Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, October 6, 1986

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, October 6, 1986
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This
Pennsylvania Gov. Dick Thornburgh announces the appointment of Mercedes Rolddn as executive director of the governor's Council on the Hispanic Community. Roldan is a native of Puerto Rico... Rosario Anaya, a member of the San Francisco Board of Education, introduces a resolution to that body to oppose the statewide referendum - Proposition 63 - making English the state’s official language. The board passed the resolution unanimously... Dr. Fred Romero takes a two-year leave from the U.S. Department of Labor this month to join SER-Jobs for Progress as director of its Washington-based Research and Policy Institute... Edmundo Mireles, 33, a special agent with the FBI, receives the 21 st annual Police Service Award from Parade magazine, a Sunday supplement for newspapers across the country.
Mireles, born in Beeville, Texas, was recognized for his role in a gun battle in Miami that left two agents and two suspects dead and five agents wounded... Forty-five Alberto Vargas watercolors sell for $4.6 million. Vargas, a renown illustrator for Esquire magazine, passed away in 1982 at the age of 87... Miami Savings and Loan vice president Luis Lauredo is selected as chairman of the Dade County, Fla, Council of Arts and Sciences. The 15-member council has an annual budget of $2.5 million... Manuel Saucedo, 9, of Hereford, Texas, dies from a severe reaction to cocaine... Teddy Higuera, a pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewers, becomes the second major league player of Mexican extraction in history to win 20 victories less than a week after Los Angeles Dodger Fernando Valenzuela became the first.. Miami Vice co-star Edward James Olmos kicks off a campaign in Miami to secure artificial limbs and therapy for children injured in the Mexico earthquake last September...
^T«^jhispani^un^veek^^eporJ^^^
Hispanic Population Will Triple
Martinez Is Easy Winner in Florida
Former Tampa mayor Bob Martinez easily defeated a former U.S. Congressman in a runoff Sept. 30 to capture the Republican gubernatorial nomination in Florida Martinez, an ex-Democrat who switched parties in 1983, will become Florida’s first Hispanic governor if he wins the Nov. 4 general election.
The 51-year-old Martinez, of Spanish heritage, took a resounding 67% of the vote to 33% for former House member Lou Frey Jr. With 99% of the precincts reporting, Martinez had 253,226 votes versus 126,073 for Frey.
Martinez now faces Democrat Steve Pajcic, a 40-year-old former Florida state legislator. Martinez will have to overcome history to win the statehouse. Florida has elected a Republican governor just once since 1900. But the Democratic nominee is coming off an acrimonious runoff fight himself, and Martinez cold benefit from a divided Democratic house.
How Latinos in Congress Voted
IMMIGRATION RULE The House of Representatives considered debate procedures established by its Rules Committee for a compromise immigration reform bill, which included an amendment by Rep Charles Schumer(D-N.Y.) giving legal status to aliens who worked in U.S. agriculture for 60 days between May 1,1985, and May 1,1986.
HOUSE VOTE Rejected 202-to-180.
CAUCUS VOTE
Six in favor,' three opposed, two not voting YES: Albert Bustamante, Solomon Ortiz (both Texas), Tony Coelho, Esteban Torres (both Calif.), Bill Richardson (N.M.), Robert Garda (N.Y.) All Democrats
NO: Democrats Ed Roybal (Calif.) and Henry B. Gonzalez (Texas), Republican Manuel Luj&n (N.M.).
NOT VOTING: E“Kika” delaGarza (Texas), Matthew Martinez (Calif.) Both Democrats
The number of Hispanics in the United States will grow from the current figure of 17.3 million to 36.5 million in 2020 and 51 million in 2050, the U.S Census Bureau projected Sept 26.
In an advance release of a Hispanic population projection report to be published next month, it was estimated that the Latino population will double within 30 years and nearly triple in the next 60 years Not including the 3.5 million people who live in Puerto Rico, the report shows that Hispanics will comprise 19% of the U.S. population in 2080.
The current percentage for mainland Hispanics is 7.2.
Basing its findings on a “middle series” of projections, and not the low or high extreme, the preliminary release included the following
• Hispanics65 years old and olderwill quadruple by 2015 and increase sevenfold by 2030.
• The median age of Hispanics will rise from 25 in 1985 to 28 in 2000,31.2 in 2020,36.2 in 2050 and 40.9 in 2080.
• Most of the population growth will be among
House Kills Immigration
Rejecting debate procedures offered by its Rules Committee Sept 26, the U.S. House of Representatives effectively killed an immigration bill for the 99th Congress.
The proposed rule, which blocked an amendment by Rep Dan Lundgren(R-Calif.) that allowed up to 350,000 foreign farm laborers into the country at a time, was voted down, 202-180. A similar amendment was included in the Senate immigration bill passed a year ago by a 69-30 vote.
The House version of the bill met most of the concerns raised by Hispanic advocates Only 13 of its 180 supporters were Republicaa
As Congress moved its adjournment date back to Oct 10, there was talk of one more effort to bring the bill back to the floor, but even if that occurred, Rep Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) told Weekly Report, “there still wouldn’t be time to resolve the differences between the House and Senate bills in conference.”
Congress has been attempting unsuccessfully to pass some form of immigration reform for the past 15 years.
Latinos 35 years old and older.
• The rate of Hispanic growth, excluding immigrants* will still be greater than that of blacks or whites, including immigrants in those groups
Mixed Latino Reaction to Nakasone’s Apology
Responding to an apology made by Japan Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone for his remarks on the “literacy level” of Hispanics and blacks in the United States two Hispanic organizations on Sept. 30 took divergent tacks.
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus issued a statement in which it agreed to accept the apology. The American Gl Forum voted to boycott Japanese products indefinitely starting Oct. 3.
On Sept. 26, U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres(D-Calif.), newly elected chairman of the Hispanic Caucus met with Japan’s ambassador to the United States Nobuo Matsunaga, in Washington, D.C., to have the apology formally relayed. The statement by the caucus said it was “rare for a world leader to admit he has made a mistake.”
As Weekly Report went to press Ed Bernaldez, national chairman of the 38-year-old American Gl Forum, said that 28 of the organization’s 37-member board of directors had decided to go along with the boycott; the other nine had not been reached. Gabe Flores chairman of International Affairs for the Gl Forum and the person who proposed the boycott, said he did not “place any value” on the apology. Because of Nakasone’s remarks “the racist element in the United States is giggling and snickering,” said Flores
The widely publicized incident began when Nakasone was reported by two Japanese newspapers on Sept. 23 to have said that the educational level of the United States was lowered because of the “considerable number of blacks Puerto Ricans and Mexicans” Nakasone, said his remarks were referring to literacy, not intelligence.


Young Adults Literacy Report Cause for Optimism
Measured byratesofyoungadults,ages21 through 25, illiteracy is not as grave a national problem as it has been portrayed in recent months, a $2 million federally funded study revealed Sept. 24.
The study, conducted by the Educational Testing Service, based in Lawrence Township, N.J., found reading proficiency levels of Hispanics clearly below those of whites and above those of blacks.
On a scale of 500, for example, 76.0% of the Hispanics read at an intermediate (250) level, contrasted to 88.7% whites and 61.1% tracks.
The differences held true at each level of education reported: eighth grade or less, some high school, high school diploma and/or some postsecondary experience, and College degree.
, The study showed that 8% of Hispanics read below the fourth grade level, compared with 4% of whites and 18% of blacks.
Nearly half of whites and Hispanics who enrolled in a General Educational Development (GED)Jiigh school equivalency program completed it less than one-quarter of the blacks did.
ETS President Gregory Anrig called the figures “better than expected.” He added, “What you have is a country that has reached a 95% level of literacy. No other country in the world has .achieved that.”
The study, called thejnost sophisticated one ever conducted on aijult literacy in this country, used “literacy tasks” in social settings fQjr'sbme of its measurements.
Asked to locate a single fact in a newspaper article or write a brief description of a job, 6% of Hispanics, 2% of whites and 14% of blacks failed.
Education Secretary William Bennett, whose department paid for the study, noted that “four of five young adults cannot satisfactorily ■ perform such elementary tasks as using a bus schedule to select correct departures and arrivals Fewer than 10% of young black and Hispanic adults are able to perform tasks of this complexity.” But overall, he said, the report proved that “the United States is not awash with illiteracy.”
READING PROFICIENCY LEVELS FOR ADULTS AGED 21-25*
Advanced Adept Intermediate Basic Rudimentary
Hisp.** 9.5% 40.6% 76.0% 95.9% 99.5%
Black 3.9 24.9 61.1 89.9 98.8
White 24.5 60.7 88.7 98.2 99.7
Total 20.9 54.4 84.1 96.8 99.6
* On a scale ofO to 500, the levels were as follows: advanced-350 and above; adept - 300; intermediate- 250; basic- 200; and rudimentary-150.
* * The survey projected that 225,000 of the nation’s 21 million 21-to-25-year-olds (roughly 1%) were Spanish-speakers whose literacy skills were insufficient to take the tests
Source: "Literacy: Profiles of America’s Young Adults" by the National Assessment of Educational Progress
Latinos Assess Training Fund Cuts
FCC Asked to Block Sale
The Mexican American Bar Association of Los Angeles County and the Spanish American League Against Discrimination from Miami filed petitions with the Federal Communications Commission on Sept. 26 to block the sale of , 10 Spianish-language television stations.
A U.S. District Court Judge, Mariana Pfaelzer, selected a $301.5 million bic) for the stations from Hallmark Cards Iric. and First Chicago Venture Capital in July, including major stations in Los Angeles, Miami, San Antonio, Paterson, N.J., and Fresno. Calif.. The FCC is expected to decide on the bid late this year or early next year.
Several Hispanic groups opposed the sale, fearing that the stations would eventually stray away from their Spanish-language format Sept. 29 was the final day for testi mony to the FCC.
The FCC denied license renewals to the stations last January when it held that they were controlled by a foreign interest, Mexico media mogul Emilio Azcarraga. The U.S. Hispanic groups contend that the acceptance of the bid by the Spanish International Communications Corp., the station’s majority stockholder, was based primarily on a lucrative financial guarantee to present SICC managers and that SICC will continue to determine the stations’ editorial content.
U:S- Rep. Matthew Martfnez (D-Calif.) introduced a bill July 24 allowing belated implementation of an FCC policy that gives licensees an incentive to sell their licenses tc minorities. License holders risk losing theii entire investment at an FCC hearing. Martinez said rio action will be taken on the bill this session,, which ends Oct. 10. He plans to reintroduce it during the next session.
2
Despite a recent reports findings that federal funding to states for job training programs declined $27.8 billion during the first five years of the Reagan administration, two employment services organizations disagree as to the impact on Latinos.
Manuel Bustelo, commissioner for New York City's Department of Employment, told Weekly Report that the training programs largely eliminated by the Reagan cutbacks- “public service employment” - had little Hispanic participation. “In terms of impact to Latinos, the elimination of public service employment programs will be negligible,” he said. Thirty-six percent of those served by Bustelo’s agency are Hispanic. •
Bustelo did agree that federal funding cuts have made it more difficult to offer adequate services. In the first five years of the Reagan administration, federal dollars to his agency were reduced from $300 million to $115 million.
Eviction Date Extended
The U.S. House of Representatives concurred in a Senate resolution Sept. 30 that would extend until Sept. 30, 1987, among other things, the availability of federally subsidized housing and housing services to undocumented aliens.
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development approved regulations April 1 that would have evicted public tenants if they could not prove legal residency. On Sept. 23 HUD decided to extend its eviction deadline to Dec. 31 of this year. Earlier, it had extended the cutoff date to last Tuesday.
Allison Sparks, communications director for the Dallas-based SER-Jobs for Progress, said the lower funding levels are “very disappointing and very discouraging.”
The 24-year-old organization, with 41 affiliates directing 110 training centers in 15 states and the District of Columbia, saw budgets for its national affiliates drop from $65 million in 1982 to $45 million this year.
Presently SER, which started with 100% federal support, gets about 90% of funding for its affiliates from the federal government. Operation of its national office, with a $2.2 million budget, is about 65% federally funded.
While Bustelo’s office has turned more to New York City for support, SER continues to reach for and gain private sector support, in harmony with its growth philosophy, said Howard Himmelbaum, manager of research and planning.
Last year, the organization served 35,000 persons, the vast majority being Latino.
Civil Rights Staff Slashed
The U.S. Civil Rights Commission approved a reorganization plan on Sept. 26 that would reduce its full-time employees from 182 to 29 and eliminate seven of its 10 regional offices.
The 5-3 vote, with Latina BlandinaCardenas Ramirez voting no by proxy and fellow Latina Commissioner Esther Gonzalez-Arroyo Buckley voting affirmatively, was in response to two separate pieces of legislation passed by the U.S. House and Senate last month that would eliminate or reduce the funding for the commission, respectively.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Miguel Perez, guest columnist
The Prismatic Latino
My black beans and rice were still missing, my stomach was growling, but my Chinese waiter at La Victoria China, a diner on New York’s Broadway and 95th Street, wanted to talk about baseball.
“Why not?” I told a friend. “Maybe the beans will get here faster.”
Our waiter, it turned out, was an authority on baseball, reciting batting averages and pitching records even better than the items on the menu.
“You like the Mets, right?” asked my friend.
“No,” replied the waiter.
“All right, a Yankee fan,” I said.
“No. I don’t like them, either,” the waiter said “They don’t have enough Latino players.
I like baseball, but I like to watch my people play. The New York teams have Hispanic names, but some of those players don’t even speak Spanish.”
Suddenly, the conversation turned into much more than baseball.
It dawned on us that this man who looks so Oriental is a Latino, too. We are not a race. We have a common geographical, cultural and linguistic identity.
Latino is a short way of saying Latin American. Latin America is a region of the world that is a true rainbow of races.
Unfortunately, to most Americans, the term “Latino” or “Hispanic” has a racial connotation, meaning “non-white.” They fail to recognize the ethnic and racial diversity of Latin Americans. In spite of the myths and misconceptions, many Latinos are white, of European origin, while may others are black, Oriental, Indian-or a combination of some or all of the above.
OUR DIVERSITY CONFUSES THE MEDIA
Unlike the United States, where you are either black or white, in Latin America there are many more racial categories. You can be a mulatto because your ancestors have both white and African blood, or you can be mestizo because there is Indian blood in your veins.
The large majority of Latinos are of Indian, Spanish or African ancestry, but you can be Cuban with Jewish or Lebanese or Chinese forebears; Venezuelan of Polish stock; Mexican of Irish or Japanese ancestry, Peruvian of English, Russian or Incan lineage,* or Argentine of Italian, German or French descent.
For non-Latinos, this racial diversity is one of the most confusing things about Latinos. They have been misled by government, the media, corporate America and Madison Avenue, which find it convenient to lump them all together into one category, “Hispanic,” with a racial connotation.
For Latinos, including many who refuse to use the term “Hispanic” because they ffeel it was imposed on them, this is one of the most irritating things about dealing with americanos. They find it especially irritating when confronted with applications or other forms that ask them to make a choice of white, black or Hispanic.
ARE YOU BLACK, WHITE OR IRISH?
“They never ask you if you are black, white or Irish,” says one of my irritated friends. “Why do they want to change my national identity into a race?”
“I’m Chinese and I am Cuban,” said my waiter, grudgingly leaving the subject of baseball, “but sometimes people don’t understand.”
My Italian friend, Giordano, called me up the othe day to tell me that now she can identify with Latinos a lot better. .
She said that now she understands how Latinos feel when they are categorized as one single race. She said that she was shocked by what she heard from an acquaintance who was trying to be polite:
“I gjrew up in a neighborhood with all Italian people,” Giordano was told. “I was the only white person in the neighborhood.”
(Miguel P6rez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK: It’s over, done for another year. Its tamales have added to the girth of the nation’s Hispanic leaders and other dignitaries and politicians. Their speeches have been packed away for yet another rewrite next year.
It seems that every September President Ronald Reagan finds a new humble, loyal, patriotic Hispanic to tell him, “Mlcasa es su casa.” Once you learn to pronounce a neat Spanish phrase like that, you work it into as many speeches as possible.
This year the president got his opportunity in the Rose Garden as he delivered his HHWeek remarks Sept 16 to Latinos who had come from around the country to share in the capital's menu of ceremonies and receptions
Reagan’s mind wandered back to his days as governor of California when he was inspecting the site of a mudslide near Santa Barbara.
“One elderly gentleman invited me into his home. And we went in standing knee-deep in that sloppy mud,” related the president. “And it was apparent that he had evidently just newly furnished this house, and the furniture- there it was, standing or sitting in all of that mud. And as we stood there in the living room, he said to me, ‘Me casa is su casa’ with all the dignity as if there was no mud and he had invited me in for just a friendly visit. I’ve never forgotten him.”
“Me casa is su casa.” That’s the way the official White House transcript has it.
Not only was that fine old gent dignified. He was bilingual!
HISPANIC HARDCORE: To every party there comes a sourbelly. This year's H HWeek dissenting vote emerges from entertainment writer Antonio Mejias-Rentas, who proposes in a syndicated* Hispanic Link column that the week be abolished in favor of an Americas-wide celebration of Dia de la Raza in October.
“HHWeek always falls on the week when Mexico and several Central American nations celebrate their independence. That, understandably, makes millions of U.S. Latinos not of Mexican or Central American descent feel left out...
“With all due respect to Christopher Columbus, who was a loyal employee of Isabel, the Queen of Spain, he never set foot in North America. The only part of the United States he ever saw was Puerto Rico. Even there, October 12 is celebrated as Dia de la Raza.”
HISPANIC HERESY: To demonstrate the impact HHWeek has on others, there’s this report from a Dallas Morning News political columnist:
“As (Texas) House Speaker Gib Lewis and some colleagues were leaving the Capitol for lunch the other day, Lewis heard the sounds of mariachi music coming from the rotunda.
“Hispanicswere celebrating Diez y Seis, the annual Sept. 16, celebration of Mexican Independence Day.
“ ‘What’s that,’ Lewis said on hearing the music, ‘Cinco de Mayo?’ ” - Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
XAVIER SUAREZ, Miami mayor, on his Hispanic Heritage Week meeting with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in Washington, D.C.:
“There is a dire need for Hispanic leaders across the country to get to know each other and see how many things we have in common. If I don’t know the congressmen - particularly the Hispanic congressmen who may share my perspective on a lot of issues, I can’t effectively help the people of Miami.”
U.S. SEN. PETE WILSON (R-Calif.) on why the U.S. -Mexico border may need to be sealed with troops:
“People come here for reasons other than a job. I think they want their babies born here...”
3
Oct. 6. 1986
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
FEDERAL FUNDING TO STATES: The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees has published its 171-page report “The Republican Record: A 5-Year Analysis of State Losses of Federal Funding (FY1982-FY1986).” For a free copy, write to: AFSCME, Public Policy, 1626 L St NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-1000.
SCIENCE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS: Hispanics, blacks and Native Americans who are working toward a master's or doctorate degree in science or engineering are invited to apply for three-year graduate fellowships offered by the National Science Foundation. The fellowships provide an $11,100 stipend for a 12-month tenure and a $6,000 cost-of-education allowance. The deadline is Nov. 14. For applications and information, write to: Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-2872.
LITERACY REPORT: The Educational Testing Service’s 68-page National Assessment of Education Progress report “Literacy: Profiles of America’s Young Adults” is available for $12.50, plus $1.50 for shipping and handling, from NAEP, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710 (1-800-223-0267 or 609-734-1327). A final report with technical documentation is available for the same price. Data tape can also be purchased.
TH REE- ALL FREE: Three Latino groups are offering free current copies of their newsletters to Weekly Report readers who send a 22-cent stamped, self-addressed envelope (or stamp plus self-addressed label). They are:
National Puerto Rican Coalition: The eight-page October issue of NPRC Reports includes a summary of its new policy agenda and three articles on its annual conference in New York last month. Write: Marilina Sanz, NPRC, Suite #500,1700 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
Northeast LULAC Regional News: The eight-page October issue includes an article by EEOC Commissioner Tony Gallegos on the need for corporations to develop specific Hispanic training programs, goals and timetables. Write: Andr§sTobar, P.O. Box 44082, Washington, D.C. 20026.
Hispanic Media Notes: The four-page September issue is devoted to activities of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C. Write: David Saah, #1001, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
EDUCATION NETWORK NEWS AVAILABLE The National Council of La Raza has set subscription prices for its bimonthly Education Network News newsletter. They range from $15 annually for individual subscriptions to $50 for corporate ones.
For five years NCLR was able to absorb the costs of printing and distributing the timely publication, but as the recipient list grew from 30 to 1,200 and postage and production costs rose, it has found it necessary to charge a subscription fee. La flaza’s address is20 FSt. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.
ESSAY CONTEST KITS AVAILABLE The National Association of Hispanic Journalists drew 16 entries from across the country for its first national high school essay contest competition this year. Already it has 16 additional inquiries from individuals and organizations contemplating staging local contests next year.
In response, NAHJ’s Jocelyn Cordova has put together a 27-page “How-To” kit, available for $5. Write or call NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
SER INAUGURATES FIVE-YEAR PLAN Using its existing delivery system, Dallas-based SER - Jobs for Progress will begin giving priority this fall to development of demonstration projects in the areas of literacy, job training, chemical abuse, youth and economic independence.
The direction was set at the national Hispanic employment and training organization’s five-year planning conference in July.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Los Angeles Raiders quarterback Jim Plunkett becomes major partner in an Adolph Coors Company distributorship serving more than 1,200 retail accounts in California’s San Joaquin and Amador counties, plus parts of Sacramento and Solano counties... Suzanne Avila, SIN vice president and regional sales manager, has been elected president of the San Francisco Advertising Club. . .
Calendar___________________________
THIS WEEK
PEACEMAKERS WEEK San Francisco Oct. 6-12
Community boards from the Bay Area will celebrate their 10th anniversary of providing free dispute resolution services and job training to the Latino community.
Georgia Quihones (415) 552-1250
LUIS NOGALES TRIBUTE Washington, D.C. Oct. 7
The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C, will honor ex-United Press International President Luis Nogales at a National Press Club luncheon. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0280
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Washington, D.C. Oct. 7
Harvard University’s Graduate School of Business Administration will hold the first of seven sessions across the country for Hispanics, blacks and other minorities pursuing a management education.
Will Ken law (617) 495-6127
LATINO DROPOUTS Santa Ana, Calif. Oct. 9 4
i he Orange County Human Relations Commission will hold a public hearing on the dropout rate of Chicanos/Latinos in that county and ways to address it.
Robert Nava (714) 834-4796
NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP DINNERS Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Miami, Denver, San
Francisco and New York Oct. 9 In an effort to gain visibility and financial support in assisting Hispanic college students, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will host a series *>f dinners.
Ernest Robles (415) 892-9971
NATIONAL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Oct. 9
The Republican National Hispanic Assembly will hold its annual leadership conference with workshops oh immigration, foreign policy in Central America and, afterward, its presidential dinner.
Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161
CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE ^alm Springs Oct. 9-11
The California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce will put on their 5th annual convention and expo, “Resources for Success Beyond the the‘80s,” with the assistant secretary of that state’s Department of Business Kathleen Calderbn as a workshop leader. Sergio Banuelos (213) 587-8820 Oct. 6, 1986
TITO PUENTE TRIBUTE New York Oct 10
Salsa stars Celia Cruz, Ray• Barreto, jazz artists Paquito D’Rivera, Dave Valentin, Art Blakely and Noel Pointer, along with the Ballet Hispanico, will pay tribute to salsero Tito Puente and raise money for a scholarship in his name.
Mickey Melendez (212) 541-7951
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct 10-12
“Challenging the Future” will be the theme of the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project’s annual conference, with workshops on the political empowerment of Latinas and the Latino youth. Marla Elena Molina (614) 464-1116
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS Chicago Oct. 10,11
The second of fourforums, the Law School Admission/ Law School Admission Services will sponsor these events to help Hispanics, blacks and other minorities evaluate and select law schools.
Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1176
COMING SOON
HIGHER EDUCATION RETAINMENT American Council on Education Philadelphia Oct 16,17 Sarah Melendez (202) 939-9395
Hispanic Link Weekly Report



CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
1
ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Hispanic marketing agency in Chicago seeks experienced account executive with knowledge of all phases of marketing and advertising Strong l writing and verbal skills in English and Spanish are essential. Immediate opening. For appointment call Mr. Ruiz at (312) 271-2720.
TV AUDIO TECHNICIAN KPBS ENGINEERING
[ Audio'Technician sought by KPBS-TV, San Diego’s public television station.
Responsibilities; include the planning, installation, maintenance and repair of broadcast audio systems; performance of complex studio | audio mixes for live broadcast and recorded productions; remote audio production; multi-? track recording and post-production.
Qualifications; At least one year of journey-level experience in audio production engineering is required. Applicants must have highly developed | diagnostic'skills and a good working knowledge of modern solid-state electronics. Demonstrable i abilities in live stereo broadcast and recording techniques are needed. The equivalent to one [ year of collegiate study in electrical engineering,
; telecommunications or other related field is [ preferred.
Salary range: $1,972 - $2,427 per month. Excellent benefit package.
Applications must be received no later than 3 â–  pm. on Wednesday, Nov. 19,1986. Apply directly | to: San Diego State University Employment i Office, Third Floor-Administration Bldg., San ;j. Diego, Calif. 92182.
KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA/TITLE IX Employer
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I Office of Assistant Academic Vice Pres.
For Undergraduate Programs
Duties: Serve as the focal point for com-: munication between the Assistant Academic | Vice President and Schools and Departments l related to the Honors Program, scholarship f programs and undergraduate programs.
| Qualifications: Graduation from high school I or GED program. Some college preferred. Sev-; eral years experience in office management I with demonstrated knowledge of office manage-I ment and practices.
| Salary. Upto$14,000 depending uponquali-I fications.
| For interview contact Personnel Services, I The Catholic University of America, Washington, j D.C. 20064 or call (202) 635-5050.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Sub-j missions are welcome for Weekly Report1 s new f| ‘guest columnist’feature. Approx. 500 words. | For writer’s guidelines, send self-addressed, j stamped envelope to: Guest column, Hispanic I Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St N.W., Wash-F ington, D.C. 20005
Atlantic Resources Corporation, Washington, D.C., can do your research. ARC has a history of working with Hispanic non-profit organizations as well as the federal government We do demographic studies, evaluation and economic impact studies. We offer a competent staff and excellent quotes. For more information contact Cristdbal Berry-Caban at (703) 476-0832.
YOGA (202) 362-2656 or (301) 933-6196 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST- Washington, D.C.-based. Will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
1
OPPORTUNITIES IN EDUCATION
l
FELLOWSHIPS/INTERNSHIPS
3
INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for submission of applications for a 12-month $14,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Oct. 20.
Open to developing journalists of Hispanic heritage, it is sponsored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and funded through a $20,000 grant by the Adolph Coors Company.
Applications may be obtained by contacting Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
Indiana University Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program
The University is seeking qualified minorities to participate in the Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program.
Each year visiting fellows are invited to teach one class during the second (eight week) session. This provides the opportunity for departments and schools to observe the work of individual fellows.
Individuals nearing completion of their doctorate and those who have completed a Ph.D. within the last four years are considered. The fellowship includes a summer salary equivalent to that ordinarily paid to an Indiana University faculty member of the same rank, plus a $2,500 stipend.
Request an application form from: Dr. Carolyn Calloway-Thomas, Director, Minority Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program, 809 E. Seventh St., Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 47405.
FEDERAL OPPORTUNITIES
The Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written test for Contract Specialist positions at grades GS5 and GS7 beginning September 15,1986, until further notice.
Obtain Qualifications Information Statement QI-1102, and OPM Form 500-AB, Admission Notice and Record Card, from any of the Office of Personnel Management Federal Job Information Centers (FJIC). Send the completed 500-AB to the OPM office nearest where you wish to take the written test.
CHICAGO STUDIES
The Department of Cnicano Studies anticipates a tenure track appointment in one of the following disciplines:
• Anthropology • Economics • Political Science • Psychology
Appointment will either be a joint appointment or a full appointment in Chicano Studies. Position effective July 1,1987. Ph.D. by time of appointment and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant Professor level preferred, although exceptionally well-qualified persons whose background and experience warrant a tenure-level appointment are also encouraged to apply.
Salary and rank dependent on qualifications. Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents including copies of main publications (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed chapters) and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by January 31,1987, to:
Dr. Mario T. Garcia
Chair, Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST NEA of New York
Persons interested in being considered for this position should submit their written application to: M r. Arthur Lavalette, Acting Director of Affiliate Services, National Education Association of New York, 217 Lark Street, Albany, N.Y. 12210.
I
ADJUNCT VITAE BANK
Lehman College is establishing a pool Or candidates for anticipated adjunct teaching positions in all academic areas. Rank and salary commensurate with experience and academic credentials. Vitae will be kept on file and considered as vacancies occur. Women and minorities are encouraged to respond.
Send resume to:
Ms. Ginger Waters Executive Assistant to the President Lehman College Bronx, N.Y. 10468
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPTY. EMPLOYER M/F
LEHMAN
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach ypur ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will-be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
Ordered by Title_____
Area Code & Phone. Advertiser Name_____
Bill To
Address
City, State & Zip


Arts& Entertainment
ART FOR THE AMERICAS: Events throughout the Western Hemisphere this week highlight the Iberian influence in American culture, as the western world commemorates the 493rd anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the “New World.”-
In San Juan, Puerto Rico, the Inter American Arts Festival concludes this week with premiere performances Oct. 9 and 11 of the new opera El mensajero de plata. The work opens the 1986-87 season for the island’s Opera de C&mara company.
The first opera commissioned to a team of Puerto Rican composer aind librettist, El mensajero de plata takes place in the northern coastal town of Loiza, where African and Spanish tradition intertwine for the celebration of the Feast of St James (Santiago Apostol). The score is by Roberto Sierra, and the original story by Myrna Casas.
Stuttgart (West Germany) Opera bass Daniel Bonilla heads the cast as the sinister “silver vejigante," with Virginia Gutierrez playing Estrella, Carmen Cornier as Mina, Alejandro VAsquez as Chaguln, and Angelo Cruz as Jacoba The New York-based ensemble Continuum,
conducted by Joel Sachs, will provide the orchestral accompaniment
The production is staged by Pablo Cabrera, with choreography by Eddie Vazquez, production design by Jaime Su&rez and lighting design by Fernando Aguilu. : f ' ; . t lyoo
Other performances at the Inter American Arts Festival, held at the city’s Centro de Bellas Artes since Sept 21, have included works by the Martha Graham Dance Company and the Canadian Brass Ensemble.
Other Inter-American cultural events are planned throughout the nation this week:
The Primera Bienal de Pintura Iberoamericana is in Miami Oct. 9-15. The event to be held every other year, is co-sponsored by the Centro Andino de Artes Populares, in Quito, and Miami’s Center for Latinoamerican Arts and Studies. Over 200 paintings from Spain and the Americas have been submitted for the exhibit; 10 prizes of $4,000 each are being awarded.
In Washington, D.C., the Kennedy Center's 1986-87 International Series continues Oct 10 with a recital by Brazilian cellist Marcio Carneiro with U.S. pianist Thomas Mastroianni. The series continues through May of 1987, with guest performers from Venezuela, Spain
and Argentina scheduled. • •
- Antonio Me/ias-Rentas
Media Report
IS SIN SINNING? Guillermo Martinez, a Miami Herald columnist who this month was promoted to senior editor, has joined those who view with alarm the Spanish International Network’s planned transfer of Mexican anchorman Jacobo Zabludovsky to New York to head SIN’s news operation, possibly to take over as anchor of Noticiero SIN.
But, admits Martinez, he’s glad that aChicano ^ Los Angeles Times’ columnist Frank del Ofmo- fired a shot before he did.
Martinez wrote Sept. 25:
“If a Cuban American journalist had led the criticism of the SIN decision, somebody certainly would have raised the specter of ethnocentrism. ‘Of course. What else would you expect from a- Cuban American? They see plots under every bed.’ ”
Martinez, immediate past president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, quoted Gustavo Godoy, SIN’s Miami-based
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link Newsservice, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisner. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor FSlix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejlas-Rentas, iPhil Garcia,
No portion ol Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) S96.
Trial subscription (13* issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Displayadsare$35 percolumninch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request
news director, tnat "despite repeated assurances (by the new Mexican executives) that they respect SI N’s news staff and want it to be part of the new organization,” his personnel are demoralized.
Zabludovsky anchors the nightly 24 Horas, which many view as much too protective of the Mexican govenment.
Commented Martinez: “For Americans of all origins, the idea of using a newscast as a propaganda vehicle for a government is repugnant. Propaganda on behalf of a foreign government is doubly odious.”
CRITICAL ISSUES: The October Hispanic Business magazine carries its fourth annual poll of 100 “Hispanic influentials” - mostly individuals in politics, academia, business and advocacy- on issues of special pertinence to U.S. Latinos Judging from its results Latinos are more of a common mind than ever.
Those questioned reasonably reflected the mainland Hispanic national origin balance -57% Mexican American, 20% Cuban American, 16% Puerto Rican- and included an improved 24% women.
Their responses on some of the 10 questions
presented by editor and publisher Jesus Chavarria:
• In general, are major corporations responsive to Hispanic needs?8% Yes 80%No.
• Do you support the concept of set affirmative action goals in employment? 83% Yes 8% No.
• In college admissions? 81% Yes 12% No.
• Are there enough Hispanics on major corporate boards? 1% Yes. 91% No.
What individuals did they identify as emerging national Hispanic leaders?.
Led by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros (mentioned by 87%), all are in politics six are Chicano, two cubano and one puertorriqueho.
After Cisneros came New York Cong ressman Robert Garcia (47%), California Congressman Esteban Torres and Denver Mayor Federico Pena (39% each), California State Senator Art Torres (38%), New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya (36%), Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez (35%), Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre(31%) and former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre (27%).
- Charlie Ericksen

THE EAST INDIES'?? ....
YOlIRE WAT OFf BUT SURE...
Y90 CM) REST HERE FOR A FEW DATS...
COLUMBUS DAY- OCT. 12
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Mireles, born in Beeville , Texas, was recognized for his role in a gun battle in Miami that left two agents and two suspects dead and five agents wounded. . . Forty-five Alberto Va rgas watercolors sell for $4. 6 million. Vargas , a renown illustrator for Esquire magaz ine, passed away in 1982 at the age of87 .. . Miami Sa vings and Loan vice president Luis Lauredo is selec ted as ch a irman of the Dade County, Fla., Council of Arts and Sciences. The 15-member c o uncil has an annual budget of $2. 5 million ... Manuel Saucedo, 9 , of Hereford, Texas , dies from a s evere r ea c ti o n to cocaine . . . Ted d y Higuera, a pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewe r s , become s the second major league player of Mexican extraction in history t o win 20 victories less than a week after Los Angeles Dodger Fernando Valenzuela became the first. . . Miami Vice co-st a r Edward James Olmos kicks off a campaign in Miami to secu r e a r tificia l limbs and therapy for children injured in the Mexico ea rthquake last September ... Pennsylvania Gov. Dick Thornburgh announces the appointment of Mercedes Roldan as executive director of the governor's Council on the Hispanic Community. Roldan is a native of Puerto Rico ... Rosario Anaya, a member of the San Francisco Board of Education , introduces a resolution to that body to oppose the statewide referendum Proposition 63-making Eng l ish the state ' s off i cial language. The board passed the resolution unanimously ... Dr . Fred Romero takes a two-year leave from the U.S . Department of Labor this month to join SER-Jobs for Progress as director of its Washington-based Research and Policy Institute ... Edmundo Mireles, 33, a special agent with the FBI, receives the 21st annual Police Service Award from Parade . magazine, a Sunday supplement for newspapers across the country. t••o•ol HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT, octo,, ... Martinez Is Easy Winner in Florida Former Tampa mayor Bob Martinez easily defeated a former U . S . Congressman in a runoff Sept. 30 to capture the Republican gubernatorial nomination in Florida Martinez, an ex-Democrat who switched parties in 1983, will become Florida's first Hispanic governor if he wins the Nov. 4 general election. The 51-year-old Martinez, of Spanish heritage, took a resounding 67% of the vote to 33% for former House member Lou Frey Jr. With 99% of the precincts reporting , Martinez had 253,226 votes versus 126,073 for Frey . Martinez now faces Democrat Steve Pajcic , a 40-year-old former Florida state legislator. Martinez will have to overcome history to win the statehouse. Florida has elected a Re publican governor just once since 1900. But the Democratic nominee is coming off an acrimonious runoff fight himself , and Martinez cold benefit from a divided Democratic house , How Latinos in Congress Voted. IMMIGRATION RULE The House of Representatives considered debate procedures established by its Rules Committee for a compromise immigration reform bill, which included an amendment by Rep . Charles Schumer(D-N . Y . ) giving legal status to aliens who worked in U . S . agriculture fo r 60 days between May 1 , 1985 , and May 1 , 1986. HOUSE VOTE Rejected 202 to-180 . CAUCUS VOTE Six in favor ; three opposed, two not voting . YES: Albert Bustamante, Solomon Ortiz (both Texas), Tony Coelho, Esteban Torres (both Calif .), Bill Richardson (N.M.), Robert Garcia (N.Y . ) All Democrats. NO: Democrats Ed Roybal (Calif.) and Henry B. Gonzalez(Texas), Republican Manuel Lujan (N.M.). NOT VOTING: E "K ika" de Ia Garza(Texas), Matthew Martinez (Calif.) Both Democrats. Hispanic Population Will Triple The number of Hispanics in the United States will grow from the current figure of 17. 3 million to 36.5 million in 2020 and 51 million in 2050 , the U . S . Census Bureau projected Sept 26 . In an advance release of a Hispanic population projection report to be published next month, it was estimated that the Latino population will double within 30 years and near l y triple in the next 60 years. Not including the 3 . 5 million people who live in Puerto Rico, the report shows that Hispanics will comprise 19 % of the U . S . population in 2080 . The current percentage for ma i nland His panics is 7 . 2 . Basing its findings on a " middle series " of projections, and not the low or high extreme , the preliminary release included the following: • Hispanics 65 years old and older will quadruple by 2015 and increase sevenfold by 2030 . • The median age of Hispanics w ill rise from 25 i n 1985 to 28 in 2000 , 31. 2 in 2020, 36 . 2 in . 2050 and 40. 9 in 2080. e Most of the population growth will be among House Kills Immigration Rejecting debate procedures offered by its Rules Committee Sept 26 , the U .S. House of Representatives effectively killed an immigrat i on bill for the 99th Congress. The proposed rule , which tlocked an amend ment by Rep Dan Lundgren (R-Calif . ) that allowed up to 350,000 foreign farm laborers into the country at a time , was voted down, 202-180 . A similar amendment was included in the Senate immigrat i on bill passed a year ago by a 69-30 vote . The House version of the bill met most of the concerns raised by Hispanic advocates. Only 13 of its 180 supporters were Republican . As Congress moved its adjournment date back to Oct 10 , there was talk of one more effort to bring the bill back to the floor , but even if that occurred, Rep Matthew Martinez (D-Calif . ) told Weekly Report, " there still wouldn't be time to reso l ve the differences between the House and Senate bills in conference . " Congress has been attempting unsuccessfully to pass some form of immigration reform for the past 1 5 years. Latin os 3 5 yea r s old and old er . • The rat e of Hispanic growth , e x cluding immigran ts, w ill still be great e r than that of blacks o r w hit es, i ncluding immigrants in those groups. Mi xed Latino Reaction to Nakasone's Apology Responding to an apology made by Japan Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone for his remarks on the "literacy level " of Hispanics and blacks in the United States, two Hispanic organ i zat ions on Sept. 30 took divergent tacks . The Congressional Hispanic Caucus issued a statem ent in which it agreed to accept the apology. The American Gl Forum voted to boycott Japan e se products indefinitely starting O ct. 3. On Sept. 26, U . S . Rep . Esteban C alif . ) , newly elected c hairman of the His panic C a u cus, met with Japan ' s ambassador to the United States, Nobuo Matsunaga, in Washington, D . C . , to have the apology for mally relayed . The statement by the caucus said it was " ra r e for a world leader to admit he has made a mistake. " As Weekly Report went to press , Ed Bernaldez , national chairman of the 38-year-old American Gl Forum , said that 28 of the organization' s 37-member boa r d of di rectors had decided to go along with the boycott the other nine had not been reached . Gabe Flores, chairman of Internat i onal Affairs for the Gl Forum and the person who pro posed the boycott, said he did not " place any value" on the apology. Because of Nakasone's remarks, "the racist element in the United States i s giggling and snickering , " said Flores . The widely publicized incident began when Nakasone was reported by two Japanese newspapers on Sept. 23 to have said that the educational level of the United States was lowered because of the "considerable number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans. " Nakasone said his remarks w er e referring to literacy, not intelligence.

PAGE 2

Yo ung Adults Literacy Report Cause for Optimism Measured by rates of young adults, ages21 through 25, illiteracy is not as grave a national pro b lem as it has been portrayed in recent months, a $2 mill ion federally funded study revealed Sept 24. The study, conducted by the Educational Testing Service, based iri Lawrence Township, N.J . , found reading proficiency levels of H . lspanics clearly belowthose of whites and above those of blacks. , On a scale of500, for example, 76. 0% of the Hispanics read a tan intermediate (250) level , contrasted to 88.7% whites and 61.1% Education Secretary William Bennett, whose department paid for the study , noted that "four of five young adults cannot satisfactorily perform such elementary tasks as using a bus schedule to select correct departures and arrivals. Fewer than 10% of young black and Hispanic adults are able to perform tasks of this complexity." But overall, he sa id , the report proved that "the United States is not awash with illiteracy." 91acks. 'The differences held true at e ach level of education reported: eighth grade or l ess, some high school, high school diploma and/or sqm , e postsecondary experience, and College degree. , Th e study showed that 8% of Hispanics read below the fourth grade level , compared with 4% of whites and 18% of blacks. READING PROFICIENCY LEVELS FOR ADULTS AGED 21-25* 1\jearly half of whites a nd Hispanics who enrolled in a General EducationaJ Development(GED},.f\igh school equivalency program completed it; less than one-quarter o f the blacks did. .. ETS President Gregory Anrig ca lled the figures "better than exp'ected." He a d d e d , "What you have is a country that has reached a 95% level of literacy. No other country in the world has achieved that" ' Hisp.*' Black White Total Advanced Adept 9 .5% 40.6% 3 . 9 24.9 24.5 60.7 20.9 54.4 Intermediate Basic Rudimentary 76.0% 95.9/o 99.5% 61.1 89.9 98.8 88. 7 98. 2 99.7 . 84.1 96. 8 99. 6 :The study, called sophisticated one ever conducted on in th is country, 4_sed "literacy task s" in social settings for some of its measurements. * On a scale o f 0 to 500, the levels were as follows: advanced350 and above; adept300; intermediate250; basic200; and rudimentary-1 50. Asked to locate a single fact in a newspaper article or write a brief description of a job, 6% of Hispanics, 2% of whi tes and 14% of blacks failed. **The survey projected that 225,000 of the nation's 21 million 21-to-25-year-olds (roughly 1%) were Spa nish-speakers whose lit e racy skills were insufficient to take the tests. Source: "Literacy: Profile s of America's Young Adults" by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. FCC Asked to Btock Sale T.he Mexican Americ an Bar Association of Los'.l'>.ngeles County and the Spani sh American League Against Discrimination from Miami filed petitions with the Federal Communications Commissio n on Sept 26 to block the sale of , 10 Spanish-language television stations. • A U.S. District Court Judge, Maria na Pfaelzer, selected a $301 .5 mill ion big for th e stations f rom Hallmark Cards lric. and First Chicago Venture Capital in July, including major stations in Los Angeles, Miam i , San Antonio, Paterson, N .J., and Fre s no. Cal if.. Th e FCC is expected t o decide on t h e bid late this year or early next year. Seve r al Hispanic g ro ups opposed th e sale , fearing that t h e stations would eventually stray. away f rom t h eir Spanish lang uage format Se pt. 29 was tt1e final day for testimony to the FCC. Th e FCC denied license renewals to the stations last January w he n it held that they were controlled by a foreign interest, Mexico media mogul E mil i o Azcarraga. The U.S. His panli::: g roups contend that the acceptance of the bid by the Spanish International Com municat i ons C orp., t he station's majority stock holder, was based primarily on a lucrative financial.gua ra ntee to present SICC managerE and.lhat SICC will continue to determin e thE. stations' editorial content U : p . . Rep. Matthew Martinez (D Calif.) in troduce d a bill July 24 a llowing be lated im plementation of an FCC policy that licensees an incentive to se ll t hei r licenses tc minorities. License holders risk losing thei1 entire inves tment at an FCC hearing . Martinez said ' ' rio action will b e taken on the bill this session; . which ends Oct 10. He plans to rein'troduce it during the next sess ion. 2 ' Latinos Assess Training Fund Cuts Despite a recent reporfs findings that federal funding to states for job training programs declined $27.8 billion during the first five years of the Reagan administration, two employment services organizations disagree as to the impact on Latinos . Manuel Bustelo, commissioner for New York City's Department of Employment, told Weekly Report that the training programs largely eliminated by the Reagan cutbacks"public service employmenf' had little Hispanic participation. "In terms of impact to Latinos, the elimination of public servic e employment programs will be negligible," he said. Thirty six percent of those served by Bustelo' s agency are Hispanic. B ustelo did agree that federal funding cuts have made it more difficult to offer adequate services. In the first five years of the Reagan administration, federal dollars to his agency were reduced from $300 million to $11 million. Eviction Date Extenc;ted The U.S. House of Representatives concurred in a Senate resolution Sept 30 that would extend un ti l Sept 30, f987, among other things, the availability of federally subsidized housing and housing services to undocumented aliens. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development approved regulations April 1 that would have ev icted public tenants if t hey could not prove legal residency. On Sept 23 HUD decided to extend its eviction deadline to Dec. 31 of this year. Earlier , it had extended the cutoff date to last Tuesday. Allison Sparks , communications director . for the Dallas-based SEA-Jobs for Progress , said the lower fundi ng levels are "very dis ,appointing and very discouraging." The 24-year-old organization, with 41 affiliates directing 110 training centers in 15 states and the District of Columbia, saw budgets fo r its national affiliates drop from $65 million i n 1982 to $45 million this year. Presently SER, which started with 100% federal support, gets about 90% of funding for its affiliates from theJederal government Operation of its national office. with a $2. 2 . million budget, is about 65% federally funded. While Bustelo's office has turned more to New York City for su p port, SER continues to reach for and gain private sector support, in harmony with its growth philosophy, sai d Howard Himmelbaum, manager of resear ch and pla n n ing. . . Last year, the organization served 35,000 persons, the vast majo r ity being Latino. Civil Rights Staff Slashed The U.S. Civil Rights Commission approved a reorganization plan on Sept 26 that would reduce its full -time employees from 182 to 29 and eliminate seven of its 10 regional offices. The 5-3 vote, with Latina Blandina Cardenas Ramirez voting no by proxy and fellow Latina Commissione r Esther Gonzalez-Arroyo Buckley voting affi r matively, was in response to two separate pieces of legislation passed by the U.S. House and Senate last month that would eliminate or reduce the funding for the com mission, respectively. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Miguel Perez, guest columnist The Prismatic Latino My black beans and rice were still missing, my stomach was growling, but my Chinese waiter at La Victoria China, a diner on New York's Broadway and 95th Street, wanted to tall< about baseball. "Why not?" I told a friend. "Maybe the beans will get here faster." Our waiter, it turned out, was an reciting batting averages and pitchi than the items on the menu. "You like the Mets, right?" my friend . "No," replied the waiter. "All right, a Yankee fan," I said. "No. I don't like them, either," the waiter said "They don't have enough Latino players. I like baseball , but I like to watch my people play . The New York teams have Hispanic names, but some of players don't even speak Spanish." Suddenly, the conversation turned into much more than baseball. It dawned on us that this man who looks so is a Latino, too. We are not a race. We have a common geographical, cultural ' and linguistic identity. Latino is a short way of saying Latin American . Latin America is a region of the world that is a true rainbow of races . Unfortunately, to most Americans, the term "Latino" or"Hispanic" has a racial connotation, meaning " non-white. " They fail to recognize the ethnic and racial diversity of Latin Americans. In spite of the myths and misconceptions, many Latinos are white, of European origin , while may others are black, Oriental, Indianor a combination of some or all of the above . OUR DIVERSITY CONFUSES THE MEDIA Unlike the United States, where you are either black or white, in Latin Amer i ca there are many more racial categories. You can be a mulatto because your ancestors have both white and African blood , or you can be mestizo because there is Indian blood in your veins . The large majority of Latinos are of Indian , Spanish or African ancestry, but you can be Cuban with Jewish or Lebanese or Chinese forebears; Venezuelan of Polish stock; Mexican of Irish or Japanese ancestry; Peruvian of English, Russian or lncan lineage; or Argentine of Italian, German or French descent. For nonLatinos, this racial diversity is one of the most confusing things about Latinos. They have been misled by government, the media, corporate America and Madison Avenue, which find it convenient to lump them all together into one category, " Hispanic , " with a racial connotation. For Latinos, including many who refuse to use the term" Hispanic" because they feel it was imposed on them, this is one of the most irritating things about dealing with americanos. They find it especially irritating when confronted with applications or other forms that ask them to make a choice of white, black or Hispanic. ARE YOU BLACK, WHITE OR IRISH? "They never ask you if you are black, white or Irish , " says one of my irritated friends. "Why do they want to change my national identity into a race?" "l; m Chinese and I am Cuban," said my waiter, grudgingly leaving the subject of b aseball, "but sometimes people don't understand." My Italian friend, Giordano, called me up the othe day to tell me that now she can identify with Latinos a lot better. She said that now she understands how Latinos feel when they are categorized as one single race . She said that she was shocked by what she heard from an acquaintance who was trying to be polite: "1 grew up in a neighborhood with all Italian people, " Giordano was told. "I was the only white person in the neighborhood." (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News. ) Sin pe/os en Ia lengua HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK: It's over, done for another year. Its tamales have added to the girth of t h e nation's Hispanic leaders and other dignitaries and politicians. Their speeches have been packed away for yet another rew r ite next year. It seems that every September President Ronald Reaga n finds a new humble, loyal, patriotic Hispanic to tell him, "Micas a es su casa." Once you learn to pronounce a neat Spanish phrase like that, you work it into as many speeches as possible. This year the president got his opportunity in the Rose Garden as he delivered his HHWeek remarks Sept. 16 to L _atinos who h ad come from around the country to share in the capital's m enu of ceremonies and receptions. Reagan's mind wandered back to his days as governor o f California when he was inspecting the site of a mudslide near Santa Barbara. "One elderly gentleman invited me into his hom e . And we went in standing knee-deep in that sloppy mud," related the president. "And it was apparent that he had evidently just newly furnished this house, and the furniture-there it was, stand i n g o r sitting in all of that mud. And as we stood there in the l i ving rooni, he said t o me , 'Me casa is su casa ' with all the dignity as if there was no mud and he had invited me in for just a friendly visit. I've never forgotten him." "Me casa is su cas a" That's the way the offici a l Wh ite House transcript has it. Not only was that fine old gent dignified. He was bilingual! HISPANIC HARDCORE: To every party there comes a s ou r belly . This year's HHWeek dissenting vote emerges from entertainment writer Antonio Mejias-Rentas, who proposes in a syndicated Hispanic Link column that the week be abolished in favor of an Americas-wide celebration of Dia de Ia Raza in October. "HHWeek always falls on the week when Mexico and several Central American nations celebrate their independence. Ttiat, understandably, makes millions of U . S . Latinos not of Mexican or Central American descent feel left out. . . "With all due respect to Christopher Columbus, who was a loyal employee of Isabel, the Queen of Spain, he never set foot in North America . The only part of the United States he ever saw was Puerto Rico. Even there, October 12 is celebrated as D ia de Ia Raza." HISPANIC HERESY: To demonstrate the impact HHWeek has on others, there's this report from a Dallas Morning News political columnist: "As (Texas) House Speaker Gib Lewis and some colleagues were leaving the Capitol for lunch the other day, Lewis heard the sounds of mariachi music coming from the rotunda. "Hispanicswere celebrating Diez y Seis, the annual Sept. 16, celebration of Mexican Independence Day. " 'What's that,' Lewis said on hearing the music, 'Cinco de Mayo?'" -Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • XAVIER SUAREZ, Miami mayor, on his Hispanic Heritage Week meeting with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in Washington, D . C . : "There is a dire need for Hispanic leaders across the country to get to know each other and see how many things we have in common. If 1 don't know the congressmen-particularly the Hispanic congressmen who may share my perspective on a lot of issues, I can't effectively help the people of Miami." U.S. SEN. PETE WILSON (A-Calif.) on why the U .S. -Mexico border may need to be sealed with troops: "People come here for reasons other than a job. I think they want their babies born here ... " 3 . Oct. 6 . 1986 Hispanic Link Weekly R e p ort

PAGE 4

COLLECTING . FEDERAL FUNDING TO STATES: The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees has published its 171-page report "The Republican Record: A 5Year Analysis of State Losses of Federal Funding (FY 1982-FY 1986) . " For a free copy, write to: AFSCME, Publi c Po li cy, 1625 L St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20036 (202) 4291000. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) EDUCATION NETWORK NEWS AVAILABLE " ' SCIENCE G RADUATE FELLOWSHIPS: Hispanics, blacks and Nati v e Americans who are working toward a master's or doctorate degree in science or engineering are invited to apply for three-year graduate fellowships offered by the National Science Foundation . The fellowships provide an $11,100 stipend for a 12-month tenure and a $6,000 cost-of-education allowance. The deadline is Nov. 14. For applications and information, write to: Fellowship Office, National Resea r ch Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D .C. 20418 (202) 334-2872. The National Council of La Raza has set subscription prices for its bimonthly Education Network News newsletter. They range from , $15 annually for individual subscriptions to $50 for corporate ones. For five years NCLR was able to absorb the costs of printing and distributing the timely publication, but as the recipient list grew from 30 to 1 ,200 and postage and production costs rose , it has found it . necessary to charge a subscription fee . La Raza ' s address is20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20001. LITERAC Y REPORT: The Educational Testing Service's68-page National Assessment of Education Progress report "Literacy: Profiles of Amer ica ' s Young Adults" is available for $12. 50, plus $1.50 for shipping and handling, from NAEP, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J . 085416710 (1-800-223-0267 or 609-734-1327). A final report with technical dO'cumentation is available for the same price . Data tape can also be ESSAY CONTEST KITS AVAILABLE The National Association of Hispanic Journalists drew 16 entries from across th _ e country for its first national high school-essay contest competition this year . Already it has 16 additional inquiries from individuals and organizations contemplating staging local contests next year . purchased. THREE-ALL FREE: Three Latino groups are offering free current copies of their newsletters to Weekly Report readers who send a 22-cent stamped, self-addressed envelope (or stamp plus self-addressed label) . They are: In response, NAHJ's Jocelyn Cordova has put together a 27-page "HowTo" kit, available for $5. Write or call NAHJ, National Press Building , Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. SER INAUGURATES FIVE-YEAR PLAN . National Puerto Rican Coalition: The eight-page October issue of NPRC Reports includes a summary of its new policy agenda and three articles on its annual conference in New York last month . Write : Marilina Sanz, NPRC , Suite #500, 1700 K St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20006. Using its existing delivery system, D . allas-based SEA-Jobs for Progress will begin giving priority this fall to development of demon stration projects in the areas of literacy, job training, chemical abuse, youth and economic independence. Northeast LULAC Regional News: The eight page October issue includes an article by EEOC Commissioner Tony Gallegos on the need for corporations to develop specific Hispanic training programs, goals and timetables. Write : Andres Tobar , P .O. Box 44082, Washington , D.C . 20026. The direction was set at the national Hispanic employment and training organization' s five-year planning conference in July. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Hispanic Media Notes: The four-page September issue is devoted to activities of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D . C . Write: David Saah, #1001, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . . 20005. Los Angeles Ra iders quarterback Jim Plunkett becomes major partner in an Adolph Coors Company distributorship serving more than 1,200 retail accounts in California ' s San Joaquin and Amador counties, plus parts of Sacramento and Solano counties ... Suzanne Avila , SIN vice president and regional sales manager, has been elected presid(3f1t _ ()f the San Francisco Advertising Club ... Calendar THIS WEEK WEEK San Francisco Oct. 6-12 Community boards from the Bay Area will celebrate their 1Oth anniversary of providing free dispute resolution services and job training to the Latino community. Georgia Quinones (415) 552-i 250 LUIS NOGALES TRIBUTE Washington , D.C. Oct. 7 The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington , D . C , will honor ex-United Press International President Luis Nogales at a National Press Club luncheon. Hector Eric k sen-Mendoza (202) 234-0280 BU ,SINESS MANAGEMENT Washington, D.C. Oct. 7 Harvard University's Graduate School of Business Administration will hold the first of seven sessions across the country for Hispanics , blacks and other minor.ities pu r suing a management education. Will Ken law (617) 495-61 27 L.A' ti.NO DROPOUTS Santa Ana , Calif . Oct. 9 4 1 he Orange County Human Relations Commission will hold a public hearing on the dropout rate of Chicanos/ Latinos in that county and ways to address it. Robert Nava (714) 834-4 796 NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP DINNERS Chicago , Dallas , Houston, Miami , Denver , San Francisco and New York Oct. 9 In an effort to gain visibility and financial support in assisting Hispanic college students, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will host a series JJf dinners. Ernest Robles (415) 892-9971 NATIONAL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Washington , D.C. Oct. 9 The Republican National Hispanic Assembly will hold its annual leadership conference with workshops on immigration , foreign policy in Central America and , afterward , its presidential dinner. Carolina Camacho (202) 363-7161 CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE "aim Springs Oct. 9-11 rhe California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce will put on their 5th annual convention and expo, " Resources for Success Beyond the the ' 80s, " with the assistant secretary of that state's Department of Business Kathleen Calderon as a workshop leader. Sergio Banuelos (213) 587-8820 Oct. 6, 1986 TITO PUENTE TRIBUTE New York Oct. 10 Sa/sa stars Celia Cruz , Ray Barreto, jazz artists Paquito D ' Rivera , Dave Valentin , Art Blakely and Noel Pointer , along with the Ballet Hispanico , will pay tribute to salsero Tito Puente and raise money for a scholarship in his name . Mickey Melendez (212) 541-7951 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 1 0-1 2 " Challenging the Future" will be the theme of the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project's an nual conference, with workshops on the political empowerment of Latinas and the Latino youth . Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-1116 LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS Chicago Oct. 10,11 The second of four forums, the Law School Admission/ Law School Admfssion Services will sponsor thesE events to help Hispanics, blacks and other evaluate and select law schools. Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1176 COMING SOON HIGHER EDUCATION RETAINMENT American Council on Education Philadelphia Oct. 16,17 Sarah Melendez (202) 939:9395 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

(coRPORATE CLASSIFIEos J ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Hispanic marketing agency in Chicago seeks experienced account executive with knowledge of all phases of marketing and advertising. Strong writing and verbal skills in English and Spanish are essential. Immediate opening. For ap pointment call Mr. Ruiz at (312) 271-2720. TV AUDIO TECHNICIAN KPBS ENGINEERING Audio Technician sought by KPBSTV, San Diego's public television station. Responsibilities: include the planning, in stallation, maintenance and repair of broadcast audio systems; performance of complex studio audio mi xes for live broadcast and recorded productions; remote audio production; multi track recording and post-production. Qualifications: At least one year of journey level experience i n audio production engineering is required Applicants must have highly developed dfagnostic skills ana a good working knowledge of modern solid-state electronics. Demonstrable I abilities in liv e stereo broadcast and recording techniques are needed. The equivalent to one year of collegiate study in electrical engineering, telecommunications or other related field is preferred. Salary range: $1,972 -$2,427 per month. E xcellent ben efi t package. Applications must be received no later than 3 pm on Wednesday, Nov. 19 , 1986. Apply directly to: San Diego State University Employment Office, Third Floor-Administration Bldg. , San Di ego, Calif. 92182. KPBSTV/FM i s an EEO/ANTITLE IX Employer ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I Office of Assistant Academic Vice Pres. For Undergraduate Programs Duties: Serve as the focal point for com municat ion between the Assistant Academic Vice President and Schools and Departments related to the Honors Program , scholarship programs and undergraduate programs. Qualifications: Graduation from high school or GED program. Some college preferred. Sev eral years experience in office management with demonstrated knowledge of office manage ment and practices. Salary: Up to$14,000 depending upon quali fications. For interview contact: Personnel Services, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064 or call (202) 635-5050. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's new •guest columnisf ' feature. Approx. 500 words. For writer's guid. elines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. N.W., Wash 1 ington, D.C . 20005 Atlantic Resources Corporation, Wash ington, D. C., can do your research. ARC has a history of working with Hispanic non-profit organizations as well as the federal government. We do demographic studies, evaluation and economic impact studies. We offer a competent staff and I' excellent quotes. For more information contact Cristobal Berry-Caban at (703) 476-08. 32. : YOGA (202) 362 or (301) 933-6196. Hispanic Link Weekly Report ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONISTWashington, D.C.based Will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737. f.eLLOWSHIPS/INTERNSHIPS) INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED The deadline for submission of applications for a 12-month $14,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D .C., has been extended to Oct. 20. Open to developing journalists of Hispanic heritage, it is sponsored by the National As sociation of Hispanic Journalists and funded through a $20,000 grant by the Adolph Coors Company. Applications may be obtained by contacting Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737. Indiana University Summer Faculty Recruitment Fellowship Program The University is seeking qualified minorities to participate in the Summer Facu lt y Recruitment Fellowship Program. Each year visiting fellows are invited to teach one class during the second (e ight week) sess ion . This provides the opportunity for departments and schools to observe the work of individu"l fellows. Individuals nearing completion of their doctorate .. and those w ho have completed a Ph . D . within the last four years are consi dered. The fellow ship includes a summer salary equivalent to that ordinarily paid to an Indiana Uni versity faculty member of the same rank, plus a $2,500 stipend. Request an application form from: Dr . Carolyn CallowayThomas , Director, Minority Summer F acu lty Re cru itment F ellowship Program, 809 E . Seventh St. , Indi ana Uni versi ty, Bloomington, Ind . 47405. FEDERAL OPPORTUNITIES The Office of Personnel Management will accept appucations to take the written test for Contract Specialist positi o ns a t grades GS5 and GS7 beginning September 15, 1986, until further notice. Obtain Qualifications Information Statement, Ql-11 02, and OPM Form 500-AB, Admission Notice and Record Card, from any of the Office of Personnel Management Federal Job lnfor m ation Centers (FJIC). Send the completed 500-AB to the OPM office nearest where you wish to take the written test. RTUNITIES IN EDUCATIO STUDIES The Department of Cnicano Studies anticipates a tenure track appointment in one of the following disciplines: • Anthropology • Economics • Political Science • Psychology Appointment will either be a joint ora full appointment in Chicano Studies. Position effective July 1 ,1987. Ph.D. by time of appoint ment and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant Professor level preferred, although exceptiona11y well qualified persons whose background and ex perience warrant a tenure-level appointment are also encouraged to apply. Salary and rank dependent on qualifications. Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents including copies of main publications (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed chapters) and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by January31, 1987, to: Dr. Mario T. Garcia Chair, Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara , Calif. 93106 An Equ a l Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST NEA of New York Persons interested in being considered for this position should submittheirwritten application to: Mr. Arthur Lavalette, Acting Director of Affiliate Services, National Education Association of New York, 217 Lark Street, Albany, N .Y. 12210. ADJUNCT VITAE BANK Le.hman College is establishing a pool o't candidates for anticipated adjunct teaching positions in all academic areas. Rank and salary commensurate with experience and academic credentials. Vitae will be kept on file and considered asvacanciesoccur. Women and minorities are encouraged to respond. Send resume to: Ms. Ginger Waters Executive Assistant to the President Lehman College Bronx, N . Y . 10468 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPTY . EMPLOYER M/F DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach ypur ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C : 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (En Tuesday will-be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . . CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as . 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multipl e use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by-----------Title-------------Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name _________ _ Bill To------------Address --------------City, State & Zip---------

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment conducted by Joel Sachs, will provide the orchestral accompaniment. The production is staged by Pablo Cabrera, with choreography by Eddie Vazquez , production design by Jaime Suarez and lighting A R T FORTH E AMERICAS: Events throughout the Western Hem isphere this week highlight the Iberian influence in American c ul ture , as the western world commemorates the 493rd anniversary o f t he arrival of Christopher Columbus to the "New World . " design by Fernando Aguilu . ( . ( Other performances at the Inter American Arts Fest iva( held at the city's Centro de Bellas Artes since Sept. 21, have included works by the Martha Graham Dance Company and the Canadian Brass Ensemble . Other Inter-American cultural events are planned throughout the nation this week: In San Juan, Puerto Rico, the Inter American Arts Festival concludes this week with premiere performances Oct. 9 and 11 of the new opera El mensajero de plata The work opens the 1986-87 season for the island's Opera de Camara company. The Primera Bienal de Pintura lberoamericana is in Miami Oct. 9-15. The event, to be held every other year, is co-sponsored by the Centro Andino de Artes Populares, in Quito, and Miami's Center for Latinoamerican Arts and Studies. Over 200 paintings from Spain and the Americas have been submitted for the exhibit; 10 prizes of $4,000 each are being awarded. The first opera commissioned to a team of Pue rto Rican composer a nd librettist, El mensajero de plata takes place in the northern coastal.town of Loiza, where African and Spanish tradition intertwine for the celebration of the Feast of St. James (Santiago Apostol) . The s core is by Roberto Sierra, and the original story by Myrna Casas. Stuttgart (West Germany) Opera bass Daniel Bonilla heads the cast.as the sinister "silver vejigante , " with Virginia Gutierrez playing Estrella , Carmen Cornier as Mina, Alejandro Vasquez as Chaguin, Angelo Cruz as Jacobo. The f\jew York-based ensemble Continuum , In Washington, D .C., the Kennedy Center's 1986-87 International Series continues Oct. 10 with a recital by Brazilian cellist Marcio Carneiro with U . S . pianist Thomas Mastroianni. The series continues through May of 1987, with guest performers from Venezuela, Spain Media Report , IS SIN SINNING? Guillermo Martinez, a Miami Herald columnist who this month was promoted to senior editor, has joined those who _ view w ith alarm the Spanish IQternational Networ k ' s planned transfer of Mexican an chorman Jacobo Zabludovskyto New York to SIN's news operation, possibly to take over as anchor of Noticiero SIN. But, admits Martinez, he ' s glad that a Chicano los Angeles Times' columnist Frank del Olmof i red a shot before he did. Mar.tinez wrote Sept. 25: ,. " If a Cuban American journalist had led the criticism of the SIN decision, somebody certainly would have raised the specter of ethnocentrism . 'Of ' course. What else would you expect from a Cuban American? They see plots under every bed.'" 'Martinez, immediate past president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, q uoted Gustavo Godoy, SIN ' s Miami-based ' HISPANIC WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic'Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW 6 Washington, D . C. 20005 (2p2) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Pub11s n er: He ctor Ericksen-Mendo za Editor. Feli x Perez Rep o rting: Ch a rlie Ericks e n , Antonio Mejias-Rentas, • Ph i l Garc ia . No porllon of HISPanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduded or in an y form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3' issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. D isplay ads are$35 percolumn inch. Ads placed by Tuesda y will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. and Argentina scheduled. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas news director , that"despite repeatea assurances (by the new Mexican executives) that they respect Sl N's news staff and want it to be part of the new organization, " his personnel are demoralized. Zabludovsky anchors the nightly 24 Horas, which many view as much too protective of the Mex:can govenment. Commented Martinez: "For Americans of all origins, the idea of using a newscast as a propaganda vehicle for a government is re pugnant. Propaganda on behalf of a foreign government is doubly odious." CRITICAL ISSUES: The October Hispanic Business magazine carries its fourth annual poll of 100 "Hispanic influentials" -mostly individuals in politics, academia, business and advocacy-on issues of special pertinence to U.S. Latinos. Judging from its results, Latinos are more of a common mind than ever. Those questioned reasonably reflected the mainland Hispanic national origin balance-57% Mexican American, 20% Cuban American , 16% Puerto Rican-and included an improved . 24% women. Their responses on some of the 10 questions presented by editor and publisher Jesus Chavarria : e In general, are major corporations res ponsive to H ispanic needs?8% Yes. 80%No. • Do you support the concept of set affir mative action goals in employment? 83% Yes . 8% No. • In college admissions? 81% Yes . 12o/o No. • Are there enough Hispanics on major corporate boards? 1% Yes . 91% No. What individuals did they identify as emerging national Hispanic leaders? . Led by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros (mentioned by 87%), all are in politics, six are Chicano , two cuba no and one puertorriquei'lo . After Cisneros came New York Congressman Robert Garcia (47%), California Congressman Esteban Torres and Denver Mayor Federico Peiia (39% each), California State Senator Art Torres (38%), New Mexico Gov . Toney Anaya (36%) , Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez (35%) , Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre(31%) and former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre (27%) . Charlie Ericksen IHE EAST. INDIES1? ••• YOIJR E OFF, BUT SURE .•. YOO CA'tJ REST "tRE FOO A FEW DAXS • • . Hispanic Link Weekly Report