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Hispanic link weekly report, October 13, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 13, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Making The News ThisWeek
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley names Leila Gonzalez-Correa as executive director of the LA City Housing Authority. Gonzalez-Correa, formerly head of the Austin, Texas, Housing Authority, is of Puerto Rican descent... Jane Delgado, chairperson of the Consortium of National Hispanic Organizations, requests a meeting with Japan’s Ambassador to the United States Nobuo Matsunaga to prevent future occurrences such as “the offensive and demeaning remarks” Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone used to describe the education level of U.S. Hispanics and blacks. . . Chicago Mayor Harold Washington appoints Maria Teresa Ayala as assistant director of the Mayor's Commission on Women’s Affairs. Ayala now
serves as the president of the board of the Instituto de Progreso Latino, an adult-education center based in the Pilsen section of Chicago. . . The five permanent members of thef jjnited Nations Security Council, which include the United|S|fej|&(|j^c4the Soviet Union, virtually assure Javier Perez de Cuellar his re-election as the international body’s secretary genera^ . . JJie^O dQfl^Bs of the California Catholic Conference urge jt|af State’s Aoteiwo reject the November ballot referendum that web Id make English the state’s official language... Lance CpI. Jose Rodriguez, 23 and a paraplegic, receives the Marine Corps National Achievement Medal for his role in saving the lives of seven fellow Marines... Diego Lopez, 41, a social worker, psychotherapist and former clinical director of New York’s Gay Men’s Health Crisis, a model for AIDS service agencies in other cities, dies from complications related to AIDS...

GOP Fields Three Major Hispanic Candidates
Two Latinos and a Latina - all Republicans - are running Nov. 4 in their states for major elective office, offering the GOP an unprecedented chance to broaden its appeal among increasingly independent-minded Hispanic voters.
If all gain their victories- none is a sure bet- the Republican Party will be able to claim an impressive set of modern-day firsts:
• The first Hispanic governor of Florida.
• Texas’ first Latino elected to statewide office.
• The first Latina elected to the U.S. Senate.
Primary victories this summer and fall by ex-Tampa, Florida, mayor Bob Martinez, Texas attorney general candidate Roy Barrera Jr. and former White House aide Linda Chavez in Maryland’s U.S. Senate race bring a new variable to national politics.
They come in the afterglow of President Reagan’s record showings among Latino voters by a GOP presidential nominee. In the 1980 general election, Reagan was estimated to have attracted 30-35% of the Hispanic vote; in 1984, between 35-40%.
Martinez, Barrera and Chavez all are ex-Democrats, Reagan-era converts. All are considered conservative.
Martinez, 51, won his Sept 30 Florida Republican gubernatorial runoff with former U.S.
Congressman Lou Frey by a 2-1 margin. Exit polls that day showed him to be favored over his Democratic opponent Steve Pajcic, a. liberal state representative, 51%-49%.
In a state where registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans by 1.1 million, Martinez needs to add many Democratic voters to his Tampa and Dade County/
Cuban bases.
Barrera, 34, trailed incumbent Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox 53%-26% in a September Gallup Poll. An earlier state poll showed him running even more poorly among Latino voters
. , continued on page 2
Dallas Latinos Call for Council Seat
At the prodding of Hispanics, the Dallas City Council unanimously voted Oct. 1 to study the redrawing of eight of its 10 council. districts to increase the chance of electing a Latino.
A majority of the Council also stated it wanted to have researched the concept of 10 single-member districts Currently, two of the
Aliens Captured Up 33%
More than 1.77 million undocumented workers were apprehended by the U.S. Border Patrol in fiscal year 1986, which ended Sept. 30, the agency reported. The figure was a one-third increase over the previous fiscal year.
Nearly all were caught along the Mexico border and all but 60,000 of them gave Mexico as their country of origin, a spokesman said.
Miami Judge Locks Up Fugitive’s Family, Boss
The parents, sisters and boss of Hialeah salesman Rafael Morales were released from the Dade Country, Fla, jail Sept. 26 pending appeal of a contempt citation against them for Morales’ failure to show up for his trial after he had been released in their custody.
Rafael Morales Sr., 67, his wife Gloria, 56, their daughters Ana, 22,and Maria Chavez, 31, and employer, Jose Garda, 36, were sentenced by Dade Circuit Judge Margarita Esquiroz to 30 days in jail. Rafael Morales Jr. was released into theircustody in March when the five promised he would show up for trial on a cocaine trafficking charge.
The Morales family and Garcia appeared trie day of the trial without Morales. When they said they did not know his whereabouts, Judge Esquiroz promptly held them all in contempt.
After spending the night in jail, the group was released pending their appeal of the ruling.
Morales Jr., 33, is still at large. If convicted, he faces a minimum sentence of 15 years.
iCouncil districts are elected at-large. Mayor :Starke Taylor, who opposed the 10 singlemember district proposal, is also elected at-,large.
Changing the districts to single-member requires a citywide referendum, with August 1987 the earliest possible date. Rene Martinez, a spokesman for the Committee on Mexican American Representation, said his group wants an election by April 1987. The U.S. Justice Department would 'have to approve the Hispanics’ preferred redistricting proposal by Feb. 12, the election filing deadline.
Hispanics make up 15% of Dallas’ population. Only three Latinos have served on the body in the city's history.
Uvaldo Martinez Guilty
The highest ranking Hispanic elected Republican official in California, San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez, pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to two felony charges of misusing a city credit card.
Martinez, as a result of plea bargaining, had 22 like felony charges dropped and agreed to resign from the Council before his Nov. 13 sentencing date. In addition, the councilman will be required to pay partial or full restitution to the city for the more than $1,800 in abused funds.
A report by Martinez, 43, to the city auditor revealed that he frequently entertained local developers, politicians and members oAhe media at expensive restaurants. The two • charges Martinez admitted guilt to amount to $68.39.


$6.5 Million Awarded to Retarded Boy, Mother
An eight-year-old boy and his mother were awarded $6.5 million Oct. 3 by a U.S. District Court jury in Newark, N.J., for brain damage and other handicaps the boy suffered at birth.
Daniel Salas and his mother, Maria Salas, 35, who now live in Hialeah, Fla., won the verdict against her obstetrician, Dr. Sun-Mei Wang, and the chief obstetrics resident at the time for the hospital, Dr. Nicholas Marino. Three of the five nurses assisting at the birth were also found negligent.
Interest accrued since the lawsuit was filed in May 1983 will raise the settlement to nearly $10 million.
Witnesses testified that Marino was prejudiced against Orientals and interfered with Wang at the time of birth. According to witnesses, Marino shoved Wang away from the operating table during a dispute.
The lawyer for Salas charged that the doctors’ behavior deprived the baby of oxygen, leading to his current condition. Daniel is confined to a wheelchair, is unable to feed himself and cannot control his bodily functions
Wang was found liable for 55% of the damage, Marino for 30%, two nurses for 6% each and the third nurse for 3%.
Calif. Bilingual Ed Veto Angers Latinos
Jobless Rate Inches Up
There were 906,000 Hispanics without worl< in September, an increase from August that sent the unemployment rate from 11.0% to 11.1% according to figures released by the U.S. Department of Labor Oct. 3.
The Hispanic unemployment rate again will fall between that of whites (6.2%) and blacks (14.8%).
September was the third consecutive month Hispanic joblessness experienced an increase.
Hispanics educational organizations and leaders on Oct. 3 railed against the veto by California Gov. George Deukmejian three days earlier of a bill that would have extended until 1992 bilingual education law in that state.
Los Angeles School Board member Larry Gonzalez said Deukmejian’s veto “is telling us to go back to the days of sink-or-swim.” Ramon Cortines, San Francisco Schools superintendent, called the veto “a political decision and not an educational” one.
Current California bilingual education law does not expire until June 1987. The governor said it was too early to extend the law until the state Department of Finance had a chance to determine its cost effectiveness.
Shelly Spiegel-Coleman, president of the California Association for Bilingual Education, countered that the Sunset Review Committee,
Cuba Visa Rule Changed
Cuban exiles who arrived in Panama before Aug. 22 will continue to have their immigrant visas processed, announced the U.S. State Department Oct. 3, six weeks after the agency said it would no longer issue visas to anyone who emigrated from Cuba to the United States by way of a third country.
The Reagan administration promulgated the initial visa stricture, along with several other Cuba-immigration toughening measures, in an effort to stop the alleged Cuban government practice of charging emigres and their families $30,000 and up to leave Cuba. The measures were also a way for the administration to express its displeasure with Cuba President Fidel Castro’s decision to renege on a pact to take back 2,746 people who came here on the 1980 Mariel boatlift. Castro balked when' Radio Marti, a U.S.-controlled station, began broadcasting to Cuba.
New Formula ‘Trims’ Poverty Rolls
The number of Hispanics living in poverty in 1985 would have decreased from 5.2 million to 3.4 million had food stamps, housing subsidies, Medicaid and Medicare been given a market value, reports a U.S. Census Bureau study released Oct. 2.
According to the official poverty rate, which does not take into account non-cash benefits, the percentage of Hispanics living in poverty rose from 28.4% in 1984 to 29% in 1985. When figuring in government aid programs, however, the number of impoverished Hispanics decreased from 19.9% to 18.9%.
“Estimates of Poverty Including the Value of Non-Cash Benefits” uses three models to revise poverty numbers: market value, recipient value and poverty budget share value. Cash recipient value is the amount of money a person will accept for a non-cash benefit. The poverty budget share approach equates noncash benefits to the amount of money necessary to meet the basic needs of an individual or family. Depending on which definition is used the number of Hispanics falling below the federal government’s poverty threshold ranges from a low of 3.4 million to a high of 4.3 million.
The measuring stick used by the federal government to quantify poverty in 1985 was income less than $10,989 for a family of
four. The overall rate for 1985 decreased to 14.0% from 14.4% the previous year.
Giving a market value to food, housing and medical benefits in 1985 would have slashed 11.5 million persons from the overall official poverty estimates, finds the report.
Allowing non-cash benefits to be included in preparing poverty data has come under fire because eligibility for many federal aid programs is linked to the poverty level.
In 1985 the federal government gave out $127 billion in assistance to low-income individuals, more than half of which went to Medicare, the health insurance program for the elderly and handicapped.
POVERTY LEVELS FOR 1984-85
Official
Definition
Market
Value*
Hisp.
Black
White
1984 1985 1984 1985
28.4% 29.0% 19.9% 18.9% 33.8 31.3 20.5 18.9
11.5 11.4 8.0 7.7
•This measure gives cash value to benefits including food, housing and all medical care.
Source: Bureau of the Census’ “Estimates of Poverty Including the Value of Non-Cash Benefits.”
empaneled by Deukmejian, found that bilingual education programs were the most cost efficient and effective way to help limited-English-proficient students learn the language.
The bill, sponsored by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown from San Francisco, defined in great detail the use of bilingual programs, from eliminating the requirement that one-third of students in a bilingual class be English speakers to allowing parents to withdraw their children from bilingual education classes
Also expressing their contempt for the veto were the Association of Mexican American Educators, the Mexican American Education Commission and the Mexican American Political Association.
In 1986,3% of the state’s$3.2 billion budget for education went to education services for limited-English-proficient students More than 550,000 of California’s 4 million students are not proficient in English.
GOP Fields3 Hispanics
continued from page 1
To win, Barrera must score heavily with conservative Anglos and with liberal Latinos.
Chavez, 39, quit as director of the White House office of public liaison Feb. 3 to seek the Republican nomination and, with support from friends in the White House, made it look easy. There is no real Hispanic voting bloc in Maryland, which may be to her advantage. As staff director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from November 1983 until April of 1985, her positions and critical remarks about U.S. Hispanic leadership brought her in constant conflict with Latino community activists.
An effective and knowledgeable speaker, she faces three main obstacles: She has lived in the state only a few years, the Democratic Party there is entrenched and well organized, and her opponent is the popular U.S Rep. Barbara Mikulski. One recent poll gives Mikulski a 20-point edge.
Nationally, GOP officials are flaunting the primary race victories of Martinez, Chavez and Barrera as evidence that the political future for Hispanics lies with them.
Tirso del Junco, former California GOP chairman, argues that Hispanics overall -younger ones in particular - “are identifying more with the philosophies of the Republican Party.”
Richard Santillan, associate professor of ethnic studies at California State University, Pomona, has spent nearly three years interviewing 300 Hispanic GOP activists nationwide. He notes that until the 1930s and the New Deal era, an overwhelming majority of Hispanics .belonged to the Republican Party.
While moderate party leaders have shepherded Hispanics back into the fold with some visible success in the last 15 years, he says, many long-time Latino Republicans are now becoming “very angry’ at the minimal gains in small business and minority enterprise development and, most pointedly, the absence of a Hispanic in the Reagan Cabinet.
“Where Mexican Americans find themselves right now is, really, without a political party,” Santillan states.
- Phil Garcia Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Juan Gonzalez, guest columnist
Marching on Washington
More than 3,000 Puerto Ricans just did something that’s out of style. On Oct. 4, we marched on Washinton, D.C., protesting civil rights abuses against Puerto Ricans.
To some polished, cosmopolitan Hispanic leaders who in the past decade have sought to ride the surfboard of Latino voting strength into posts as junior partners to the nation’s movers and shakers, the march seemed obsolete, a throwback to the militant days of yesteryear, a bit embarrassing, certainly unrefined.
But to the Puerto Rican union members, students, parents, young professionals and community activists who converged outside the White House in the largest Puerto Rican protest the nation’s capital has ever seen, it was a proud and historic day.
Called by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, a nearly six-year-old civil rights organization, the march sought to dramatize, its opposition to a series of actions by the U.S. Justice Department, Department of Education and the U.S. Civil Rights Commission that have given the green light across the country to every racist in a position of power who wants to trample on the hard-won civil rights gains of the past 20 years.
And those who marched, who gave a full day out of their year, who paid precious money from their pockets to take long rides in buses and cars just for the chance to shout publicly how they feel, those people were the actual victims of abuses, not “representatives.”
A TEXTBOOK OF INJUSTICE
They were the family members and friends of Wilfredo Santiago, a young Puerto Rican in Philadelphia serving life in prison after being convicted of murdering a policeman in a trial so rife with civil rights violations that it has become a textbook of injustice in that city.
They were the parents of children of PS-16, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where Hasidic Jewish leaders have persuaded the local school board to build a wall in the school separating the Orthodox Jewish children from black and Puerto Rican youth so that the Jewish kids would not be “corrupted”
They were the voters of Jersey City, where last year an incumbent mayor, trying to prevent a large Puerto Rican voter turnout, engineered a massive voter challenge strategy on election day that disenfranchised scores of Puerto Rican and black voters.
JACKSON, TREVINO UNDERSTOOD
They were the families and supporters of more than a dozen Puerto Rican independence activists who have been jailed by the FBI and are facing trial in Hartford, Conn., on charges of conspiracy in relation to a politically motivated Wells Fargo bank robbery several years ago.
Those who came to the march heard messages of solidarity and encouragement from the Rev. Jesse Jackson and from Joe Trevino, executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Jackson and Trevino said they understood why Puerto Ricans, who have the lowest family income levels of any group in the country (except for Native Americans) and who have the highest dropout and unemployment rates of any Hispanic group, had to march by ourselves, had to dramatize our own plight.
Too often, statistics about the economic and social condition of Hispanics in general mask the particularly devastating condition of the 2.5 million Puerto Ricans in this country.
Too often, “Hispanic” progress is actually Cuban progress or Chicano progress, while Puerto Ricans remain mired in poverty.
To recognize1 that is not to be divisive toward la familia latina.
By acknowledging that differences exist among Cubans and Chicanos and Puerto Ricans, we are able to depict the real situation that confronts this nation.
And we are able to demand that those who make policy take that reality into account.
(Juan Gonzalez is a reporter and columnist with The Philadelphia Daily News.)
3,000 PUERTO RICANS PROTEST AT WHITE HOUSE
Sin pelos en la lengua
PLAYING POLITICS: In the bad old days, when Hispanic community representatives timidly approached the gate keepers of our donkey and elephant political preserves to inquire as to when the local king-makers would consider supporting a Latino or Latina candidate, inevitably they were told: “When you get your act together.”
We were never provided with precise directions on how to get our act together. And we never quite succeeded in doing it to the satisfaction of the gate keepers.
In fact, when we went back to the barrio to figure out the rules, Democratic and Republican incumbents were calling a truce long enough to change the rules we were learning- reshaping districts, rewording voting requirements and the like.
Now we’ve entered the ’80s. Our strategic numbers are forcing leaders in both parties to show concern for our political ambitions. Both parties are building at least some Hispanic influence into their superstructures.
But, alas and alack, there are glitches.
For example, California Gov. George Deukmejian has been dutifully making the appropriate mid-level election-year appointments of Hispanics, and he even came out strongly against California’s bigot-infested Proposition 63, the Official-English measure on the November ballot.
But he is opposing the confirmation of our symbol of success, California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, in his reconfirmation vote, and now he has vetoed legislation to extend California’s bilingual education act.
He attacks our role models and our children.
And George Bush, who wants so badly to be our next president, loves to remind us that his son Jeb speaks great Spanish and married a nice Mexican girl.
Well, George left his wife Barbara alone with some reporters at the National Press Club the other day. And Barbara blabbed that she was “appalled” when she learned that the United States had no official language.
“I foresee many problems if you don’t make English the official language,” she said, citing bilingual education as one of those problems.
It’s nice to see the Republican Party permitting people named Martinez and Chdvezand Barrera to adorn their ticket for higher level office. It’s certainly more than the Democratic Party has done.
But really, isn’t it time that both of them got their acts together?
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
CHI CHI RODRIGUEZ, describing Cleveland’s Canterbury Golf Club course after winning the SeniorTournament Players Championship: “Those greens came downhill faster than Jerry Falwell going through Harlem."
Oct. 13,1986
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
POVERTY REVISIONS: The U.S. Census Bureau’s report “Estimates of Poverty Including the Value of Noncash Benefits: 1985” says poverty is not as widespread as believed when benefits such as food stamps are included. The report was not yet available at press time. To order, write for. Technical Paper 56, Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
HIGHER EDUCATION FINANCING: “Five Federal Financial Aid Programs ‘86-‘87” lists and explains grants, work-study programs and loans available from the federal government. For a free copy, write to: Consumer Information Center, Dept., P-72, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
PAY EQUITY: Jobs held by Hispanics and blacks in New York State are undervalued compared to similar ones held by whites, according to a recent report. For a copy, send $3.50 to: National Committee on Pay Equity, Working Paper 17, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
DRUG USE IN SCHOOLS: “Schools Without Drugs” is a 78-page booklet put together by the U.S. Department of Education on detecting drug use and setting and enforcing policy to combat it. For a free copy, write: “Schools Without Drugs,” Pueblo, Colo. 81009 or call toll free at (1)-800-624-0100.
LEGAL REDRESS FOR BIGOTRY: “Striking Back at Bigotry: Remedies Under Federal and State Law for Violence Motivated by Racial, Religious and Ethnic Prejudice” is a handbook outlining, state by state and according to federal law, recourse for prejudice. For a copy, send $15 to: The National Institute Against Prejudice and Violence, 525 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, Md. 21201.
PROVIDING FOR IMMIGRANTS: An increasing demand for bilingual education is one of the problems that will occur as the number of Hispanic and Asian immigrants grows over the next 25 years, according to a report by the American Council of Life Insurance titled “New Immigrants, New Minorities.” For a copy of the 36-page report, write to: ACLI, Social Research Dept., 1850 KSt. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006(202) 862-4370.
SIX-PART SERIES: The Dallas Morning News is compiling its six-part series on the Dallas Hispano into an attractive publication. Fora free copy, write reporter Mercedes Olivers, Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, Dallas, Texas 75265.
CONNECTING
Here are some creative projects nationwide geared to Hispanic youth:
‘FUTURE COLLEGE STUDENT REGISTRY
The University of Southern California has inaugurated a computerized registry of future Hispanic college students in an effort to increase their numbers in higher education.
Junior and senior high school students with college potential may be registered at no charge. They will periodically receive motivational and informative materials about college, including personalized letters, newsletters, brochures and holiday greetings.
To place a student in the registry, you may call the Office of Hispanic Programs, College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at (213) 743-0977 or write its director, Dr. Samuel Mark, at 727 W. 27th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90007. Include the student’s full name, complete mailing address, telephone number and year in school. Other information about the student can be included on a registration card available from the office.
CULTURAL EXCHANGE IN MIAMI
Eighteen Dade County, Fla., high school students- mostly Hispanic - are participating this week in a pilot international student conference in Miami with 21 students from nine Latin American countries.
Eight local organizations cooperated in staging the Oct. 8-15 cultural interchange, which coordinators believe is the first such event of its magnitude sponsored by a public school system.
The participants share in educational and social events ranging from a shared school day, activities at Miami Dade Community College, a dance, visits with legislators and civil leaders, and a reenactment of Columbus’ voyage to the New World at Jose Marti Park.
Coordinating the conference is Olga Bichachi, community relations coordinator, Dade County Public Schools, 1450 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla. 33132.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
The San Antonio Board of Education recently approved a budget for a principal and secretary for its planned new High School for the Performing Arts, signaling that it will be ready for half-day classes next year...
Calendar__________________________
THIS WEEK
HIGHER EDUCATION RETAINMENT Philadephia Oct. 16,17
The American Council on Education will co-sponsor this seminar where about 100 educators from the eastern U.S. will gather to discuss combating the low rate of college completion by Latinos.
Sarah Melendez (202) 939-9395
MISS TEXAS SCHOLARSHIP PAGEANT Galveston, Texas Oct. 16-18 Forty^seven cities from Texas will send their representatives to compete for scholarships in the 2nd Miss Texas-Hispanic Pageant sponsored by Fiestas Patrias of Galveston.
Robert Quintero (409) 763-2348
classical style of flamenco dancing, will be the order of the day when the National Council of Hispanic Women celebrates Columbus Day.
Alba Moesser(202) 639-8823
LATINAS’ LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles Oct. 18
“Meeting the Challenge: A Woman’s Agenda for Success” will be the theme for this leadership development seminar put on by the Hispanic Women’s Council, with California Assemblywoman Gloria Molina as a panelist.
Genoveva Arellano (213) 629-4974
DIA DE LOS MUERTOS Denver Oct. 18-Nov. 16
The Chicano H umanities and Arts Council of Denver will recognize El Dia de los Muertos with a print, photography and contemporary art exhibit in different locations throughout the city.
Patricio Cordova (303) 477-7733
TRAINING CONFERENCE National Hispanic Association Oakland, Calif. Oct. 24-26 Jim Caudiilo (415) 235-4779
LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRANTS SYMPOSIUM
Queens College of New York City Great Neck, N.Y. Oct 30 Barbara Richardson (718) 670-4172
SUCCESS STRATEGIES FOR WOMEN Organization of Pan Asian American Women Chevy Chase, Md. Nov. 1 Cindee Teves Jacobs (301) 530-7219
CINEFESTIVAL ‘86 Guadalupe Theater of San Antonio San Antonio, Texas Nov. 5-14 Cinefestival {512) 271-9070
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS CONFERENCE Reston, Va. Oct. 17-19
Supporting cultural diversity, establishing support networks and developing professionally are topics at the National Association of Independent Schools’ conference for Hispanics and other minorities. Selby Holmberg (617) 723-6900
DIA DE LA RAZA CELEBRATION Washington, D.C. Oct. 18
Food and music, including a demonstration of the 4
COMING SOON
EMPOWERMENT OF FARM WORKERS Rural Opportunities Inc.
Rochester, N.Y. Oct. 23 Stuart Mitchell (716) 546-7180
HISPANIC LITURGICAL CONFERENCE Instituto de Liturgia Hispana Chicago Oct. 23-26 Frank Gutierrez (312) 521-8400
Oct. 13,1986
SPOTLIGHT
EDUCATING MIGRANTS: “Education: The Key to Opening Doors?’ is the title of the National Association of High School Equivalency Programs and College Assistance Migrant Programs’ conference on Oct. 20-24 in Napa, Calif. Devising ways to better serve migrant youth and networking more expansively with government agencies at all levels are topics to be highlighted Forfurther information, contact Helen ’ Galvan at (209) 294-4768.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


c
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
I
DIRECTOR OF LEADERSHIP Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program
for College Graduates and Graduate Students The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc.
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. serves as a clearinghouse for non-legislative programs designed to heighten awareness among the Hispanic community of the American political process. The Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate Students was recently funded by the Ford Foundation to help the Congressional Hispanic (Caucus Institute meet its mandate.
Position Title: Director of Leadership Qualifications: Masters degree or equivalent Salary Range: $25,000 - $30,000
Additional Skills Required:
Evidence of successful management of programs, personnel and fiscal matters. Experience in teaching and/or management. Evidence of successful experience in working with legislative bodies or other agencies/organizations. Training and/or successful background in curriculum development, research activities as well as ability in computer applications and setting up data bases. Demonstrated proficiency in speaking and writing skills. An equivalentcombination of education, training and experience will be given consideration.
Job Summary:
The Director of Leadership reports to the Executive Director of the Caucus Institute. Typical duties include: development of internship sites; intern recruitment and supervision; preparing and administering program budget; preparing and disseminating existing program materials, research and resource materials on leadership; networking, organizing and directing communication and publication materials to provide information to members; and developing a public relations program to promote public and legislative support for leadership endeavors.
Travel will also be required for this position. Additional duties may be assigned by the Executive Director.
For additional information, please contact Ms. Beverly Ellerman, Executive Director, Congressional Hispanic Caucus, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002.
WANTED: Hispanic copy/journalist/writer. Salary negotiable. Los Angeles. Call Lisa Baca (213) 663-4755.
r-----------------------------------—-------
TALENT I
-------------------------------------J
CARMELO MELENDEZ, resident of Merrillville, Ind., seeks employment in the private sector. Has degree (BA) in health science administration and extensive experience in preparing civil rights and analytical reports. Experience includes 14 years in federal service as well as 10 years in TV as a producer and host of a weekly show in Chicago. Interested in working in management, human resources or public relations in the corporate sector. Would consider relocation depending on the job offer, but would prefer to stay in the Midwest (Chicago, Indiana). Please respond to: Carmelo Melendez, WCIU, Channel 26,141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, III. 60604 (219) 980-3797 evenings or (312) 663-0271 days.
^ FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES J

U.S. GOVERNMENT
SECIIIIY
OFFICERS
SECURE YOUR FUTURE WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT
If you want a career in security, who better to protect than the National Security Agency? We have numerous vacancies on our staff of Uniformed Protective Officers in the Fort Meade, Maryland area.
The work is challenging and responsible—protecting federal property, keeping order, and ensuring the safety of personnel under all circumstances.
• Salary is $15,865 or more based on experience.
• Candidates must be high school graduates and over 19 with 2 years general work experience, military background, or 2 years college.
• Applicants are subject to security clearance investigation.
• Successful applicants will undergo 8 weeks of training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Georgia.
• Good entry into federal workforce or second income for physically fit retirees.
• Driver's license required.
• Successful candidates will be required to carry firearms.
Please send us your resume, letter of interest, or SF-171.
National Security Agency Attn. M322 (DBJ)
Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6000
U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members.
An equal opportunity employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach ypur ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
G
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
1
Atlantic Resources Corporation, Washington, D.C., can do your research. ARC has a history of working with Hispanic non-profit organizations as well as the federal government. We do demographic studies, evaluation and economic impact studies. For more information contact Cristobal Berry-Caban at (703) 476-0832. Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
MORE ART FOR THE AMERICAS: Festivals throughout the month of October highlight Hispanic art in the hemisphere.
The 14th annual Festival Internacional Cenvartino gets underway this week in Guanajuato, Mexico, with the participation of four U.S.1 groups and at least one U.S. Hispanic artist.
Two of the participating groups hail from Arizona. Pianist David Lopez will travel with Gregg Armstrong, John Snavel and Elizabeth Ervin-all members of the Phoenix-based Sonora Quartet. Also from Phoenix, the Jazz Berry Jam group will give various performances. ,
The other two U.S. groups are The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet and the Ohio Ballet. Two current members of the Cincinnati-based ballet - Xozhitl Tejada and Mercedes Gudino- are Mexican nationals.
A total of 33 countries will be represented at the festival, which begins Oct. 17 with the ballet Mural performed by the Ballet Folklorico of the University of Colima Choreographed by Raphael Zamarripa, the work is based on Diego Rivera’s mural Sueho de urta tarde de domingo en la Alameda Central, which survived last year’s earthquake
in Mexico City.
Coincidentally, a current exhibit commemorates the 10Oth anniversary of the birth of Rivera. Over 300 works are part of Diego Rivera: A Retrospective, now at Mexico City’s Palacio de las Bellas Aries.
The exhibit began in the United States with the rediscovery, at the Detroit Art Institute, of 13 drawings that had been lost for 47 years The show was also seen at the Philadelphia Art Museum. Funds raised in the United States from the exhibit will be used to help restore several Diego Rivera murals in Mexico.
Other Hispanic art festivals continue in the United States.
In Miami, the city’s Hispanic Heritage Festival continues Oct. 17 with the world premiere of the Miami City Ballet at the Gusman Cultural Center. A work by Peruvian choreographer Jimmy Gamonet de los Heros is included in the premiere. Edward Villella is the ballef s artistic director; Hispanic dancers include Maria Elena Mencia, Yanis Pikieris and Marfa Verdeja.
In Iowa City, the 2nd annual Festival del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano is staged Oct. 14-18, with entries from Cuba, Chile, Venezuela, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Colombia, Argentina and the United States. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
AUTUMN READING: Following is the final installment in a compilation of recently, or soon-to-be, published books by Hispanic authors or on topics of relevance to Hispanics:
“LET ALL OF THEM TAKE HEED”: MEXI-1 CAN AMERICANS AND THE CAMPAIGN FOR EDUCATIONAL EQUALITY, 1929-1981, by Guadalupe San Miguel (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 304 pp., $25.00 hardcover.
This book examines, through the activities of the League of United Latin American Citizens, American Gl Forum and Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, as well as interviews with individuals, how and why educational policies in this country were implemented, and how they placed Hispanics at the periphery.
MIRROR OF LANGUAGE: THE DEBATE ON BILINGUALISM, by Kenji Hakuta(Basic Books, 10 E. 53rd St., New York, N.Y. 10022), $18.95 hardcover.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,, •Phil Garcia. V
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Free of the rhetoric and hyperbole so often associated with the issue of bilingual education, Hakuta’s book offers evidence that educating children in their native language is beneficial and promotes the growth of cognitive skills.
MURDER UNDER TWO FLAGS: THE U.S., PUERTO RICO, AND THE CERRO MARA-1 VILLA COVER-UP, by Anne Nelson (Ticknor & Fields, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, N.Y.
10017), 269 pp., $17.95 hardcover.
Nelson’s book traces U.S.-Puerto Rico relations from 1898 to present and the island’s political climate. The book uses as its center-piece the killing of two pro-independence men in 1978 by Puerto Rican police atop the mountain Cerro Maravilla.
REQUIEM FOR A WOMAN’S SOUL, by Omar Rivabella(Random House,201 E.50th St., New York, N.Y. 10022), 116 pp., $14.95 hardcover.
Argentine Rivabella’s novel is narrated by a l priest in an unnamed Latin American country. \ The cleric pieces together scraps of paper' that turn out to be the diary of a woman in prison and her ordeal, frought with torture and other human rights abuses.
THE THREE WARS OF ROY BENAVIDEZ,
by Medal of Honor winner Roy Benavfdez and Pulitzer Prize-winner Oscar Griffin (Corona Publishing Co., 1037 S. Alamo, San Antonio, Texas 78210), $17.95 hardcover.
Scheduled for publication on Veterans’ Day (Nov. 11), this book tells of Benavidez’s struggle against poverty and prejuduce while growing up in South Texas, his experience in Vietnam, and his decade-long battle with the federal government to obtain his medal.
WITH THESE HANDS, photographs by Ken Light, essay by Paula DjPerna, and preface by Cesar Chavez (Pilgrim Press, 132 W. 31 st St., New York, N.Y. 10001). 128 pp., $9.95 paperbound.
With 65 duo-tone photographs, this book sympathetically examines the hard life of farmworkers in the United States.
LOS TUCSONENSES, by Thomas E Sheridan (University of Arizona Press, 1615 E. Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85719), 300 pages with 40 illustrations, $22.50 clothbound.
This scholarly yet passionate book celebrates the role of the Mexican community in Tucson between 1854 and 1941 and traces its gradual loss of economic and political power.
- Felix Perez
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Making The News This Week Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley names Leila Gonzalez-Correa as executive director of the L.A. City Housing Authority. Gonzalez Correa, formerly head of the Austin , Te x as , Housing Authority, is of Puerto Rican descent. .. Jane Delgado, chairperson of the Consor .tium of National Hispanic Organizations, requests a meeting with Japan' s Ambassador to the United States Nobuo Matsunaga to prevent future occurrences such as "the offensive and demeaning remarks " Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone used to describe the education level of U . S . Hispanics and blacks. . . Chicago Mayor Harold Washington appoints Maria Teresa Ayala as assistant . director of the Mayor's Commission on Women's Affairs . Ayala now serves as the president of the board of the /nstituto de Progreso Latino, an adult-educatio n center based in the Pilsen section of Chicago. . . The five permanent members of tlie, Nations Security Council, which include the the Soviet Union, virtually assure Javier Perez de Cuellar his re-election as the international body's secretary generaJ. .. ,T.b.e .j20 o.f the California Catholic Conference urge) : lla.f $tate' s the November ballot referendum that w euld make English the state's official language ... Lance Cpl . Jose Rodriguez, 23 and a paraplegic, receives the Marine Corps National Achievement Medal for his role in saving the lives of seven fellow Marines ... Diego Lopez, 41, a social worker, psychotherapist and former clinical director of New York' s Gay Men' s Health Crisis, a model for A I DS service agencies in other cities, dies from complications related to AIDS ... VoL4 ""4 ' I HI SPAN JC LJ N K WEEKLY REPORT liiioiiict.iii13,iii19iii86 GOP Fields Three Major Hispanic Candidates Two Latinos and a Latinaall Republicansare running Nov. in their states for major elective office, offering the GOP an unprecedented chance to broaden its appeal among increasingly independent-minded Hispanic voters. If all gain their victories-none is a sure bet-the Republican Party will be able to claim an impressive set of modern-day firsts: • The first Hispanic governor of Florida. • Texas' first Latino elected to statewide office. • The first Latina elected to the U.S. Senate. Primary victories this summer and fall by ex-Tampa, Florida, mayor Bob Martinez, Texas attorney general candidate Roy Barrera Jr. and former Wh ite House aide Linda Chavez in Maryland's U .S. Senate race bring a new variable to national politics. They come in the afterglow of President Reagan ' s record showings among Latino voters by a GOP presidential. nominee. In the 1980 general election, Reagan was estimated to have attracted 30-35% of the Hispanic vote ; in 1984, between 35-40%. Martinez, Barrera and Chavez all are ex Democrats, Reagan-era converts. All are considered conservative. Martinez, 51, won his Sept 30 Florida Repub lican gubernatorial runoff with former U.S . Congressman Lou Frey by a 2-1 margin. Exit polls that day showed him to be favored over his Democratic opponent, Steve Pajcic , a . liberal state representative, 51 %-49%. In a state where registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans by 1.1 million , Martinez needs to add many Demo cratic voters to his Tampa and Dade County/ Cuban bases. Barrera, 34, trailed incumbent Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox 53%-26% in a September Gallup Poll. An earlier state poll showed h i m running even more poorly among Latino voters. continued o n page 2 Aliens Captured Up 330/o More than 1 .77 million undocumented work ers were apprehended by the U.S. Border Patrol in fiscal year 1986, which ended Sept. 30, the agency reported. The figure was a one-third increase over the previous fiscal year. Nearly all were caught along the Mexico border and all but 60,000 of them gave Mexico as their country of origin, a spokesman said. Dallas Latinos c all for Cou . ncil Seat At the prodding of Hispanics, the Dallas City Council unanimously voted Oct. 1 to study the redrawing of eight of its 1 0 council, districts to increase the chance of electing a Latino. A majority of the Council also stated it wanted to have researched the concept of 1 0 single-member districts. Currently , two of the _ Miami Judge Locks Up Fugitive's Family, Boss The parents, sisters and boss of Hialeah salesman Rafael Morales were released from the Dade Country, Fla, jail Sept. 26 pending appeal of a contempt citation against them for Morales' failure to show up for his trial after he had been released in their custody. Rafael Morales Sr., 67, his wife Gloria, 56, their daughters Ana , 22,and Maria Chavez , 31, and employer, Jose Garcia , 36, were sentenced by Dade Circuit Judge Margarita Esquiroz to 30 days i n jail . Rafael Morales Jr. was re leased into their custody in March when the five promised he would show up for trial on a cocaine trafficking charge. The Morales family and Garcia appeared H1e day of the trial without Morales. When they said they did not know his whereabouts, Judge Esquiroz promptly held them all in contempt. After spending the night in jail, the group was released pending their appeal of the ruling. Morales Jr. , 33, is still at large . If convicted, he faces a minimum sentence of 15 ,Council districts are elected at-large. Mayor ; Starke Taylor, who opposed the 10 single ;member district proposal, is also elected at , large. Changing the districts to single-member requires a citywide referendum, with August 1987 the earliest possible date. Rene Martinez, a spokesman for the Committee on Mexican American Representation , said his group wants an election by April 1987. The U . S . Justice Department would ihave to approve the His panics' preferred redistricting proposal by Feb. 12, the election filing deadline. Hispanics make up i 5% of Dallas' population . Only three Latinos have served on the body in the city's history. Uvaldo Martinez Guilty The highest ranking Hispanic elected Republican official in California, San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez, pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to two felony charges of misusing a city credit card. Martinez, as a result of plea bargaining had 22 like felony charges dropped and to resign from the Council before his Nov . 13 sentencing date. In addition, the councilman will be required to pay partial or full restitution to the city for the more than$1,800 in abused funds. A report by Martinez, 43, to the city auditor revealed that he frequently entertained local developers, politicians and members ofthe media at expensive restaurants. The two ;charges Martinez admitted guilt to amount to

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$6.5 Million Awarded to Retarded Boy, Mother An eight-year-old boy and his mother were awarded $6. 5 million Oct. 3 by a U . S . District Court jury in Newark, N.J., for brain damage and other handicaps the boy suffered at birth. Daniel Salas and his mother, Maria Salas, 35, who now live in Hialeah, Fla., won the verdict against her obstetrician, Dr. Sun Mei Wang, and the chief obstetrics resident at the time for the hospital, Dr. Nicholas MarinO. Three of the five nurses assisting at the birth were also found negligent. Interest accrued since the lawsuit was filed in May 1983 will raise the settlement to nearly $10 million. Witnesses testified that Marino was pre judiced against Orientals and interfered with Wang at the time of birth. According to witnesses, Marino shoved Wang away from the operating table during a dispute. . The !awyer for Salas charged the doctors' behavior deprived the baby of oxygen, leading to his current condition. Daniel is confined to a wheelchair, is unable to feed himself and cannot control his bodily functions. Wang was found liable for 55% of the da mage, Marino for 30%, two nurses for 6% each and the third nurse for 3% . Jobless Rate Inches Up There were 906,000 Hispanics without in September, an increase from August that sent the unemployment rate from 11. 0% to 11.1% according to figures released by the U.S. Department of Labor Oct. 3 . The Hispanic unemployment rate again will fall between that of whites (6.2%) and blacks (14.8%). . . September was the third consecutive mont!" Hispanic joblessness experienced an increase . • Calif. Bilingual Ed Veto Angers Latinos Hispanics educational organizations and leaders on Oct. 3 railed against the veto by California Gov. George Deukmejian three days earlier of a bill that would have extended until 1992 bilingual education law in that state. Los Angeles School Board member Larry Gonzalez said Deukmejian's veto "is telling us to go back to the days of sink-or-swim." Ramon Cortines, San Francisco Schools superintendent, called the veto "a political decision and not an educational" one. Current California bilingual education law does not expire until June 1987. The governor said it was too early to extend the law until the state Department of Finance had a chance to determine its cost effectiveness. Shelly Spiegel-Coleman, president of the California Association for Bilingual Education, countered that the Sunset Review Committee, Cuba Visa Rule Changed Cuban exiles who arrived in Panama before Aug. 22 will continue to have their immigrant visas processed, announced the U . S . State Department Oct. 3, six weeks after the agency said it would no longer issue visas to anyone who emigrated from Cuba to the United States by way of a third country. The Reagan administration promulgated the initial visa stricture , along with several other Cuba-immigration toughening measures, in an effort to stop the alleged Cuban govern ment practice of charging emigres and their families $30,000 and up to leave Cuba. The measures were also a way for the administration to express its displeasure with Cuba President Fidel Castro's decision to renege on a pact to take back 2,746 people who came here on the 1980 Mariel boatlift. Castro balked when Radio Marti, a U .S. -controlled station , began broadcasting to Cuba. empaneled by Deukmejian, found that bilingual education programs were the most cost efficient and effective way to help .limitedEnglish proficient students learn the language. The bill, sponsored by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown from San Francisco, defined in great detail the use of bilingual programs , from eliminating the requirement that one third of students in a bilingual class be English speakers to allowing parents to withdraw their children from bilingual education classes . Also expressing their contempt for the veto were the Association of Mexican American Educators, the Mexican American Education Commission and the Mexican American Political Association . In 1986,3% of the state's$3. 2 billion budget for education went to education services for limited-Englishproficient students. More than 550,000 of California's 4 million students are not proficient in English. GOP Fields 3 Hispanics continued from page 1 To win , Barrera must score heavily with conserv ative Anglos and with liberal Latinos. Chavez, 39, quit as director of the White House office of public liaison Feb. 3 to seek the Republican nomination and, with support from friends in the White House, made it look easy . There is no real Hispanic voting bloc in Maryland, which may be to her advantage . As staff director of the U . S . Commission on Civil Rights from November 1983 until April of 1985, her positions and critical remarks about U.S. Hispanic leadership brought her in constant conflict with Latino community activists . New Formula 'Trims' Poverty Rolls An effective and knowledgeable speaker, she faces three main obstacles: She has lived in the state only a few years , the Demo cratic Party there is entrenched and well organized, and her opponent is the popular U.S. Rep . Barbara Mikulski . One recent poll gives Mikulski a 20-point edge. The number of Hispanics living in poverty in 1985 would have decreased from 5.2 million to 3.4 million had food stamps, housing sub sidies, Medicaid and Medicare been given a market value, reports a U.S. Census Bureau study released Oct. 2. According to the official poverty rate , which does not take into account non-cash benefits, the percentage of Hispanics living in poverty rose from 28 . 4% in 1984 to 29% in 1985 . When figuring in government aid programs, however , the number of impoverished Hispanics de crea-sed from 19.9% to 18.9%. "Estimates of Poverty Including the Value of Non-Cash Benefits" uses three models to revise poverty numbers: market value, recipient value and poverty budget share value. Cash recipient value is the amount of money a person will accept for a non-cash benefit. The poverty budget share approach equates non cash benefits to the amount of money neces sary to meet the basic needs of an individual or family . Depending on which definition is used the number of Hispanics falling below the federal governmenfs poverty threshold ranges from a lowof3.4 million to a high of4. 3 million. The measuring stick used by the federal government to quantify poverty in 1985 was income .less than $1 0,989 for a family of four. The overall rate for 1985 decreased to 14.0% from 14.4% the previous year. Giving a market value to food, housing and medical benefits in 1985 would have slashed 11.5 million persons from the overall official poverty estimates, finds the report. Allowing non-cash benefits to be included in preparing poverty data has come under fire because eligibility for many federal aid programs is linked to the poverty level. In 1985 the federal government gave out $127 billion in assistance to low-income indi viduals, more than half of which went to Medicare, the health insurance program for the elderly and handicapped. POVERTY LEVELS FOR 1984-85. Official Market Definition Value* 1984 1985 1984 1985 Hisp. 28.4% 29.0% 19.9% 18.9% Black 33.8 31.3 20.5 18.9 White 11.5 11. 4 8 . 0 7 . 7 *This measure gives cash value to benefits including food, housing and all medical care . Source: Bureau of the Census' " Estimates of Poverty Includ ing the Value of Non Cash Benefits." Nationally, GOP officials are flaunting the primary race victories of Martinez, Chavez and Barrera as evidence that the political future for Hispanics lies with them . Tirso del Junco, former California GOP chairman, argues that Hispanics overall -younger ones in particular-"are identifying more with the philosophies of the Republican Party." Richard Santillan, associate professor of ethnic studies at California State University, Pomona, has spent nearly three years inter viewing 300 Hispanic GOP activists nationwide. He notes that until the 1930s and the New Deal era, an overwhelming majority of Hispanics belonged to the Republican Party . While moderate party leaders have shep herded Hispanics back into the fold with some visible success in the last 15 years, he says, many long-time Latino Republicans are now becoming "very angry" at the minimal gains in small business and minority enterprise development and, most pointedly, the absence of a Hispanic in the Reagan Cabinet. "Where Mexican Americans find themselves right now is, really, without a political party," Santillan states. Phil Garcia Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Juan Gonzalez, 9 uest columnist Marching on Washington More than 3,000 Puerto Ricans just did something that's out of style. On Oct. 4, we marched on Washinton, D.C., protesting civil rights abuses against Puerto Ricans. To some polished, cosmopolitan Hispanic leaders who in the past decade have sought to ride the surfboard of Latino voting strength into posts as junior partners to the nation's movers and shakers, the march seemed obsolete, a throwback to the militant days of a bit embarrassing, certainly unrefined. But to the Puerto Rican union members, students, parents, young professionals and community activists who converged outside 3 ,000 PUERTO RICANS PROTEST AT WHITE HOUSE the White House in the largest Puerto Rican •------------------------.. protest the nation ' s capital has ever seen, it was a proud and historic day. Called by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights , a nearly six-year-old Sin pelos en Ia lengua civil rights organization, the march sought PLAYING POLITICS: In the bad old days , when Hispanic to dramatize its opposition to a series of community representatives timidly approached the gate keepers actions by the U.S. Justice Department, of our donkey and elephant political preserves to inquire as to of Education and the U.S. Civil when the local king-makers would consider supporting a Latino or Rights Commission that have given the green light across the Latina candidate, inevitably they were told: "When you get your country to e v ery racist in a position of power who wants to trample on act together. " the hard-won ci v il rights gains of the past 20 years. we were never provided with precise directions on how to get And those who marched, who gave a full day out of their year, who our act together. And we never quite succeeded in doing it to the paid prec ious money from their pockets to take long rides in buses satisfaction of the gate keepers. and cars just for the chance to shout publicly how they feel , those In fact, when we went back to the barrio to figure out the rules, people were the actual victims of abuses, not "representatives." Democratic and Republican incumbents were calling a truce long A TEXTBOOK OF INJUSTICE enough to change the rules we were learning-reshaping districts, They were the family members and friends of Wilfredo Santiago, a rewording voting requirements and the like. young Puerto Rican in Philadelphia serving life in prison after being Now we ' ve entered the '80s. Our strategic numbers are forcing convicted of murdering a policeman in a trial so rife with civil rights leaders in both parties to show concern for our political ambitions. violations that it has become a textbook of injustice in that city. Both parties are building at least some Hispanic influence into They were the parents of children of PS-16, in Williamsburg, their superstructures. Brooklyn , where Hasidic Jewish leaders have persuaded the local But, alas and alack, there are glitches. school board to build a wall in the school separating the Orthodox For example, California Gov. George Deukmejian has been J e w is h children from black and Puerto Rican youth so that the Jewish dutifully making the appropriate mid-level election-year appointments kids would not be " corrupted." of Hispanics, and he even came out strongly against California's The y were the voters of Jersey City, where last year an incumbent bigot-infested Proposition 63, the Official-English measure on the m a y o r , trying to prevent a large Puerto Rican voter turnout , engineered a November ballot. mas si ve voter challenge strategy on election day that disenfranchised But he is opposing the confirmation of our symbol of success, scores of Puerto Rican and black voters. California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso . in his reJACKSON, TREVINO UNDERSTOOD confirmation vote , and now he has vetoed legislation to extend They were the families and supporters of more than a dozen Puerto California' s bilingual education act. Rican independence activists who have been jailed by the FBI and He attacks our role models and our children. are facing trial in Hartford , Conn., on charges of conspiracy in relation And George Bush, who wants so badly to be our next president, to a politically motivated Wells Fargo bank robbery several years ago. loves to remind us that his son Jeb speaks great Spanish and Those who came to the march heard messages of solidarity and married a nice Mexican girl. encouragement from the Rev. Jesse Jackson and from Joe Trevino, Well, George left his wife Barbara alone with some reporters at executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens. the National Press Club the other day. And Barbara blabbed that Jackson and Trevino said they understood why Puerto Ricans , who she was "appalled" when she learned that the United States had have the lowest family income levels of any group in the country no official language. (except for Native Americans) and who have the highest dropout and " I foresee many problems if you don't make English the official unemployment rates of any Hispanic group, had to march by ourselves, language, " she said, citing bilingual education as one of those had to dramatize our own plight. problems. Too often, statistics about the economic and social condition of lfs nice to see the Republican Party permitting people named Hispanics in general mask the particularly devastating condition of Martinez and Chavez and Barrera to adorn their ticket for higher the 2 . 5 million Puerto Ricans in this country. level office. lfs certainly more than the Democratic Party has Too often, "Hispanic" progress is actually Cuban progress or done. Chicano progress, while Puerto Ricans remain mired in poverty. But really, isn't it time that both of them got their acts together? To recognize' that is not to be divisive toward Ia familia latina By acknowledging that differences exist among Cubans and Chicanos -Q t • and Puerto Ricans, we are able to depict the real situation that UO Jng confronts this nation. • • • And we are able to demand that those who make policy take that reality into account. (Juan Gonzalez is a reporter and columnist with The Philadelphia Daily News.) CHI CHI RODRIGUEZ, describing Cleveland' s Canterbury Golf Club course after winning the Senior Tournament Players Championship: "Those greens came downhill faster than Jerry Falwell going through Harlem." 3 Oct. 13,1986 Hispanic Link Weekly Report '

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COLLECTING POVERTY REVISIONS: The U.S. Census Bureau's report"Estimates of Poverty Including the Value of Noncash Benefits: 1985" says poverty is not as widespread as believed when benefits such as food stamps are included. The report was not yet available at press time. To order, write for. Technical Paper 56, Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. HIGHER EDUCATION FINANCING: "Five Federal Financial Aid Programs '86-'87" lists and explains grants, work-study programs and loans available from the federal government. For a free copy, write to: Consumer Information Center, Dept., P-72, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. PAY EQUITY: Jobs held by Hispanics and blacks in New York State are undervalued compared to similar ones held by whites, according to a recent report. For a copy, send $3.50 to: National Committee on Pay Equity, Working Paper 17, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20036. DRUG USE IN SCHOOLS: "Schools Without Drugs" is a 78-page booklet put together by the U.S. Department of Education on detecting drug use and setting and enforcing policy to combat it. For a free copy, write: "Schools Without Drugs," Pueblo, Colo. 81 009 or call toll free at (1 )-800-624-0 1 00. LEGAL REDRESS FOR BIGOTRY: "Striking Back at Bigotry: Remedies Under Federal and State Law for Violence Motivated by Racial, Religious and Ethnic Prejudice" is a handbook outlining, state by state and according to federal law, recourse for prejudice. For a copy, send $15 to: The National Institute Against Prejudice and Violence, 525 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, Md. 21201. PROVIDING FOR IMMIGRANTS: An increasing demand for bilingual education is one ofthe problems that will occur as the number of His panic and Asian immigrants grows over the next 25 years, according to a report by the American Council of Life Insurance titled" New Immigrants, New Minorities. " For a copy of the 36-page report, write to: ACLI, Social Research Dept., 1850 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 862-4370. SIXPART SERIES: The Dallas Morning News is compiling its six part series on the Dallas Hispano into an attractive publication. For a fre e copy, write reporter Mercedes Olivera, Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, Dallas, Texas 75265. CONNECTING Here are some creative projects nationwide geared to Hispanic youth: 'FUTURE COLLEGE STUDENT' REGISTRY The University of Southern California has inaugurated a computerized registry of future Hispanic college students in an effort to increase their numbers in higher education. Junior and senior high school students with college potential may be registered at no charge. They will periodically receive motivational and informative materials about college, including personalized letters, newsletters, brochures and holiday greetings. To place a student in the registry, you may call the Office of Hispanic Programs, College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at (213) 743-0977 or write its director, Dr. Samuel Mark, at 727 W. 27th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90007. Include the student's full name, complete mailing address, telephone number and year in school. Other in formation about the student can be included on a registration card available from the office. CULTURAL EXCHANGE IN MIAMI Eighteen Dade County, Fla., high school students.:. mostly Hispanic -are participating this week in a pilot international student conference in Miami with 21 students from nine Latin American countries. Eight local organizations cooperated in staging the Oct. 8-15 cultural interchange, which coordinators believe is the first such event of its magnitude sponsored by a public school system. The participants share in educational and social events ranging from a shared school day, activities at Miami Dade Community College, a dance, visits with legislators and civil leaders, and a re enactment of Columbus' voyage to the New World at Jose Marti Park . Coordinating the conference is Olga Bichachi, community relations coordinator, Dade County Public Schools, 1450 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla . 33132. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES The San Antonio Board of Education recently approved a budget for a principal and secretary for its planned new High School for the Performing Arts, signaling that it will be ready for half-day classes next year ... Calendar classical style of flamenco. dancing, will be the order of the day when the National Council of Hispanic Women celebrates Columbus Day. TRAINING CONFERENCE National Hispanic Association Oakland, Calif. Oct. 24-26 THIS WEEK HIGH, ER EDUCATION RETAINMENT Philadephia Oct. 16,17 The American Council on Education will co-sponsor this seminar where about 100 educators from the eastern U.S. will gather to discuss combating the low rate of college completion by Latinos. Sarah Melendez (202) 939-9395 MISS TEXAS SCHOLARSHIP PAGEANT Galveston, Texas Oct. 16-18 Forty-seven cities from Texas will send their repre sentatives to compete for scholarships in the 2nd Miss Texas-Hispanic Pageant sponsored by Fiestas Patrias of Galveston. Robert Quintero (409) 763-2348 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS CONFERENCE Reston, Va. Oct. 17-19 Supporting cultural diversity, establishing support networks and developing professionally are topics at the National Association of Independent Schools' conference for Hispanics and other minorities. Selby Holmberg (617) 723-6900 DIA DE LA RAZA CELEBRATION Washington, D.C. Oct. 1 8 Food andmusic, including a demonstration of the 4 Alba Moesser (202) 639-8823 LATINAS' LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles Oct. 18 "Meeting the Challenge: A Woman ' s Agenda for Success" will be the theme for this leadership development seminar put on by the Hispanic Women's Council, with California Assemblywoman Gloria Molina as a panelist. Genoveva Arellano (213) 629-497 4 DIA DE LOS MUERTOS Denver Oct. 18-Nov. 16 The Chicano Humanities and Arts Council of Denver will recognize El Dia de los Muertos with a print, photography and contemporary art exhibit in different locations throughout the city. Patricio Cordova (303) 477-7733 COMING SOON EMPOWERMENT OF FARM WORKERS Rural Opportunities Inc. Rochester, N . Y . Oct. 23 Stuart Mitchell (716) 546-7180 HISPANIC LITURGICAL CONFERENCE /nstituto de Liturgia Hispana Chicago Oct. 23-26 Frank Gutierrez (312) 52-1-8400 Oct. 13, 1986 Jim Caudillo(415) 235-4779 LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRANTS SYMPOSIUM Queens College of New York City Great Neck, N .Y. Oct. 30 Barbara Richardson (718) 670-4172 SUCCESS STRATEGIES FOR WOMEN Organization of Pan Asian American Women Chevy Chase, Md. Nov. 1 Cindee Teves Jacobs (301} 530-7219 CINEFESTIVAL 'Bf. Guadalupe Theater of San Antonio San Antonio, Texas Nov. 5-14 Cine festival (512} 271-9070 SPOTLIGHT EDUCATING MIGRANTS: "Education: The Key to Opening Doors" is the title of the National Association of High School Equivalency Programs and College Assistance Migrant Programs' conference on Oct. 20-24 in Napa, Calif. Devising ways to better serve migrant youth and networking more expansively with government agencies at all levels are topics to be highlighted. For further information, contact Helen ' Galvan at (209} 294-4768. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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(coRPORATE CLASSIFIEDS] DIRECTOR OF LEADERSHIP Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate Students The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc . serves as a clearinghouse for non-legislative programs designed to heighten awareness among the Hispanic community of the American political process. The Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate St udents was recently funded by the Ford Foundation to help the Congressional Hispanic , Caucus Institute meet its mandate . Position Title: Director of Leadership Qualifications: Master's degree or equivalent Salary Range : $25,000-$30,000 Additional Skills Required: Eviden ce of successful management of pro grams, personnel and fiscal matters. Experience in teach ing and/or management. Evidence of successful experience in working with legislative bodies or other agencies/organizations. Training and/or successful background in curriculum development, research activities as well as ability in computer applications and setting up data bases. Demonstrated proficiency in speaking and writing skills. An equivalent combination of education , training and experience will be given consideration. Job Summary: The Director of Leadership reports to the Executive Director of the Caucus Institute. Typical duties include: development of internship sites; intern recruitment and supervision ; preparing and administering program budget; preparing and disseminating existing program materials , research and resource materials on leadership ; networki ng , organizing and directing com muni ca tion and publication materials to provide information to members; and developing a public relations program to promote public and legis lative support for leadership endeavors. Travel will also be required for this position . Additional duties may be assigned by the Executive Director . For additional information, please contact Ms. Beverly Ellerman , Executive Director , Con gressional Hispanic Caucus , 504 C St. NE , Washington , D . C . 20002. WANTED: Hispanic copy/journalist/writer. Salary negotiable . Los Angeles. Call Lisa Baca (213) 663-4755. [ TALENT ] CARMELO MELENDEZ, resident of Merrill ville, Ind., seeks employment in the private sector. Has degree (BA) in health science administration and extensive experience in pre paring civil rights and analytical reports . Ex perience includes 14 years in federal service as well as 10 years in TV as a producer and host of a weekly show in Chicago. Interested in working in management, human resources or public relations in the corporate sector. Would consider relocation depending on the job offer , but would prefer to stay in the Midwest(Chicago, Indiana) . Please respond to: Carmela Melendez, WCIU, Channel 26, 141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Ill. 60604 (219) 980-3797 evenings or (312) 663-0271 days . Atlantic Resources Corporation, Wash ington, D . C., can do your research . ARC has a history of working with Hispanic non-profit organ izations as well as the federal government. We do demographic studies, evaluation and economic impact studies. For more information contact Cristobal BerryCaban at (703) 476-0832. Hispanic Link Weekly Report FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES U.S. GOVERNMENT SEI:IRITY IFFII:ERS SECURE YOUR FUTURE WITH THE U .S. GOVERNMENT If you want a career in security, who better to protect than the National Security Agency? We have numerous vacancies on our staff of Uniformed Protective Officers in the Fort Meade, Maryland area. The work is challenging and responsible-protecting federal property, keeping order, and ensuring the safety of personnel under all circumstances. • Salary is $15,865 or more based on experience. • Candidates mu s t be high school graduates and aver 19 with 2 years general work e xperience, military background, or 2 years college. • Applicants are subject to security clearance investigation. • Successful applicants will undergo 8 weeks of training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Georgia. • Good entry into federal workforce or second income for physically fit retirees. • Driver' s license required. • Successful candidates will be required to carry firearms. Please send us your resume, letter of interest, or SF-171. National Security Agency Attn. M322 (DBJ) Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6000 U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members. An equal opportunity employer. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTORi No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed ,of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach ypur ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C.' 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (En Tuesday be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by----------Title -::--:--:-=---------Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name---------Bill Address City, Stat-e-::&-:Z::i-p--------5

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Arts & Entertainment in Mexico City. Coincidentally, a current exhibit commemorates the 1 OOth anniversary of the birth of Rivera. Over 300 works are part of Diego Rivera: A Retrospective , now at Mexico City's Palacio de las Bellas Artes. MORE ART FOR THE AMERICAS: Festivals through-out the month of October highlight Hispanic art in the hemisphere. The 14th annual Festiva/lnternacional Cenvartino gets under way this week in Guanajuato, Mexico, with the participation of four U . S. groups and at least one U.S. Hispanic artist. Two of the participating groups hail from Arizona. Pianist David Lopez will travel with Gregg Armstrong, John Snavel and Elizabeth Ervinall members of the Phoenix-based Sonora Quartet. Also from Phoenix, the Jazz Berry Jam group will give various performances. The exhibit began in the United States with the rediscovery, at the Detroit Art Institute, of 13 drawings that had been lost for 47 years. The show was also seen at the Philadelphia Art Museum . Funds raised in the United States from the exhibit will be used to help restore several Diego Rivera murals in Mexico. Other Hispanic art festivals continue in the United States. The other two U . S . groups are The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet and the Ohio Ballet. Two current members of the Cincinnati-based ballet Xozhitl Tejada and Mercedes Gudino-are Mexican nationals. In Miami, the city's Hispanic Heritage Festival continues Oct. 17 with the world premiere of the Miami City Ballet at the Gusman Cultural Center. A work by Peruvian choreographer Jimmy Gamonet de los Heros is included in the premiere. Edward Villella is the ballet's artistic director; Hispanic dancers include Maria Elena Mencia, Yanis Pikieris and Maria Verdeja. A total of 33 countries will be represented at the festival, which begins Oct. 17 with the ballet Mural performed by the Ballet Folkl6rico of the University of Colima. Choreographed by Raphael Zamarripa, the work is based on Diego Rivera's mural Suefw de una tarde de cj!?mingo en Ia Alameda Centra( which survived last year's earthquake In Iowa City, the 2nd annual Festival del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano is staged Oct. 14-18, with entries from Cuba, Chile, Venezuela, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Colombia, Argentina and the United States. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report AUTUMN READING: Following is the final installment in a compilation of recently, or soon-to-be, published books by Hispanic authors or on topics of relevance to Hispanics: "LET ALL OF THEM TAKE HEED": MEXI- • CAN AMERICANS AND THE CAMPAIGN FOR EDUCATIONAL EQUALITY, by Guadalupe San Miguel (University of Texas Press , P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 304 pp. , $25.00 hardcover. This book examines, through the activities of the League of United Latin American Citizens, American Gl Forum and Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, as well as interviews with individuals, how and why educational policies in this country were im plemented, and how tf]ey placed Hispanics at the periphery. MIRROR OF LANGUAGE: THE DEBATE ON BILINGUALISM, by Kenji Hakuta(Basic Books, 10 E. 53rd St., New York, N.Y . 1 0022), $18.95 hardcover. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of . Hispanic Link News Service, Inc: 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen.Mendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antoni? fvlejias-Rentas, , • Phil Garcia. No port1on ol HISPanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcasl in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Muliiple use rates on request. 6 Free of the rhetoric and hyperbole so often associated with the issue of bilingual education, Hakuta's book offers evidence that educating children in their native language is beneficial and promotes the growth of cognitive skills. MURDER UNDER TWO FLAGS: THE U.S., PUERTO RICO, AND THE CERRO MARA! VILLA COVER-UP, by Anne Nelson (Ticknor & Fields, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, N.Y . 1 0017), 269 pp., $17.95 harcfcover. Nelson's book traces U.S.-Puerto Rico re lations from 1898 to present and the island's political climate. The book uses as its center piece the killing of two pro-independence men in 1978 by Puerto Rican police atop the mountain Cerro Maravilla REQUIEM FOR A WOMAN'S SOUL, by Omar Rivabella (Random House, 201 E. 50th St. , New York, N . Y . 1 0022), 116 pp., $14.95 hardcover. Argentine Rivabella's novel is narrated by a ' priest in an unnamed Latin American country. 1 The cleric pieces together scraps of paper' that turn out to be the diary of a woman in prison and her ordeal, frought with torture and other human rights abuses. THE THREE WARS OF ROY BENAVIDEZ, by Medal of Honor winnd Roy Benavrdez and Pulitzer Prize-winner Oscar Griffin (Corona Publishing Co., 1037 S . Alamo , San Antonio, Texas 78210), $17.95 hardcover. Scheduled for publication on Veterans' Day (Nov. 11 ), this book tells of Benavidez' s strug gle against poverty and prejuduce while growing up in South Texas, his experience in Vietnam, and his decade-long battle with the federal government to obtain his medal. WITH THESE HANDS, photographs by Ken Light, essay by Paula DiPerna, and preface by Cesar Chavez (Pilgrim Press, 132 W . 31st St., New York, N .Y. 10001 ). 128 pp., $9.95 ' With 65 duo-tone photographs, this book sympathetically examines the hard life of farmworkers in the United States. LOS TUCSONENSES, by Thomas E. Sheridan (University of Arizona Press, 1615 E. Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85719), 300 pages with 40 illustrations, $22.50 clothbound. This scholarly yet passionate book celebrates the role of the Mexican community in Tucson between 1854 and 1941 and traces its gradual loss of economic and political power. Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report