’ll get loyalty from him. We’ll get done whatever the president wants to have done.” Equally outrageous is the White House action with regard to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, for more than two decades our apolitical “national conscience.”
‘TRICKLE DOWN’ CIVIL RIGHTS The administration tried to talk black fundamentalist minister Edward Hill of Los Angeles - a vocal foe of the Equal Rights Amendment - into taking on the chairmanshipi “They said that I could hold the hearings in the same cities I was holding revivals,” he says.
Ultimately, the White House settled on a conservative black; Republican Party loyalist from San Diego, Clarence Pendleton, who shares the president’s opposition to affirmative action hiring programs as well as to busing as an option to achieve school desegregation.
Pendleton advocates “supply side” civil rights - also known, presumably, as “trickle down”'civil rights.
The administration doesn’t have the courage to advocate for outright elimination of EEOC or the Civil Rights Commission. Instead, wa sting millions of taxpayers’ dollars, it intends to allow them to twist slowly in the wind, totally uncommitted to the mandates and laws they have responsibility to enforce or assess 3
Sin pelos en la bngua
FAREWELL PARTY: The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, whose lonely, lingering death was prophesied by this week’s guest columnist Ruben Bon ilia five years ago, may finally roll over and die this year.
In Washington, there really isn’t very much left of the once-proud institution except empty desks and chairs Those who cared about its mission were pushed or squeezed out long ago. The right-wing ideologues who were given the commission as a toy by the Reagan administration worked with a clumsy persistence to make the lives of civil rights believers so miserable that even $30,000, $40,000 or $50,000 annual salaries were insufficient balm.
In the commission’s regional offices, the situation was somewhat different Distance is a buffer, and no matter how hard Washington bureaucrats of any stripe try to control their field forces, the latter somehow manage to achieve most of their own agenda.
The Civil Rights Commission has nine regional offices, and a third of their directors are Hispanics. That’s a statistic that defies East Coast federal standards.
They are Philip M6ntez, who runs the Western regional office out of Los Angeles; Richard Avena, who runs the Southwestern regional office out of San Antonio, and Ruth Cubero, who runs the Eastern regional office out of New York City. Two Chicanos and a puertorriqueha - all of whom sharpened their teeth and talents in those special civil rights years of the ’50s and/or ’60s.
They have logged between 12 and 20 years running their respective CCR domains. But now, no matter whether Congress writes a check for$11 million or $6 million or for nothing in its last-minute wisdom, they will be told to leave. Their Washington bosses’ contingency plans include a variety of ways to save their own bureaucratic skins, but no matter how much Congress doles out there’s nothing in the pot for field personnel. One creative plan calls for “consolidating” field operations into Los Angeles, Kansas City and Washington, D.C., regional offices - but not staffing them. And field personnel will have no “bumping” rights over headquarters personnel.
Each of the three will leave his or her mark:
Cubero - as an artist who could blend her mediation and advocacy skills. Avena and M6ntez- as individuals who thrived on playing civil rights poker with the most reactionary mayors or police chiefs in their territories. All enjoyed enough victories to make their jobs worth sticking with- even after the direction of the commission changed so drastically in the ’80s.
Symbolic of their achievement and style is the Los Anjgqles0ity Council reapportionment victory won for Hispanics just mis nfonth.
With reports, press conferences, private meetings aha legal challenges, Montez has fought incumbent Council powers? anti-H ispanic gerrymandering for most of his tenure. He tried it again a/ few years ago, documenting a strong case with the commission’s California advisory committee, only to be told by his D.C. bosses to forget about his report, to put it on a shelf. Sit on it.
Somehow - in one of those mysteries of the bureaucracy - the report found its way into the hands of a sympathetic lawyer in the Justice Department A case against the city was filed. And a significant chapter in Los Angeles’ history is being written as a result
Montez will never get the credit, nor the blame. That’s the way he was taught to do the job in those earlier days when your very life could depend on your doing it right
________________________________ - Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
RICARDO (SLIC RIC) SALINAS, comedian with San Francisco’s “Culture Clash,” explaining the difference between a Yuppie and a Huppie (Hispanic Upwardly Mobile Professional):
“About $35,000."
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
HISPANIC SPEAKERS DIRECTORY: The 2nd edition of the National Directory of Hispanic Speakers Iists325 Hispanics who are available for speaking engagements on a wide variety of topics. Fora free copy, write to: Adolph Coors, Community Relations Dept., NH420, Golden, Colo. 80401.
SCHOOL PERFORMANCE STUDY: The Hispanic Policy Development Project offers an analysis on Hispanic employment and education based on survey data tracking 1980 high school sophomores. Findings are reported in the quarterly publication The Research Bulletin, which can be obtained for free by writing to: HPDP, Suite 310,1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
UNITED FARM WORKERS VOLUNTEER: UFW is looking for volunteers for its year-long program. Depending on a volunteer’s skills, he or she can be placed in one of several states. Volunteers receive free room and board, a weekly allowance and a readjustment allowance upon completion of the year. For applications, write to Cesar Chavez, c/o Recruitment P.O. Box 62, Keene, Calif. 93531-9989.
BOOK CATALOG: The Catalogo General - 1986-1987 is a 40-page magazine on books of Latinos, particularly Cubans. Books not included in the catalog can also be ordered. For a free copy, write to: Libreria & Distribuidora Universal, P.O. Box 450353, Miami, Fla 33145 (305) 642-3234.
MARIELITOS’ SCHOOL INTEGRATION: “The Children of Mariet From Shock to Integration" is a study on the integration of Cuban children into South Florida's school system. For a copy, send $2 to the Cuban American National Foundation, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C. 20007.
DROPOUTS: The Institute for Educational Leadership has released a report titled “School Dropouts: Everybody's Problem” with recommendations to alleviate the dropout problem. For a copy, send $5, plus$1 for postage and handling, to: IEL, Publications Dept, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION SURVEY: The U.S. Conference of Mayors CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U. & Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
FORD REACHES OUT TO LATINO PRESS
The Washington, D.C., public affairs office of the Ford Motor Co. is using the occasion of National Minority Economic Development Week next month to invite Hispanic and minority press representatives to join Gary White the company s minority supplier development program manager, at lunch Oct 9.
White will describe the program’s objectivee organization, achievements and obstacles for the D.C. journaliste as well as answer their questions.
CONCILIO AIDS TEACHER SEARCH The Seattle School District is seeking Latino teachers, administrators and other personnel, and has sought aid from Seattle’s Concilio for the Spanish Speaking.
The Concilio is seeking 60 Latino applicants for teaching positions and up to 100 for other positions, including facilities, food services, warehouse and athletic offices.
The goal of the project is to raise Latino representation in the district’s work force to match that of the student population, roughly 5%. To do that, the school district estimates it needs to hire about 90 teachers and administrators.
Applicants are being sought from across the United States. Applicants should contact Ricardo Sdnchez, executive director, Concilio for the Spanish Speaking, Suite 210,107 Cherry St, Seattle, Wash. 98104 (206) 447-4891.
PRO, CON AND MORE ON MAQUILADORAS
The El Paso Business Review is initiating regular coverage of Mexico’s In Bond (Maquiladora) industry, which now involves 5,714 U.S. supplier companies spread across 44 states.
This month, the Review published a special 40-page issue, combining the tabloid's regular Sept. 1 and Sept. 15 editions, to look at its impact on border communities. It examined the industr/s recent phenomenal growth from perspectives of both countries, of labor, business, etc.
For a copy, send $1 to: Joe Rodriguez, News Editor, El Paso Business Review, 6500 Convair, Suite D-l, El Paso, Texas 79925 (915) 778-9572.
Calendar_____________________________
THIS WEEK
CHICANO EDUCATION CONFERENCE Fresno, Calif. Oct 1 -3
“California’s Changing Demographics: Politics, Planning and Partnerships^’ will be the theme of the Raza Advocates for Chicanos in Higher Education’s 11 th annual conference.
Manuel Perez (209) 294-2963.
WOMEN IN CHILE Washington, D.C. Oct 2
The Mexican American Women’s National Association will hosta lecture with Chileanfolksinger and lawyer Isabel Aldunate on the status of women in that country and its economic conditions.
Luz Prieto (202) 636-4025.
HISPANIC LAWYERS CONVENTION Chicago Oct. 2-4
The Juarez/Lincoln Awards will be presented to the outstanding Hispanic lawyer of 1986, Hispanic judges will be honored and there will be workshops on practice concerns at the National Hispanic Bar Association’s convention.
Marisel Ayabarreho-Hernandez (312) 277-5902
HISPANIC RELIGIOUS MUSIC FESTIVAL 4
Chicago Oct. 3
Several Hispanic parishes of Chicago will put on El Festival de la Nueva Musica Hispana to showcase compositions from Hispanics throughout the United States and the workmanship of Hispanic musicians Arturo Perez (312) 521-8400
LEADERSHIP SUMMIT Riverside, Calif. Oct 3,4
California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will be among the participants at the Institute for Social Justice's summit titled “A New Latino Empowerment Movement for the ’90s”
Armando Navarro (714) 888-0207
HISPANICS IN EDUCATION San Francisco Oct. 5-8
The American Council on Education will hold its 69th annual meeting with Arturo Madrid, president of the Torres Rivera Center, as a participant in a workshop on increasing multiculturalism in educatioa Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Washington, D.C. Oct. 5-11 In an effort to help businesses locate new opportunities learn the latest management techniques and establish networks the Small Business Administration will co-sponsor a number of events.
Ivette Rodriguez (202) 377-1936
COMING SOON
PEACEMAKERS WEEK Community Dispute Boards San Francisco Oct 6-12 Georgia Quihones (415) 552-1250
CHICANO/LATINO DROPOUTS HEARING Orange County Human Relations Commission Santa Ana, Calif. Oct 9 Robert Nava (714) 834-4796
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Republican National Hispanic Assembly Washington, D.C. Oct. 9 Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161
CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONFERENCE Law School Admission Council/Law School Admission Services Chicago Oct 10,11 Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1176
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANAS AND LEADERSHIP: The Hispanic Women’s Council will host a conference Oct. 18 titled “Meeting the Challenge: A Woman’s Agenda for Success” in Los Angeles California Assemblywoman Gloria Molina will be among the more than 20 featured panelists and speakers on leadership and personal development For further information, contact Genoveva Arellano (213) 629-4974.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report



^CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDSJ Fellowships/internships^ [opportunities in education]
Producer, Advertising and Promotion WRC-TV, NBC Washington, D.C. $27,600 - $36,000
Candidate creates and coordinates production of all WRC-TV promotional advertising material for print, radio and TV. Directs performers, technicians and artists in all phases of production and assumes some management responsibilities with establishing work priorities and production budgets.
Significant experience in a promotion capacity with emphasis on copywriting, art direction, production techniques and administration is required.
Qualified applicants should submit a current resume with salary history to: Laurie Hayen, Personnel Administrator, NBC,4001 Nebraska Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20016.
Information on other current job openings can be obtained by calling NBC’s Job Line at (202) 885-4058.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish. Type 60 words per minute, ability to work effectively under pressure Word processing experience desirable. Good writing skills essential. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO Reporter, Los Angeles Bureau. Candidate develops ideas/ proposals for reports and programs; prepares and presents reports and program segments. College degree and four years broadcast or specialized journalism. Initial location in Texas. Salary is $35,152/yr.
Submit resume and sample reporting audio tape to: National Public Radio, Personnel, 2025 M St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-2000.
ENGINEER CORPS JOBS The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks Persons wishing to get more information should contact Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C. 20314-1000(202)272-0098.
FEDERAL OPPORTUNITIES The. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written test for Contract Specialist positions at grades GS5 and GS7 beginning September 15,1986, until further notice.
Obtain Qualifications Information Statement QI-1102, and OPM Form 500-AB, Admission Notice and Record Card, from any of the Office of Personnel Management Federal Job Information Centers (FJIC). Send the completed 500-AB to the OPM office nearest where you wish to take the written test.
Fellowships in Cable TV Management
The Walter Kaitz Fellowship provides experienced professionals with management experience in the cable television industry.
I n this full-time, performance- based program, Fellows work in job assignments designed to utilize their abilities.
If you are a college graduate with a proven track record in your current profession and a sincere interest in the cable industry as a new career, find out more about the Fellowship by writing to Anne Fudge, Recruitment Coordinator, The Walter Kaitz Foundation, P.O. Box 11080, Oakland, Calif. 94611.
HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIPS
Hispanic Link News Service will offer two 12-month paid internships this fall for developing reporters. They are:
Internship No. 1: Opentoall Hispanics. Pays $14,000. Sponsored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and funded through a grant from the Adolph Coors Company.
Internship No 2: Open to candidates of Puerto Rican heritage. Pays $15,000. Sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded through a grant by the Gannett Foundation.
We have some flexibility as to when the selected internscome aboard but have set Oct. 6 as the deadline for applications for No. 1 and Oct. 20 as the deadline for No. 2.
For applications, call or write:Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Indiana University Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program
The University is seeking qualified minorities to participate in the Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program.
Each year visiting fellows are invited to teach one class during the second (eight week) session. This provides the opportunity for departments and schools to observe the work of individual fellows.
Individuals nearing completion of their doctorate and those who have completed a Ph.D. within the last four years are considered. The fellowship includes a summer salary equivalent to that ordinarily paid to an Indiana University faculty member of the same rank, plus a $2,500 stipend.
Request an application form from: Dr. Carolyn Calloway-Thomas, Director, Minority Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program, 809 E. Seventh St., Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 47405.
MANAGER
Application/Systems Programming
Supervises the programming staff. Responsible for feasibility studies;'systems analysis and design activities; and installation, testing and maintenance of systems software Administrative applications run on an IBM 4341 processor under VM/OS-VS 1. Cullinet DB/DC IDMS used for our TP and data base on-line programming environment Baccalaureate degree and appropriate experience in data processing required. Excellent fringe benefits. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and salary history to: _
Director of Data Processing Lehman College The City University of New York Bronx, N.Y. 10468
An Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer
CHICANO STUDIES
The Department of Chicano Studies anticipates a tenure track appointment in one of the following disciplines:
• Anthropology •Economics • Political Science •Psychology Appointment will either be a joint appointment or a full appointment in Chicano Studies. Position effective July 1,1987. Ph.D. by time of appointment and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant Professor level preferred, although exceptionally well-qualified persons whose background and experience warrant a tenure-level appointment are also encouraged to apply.
Salary and rank dependent on qualifications. Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents including copies of main publications (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed chapters) and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by January 31, 1987, to:
Dr. Mario T. Garcia
Chair, Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer •]
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts& Entertainment
SHOWS TO WATCH: A survey of the fall network television season being conducted by Hispanic Link News Service, in cooperation with the H ispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, will focus on prime time shows with Latinos in lead, regular and recurring roles.
Curiously, all of the series with Hispanics in such roles are shown on Thursdays and Fridays this season. Many compete against one another.
These programs are listed below, beginning with the two new shows and followed by returning shows, in alphabetical order. Listings include networks and production companies, in bold, followed by regular air times in parentheses (ET).
Kay O'Brien, CBS, Orion Television (Thursdays, 10 p.m.) Patricia Kalember stars as the title character, a female surgeon. Priscilla Lopez plays head nurse Rosa VHIanueva, a confidante.
LA Law, NBC, 20th Century Fox Television (Fridays, 10 p.m.) Hispanic actor Jimmy Smits is part of the show's ensemble; he plays the role of Victor Sifuentes. Actress Bel Sandrealso plays a recurring character in the series.
The A-Team, ABC, Universal Television (Fridays, 8 p.m.) Eddie Velez is the newest member of this underground group of heroes.
The Colbys, ABC, Aaron Spelling Productions (Thursdays, 9 p.m.) The show returns for a second season with Ricardo Montalban
as the mean Zachary Powers.
Falcon Crest CBS, LorimarTelevision(Fridays, 10 p.m.) Lorenzo Lamas, Ana Alicia and Cesar Romero return to the oldest show this j season with Hispanic leads.
Family Ties, NBC, Paramount Television (Thursdays, 8:30 p.m.) Tina Youthers is Hispanic.
Hill Street Blues, NBC, MTM Productions (Thursdays, 10 p.m.) Pursuing other professional interests, actor Rene Enriquez will no longer be seen regularly on this show. Actor Trini Sylva has taped one episode for this season.
Miami Vice, NBC, Michael Mann Productions (Fridays, 9 p.m.)
The show earned actor Edward James Olmos an Emmy for “Best Supporting Actor" in 1985; none in 1986. Also featured is Saundra Santiago.
Some Hispanic actors will be seen in network specials. Among the miniseries, Fresno (CBS) has Luis Avalos and Blood and Orchids (CBS) has Jose Ferrer.
Latinos will be seen in several “made for television” movies: Bel Sandre in The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory( NBC); Richard Yniquez in Gone to Texas: The Sam Houston Story (CBS); Henry Darrow in Blood Sport (CBS); and Mel Ferrer in Outrage (CBS).
Weekly Report readers wishing to participate in the Hispanic Link/HAMAS survey of fall network programming may obtain survey forms by writing or calling Antonio Mejias-Rentas, 8440 Fountain Ave., #107, West Hollywood, Calif. 90069 (213) 650-0846.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TELEGUIAS ON THE RISE: Letting the nation’s Spanish-speaking Hispanics know what there is to watch on television is becoming big business for Latino publishers, with TV guides in Spanish now being published in most major markets in the country.
Los Angeles, the center of the television industry and home to one of the largest Hispanic communities in the country, offers its residents four such guides from which to choose. One, Teleguia, is a tabloid published as a Sunday supplement by the daily newspaper La Opinion The other three - Nacional, TV Guia and La Guia - are “shoppers” given free at supermarkets and other businesses in Latino neighborhoods.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza ,
Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, .Phil Garcia.
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
La Guia is considered the “granddaddy of ! these publications,” according to one industry insider. It was begun in 1979 by Art Lerner,
, who then published similar guides in English ' for the San Fernando Valley.
Lerner says the key to his publications’ success has been to maintain simple guidelines: a format similar to the guide published by The Los Angeles Times, with plenty of editorial content, and to “never cheat my advertisers of a single copy.”
“Falsified circulation of print products was always the rule rather than the exception,” says Lerner, who heads the audit committee for the National Association of Hispanic Publications. Counted by verified audit techniques, La Guia claims 125,000 issues for its L.A edition and another 21,000 for San Fernando Valley.
Not all Spanish-language TV guides are as successful, as told by the experience of
Ramon Arroyo and his three business partners in Teleguia Inc. Earlier this year the Texas company bought the 10-year-old TV Reports, published in the Odessa-Midland area, with the intent of putting out a sister publication in Spanish.
Within months, Teleguia folded. “The publication was very popular,” according to Arroyo, “but we didn’t have anybody to go out and sell ads.”
Other publishers have found success with the shopper format. Ezequiel and Rosalinda Montes have published Teleguia de Chicago since July 1985, with present circulation estimated at 20,000. In New York the television production company Hispanic Media began publishing TV Guia Informativa in August and now claims a circulation of 75,000 each in Manhattan and the Bronx. Frank Romeo is the magazine’s publisher.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Washington visits Mexico City to, among other things, drum up support among Windy City Hispanics for his re-election campaign back home ... U . S . District Attorney Mario Merola announces the indictment of three Bronx teenagers for what is believed to be racially motivated beatings of two Puerto Rican youths in that burrough. . Vera Clemente, wife of baseball legend presents the Roberto Clemente Award to Baltimore Onoles Utahty player Juan Beniquez. Los Angeles pitcher Fernando Valenzuela won the National League equivalent in June ... Ace Valenzuela becomes the first professional baseball player of Mexican extraction to win 20 games in the National League . . . Cincinnati Reds first baseman Tony Perez, 44, announces his retirement at pre-game ceremonies. Perez , completing his 22 nd major league season, had a hit and a walk in the game ... U . S . Department of Transportation Deputy Secretary Jim Burnley announces the appointment of Raymond Salazar as director of the Federal Aviation Administration' s National Civil Aviation Security Office. Salazar is a native of California .. United Nations Sec retary General Javier Perez de Cuellar says he is not sure he will seek a second five-year term this fall. De Cuellar says he does not want to preside over the troubled organization . . . The Ford Foundation selects San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros to its recently formed Bilateral Commission on the Future of United States-Mexican Rela tions. The commission will hold its first meeting Oct. 9 in the border cities of San Diego and Tijuana . . Chicago Mayor Harold :v.t••l HISPANIC LINKWEEKLY R ;Bep., Torres : Demands Nakasone Retraction Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairman Esteban Torres (DCalif . ) called on Japan's Prime M!nister Yasuhiro Nakasone Sept. 23 to retract comments he made to a political gathering las t week that the intelligence level in the United States suffers because of its " considerable number of blacks , Puerto Ricans and Mexicans. " Nakasone ' s remarks that"the level of the United States society is lower" than that of Japan, with its " information-oriented , highly educated society" because of the U.S. black and brown population, was quoted in two Japanese newspapers. A spokesman said later that he was referring to literacy , not intelligence. "Either way , he should retract that statement, " Torres said, adding that itcame"at a time when many of us in Congress are working to improve relationships between the United States and Japan." Court Okays LA. Remap Federal court approval of a redistricting plan for the 15-member Los Angeles City Council has opened the door tor the election of a second Hispanic representative to that body. Federal District Judge James ldeman approved Sept 22 a Council proposal creating new District No. 1, dominantly Hispanic and without an incumbent, in central Los Angeles . A special election is expected to be called in late January or early February. Mentioned among several likely candidates for the seat are State Assembly member Glori a Molina and Los Angeles Board of Education member Larry Gonzalez. Judge Ide man said that the plan, which had been vetoed by Mayor Tom Bradley but over ridden by the Council, met all U . S . Justice Department requirements. The department had sued the city for intentionally diluting the voting power of Los Angeles' 27% Hispanic population. The plan, supported by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, also creates a district in suburban San Fernando Valley which is 44% Hispanic. Twenty-two new shows begin the fall tele vision season this month, and none features a Hispanic actor or actress in the lead role . Only two of the new shows have Latinos in prominent, regular rolesboth playing Hispanics. The tall season, officially begun Sept. 21, starts with 62 drama and comedy series airing in prime time on the three commercial television networks. Less than a dozen of those shows have Latinos in their cast. Priscilla Lopez , an actr ess recognized on Broadway with a Tony nomination for her portrayal of Morales in A Chorus Line and a Tony Award for A Day in Hollywood, A Night in the Ukraine , will be seen as Rosa Villanueva on Kay O'Brien , a new series airing on CBS this fall. Airing this season on NBC is L.A . Law , a series with an ensemble cast that includes the recurring character of Victor Sifuentes played byJimmySmits, a Hispanic actor. The drama was created by Steven Bochco. One show returning to network television this year, ABCs The ATeam , will add a Hispanic to its cast. Eddie Velez will play Dishpan , a regular character. Five out of the six shows with Hispanic performers that began the 1985 season will return in 1986. Both the 1 98485 and 1983 fall seasons began with seven shows featuring Hispanic actors and actresses. The number of programs with Hispanic cast members at the beginning of a fall season does not reflect an exact count for the year-Court Upholds Ferre Fine The Florida Supreme Court on Sept. 18 upheld a lower court ruling that former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre illegally accepted campaign contributions after winning the 1981 mayoral race. Without comment, the court concurred that Ferre illegally accepted 35$1 ,000 contributions from Clinica Asociaci6n Cubana Health Plan, a health maintenance organization, five weeks after winning the race. Florida state law requires that contributions received after an election be returned. At the time, the health concern was competing for a city contract. Ferre was fined $70,000. especially since" mid season replacements" virtually have created a second season that generally begins in January. In 1984, the mid-season introduction of ABCs aka Pablo , which aired only six episodes, upped by 16 the number of Hispanics seen regularly on network television. A short lived mid-season addition to last year's schedule, CBS ' s Foley Square , featured actor Hector Elizondo in the role of an assistant district attorney. A survey conducted in 1985 by the League of United Latin American Citizens found that 1 % of t he characters presented on television were Hispanic. This year, the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences will participate in a survey of the fall season being conducted by Hispanic Link NeYJS Service. continued on page 2 House Acts on Pesticides The U . S . House of Representatives passed a bill, 329 to 4, on Sept. 19 that would overhaul for the first time in 14 years the federal pesticide act. The bill was immediately criticized by en vironmental groups because of an amendment that prohibits states from imposing standards more stringent than those of the federal government The amendment to preempt states from in effect overriding federal regulationslobbied for by growers-was passed 214 to 121. The bill requires chemical companies to complete health and safety tests in 1 0 years tor 600 active ingredients in approximately 35,000 pesticides now on the market The 1972 Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act called for such tests by 197 5 as a condition for a license from the Environ mental Protection Agency. Congress extended the deadline twice and dropped it in 1978. The Senate Agriculture Committee on Aug. 13 approved an amendment that created for the first time federal standards to prevent pesticide contamination among farm workers. The Senate amendment also imposed safety and health tests. The Senate version has a similar provision prohibiting states from setting tougher stand ards.

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Mayors Say Affirmative Action Works Affirmative action programs throughout the United States have proven to be beneficial and are working successfully, according to a survey of more than 1 00 cities by the U.S . . Conf,erence of Mayors released Sept. 18. The 121-city survey, conducted over the s1,1mmer, said there have been general im provements in recruitment procedures, hirings and pr9motions. .. Some ofthe findings of the report, " Affirmative Action Programs il1 City Government," included : • Halfof th . e cities said that the programs have improved the c:leliveiy of public services. . • Four -fifthsbt.the mu n icipalities reported ... an improveme. n ( in recruitment. .• : •.. , cjt.ies : public had a more favorable perception of city services . • . efficiency, production, job satisfaction relations were cited in the report. The 20-page r.eport goes against the philo-Alien Benefits Targeted, The Immigration Reform Law Institute announced Sept. 18 that it had begun sur i ng the U.S . Labor Department to decertify the unemployment insurance program of Texas because of a decision by a U .S. District Court upholding a ruling that undocumented aliens can seek work and unemployment benefits. The settlement was handed down Aug. 25 in Ibarra vs. the Texas Employment Commission. Judge William Wayne Justice of the U .S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas rejected an attempt by the Texas State Attorney Gen . eral's Office to strike the settlement. Decertification could cost Texas $50 million in federal funds to administer the insurance program. sophy of the Reagan administration, which believes that affirmative action programs lead to a stratified society and discrimination against white males . The U . S . Supreme Court has issued three decisions since May upholding affirmative action plans in three cities. Prompted by the court decisions, the U.S. Justice Department decided to drop all but three of its challenges to 51 affirmativeaction plans around the nation. The administration also decided to pi.Jt off whether to scrap or modify an executive order requiring hiri ng goals from federal contractors for Hispanics , blacks, other minorities and women. NoN ewHispanic Leads continued from page 1 The H i spanic Link/HAMAS survey will count the number of His panic characters portrayed in network television and the number of por trayals -Latino and non-Latino given by Hispanic artists. Remarks provided by survey participants will be incorporated into a report to be released by Hispanic Link and HAMAS next year. (See Arts and Entertainment) ; Tabulating the Hispanic presence on net work television is necessary for the sake of "historical accuracy , " according to Abel Franco . The actor, who will be seen in the role of a Hispanic judge this year on LA Law, is head of the HAM AS "media watch" committee that will oversee the survey. Franco uses the Korean War to make his point. "Our boys were there and they died in great numbers. But during 11 years of M*A*S*H, with all the show's critical acclaim, we were lucky if there was a Hispanic seen in it every once in a while . " -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Literacy Act Introduced in Senate Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N . M . ) on Sept. 18 introduced that chamber's version of the English Proficiency Act, a measure to establish English literacyprogramsforlimited-English prof icient adults. Co-sponsored by Sens. Dennis DeConcini. (D-Ariz .), Paul Simon (D-111.), Alan Cranston (D-Calif. ) , Paul Sarbanes ( D-Md. ) , and Patrick : Moynihan (D-N.Y.) , the bill would authorize a ppropriations of $10 million for each of the fiscal years 1987, 1988 and 1989 . It establishes a grant program within the Office of Adult Education of the Department of Educa t ion . Tne act would also create a national clearinghouse on literacy education to gather and disseminate information on effective remedial measures. Bingaman, upon introducing the bill , cited a study which found that 56% of Hispanic adults are functionally illiterate-lacking the reading, writing, comprehensi on and math skills to function beyond the fourth grade. Rep. Matthew Martinez, (D-Calif .), introduced in the House on June 17 the precursor of the Senate proficiency bill . As of Sept 18, Mart inets bill had obtained the sponsorship of 59 congress . men. Some of the organizations expressing their support of the bill are the National ,Education 2 Association , the Nat i onal Parents and Teachers Association, the National Council of La Raza, the Cuban National Planning Council and the National Puerto Rican Coalition . BETWEEN 17 AND 20 MILLION U.S. ADULTS ARE ILLITERATE English-Speaking Whites 41% Sources: Bureau of the Census and U.S Department of, Education, English Language Proficiency 1982. Latina Tackles Gridiron One year after a New Jersey court lifted an all-male restriction on high school foot ball, a 14-year-old Latina is vying for a spot as a wide receiver on her Union City high school team . Lina Garcia, 5 feet 3 inches tall and 120 pounds, and Elizabeth Balsley, a senior, are the only two females in the state on high school teams . It was Balsley's discriminat i on lawsuit that forced the court decision. Garcia , wearing jersey No . 54, plays for the frosh team . Luis Cruz, a running back, said , "We're trying to teach her how to hit and take a hit." Garcia .Switches Papers Gerald Garcia , founding president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, joins the Harte-Hanks Communications news paper group Oct. 1 as publisher of the Bryan College Station (Texas) Eagle . Until his last week, Garcia , 43, was editor and publisher of Gannett News papers ' Tucson Citizen and vice president of Gannett West. Both companies own numerous media properties. Gannett, headquartered in Arlington, Va., owns92 daily newspapers; Harte-Hanks, headquartered in San Antonio, owns 26 dailies and more than 100 non-dailies . Garcia, a native of Beeville, Texas, , and journalism graduate of Texas A&M in College Station, said he was making the move in part to allow more time to be with his wife , Joyce, son, Gerry, 18, who is enrolling in Texas A&M next year, and daughter, Wendy, 13. " I want to spend my day differently, " he said . Lujan Most Conservative Rep. Manuel Lujan (R-N.M . ) received the highest rating of all voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on issues of importance to the American Conservative Union during the 1985 legislative session , according to a report issued late last month. The ACU report rated representatives on 19 issues, two of which were double-weighted because of their significance to ACU . Lujan scored a rating of67%, voting affirmatively on both issues: the authorization of $1. 5 billion to procure 21 MX missiles and the repeal of an amendment prohibiting aid to military groups in Angola. The cumulative rating for Lujan over his nine terms was 76%. In descending order, the ratings for the other caucus members were: Solomon Ortiz(DTexas) Kika de Ia Garza(D-Texas) . Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) Bill Richardson (D-N . M . ) Esteban Torres(D-Calif.) . Edward Roybai(D-Calif.) Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) Henry Gonzalez (DTexas) Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) 1985 Cumulative 33% 24 19 14 10 5 5 0 0 0 32% 55 19 15 3 9 8 23 8 6 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Ruben Bonilla, guest columnist Burying a Dead Horse (Editor's note: This column was syndicated by Hispanic Link News Service in December 1981 when Corpus Christi, Texas. attorney Ruben Bonilla was president of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Congress is presently debating whether to eliminate or drastically reduce funding for the U.S Commission on Civil Rights.) lfs wastefula multimillion-dollar drain on taxpayers. lfs degrading, devious and divisive to a nation in want of unity. lfs certainly hypocritical. But politically, ifs So President Reagan continues h . is search for unqualified, uncommitted and even in competent minorities to place in positions of power and trust in his administration. His modus operandi is to put them in charge of governmental bodies he intends, ultimately, to destroy. By using them, he can come back later, after inertia has set in and the agencies' constituencies have been turned off by their non-performance; and quietly apply the coup de grace. Seldom is there a great outcry when you bury a long-dead horse. The ploy is one Reagan practiced while governor of California , trying it on bodies such as the State Office of Economic Opportunity. Its political benefits are multiple and immediate: 1 . He can pretend that "minorities" have a voice in his administration . 2. His appointees serve as flak catchers. Minority victims of dis crimination and other abuses of constitutional guarantees become less credible when they make accusations against an agency fronted by another minority. 3. When, per plan, theagenciesfinallyfounderand fail, the minority appointees become the scapegoats. And the implication has been successfully planted: Minorities are not yet "ready" for leadership positions in America. WON'T 'TAKE ON THEIR OWN' According to initial administration logic, because so few minorities were being named to ANY positions, leaders of black and Hispanic organizations wouldn't be likelyto"take on their own." So the president nominated William Bell, a black with an embarrass ing record of failure as president of his own Detroit-based executive search company, to head the Equal Employment Opportunity mission (EEOC), an agency with an annual budget of $141 . 2 million. Bell's one-man show, which operates rent-free out of his brother's law office and has total assets of $500, places clients at the rate of one a year. Now 55, he claims to earn $7,000 annually. Bell's only apparent qualification for the demanding $55,000-a year job is that he worked in tfte Reagan-Bush campaign. (Former top Reagan advisor) Lyn Nofziger comments: "To me, the most important thing in politics is loyalty and we'll get loyalty from him . We ' ll get done whatever the president wants to have done. " Equally outrageous is the White House action with regard to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, for more than two decades our apolitical "national conscience." •TRICKLE DOWN' CIVIL RIGHTS The administration tried to talk black fundamentalist minister Edward Hill of Los Angeles -a vocal foe of the Equal Rights Amendment into taking on the chairmanship. "They said that I could hold the hearings in the same cities I was holding revivals, " he says . Ultimately, the White House settled on a conservative black 1 Republican Party loyalist from San Diego, Clarence Pendleton, who shares the presidenfs opposition to att_irmative action hiring programs as well as to busing as an option to achieve school desegregation. Pendleton advocates "supply side " civil rights-also known, pre sumably, as "trickle down" civil rights. The administration doesn't have the courage to advocate for outright elimination of EEOC or the Civil Rights Commission. Instead, wasting millions of taxpayers' dollars, it intends to allow them to twist slowly in the wind, totally uncommitted to the mandates and laws they have responsibility to enforce or assess. 3 . . Sin pelos en Ia lengua FAREWELL PARTY: The U . S . Commission on Civil Rights, whose lonely, lingering death prophesied by this week's guest columnist Ruben Bonilla five years ago, may finally roll over and die this year. In Washington , there really isn ' t very much left of the once-proud institution except empty desks anci chairs. Those who cared about its mission were pushed or squeezed out long ago. The right wing ideologues who were given the commission as a toy by the Reagan administration worked with a clumsy persistence to make the lives of civil rights believers so miserable that even $30,000, $40,000 or $50,000 annual salaries were insufficient balm. In the commission's regional offices, the situation was 110mewhat different. Distance is a buffer, arid no matter how hard Washington bureaucrats of any stripe try to control their field forces, the latter somehow manage to achieve most of their own agenda. The Civil Rights Commission has nine regional offi ces, and a t hird of their directors are Hispanics . Thafs a statistic that defies East Coast federal standards. They are Philip M6ntez, who runs the Western regional office out of Los Angeles; Richard Avena, who runs the Southwestern regional office out of San Antonio , and Ruth Cubero, who runs the Eastern regional office out of New York City. Two Chicanos and a puertorriqueflaall of whom sharpened their teeth and talents in those special civil rights years of the '50s and/or '60s. They have logged between 12 and 20 years running their respective CCR domains. But now, no matter whether Congress writes a check for$11 million or $6 million or for nothing in its last minute wisdom, they will be told to leave. Their Washington bosses' contingency plans include a variety of ways to save their own bureaucratic skins, but no matter how much Congress doles out, there's nothing in the pot for field personnel. One creative plan calls for "consolidating" field operations into Los Angeles, Kansas City and Washington, D .C., regional offices -but not staffing them. And field personnel will have no "bumping" rights over headquarters personnel . Each of the three will leave his or her mark: Cubero as an artist who could blend her mediation and advocacy skills . Avena and Montez-as individuals who thrived on playing civil rights poker with the most reactionary mayors or police chiefs in their territories. All enjoyed enough victories to make their jobs worth sticking with-even after the direction of the commission changed so drastically in the '80s. . / Symbolic of their achievement and style is the Los Ang'eles ity Council reapportionment victory won for Hispanics just this onth. With reports , press conferences, private meetings & d legal challenges, Montez has fought incumbent Council powers' anti Hispanic gerrymandering for most of his tenure. He tried it few years ago, documenting a strong case with the commission's California advisory committee, only to be told by his D.C. bosses to forget about his report, to put it on a shelf. Sit on it. . Somehowin one of those mysteries of the bureaucracy-the report found its way into the hands of a sympathetic lawyer in the Justice Department. A case against the city was filed. And a significant chapter in Los Angeles' history is being written as a result. Montez will never get the credit, nor the blame . That's the way he was taught to do the job in those earlier days when your very life could depend on your doing it right. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... RICARDO (SLIC RIC) SALINAS, comedian with San Francisco' s explaining the difference between a Yuppie and a Hupp1e (H1spamc Upwardly Mobile ProfessionaQ: "About $35,000." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING HISPANIC SPEAKERS DIRECTORY: The 2nd edition of the National Directory of Hispanic Speakers lists325 Hispanics_who are available for speaking engagements on a wide variety of topics. For a free copy, write to: Adolph Coors, Community Relations Dept., NH420, Golden, Colo. 80401. SCHOOL PERFORMANCE STUDY: The Hispanic Policy Develop ment Project offers an analysis on Hispanic employment and education based on survey data tracking 1980 high school sophomores. Findings are reported in the quarterly publication The Research Bulletin, which can be obtained for free by writing to: HPDP, Suite 310, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. UNITED FARM WORKERS VOLUNTEER: UFW is looking for volunteers for its year-long program. Depending on a volunteer's skills, he orshe can be placed in one of several states. Volunteers receive free room and board, a weekly allowance and a readjustment allowance upon completion of the year . For applications, write to Cesar Chavez, c/o Recruitment P.O. Box 62, Keene, Calif. 93531-9989. BOOK CATALOG: The Catalogo General-1986-1987 is a 40page magazine on books of Latinos, particularly Cubans . Books not included in the catalog can also be ordered. For a free copy, write to: Libreria & Distribuidora P.O. Box 450353, Miami, Fla 33145 (305) 642-3234. MARIELITOS' SCHOOL INTEGRATION: " The Children of Marie! : From Shock to Integration" is a study on the integration of Cuban children into South Florida's school system. For a copy, send $2 to the Cuban American National Foundation, 1 000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C . 20007. DROPOUTS: The Institute for Educational Leadership has released a report titled "School Dropouts: Everybody's Problem" with recom mendations to alleviate the dropout problem . For a copy, send $5, plus $1 for postage and handling, to: IEL, Publications Dept, 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION SURVEY: The U . S . Conference of Mayors • has published its 121-city survey on affirmative action programs . The 20-page " Affirmative Action Programs in City Government'' can be obtained. for free by writing to: USCM, 1620 I St. NW, 4th Floor, Washington, D .C. 20006. Chicago Oct. 3 CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) FORD REACHES OUT TO LATINO PRESS The Washington, D . C . , public affairs office of the Ford Motor Co. is using the occasion of National Minority Economic Development Week next month to invite Hispanic and minority press representatives to join Gary White , the company's minority supplier development program manager, at lunch Oct. 9. White will describe the program's objectives, organization, achieve ments and obstacles for the D.C. journalists, as well as answer their questions. CONCILIO AIDS TEACHER SEARCH The Seattle School District is seeking Latino teachers, administrators and other personnel , and has sought aid from Seattle's Concilio for the Spanish Speaking . The Concilio is seeking 60 Latino applicants for teaching positions and up to 100 for other positions, including facilities, food services , warehouse and athletic offices. The goal of the project is to raise Latino representation in the district's work force to match that of the student population, roughly 5%. To do that, the school district estimates it needs to hire about 90 teachers and administrators . Applicants are being sought from across the United States. Ap plicants should contact Ricardo Sanchez, executive director, Concilio for the Spanish Speaking, Suite 210, 107 Cherry St., Seattle, Wash . 98104 (206) 447-4891. PRO, CON AND MORE ON MAQUILADORAS The El Paso Business Review is initiating regular coverage of Mexico's In Bond (Maquiladora) industry, which now involves 5,714 U.S. supplier companies spread across 44 states . This month , the Review published a speciai4Q-page issue, combining the tabloid's regular Sept. 1 and Sept. 15 editions, to look at its impact on border communities. It examined the industry's recent phenomenal growth from perspectives of both countries, of labor, business, etc. For a copy, send $ 1 to: Joe Rodriguez , News Editor, El Paso Business Review, 6500 Convair , Suite D-1, El Paso , Texas 79925 (915) 778-9572. PEACEMAKERS WEEK Calendar THIS WEEK CHICANO EDUCATION CONFERENCE Fresno , Calif . Oct. 1-3 Several Hispanic parishes of Chicago will put on El Festival de Ia Nueva Musica Hispana to showcase compositions from Hispanics throughout the United States and the workmanship of Hispanic musicians . Arturo Perez (312) 521-8400 Community Dispute Boards San Francisco Oct. 6-12 Georgia Quinones (415) 552-1 250 CHICANO/LATINO DROPOUTS HEARING Orange County Human Relations Commission Santa Ana, Calif . Oct. 9 " California ' s Changing Demographics : Politics, Plan ning and Partnerships " will be the theme oft he Raza Advocates for Chicanos in Higher Education ' s 11th annual conference. Manuel Perez (209) 294-2963. WOMEN IN CHILE Washington, D.C. Oct. 2 The Mexican American Women's National Association will host a lecture with Chilean folksinger and lawyer Isabel Aldunate on the status of women in that country and its economic conditions. Luz Prieto (202) 636-4025. HISPANIC LAWYERS CONVENTION Chicago Oct. 2-4 The Juarez/Lincoln Awards will be presented to the outstanding Hispanic lawyer of 1986, Hispanic judges will be honore d and there will be workshops on practice concerns at the National Hispanic Bar Association' s convention. Marisel Ayabarreiio-Hernandez (312) 277-5902 HISPANIC RELIGIOUS MUSIC FESTIVAL 4 LEADERSHIP SUMMIT Riverside, Calif. Oct 3,4 California Supreme Court Just ice Cruz Reynoso will be among the participants at the Institute for Social Justice's summit titled "A New Latino Empowerment Movement for the '90s." Armando Navarro (714) 888-0207 HISPANICS IN EDUCATION 3an Francisco Oct. 5-8 The American Council on Education will hold its 69th annual meeting with Arturo Madrid , president of the Tomas Rivera Center, as a participant in a workshop on increasing multiculturalism in education. Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410 MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Washington, D.C. Oct. 5-11 In an effort to help businesses locate new oppor tunities, learn the latest management techniques and establish networks, the Small Business Adminis tration will co-sponsor a number of events. lvette Rodriguez (202) 377-1936 COMING SOON Robert Nava(714) 834-4796 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Republican National Hispanic Assembly Washington, D . C . Oct. 9 Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161 CHAMBERSOFCOMMERCECONFERENCE Law School Admission Council/Law School Admis sion Services Chicago Oct. 10,11 Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1176 SPOTLIGHT HISPANAS AND LEADERSHIP: The Hispanic Women's Council will hoat a conference Oct. 18 titled "Meeting the Challenge: A Woman's Agenda for Success" in Los Angeles. California Assembly woman Gloria Molina .will be among the more than 20 featured panelists and speakers on leadership and personal development. For further information, contact: Genoveva Arellano (2131629-4974. Hispanic Link Weekly Report j I l I I I I i I I l I l i I l !

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(cORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS]EELLOWSHIPS/INTERNSHIPS1-=P=PO=R=T=U=N=IT=I=ES=IN=E=DU=C=A=T=IO:::;' Producer, Advertising and Promotion Fellowships in WRCTV, NBC Washington, D.C. Cable TV Management $27,600$36,000 The Walter Kaitz Fellowship provides ex peri Candidate creates and coordinates production enced professionals with management ex peri of all WRC TV promotional advertising material ence in the cable television industry. for print, radio and TV. Directs performers, techIn this fulltime, performance-based program, nicians and artists in all phases of production Fellows work in job assignments designed to and assumes some management responsibilities utilize their abilities. with establishing work priorities and production If you are a college graduate with a proven budgets. track record in your current profession and a Significant experience in a promotion capacity sincere interest in the cable industry as a new with emphasis on copywriting, art direction, career, find out more about the Fellowship by production techniques and administration is writing to: Anne Fudge, Recruitment Coordinator, required. The Walter Kaitz Foundation , P.O. Box 11080, Qualified applicants should submit a current Oakland, Calif. 94611. resume with salary history to: Laurie Hayen, Personnel Administrator, NBC,4001 Nebraska HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIPS Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20016. Hispanic Link News Service will offer two 12 Information on other current job openings month paid internships this fall for developing can be obtained by calling NBC's Job Line at reporters. They are: (202) 885. Internship No.1: Open to all Hispanics. Pays $14,000. Sponsored by the National Association ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT of Hispanic Journalists and funded through a Bilingual with good Spanish. Type 60 words grant from the Adolph Coors Company. per minute, ability to work effectively under lnternshipNo2: OpentocandidatesofPuerto . pressure. Word processing experience desirable. Rican heritage. Pays $1 5,000. Sponsored by Good writing skills essential. Contact: Lupe the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. through a grant by the Gannett Foundation. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) We have some flexibility as to when the 628. selected interns come aboard but have set Oct. NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO Reporter, Los Angeles Bureau. Candidate develops ideaS/ proposals for reports and programs; prepares and presents reports and program segments. College degree and four years broadcast or specialized journalism. Initial location in Texas. Salary is $35, 152/yr. Submit resume and sample reporting audio tape to: National Public Radio, Personnel, 2025 M St. N .W., Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822 2000. ENGINEER CORPS JOBS The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks. Persons wishing to get more information should contact Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C. 20314 000 (202) 272. FEDERAL OPPORTUNITIES The. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written test for Contract Specialist positions at grades GS5 and GS7 beginning September 15, 1986, until further notice. 6 as the deadline for applications for No. 1 and Oct. 20 as the deadline for No. 2. For applications, call or write: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Indiana University Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program The University is seeking qualified minorities to participate in the Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program. Each year visiting fellows are invited to teach one class during the second (eight week) session. This provides the opportunity for departments and schools to observe the work of individual fellows. Individuals nearing completion of their doctorate and those who have completed a Ph.D. within the last four years are considered. The fellow ship includes a summer salary equivalent to that ordinarily paid to an Indiana University faculty member of the same rank, plus a $2,500 stipend. Request an application form from: Dr. Carolyn CallowayThomas, Director, Minority Summer Faculty Recruiiment Fellowship Program, 809 E. Seventh St., Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 47405. MANAGER Application/Systems Programming Supervises the programming staff. Re sponsible for feasibility studies; systems an
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Arts & Entertainment SHOWS TO WATCH: A survey of the fall network television season being conducted by Hispanic Link News Service, in co operation with the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, will focus on prime time shows with Latinos in lead, regular and recurring roles. Curiously, all of the series with Hispanics in such roles are shown on Thursdays and Fridays this season. Many compete against one another. These programs are listed below, beginning with the two new shows and followed by returning shows, in alphabetical order . Listings include networks and production companies, in bold, followed by regular air times in parentheses (ET) . Kay O'Brien, CBS, Orion Television (Thursdays, 10 p . m . ) Patricia Kalember stars as the title character, a female surgeon. Priscilla Lopez plays head nurse Rosa Villanueva, a confidante. LA Law, NBC, 20th Century Fox Television (Fridays, 10 p . m . ) Hispanic actor Jimmy Smits is part of the show's ensemble; he plays the role of Victor Sifuentes. Actress Bel Sandre also plays a recurring character in the series. The A-Team, ABC, Universal Television (Fridays, 8 p . m . ) Eddie Velez is the newest member of this underground group of heroes. The Colbys, ABC, Aaron Spelling Productions (Thursdays, 9 P -T-) The show returns for asecond season with Ricardo Montalban as the mean Zachary Powers. Falcon Crest, CBS, LorimarTelevision(Fridays, 10 p.m . ) Lorenzo Lamas , Ana Alicia and Cesar Romero return to the oldest show this season with Hispanic leads . Family Ties, NBC, Paramount Television (Thursdays, 8:30 p.m.) Tina Youthers is Hispanic. Hill Street Blues, NBC, MTM Productions (Thursdays, 10 p .m.) Pursuing other professional interests, actor Rene Enriquez will no longer be seen regularly on this show. Actor Trini Sylva has taped one episode for this season . Miami Vice, NBC, Michael Mann Productions (Fridays, 9 p . m . ) The show earned actor Edward James Olmos an Em my for "Best Supporting Actor" in 1985; none in 1986. Also featured is Saundra Santiago. Some Hispanic actors will be seen in network specials. Among the miniseries, Fresno (CBS) has Luis Avalos and Blood and Orchids (CBS) has Jose Ferrer. Latinos will be seen in several "made for .television" movies: Bel Sandre in The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory( NBC); Richard Yniquez in Gone to Texas: The Sam Houston Story (CBS); Henry Darrow in Blood Sport (CBS); and Mel Ferrer in Outrage (CBS). Weekly Report readers wishing to participate in the Hispanic Link/HAMAS survey of fall network programming may obtain survey forms by writing or calling Antonio Mejias-Rentas, 8440 Fountain Ave., # 107, West Hollywood, Calif. 90069 (213) 650-0846. -Antonio Mejias Rentas Media Report La Guia is considered the "granddaddy of 1 these publications, " according to one industry insider. It was begun in 1979 by Art Lerner, , who then published similar guides in English 1 for the San Fernando Valley . Ramon Arroyo and his three business partners in Teleguia Inc. Earlier this year the Texas company bought the 1 0-year-old TV Reports, published in the Odessa-Midland area, witt the intent of putting out a sister publication in Spanish. TELEGUIAS ON THE RISE: Letting the nation's Spanish-speaking Hispanics know what there is to watch on television is becoming big business for Latino publishers, with TV guides in Spanish now being published in most major markets in the country. Los Angeles, the center of the television industry and home to one of the largest Hispanic communities in the country, offers its residents four such guides from which to choose. One, Teleguia, is a tabloid published as a Sunday supplement by the daily news paper La Opinion. The other three-Nacional, TV Guia and La Guia-are "shoppers" given free at supermarkets and other businesses in Latino neighborhoods. 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza . Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas. . Phil Garcia. No port1on ol HISPanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) S26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. Lerner says the key to his publications' success has been to maintain simple guide lines : a format similar to the guide published by The Los Angeles Times, with plenty of editorial content, and to "never cheat my advertisers of a single copy." " Falsified circulation of print products was always the rule rather than the exception, " says Lerner, who heads the audit committee for the National Association of Hispanic Publications. Counted by verified audit tech niques, La Guia claims 125,000 issues for its L.A edition and another 21 ,000 for San Fer nando Valley . Not all Spanish-language TV guides are as successful, as told by the experience of NEW FALL TV SEASON LATINO RECEPTION Within months, Teleguia folded. " The publication was very popular," according to Arroyo," but we didn't have anybody to go out and sell ads . " Other publishers have found success with the shopper format. Ezequiel and Rosalinda Montes have published Teleguia de Chicago since July 1985, with present circulation estimated at 20,000 . In New York, the television production company Hispanic Media began publishing TV Guia lnformativa in August and now claims a circulation of 75,000 each in Manhattan and the Bronx. Frank Romeo is the magazine's publisher. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Hispanic Link Weekly Report I I i ! i I