Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, January 5, 1987

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, January 5, 1987
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
Infant heart transplant recipient Baby Jesse, whose parents relinquished custody of him last spring to allay fears that he would not receive proper post-operative care from the unwed couple, is back temporarily with his father, Jesse Sepulveda, 26, and mother Deana Binkley, 17. They had relinquished custody to grandparents Alfred and Edna Sepulveda. California’s Loma Linda hospital approved the move until the final guardianship hearing in March... Thirteen-year-old Juan Garcia, being treated for drawfism at Florida Elks Childreris Hospital, spends Christmas at home in Altamonte Springs after doctors repprt that his left leg has already grown a half-inch... Thirteen-month-old Vladimir Ramos is given a 50-50 chance of
keeping his left foot, which was grafted to his right leg at New York’s Bellevue Hospital. The boy’s mother jumped under a subway train with him in her arms. His right foot and left leg were damaged beyond surgical repair... New Mexico’s Supreme Court upholds retiring Gov. Toney Anaya’s commutations of sentences to that state’s five Death Row inmates... Richard Andrade, 25, convicted of the rape-murder of Corpus Christi bar manager Cordelia Mae Guevara, is executed by poison injection in Huntsville, Texas, prison... Cincinnati Bengals offensive tackle Anthony Munoz is named to Associated Press’ all-pro football team. Teammate Max Montoya, an offensive guard, and Atlanta Falcons nose tackle Tony Casillas earn honorable mentions.. Washington, D.C., attorney Eduardo Pena Jr. is named to the Board of Regents of Catholic University of America...
Vo I. 5 No. 1
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ill) Si
27% of Hispanics Lack Health
Although nearly one in five Hispanics over the age of 14 suffers from a disability, H ispanics are much less likely to be protected by health insurance than either whites or blacks, anew U.S. Census Bureau survey revealed.
Twenty-seven percent of Hispanics contrasted to 19% of blacks and 12% of whites, are not covered by health insurance, it reported.
The survey, “Disability, Functional Limitation and Health Insurance Coverage: 1984/85,” was made public Dec. 23.
It found that disability was more prevalent among females than males, and blacks were more often disabled than Hispanics or whites.
WHO HAS HEALTH INSURANCE?
(Fourth quarter- 1985)
Number Percent
Hispanics ' 10,353,000 73.0%
Whites ! 175,243,000 87.6%
Blacks 22,995,000 80.7%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
The work disability rate(a condition limiting the type or amount of work one can do) was 15.8% among blacks aged 16-to-64. Among
Two Arraigned in Camarena Killing
Two Mexican citizens were arraigned in Los Angeles Dec. 29 on drug conspiracy charges in connection with the 1985 kidnaping and murder of federal drug agent Enrique Camarena Salazar.
One of the men, Jesus Felix-Gutierrez, 38, was identified as a narcotics dealer who helped Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero flee the country after the slaying, Drug Enforce-
Rivera Sued for Bust
TV personality Geraldo Rivera and Harris County sheriff Johnny Klevenhagen are being sued for $30 million by a Houston woman arrested during a nationally televised drug bust.
Terry Rouse filed suit Dec. 29 in connection with her arrest for possession of a quarter-gram of cocaine at a Channelview house as part of a drug bust broadcast during Rivera’s Dec. 2 TV special, “American Vice: The Doping of a Nation.”
A district judge has dismissed charges against Rouse, saying there was no probable cause to believe she was guilty. Rouse said she was living at the house in return for painting it and the show injured her reputation, subjected herto libel and slanderand led to her false arrest.
The Houston-area raid was one of three broadcast during the show. Attorneys for people arrested in San Jose and Fort Lauderdale, Fla., have also threatened to I sue._________________________________
ment Administration agent Douglas Kuehl said in an affidavit filed in federal court.
Felix-Gutierrez’s nephew, Carlos Felix-Gutierrez, 26, was also arraigned. Both men are considered significant in the investigation in which Caro Quintero is accused of killing Camarena and a Mexican pilot who flew part-time for the DEA. Caro Quintero is being held in a Mexican jail in connection with the murders
The two were arrested Dec. 24 after a six-week stakeout in Los Angeles.
Two other Mexicans are in U.S. custody in connection with the case. On Dec. 22, a federal jury in San Diego convicted Mario Martinez Herrera, 38, of perjury for lying to a grand jury investigating Camarena’s slaying.
Rene Martin Verdugo, who was apprehended last January, has also been convicted on federal drug charges in California.
A M. Paracchini Elected
Alberto M. Paracchini, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Banco de Ponce, was elected Dec. 23 to a three-year term as a Class A director of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
The first native-born Puerto Rican to serve as a Federal Reserve director, Paracchini, 54, will be one of three banking representatives on the nine-member board. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is the largest and most influential of the system’s 12 regional banks.
Paracchini joined Banco de Ponce as an auditor in 1956.
Ins. Protection
Hispanics it was 10.8%; among whites, 11.7%.
The percentage of persons who were so disabled that they couldn’t work at all was: blacks 9.2%, Hispanics6.9% and whites4.8%. Altogether, 8 million U.S. residents (5.3% of the population) were prevented from working by disabilities.
The report also found that disabled children (those under 18 with a long-lasting condition limiting their ability to walk, run or play or a mental or emotional problem limiting their ability to learn) were more likely to live in low-income households However, the percentage of disabled Hispanic children was more than 1% lower than white children:
Hispanic White Black
Number 101,000 1,560,000 319,000
Percent 2.0% 3.1% 3.4%
Among persons 65 years and older, whites were less inclined to be classified as functionally limited:
Hispanic White Black
Number 401,000 13,617,0001,635,000
Percent 58.6% 56.9% 75.0%
Functional limitations include inability to see, hear, speak walk use stairs, lift or move around. Approximately 10% of the labor force under 65 had one or more limitations, but only 1.5% had a severe limitation.
Persons with functional limitations were less likely that the general population to be covered by private health insurance, the report noted. Additionally, it found that young people, Hispanics and blacks were less likely than the general population to be covered by such
_______________________continued on page 2
PERSONS WITH FUNCTIONAL LIMITATION STATUS - 1984 (15 years old and over)
With a Limitation
Hispanic White Black
Male 17.5% 14.7% 20.4%
Female 23.5 22.7 28.6
Both sexes 19.2 20.2 24.9
With Severe Limitation
Male 5.3% 5.3% 6.7%
Female 9.6 9.1 11.8
Both sexes 7.6 7.3 9.5
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart


Immigration Roundup: S.S. Verification Pilot Set
A Texas pilot program, beginning Jan. 20, will enable employers to verify social security numbers by telephone and is part of the Reagan administration’s implementation of the new immigration law.
The six-month program, announced Dec. 18 by Social Security Commissioner Dorcas Hardy and Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas), will allow 70,000 businesses in Dallas, Corpus Christi and El Paso to check the validity of numbers through a toll-free number.
If the $18,000 test program is successful, Gramm said he would introduce legislation to make the program available nationwide at a small cost to employers.
“I am not in favor of a mandatory program.
Th is is a service for people who want assurance they are not violating the law,” Gramm said, adding the Immigration and Naturalization Service would accept the social security verification as a “good-faith” effort in complying with immigration regulations.
Hardy said the voluntary program will not be a tool for catching illegal aliens because verification information would not be turned over to the INS. If there is a discrepancy in the number, the person would be referred to a social security office, she added.
FEE FOR LEGALIZATION
Undocumented workers applying for amnesty under the immigration bill will face an appli-
6 Colleges Test Hispanic Retention
Increasing Hispanic student retention will be the focus of six college campuses participating in a study by the Office of Minority Concerns of the American Council on Education.
The campuses are Northern Illinois University, Kean College of New Jersey, Albright College in Pennsylvania and three other New
Services Lure4% Latinos
Hispanics made up 4% of the 333,600 recruits who joined the U.S. military service in fiscal year 1986, according to Defense Department figures released Dec. 23. Blacks made up 19%.
As of Sept. 30,1986, Hispanics comprised 3.7% of the nation’s military personnel-80,113 out of a total of 2,156,593.
A breakdown by service shows:
Total# Total % Latino '86 Black '86
Branch Latino Latino Recruits Recruits
Army 28,007 3.6% 4% 22%
Navy 21,936 3.8% 6% 17%
Marines 9,578 4.8% 5% 17%
A F. 20,592 3.4% 2% 16%
TOTAL 80,113 3.7% 4% 19%
Latinos comprise 7% of the 18-24 age group from which most military personnel are recruited.
Rival Buys Laredo News
The Laredo News, believed by publisher Javier Lozano to be the only English-language daily newspaper in the United States under Hispanic ownership, ceased publication Dec. 22.
The News, founded in August 1977 by local businessman A. R. (Tony) Sanchez Sr., and his son, A. R. Sanchez Jr., turned over its assets to the competing Laredo Times for an undisclosed sum. Both papers had daily circulations of about 17,000. The Times is owned by the New York-based Hearst Corp.
News editor Peter Lee commented that Laredo wasn’t big enough to support two newspapers. The area has been hard-hit by economic problems affecting both Mexico and Texas in recent years.
The News, which also carried a Spanish-language section, had 85 employees.
Jersey institutions, Mercer County Community College, Passaic County Community College and Glassboro State College.
The volu ntary case study developed after a November workshop on Hispanic student retention sponsored by OMC, the New Jersey Department of Higher Education and the City University of New York Each campus will design its own strategies for Hispanic retention, said OMC associate director and coordinatorof the project, Sarah E. Melendez. These strategies may range from support services for students, recruitment and the hiring of Latino faculty, she added.
Airway Pioneer Dies at 81
Jose Antonio de Zalduondo, whose concept for an international airway document created the international cargo industry, died of Alzheimer’s disease on Dec. 21 in Boston. The former Pan American executive was 81, Originally from Spain, de Zalduondo joined Pan Am in Mexico in 1929 and then worked as a sales manager for its Latin American division in Miami from 1937 to 1'946.
De Zalduondo convinced Latin American governments to eliminate prior consular approval for foreign shipments and replace it with the airway document that accompanied each shipment. The document was accepted internationally.
cation fee expected to fall within the upper range of current INS fees of $5 to $100.
“I don’t think the American taxpayershould have to subsidize this,” said Alan C. Nelson, Immigration and Naturalization Service commissioner.
The INS will begin accepting applications May 5,1987, for illegal aliens who have lived in the United States before 1982 and fees should be set by late January.
APPREHENSIONS DOWN 20%
The number of apprehensions of undocumented aliens entering the U.S. from Mexico dropped almost 20% in November and early December, according to INS figures At the same time, fewer undocumented workersare traveling South during the holidays. Officials credit changes in the immigration law for these trends.
ADVANCE PAROLE APPROVED INS is prepared to grant “advance parole,” permission for undocumented workers who qualify for amnesty to legally leave the U.S. for emergency reasons INS press officer Duke Austin said. Austin admitted there had been confusion in the Western Region, which includes Los Angeles, about the guidelines CHURCH OFFERS SANCTUARY Dolores Mission Church, a Catholic parish in East Los Angeles, has offered sanctuary to Mexican immigrants expected not to qualify for amnesty under INS regulations. ELEVEN DOMINICANS DIE Eleven undocumented Dominicans sailing to Puerto Rico died when their boat capsized near the shore. Authorities believe 40 to 48 people were aboard and several others are missing.
SCAM WARNING ISSUED More than 20 undocumented workers lost $2,000 each to a man impersonating an INS officerin Los Angeles who told them hecould secure early legalization for them INS officials warn against such scams and advise those seeking amnesty that no applications will be accepted before May. Applicants should secure advise from recognized voluntary groups for free or a nominal fee.
Disability Study Reveals Latino Needs
continued from page 1 insurance.
Only 55% of blacks and Hispanics had private health insurance, while 80% of whites did.
The proportion of persons covered by employment-related health insurance was 65% among whites, 49% Hispanics and46% among blacks.
The data, based on information compiled from 26,000 households, came from the Bureau’s survey of income and program participation. It is detailed by age groupings, income and educational level, for those living alone, married persons, those receiving program benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid, and those in the labor force.
Altogether, the report found 31.3 million
people, including 3.8 million Hispanics, are not covered by health insurance.
NEED ASSISTANCE WITH ACTIVITIES
(15 years old and over)
One or more Hispanic White Black
activities 4.2% 4.1% 5.7%
Getting around 2.0 2.0 2.9
Housework 2.8 3.1 4.6
Meal preparation 2.3 2.2 3.5
Personal care 1.4 1.3 2.0
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Omar Chapa, guest columnist
Beyond the Border
We are the Antonios, Marias and Robertos of the North, our names bastardized, mispronounced or shortened by the dominant Anglo culture.
We’ve become Tony, Mary and Bob, joining the country club, sitting in board rooms, running for office and speaking less Spanish than our neighbors trekking off to Cancun.
We are Americans involved in a movement that’s been a long time coming, our roots in .
this country many generations deep, our leaders finally emerging our strength coming from what Mexico couldn’t give us and the United States finally did: opportunity, free-
The United States has shaped our attitudes J w
and values, expanded our vision and allowed ; us to embrace the best of two distinctly different worlds: one of Yankee drive and ingenuity and the other of rich Mexican cultural heritage.
We are Mexican Americans, Chicanos, Hispanics, whatever suits you, the most numerous members of a minority group dubbed “The Sleeping Giant’ in a country that prides itself in superlatives.
In 1848, with a document called the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, our Mexican forefathers signed away half of the motherland, donating the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wyoming to the present experiment of immigration and the “American melting pot”
Our land was parceled and sold from under us, our dignity lost and regained amid the incredible challenges of a reconfigurated nation.
We persevered, we survived, becoming contributors to the larger economic and social milieu. Our music and culture have been infusive, gaining a foothold on the landscape as prevalent as fast fopd restaurants and computer software. Our cuisine fills fiestas with the , scent of cilantro and fresh guacamole, with tasty pan dulce and spicy red and green sauces.
We have come a long way. Yet, for want of political clout, perhaps only our numbers will ensure that our children keep chasing a growingly elusive, cherished American dream.
VIEW FIXATED ON BORDER
Unfortunately, this nation’s view of us is fixated on a 2,000-mile border that conveniently renders us as migrants, peasants or the stereotypical Mexican parody of ourselves perpetuated in literature or dozens of inane commercials or movies:" someone who is unattractive, who is easily outmaneuvered, exploited and uneducated.
This nation lives in a fastasy with regard to its ethnic minorities, claiming that we all melt down to some bland, ethnocentric Anglo, when in reality all of our customs, traditions, languages and perhaps even racial and ethnic dispositions have coverged on the country to make it the most diverse, strongest, richest nation on earth.
The United States will always be primarily an English-speaking country, but thaf s not to say that its character and stature do not undergo changes with the ebb and flow of contributions made by its ethnically rich citizens and residents. If it is ever to live up to its potential as a world leader, it must change its continued paternalistic, stale attitude toward us. It must do so if for no other reason than that we are now becoming its leaders.
As a group, we have developed our unique ways to succeed. A good number of us are ascending the system to realize our own dreams or those born of previous generations, of parents and grandparents who risked plenty and made it through a life-changing frontier.
We are a people with bonds and without bonds. We are individuals. We ourselves need to affirm that as much as the country does.
We are like the rest, and unlike them. We are Americans well beyond the border.
(Omar Chapaâ–º a personnel management consultant residing in Lafayette, Calif., immigrated at age 6 from Paras, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, to East Chicago, Indiana, where his father was a steelworker.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
BIGGEST MOMENT: What was the big moment of 1986 for U.S. Latinos- the outstanding event or accomplishment to make the year memorable?
How about Bob Martinez’s election as Florida’s first Latino governor?
No. It was a sweet victory, especially considering that the 51-year-old ex-Tampa mayor is the first Latino in the nation to be elected governor as a Republican. But Democrats like-Jerry Apodaca and Toney Anaya, both of New Mexico, and RaOl Castro of Arizona had reached that pinnacle before.
Maybe the political breakthroughs in cities such as Los Angeles and Chicago, where mandated city council redistricting removed discriminatory barriers which had blocked the Latino community’s political progress for decades?
Nope. Those were heady wins, admittedly. In Chicago, the elimination of gerrymandered districts enabled Latinos to increase their number on the City Council irom one to four.
In Los Angeles, only one Hispanic had been elected to the Council in this century prior to Richard Alatorre’s December
11985 special election win. A reapportionment plan approved by the U.S. Justice Department in August should assure a minimum of two Hispanic representatives on that 15-member body this spring. Important, but...
| What about sports? Los Angeles Dodger Fernando Valenzuela became the highest paid pitcher in major league history.
That won’t get my vote, either.
| Then how about Henry Cisneros’ astute and acclaimed leader-. ship of the National League of Cities during his busy year as its president? The San Antonio mayor certainly enhanced his chances as the Democratic Party’s vice presidential candidate in ’88.
Cisnero’s grasp of national and international affairs, his track record in San Antonio, and his integrity and sensitivity make him a lot more qualified presidential candidate than most of those being promoted for the No. 1 spot on either major ticket Vice president? Big deal.
So what gets my vote as the Hispanic big moment of 1986?
Luis Nogales changed jobs. That’s my choice.
I pick it as the year’s outstanding event not because Nogales, a 43-year-old former migrant farmworker, is any more special than Cisneros or Martinez or other present-day pathfinders like Antonia Hern&ndez, Xavier Sudrez or Franklin Chang Diaz.
Nogales^ career change symbolizes a new era for U.S. Hispanics.
As the year opened, he was the highly visible president and chief executive officer of the nation’s No. 2 wire service, United Press International. He was credited, since taking over UPI in September 1984, with steering it from sure disintegration to profitability. He did it with compassion and class.
Nogales guided UPI through bankruptcy proceedings and its sale for $41 million to Mexican media magnate Mario Vazquez Rana.
Vazquez Rana either underestimated the ability of his Chicano executive officer or overestimated the acceptance that he, as a foreigner, would get from his U.S. media brethren. After finalizing the deal this summer, he insisted on running the show personally, so Nogales quit in July. Vdzquez Rana has had nothing but problems since.
Now Nogales has been hired by yet another Mexican multimillionaire; Emilio Arc6rraga, the godfather of the mighty SIN television network, with 409 affiliates nationally. Nogales will head ECO, a new international television news network which will serve SIN affiliates in the United States and other clients worldwide.
A generation ago, the power players of both Mexico and the United States rejected U.S.-born Mexicans as less than equals.
As Nogales has moved from print media to broadcast media, from a dominant English-speaking boardroom to a dominant Spanish-speaking one, he has shown this nation the true potential and value of its bilingual, bicultural children. - Kay B&rbaro


COLLECTING
I
DISABILITIES AND HEALTtTTNSURANCE: The U.S. Census Bureau.has released a 50-page study with statistics on Hispanic disabilities and health insurance protection. Request “Disabilities, Functional Limitation and Health Insurance Coverage: 1984/85,” Current Population Report Series P-70, No. 8, from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (Price not available at press time.)
VOTING ASSISTANCE: The U.S. General Accounting Office published a report recently titled “Bilingual Voting Assistance: Costs of and Use During the November 1984 General Election.” A free copy of the 63-page report can be obtained by writing to: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
SOCIAL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: The Rockefeller Foundation, under its Equal Opportunity Program, announced recently 15 minority fellowships for individuals who haved earned a Ph.D. and are interested in areas such as education, employment, housing and civil rights. Applications for the fellowships, which will begin in September 1987 and will not exceed $25,000, must be postmarked by Jan. 15. For information, write: Research Fellowship Program for Minority Groups^ Scholars, Rockefeller Foundation, 1133 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 (212) 869-8500.
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION FELLOWSHIPS: Latinos, blacks, other minorities and women who have at least three years of administrative experience and are interested in public administration and rural development are encouraged to apply to a 14-month fellowship program sponsored by the National Urban/Rural Fellows Between 30 and40 fellowships will be awarded in June 1987 and will range from $14,000 to $16,000. The deadline to apply is Feb. 20. Information and applications can be obtained by writing to: National Urban Fellows 570 Seventh Ave., Suite 905, New York, N.Y. 10018 (212) 221-7090.
HISPANIC ISSUES RESEARCH GRANTS: Poverty/income distribution, employment, the criminal justice system and changing family structures are the themes for grants on contemporary research on Latinos sponsored by the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council. The grants which will range from $30,000 to $50,000, will be awarded in April 1987. Entry deadline is Feb. 1. For applications, write to: Lonnie Sherrod/Mintari Preston, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158 (212) 661-0280.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U. S. Hispanic community , and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
FEW CUBAN EXECUTIVES IN DADE COUNTY
Despite the success of Cuban Americans in the Miami area, few are ! on the executive level, a survey reported by Guillermo Martinez, 1 columnist for the Miami Herald, found. Of Dade County’s 25 largest 1 employers excluding eight public agencies, only two have one local j Hispanic on their board of directors Martinez reported recently.
“How can we speak about working together, about integrating this j community, if the largest private corporations in town are still a 1 bastion of the white-American establishment?” he quoted an anonymous | Cuban American executive.
AGENCY AWARDS $36 MILLION CONTRACT MAECORP, a Hispanic-owned hazardous waste management 1 company in Chicago, was awarded a three-year, $36 million contract from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide emergency j response clean-up services for Superfund sites in six Midwest states j The contract was a result of $1.7 million in venture capital raised for j MAECORP by Amoco Venture Capital Company, including a $450,000 investment by Amoco. Henry C. Mendoza is chairman and chief | executive officer of MAECORP.
MAES JOINS CONSULTING FIRM Jim Maes, a former executive assistant to past National Image President David Montoya, is now recruiting engineers for AMS j Consultants A 15-yearemployeeof the federal Environmental Protection j Agency, Maes may be reached at P.O. Box 16222, Santa Fe, N.M. â–  87506 (505) 473-9280. ' j|
i
POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS AVAILABLE The National ResearchCouncilplanstoaward35 Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowships for minority scientists engineers and scholars ] in the humanities. The national competition is open to those preparing j or already teaching at the college-level and who have doctoral or | otherterminal degrees. Applications for the one-yearfellowship may 1 be obtained from: Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D.C. 20418. The deadline is j Jan. 16.
Calendar
Following are the major state and regional conferences conventions, seminars and events for 1987:
STATE EVENTS 1987
CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL
EDUCATION
Conference
Anaheim, Calif. Jan. 28-31 Margo Ferris (714) 962-3710
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF AZTLAN
Scholarship Banquet Los Angeles Jan. 29
Rosemarie Zapata Ramirez (818) 449-2345
OHIO COMMISSION ON SPANISH SPEAKING
AFFAIRS
Retreat
Columbus Ohio Jan. 31-Feb. 1 Ramiro Estrada (614) 466-8333
4 I
CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION
Journalism Opportunity Conference
Los Angeles Feb. 6, 7
Suzanne Manriquez (213) 743-7158
LULAC POMONA/EAST LOS ANGELES NATIONAL
SERVICE CENTER
Hispanic Career Conference
Ontario, Calif. March 4
Al Rios (714) 623-0588
MICHIGAN HISPANIC EDUCATION OFFICE Educational Conference and Awards Banquet Lansing, Mich. May 8, 9 Antonio Flores (517) 373-3260
MICHIGAN SPANISH SPEAKING COMMISSION
Conference
Flint, Mich. June 18-20
Paul Vdsquez (313) 766-7418
TEXAS ASSOCIATION MEXICAN AMERICAN
CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
Convention
Houston July 29-Aug. 1 Joe Medina (512) 447-9821
CAFE de CALIFORNIA
Training Conference
San Diego Sept. 10
Diane Santillan (805) 395-2525
NATIONAL COALITION OF HISPANIC HEALTH \ AND HUMAN SERVICES ORGANIZATIONS Mid-West Conference on Hispanic Families Milwaukee, Wise. October (date not set)
Marvin Cooperstein(414) 672-5300
THIS WEEK
VOTER REGISTRATION RALLY Chicago Jan. 9
Midwest Voter Registration Education Project will sponsor a Chicago Voter Registration Rally.
Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-1116
LEGISLATIVE BRIEFING College Park, Maryland Jan. 11 The 1987 Women’s Legislative Briefing will be sponsored by the Commissions for Women of Prince George’s and Montgomery counties along with more than 50 other county and statewide women’s organizations. Eleven workshops will cover pay equity, women’s health, civil rights, the Higher Education Act, tax reform and more.
Marge Zimmerman (301) 952-3383.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CHANCELLOR INDIANA UNIVERSITY EAST
Indiana University invites applications and nominations for the position of Chancellor at its Indiana University East Campus, located in Richmond, Indiana. The chancellor reports to the President of the Indiana University System and is responsible for the leadership, planning, management and evaluation of the campus programs. Candidates should have a strong academic background, an earned doctorate, a record of successful administrative experience and the ability to work with external constituencies. Familiarity with the operation of a multi-campus system is desirable.
The campus presently offers a range of two year programs and a limited number of baccalaureate programs and graduate courses serving 1,400 commuter students.
Nominations and letters of application with appropriate material (including resume) should be submitted to:
Chancellor Search Committee Indiana University East 2325 Chester Boulevard Richmond, Indiana 47374
The committee expects to submit its report to the President by mid-February, 1987.
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION The Children’s Defense Fund is seeking a Director of Finance and Administration. The Director is responsible for managing the financial, personnel and office systems in a 70-person, $5 million nonprofit, privately funded child advocacy group. Qualifications are:
• Management-level experience in developing and maintaining accounting, financial and support systems in a nonprofit environment:
• Knowledge of personnel policies, benefits administration and office procedures;
• Familiarity with automated and computer-based financial systems; and,
• Advanced degree/training in Accounting or Administration and 10 years experience preferred. Salary range mid $30s to $40’s, depending on experience.
Please send resumes to:
Ms. Pamela Cary Administrative Assistant Children’s Defense Fund 122 C St. NW, Suite 400 Washington, D.C. 20001 CDF IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE %
New employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, serving the East Coast South and Midwest Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish. Contact Lucienne Loman
National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228
DIRECTOR OF THE BECHTEL INTERNA^ TIONAL CENTER at Stanford University sought Salary range is $50-55,000 per year (depending on qualifications and experience). Applications must be postmarked by Feb. 10, 1987. For further information contact Kathy DeMoulin Personnel Department Stanford University Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-0918
Equal Opportunity Employer through Affirmative Action.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
EDITOR
Professional membership association seeks experienced professional editor. Minimum three years experience and Bachelors degree preferred. Proofreading, editing and production work required for professional journals and books. Must be well organized with in-depth knowledge of English required, knowledge of behavioral science preferred. Starting salary low twenties plus excellent benefits. Send resume to: Employment Specialist, National Association of Social Workers, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910.
EOE
1987 NAHJ CALENDAR
A1987 calendar showcasing the talents of 12 Hispanic photojournalists with 22 photographs is for sale for $8 by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. The 11x14-inch calendar also lists more than 100 major’87 media and Hispanic organizational events by date. Contact persons and their phone numbers are included.
The $8 purchase price covers postage and handling.
Order from NAHJ, Suite 634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045. Or call (202) 783-6228.
FUNDRAISER
National civil rights organization seeks vice president for development to raise $3 million annually from foundations, corporations and individuals; perform outreach/solicitation; and develop/implement strategy to solicit$250 thousand annually in new funding.
Requirements: Five years fund-raising/ marketing experience; knowledge of foundation/ corporation giving and deferred/planned giving; experience with boards of directors; excellent communication skills; some knowledge of legal issues and bilingual ability (English/Spanish) helpful.
Resumes with references to Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 1/26/87.
CHICANO STUDIES The Department of Chicano Studies anticipates a tenure track appointment in one of the following disciplines:
• Anthropology # Economics • Political Science • Psychology Appointment will either be a joint appointment or a full appointment in Chicano Studies. Position effective July 1,1987. Ph.D. by time of appointment and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant Professor level preferred, although exceptionally well-qualified persons whose background and experience warrant a tenure-level appointment are also encouraged to apply.
Salary and rank dependent on qualifications. Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents, including copies of main publications (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed chapters), and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by Jan. 31, 1987 to:
Dr. Mario T. Garcia
Chair, Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington,' D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 2001.0(202)483-1140.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
Ordered by Title_____
Area Code & Phone. Advertiser Name_____
Bill To___________
, .
Address___________
City, State & Zip


Arts & Entertainment
STAGE: Broadway’s surprise hit in 1986 was a play about a teenager and his drug dealer father written by a 26-year-old New York Puerto Rican. For his Cuba and His Teddy Bear - which opened in April starring Robert De Niro and Ralph Macchio -playwright Reinaldo Povod won in Octoberthe George Oppenheimer Award for best new writer to have a play staged in New York.
Last year’s Broadway hit - Tango Argentino- began its national tour in Miami in May, the same month it was nominated for three Tony awards. The show picked up a nomination in the “best musical” category; its dancers were nominated for “best choreography” and Claudio Segovia and Hector Orezzoli for" best direction of a musical.”
Also nominated for Tonys in 1986 were Chita Rivera (“best actress in a musical” for Jerry’s Girls) and Jose Quintero (“best director of a play" for The Iceman Cometh).
In the summer, New York’s Festival Latino increased its scope with visiting Hispanic theater companies from around the country. Other important theater events held in the summer were the International Chicano Latino Theater Festival, in Morelos, Mexico, and the first Zarzuela Festival in El Paso, Texaa
In July, the Costa Mesa, Calif., South Coast Repertory’s Hispanic Playwright’s Project culminated with staged readings of plays by Arthur Giron, Lisa Loomer and Eduardo Machado. The project is now set as an annual event.
Two Hispanic-theme operas premiered in 1986. In Puerto Rico, a
new opera based on the folk tradition of the Fiesta de Santiago de los Caballeros opened in October at the Centro de Bellas Artes El mensajero de plata was composed by Robert Sierra with a libretto by Myrna Casas
Gian Carlo Menotti wrote Goya, an opera based on the life of the Spanish painter premiered by the Washington Opera at the Kennedy Center in November. Placido Domingo sang the title role; Chilean mezzo Victoria de Alba sang the Duchess of Alba.
TELEVISION: After a 10-year dispute among its stockholders, 10 SIN TV stations were put on sale. The possibilities of U.S. Hispanic ownership of the nation’s first Spanish-language network apparently died when its parent company accepted a $301.5 million bid from Hallmark Cards Inc. and FirstChicagoVentureCapital. (Thesale awaits final approval by the Federal Communications Commission.)
One of SIN’s highest-rated programs, Televisa’s Siempre en Domingo, moved from Mexico City to Miami for three Sundays in August.
Twenty-two shows began the fall prime time television season in September, and not one featured a Hispanic actor or actress in a lead role. Of the new programs, CBS’ Kay O’Brien featured Priscilla Lopez and NBC’s L. A Law had Jimmy Smits - both Latinos in secondary roles.
A pilot episode for the sitcom The Family Martinez, starring Robert Beltran and Anne Betancourt, aired on CBS in August. The show has been talked about asa“mid-season” replacement, but noannouncements have been made.
On cable, the successful Sanchez of Bel Air, on the USA Network, has been signed for a new season. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
CONFERENCESANDCAREERS: Hispanics in the media and those interested in the field have a full agenda of events in 1987. Following is a chronological listing of the major meetings and job fairs throughout the United States:
The American Society of Newspaper Editors. Local and regional minorities job fair/conferences will be held at:
Ann Arbor, Mich. Jan. 15-17, Campus Inn. Contact Herb Boldt (313) 222-2319. Louisville, Ky. Jan. 15-17, Brown Hotel. Contact Mervin Aubespin (502) 582-4191.
Akron, Ohio Jan. 29-31,Cascade Holiday Inn. Contact: John Greenman (216) 375-8293. Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 29-31, Ramada Hotel..
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Displayadsare$35 per column inch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Contact: James Denley(205) 325-2214. Sacramento, Calif. Jan. 29-31, Sacramento Inn. Contact Mike Flanagan (916) 321-1009.
NEWSDAY: The Long Island daily will sponsor a job opportunity conference for minorities Jan. 23, 24 in Long Island, New York. For more information, contact: Reginald Tuggle (516) 454-2183.
NATIONAL HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS: Puerto Rican preacher Jose D. Camacho will address the Hispanic banquet Feb. 4 in Washington, D.C. during the National Religious Broadcasters convention Jan. 31-Feb. 4. For registration information contact Duane Ward (202) 628-4831.
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE FOR MINORITIES: Sponsored by the California Chicano News Media Association in Los Angeles on Feb. 6,7, it is the largest media job fair on the West Coast for minority professionals and students. Registration information is available from: Magdalena H. Beltran (213) 743-7158.
HOWARD UNIVERSITY: A job opportunity conference for minorities will be held Feb. 18-21 at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Contact Virginia Stewart (202) 636-7491.
INSTITUTE FOR JOURNALISM EDUCATION: The National Conference on Minorities in the Media, sponsored by IJE, will De held in Washington, D.C. on March 9, 10. Top minority journalistsand alumni of IJE programs have been invited to the conference. For more information, contact Charles Martin (415) 642-3503.
MINORITY JOB CONFERENCE: Hosted by the Washington Post, recruiters from the newspaper industry will interview minority students and professionals for jobs and internships in marketing, sales, circulation, advertising and data processing positions in Washington, D.C. March 19-21. Registration information forthe conference, sponsored by
the American Newspaper Publishers Association and the Task Force on M inorities in the Newspaper Business, is available, from Sandra Moller at (800) 544-7678.
NATIONAL HISPANIC VIDEO SHOW: This event will address all aspects the Hispanic video market in Dallas on March 28,29. Contact Candelario Gutierrez (800) 331-4502.
FILM FESTIVAL UNO Productions and the Stage of Arts Productions will present the Latin American Film Festival in Los Angeles from April 10-19. Contact (213) 271-2144.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: NAHJ will host its fifth National Media Conference in Los Angeles April 22-25. A job fair will also be held during the conference. Contact Frank Newton (202) 783-6228. _ Melinda Machado
Notice to Subscribers
Effective 1987, Hispanic Link Weekly Report will convert to publishing 50 issues annually, including two special 8-page editions.
One of the 8-page editions will focus on the media and be coordinated with the annual National Hispanic Media Conference held every April. The other will be a year-end special, coming out just before Christmas The week following each of these editions, we will take a one-week break
All present Weekly Report readers will receive 52 issues on their current $96 annual subscriptions
Any subscribers who renew this month -no matter when theii\’87\renewal date falls - will also have their renewals extended two additional issues in 1988.
Weekly Report began as a 4-page publication in September 1983 and expanded to 6 pages in September 1986.
Thanks for your continued support.
Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Infant heart transplant recipient Baby Jesse, whose parents relinquished custody of him last spring to allay fears that he would not receive proper post-operative care from the unwed couple, is back temporarily with his father, Jesse Sepulveda, 26, and mother Deana Binkley, 17. They had relinquished custody to grandparents Alfred and Edna Sepulveda. California ' s Lorna Linda hospital approved the move until the final guardianship hearing in March . . . Thirteen year-old Juan Garcia, being treated for drawfism at Florida Elks Childreris Hospital , spends Christmas at home in Altamonte Springs after doctors report that his left leg has al r eady grown a half inch ... Thirteen-month-old Vladimir Ramos is given a 50 chance of keeping his left foot, which was grafted to his right leg at New York ' s Bellevue Hospital. The boy's mother jumped under a subway train with him in her arms . His right foot and left leg were damaged beyond surgical repair ... New Mexico's Supreme Court upholds retiring Gov . Toney Anaya's commutations of sentences to that state's five Death Row inmates . . . Richard Andrade, 25, convicted of the rape-murder of Corpus Christi bar manager Cordelia Mae Guevara, is executed by poison injection in Huntsville , Texas , prison .. . Cincinnati Bengals offensive tackle Anthony Muiioz is named to Associated Press ' all pro football team . Teammate Max Montoya, an offensi ve guard, and Atlanta Falcons nose tackle Tony Casillas earn honorable mentions. .. Washington , D . C . , attorney Eduardo Peiia Jr. is named to the Board of Regents of Catholic University of America ... Vol. 5 No.1 ANIC LINK WEEKLY REP Jan.5, 1987 27/o of Hispanics Lack Health Ins. Protection Althoug h nearly one in five Hispanics over the age of 14 suffers from a disability , Hispanics are much less likely to be protected by health insurance than either whites or blacks, a new U.S . Census Bureau survey revealed . Twenty-seven percent of Hispan ics, contrasted to 19% of blacks and 12% of whites, are not covered by health insurance, it reported. The survey, " Disability, Functional Limitation and Health Insurance Coverage : 1984/85," was made public Dec . 23. It found that disability was more prevalen t among females than males , and blacks we r e more often disabled than Hispanics or whites . WHO HAS HEALTH INSURANCE? (Fourth quarter-1985) i Hispanics : Whites Blacks Number 10,353,000 175,243,000 22 ,995,000 S o ur ce : U.S. C e n s u s Bur ea u Per cent 73.0% 87. 6 % 80.7% -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart The work disability rate(a condition limit i ng the type or amount of work one can do) was 15. 8 % among blacks aged 16-to-64 . Among Two Arraigned in Camarena Killing Two Mexican citizens were arraigned in Los Angeles Dec . 29 on drug conspiracy charges in connection with the 1985 kidnaping and murder of federal drug agent Enr ique Camarena Salazar . One of the men , Jesus FelixGutierrez , 38, was identified as a narcotics dealer who helped Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero flee the country after the slaying , Drug EnforceRivera Sued for Bust TV personality Geraldo Rivera and Harris County sheriff Johnny Klevenhagen are being sued for $30 million by a Houston woman arrested d uring a nationally televised drug bust. Terry Rouse filed suit Dec . 29 in connection with her arrest for possession of a quarter gram of cocaine at a Channelview house as part of a drug bust broadcast during Rivera ' s Dec . 2 TV special , " American Vice : The Doping of a Nation. " A district judge has dismissed charges against Rouse, saying there was no probable cause to believe she was guilty. Rouse said she was living at the house in return for painting it and the show injured her reputation , subjected her to libel and slander and led to her false arrest. The Houston-area raid was one of three broadcast du r ing the show. Attorneys for people arrested in San Jose and Fort Lauderdale, Fla. , have also threatened to sue. ment Administration agent Douglas Kuehl said in an affidavit filed in federal court. Feli xGutierrez' s nephew, Carlos Feli x Gutierrez, 26, was also arraigned . Both men are considered significant in the investigation in whi c h Caro Quintero is accused of killing Camarena and a Me x ican pilot who flew part time for the DEA Caro Quintero is being held in a Mexican jail in conne c tion with the murders. The two were arrested Dec . 24 after a si x week stakeout in Los Angeles . Two oth e r Mex icans are in U . S . custo dy in connection with the case . On Dec . 22 , a federal jury in San Diego c onvicted Mario Martinez Herrera , 38, of perjury for lying to a grand jury investigating Camarena ' s slaying. Rene Martin Verdugo , who was apprehended last January, has also been convicted on fede r al drug charges in California . A. M. Paracchini Elected Alberto M . Paracchini , chairman , p resident and chief e x ecut ive off icer of Banco de Ponce , was elected Dec . 23 to a three-year term as a Class A director of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The first nat i ve-born Puerto Rican to serve as a F e deral Reserve director, Paracchini , 54, will be one of three banking representatives on the nine-member board. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is the largest and most influential of the system's 12 regional banks . Paracchini joined Banco de Ponce as an auditor in 1956. Hispanics it was 1 0 . 8%; among whites, 11. 7 % . The percentage of persons who were so d i sabled that they couldn' t work at all was : blacks 9.2 % , Hispanics 6 . 9 % and whites4.8o/o. Altogether, 8 million U . S . residents (5. 3 % of the population) were prevented from working by disabilities. The report also found that disabled children (those under 18 with a long lasting condition limiting their ability to walk, run or play or a mental o r emot ional problem limiting their abil ity to learn) were more likely to live in low income households. However , the percentage of disabled Hispanic children was more than 1 % lower than white children: Hispanic White Black Number 101 ,000 1 ,560,000 319,000 Pe rcent 2 . 0 % 3 . 1 o/o 3.4% Among persons 65 years and older, whites were less inclined to be classified as functionally limited : Hispanic White Black Number 401 ,000 13, 617,0001 , 635 , 000 Percent 58. 6 % 56. 9 % 75. 0 % Functional limitations include inability to see, hear , speak, walk, use stairs, lift or move around . Appro x imately 10% of the labor force under 65 had one or more limitations, but only 1 . 5 % had a seve r e limitation. Persons with functional limitations were less likely that the general population to be covered by private health insuranc;:e, the report noted. Additionally , it found that young people , Hispanics and blacks were less likely than the general population to be covered by such co ntin ue d o n page 2 PERSONS WITH FUNCTIONAL LIMITATION STATUS -1984 (15 years old and over) With a Limitation Hispanic White Black Male 17 . 5 % 14. 7 % 20.4 % Female 23. 5 22 . 7 28. 6 Both sexes 19.2 20.2 24.9 With Severe Limitation Male Female 5 . 3 % 5 . 3% 6 . 7 % 9 . 6 9 . 1 11. 8 Both sexes 7.6 7.3 9 . 5 Sou r ce : U . S. Cen s u s Bur ea u -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart

PAGE 2

Immigration Roundup: S.S. Verification Pilot Set A Texas pilot program, beginning Jan. 20, will enable employers to verify social security numbers by telephone and is part of the Reagan administration's implementation of the new immigration law. The six-month program, announced Dec. 18 by Social Security Commissioner Dorcas Hardy and Sen. Phil Gramm (A-Texas), will allow 70,000 businesses in Dallas, Corpus Christi and El Paso to check the validity of numbers through a toll-free number, If the $18,000 test program is successful, Gramm said he would introduce legislation to make the program available nationwide at a . small cost to employers. "I am not in favor of a mandatory program. This is a service for people who want assurance they are not violating the law," Gramm said, adding the Immigration and Naturalization Service would accept the social security verifi cation as a "good-faith" effort in complying with immigration regulations. Hardy said the voluntary program will not be a tool for catching illegal aliens because verification information would not be turned over to the INS . If there is a discrepancy in the number, the person would be referred to a social security office, she added. FEE FOR LEGALIZATION Undocumented workers applying for amnesty under the immigration bill will face an application fee expected to fall within the upper range of current INS fees of $5 to $100. "I don ' t think the American taxpayer should have to subsidize this," said Alan C. Nelson, Immigration and Naturalization Service com missioner. The INS will begin accepting applications May 5, 1987, for illegal aliens who have lived in the United States before 1982 and fees should be set by late January. APPREHENSIONS DOWN 20% 6 Colleges Test Hispanic Retention The number of apprehensions of undocumented aliens entering the U.S . from Mexico dropped almost 20% in November and early December, according to INS figures. At the same time, fewer undocumented workers are traveling South during the holidays. Officials credit changes in the immigration law for these trends. Increasing Hispanic student retention will be the focus of six college campuses participat ing in a study by the Office of Minority Concerns of the American Council on Education. The campuses are Northern Illinois Uni versity, Kean College of New Jersey, Albright College in Pennsylvania and three other New Services Lure4/o Latinos Hispanics made up 4% of the 333,600 recruits who joined the U.S. military service in fiscal year 1986, according to Defense Department figures released Dec. 23. Blacks made up 19%. As of Sept. 30, 1986, Hispanics comprised 3 . 7% of the nation's military personnel80,113 out of a total of 2,1 56,593. A breakdown by service shows: Total# Total% Branch Latino Latino Latino ' 86 Black '86 Recruits Recruits Army 28,007 3.6% 4o/o 22% Navy 21 ,936 3.8% 6% 17% Marines 9,578 4.8% 5% 17% A. F. 20,592 3.4% 2% 1 6% TOTAL : 80,113 3. 7% 4% 1 9% Latinos comprise 7% of the 18-24 age group from which most military personnel are recruited. Rival Buys Laredo News The Laredo News, believed by publisher Javier Lozano to be the only English-language daily newspaper in the United States under Hispanic ownership, ceased publication Dec. 22. The News, founded in August 1977 by local businessman A. R. (Tony) Sanchez Sr., and his son, A. R. Sanchez Jr., turned over its assets to the competing Laredo Times for an !Jndisclosed sum. Both papers had daily circulations of about 17,000. The Times is owned by the New York-based Hearst Corp. News editor Peter Lee commented that Laredo wasn't big enough to support two newspapers. The area has been hard-hit by economic problems affecting both Mexico and Texas in recent years. The News, which also carried a Spanish language section, had 85 employees. 2 Jersey institutions, Mercer County Community College, Passaic County Community College and Glassboro State College. The voluntary case study developed after a November workshop on Hispanic student retention sponsored by OMC, the New Jersey Department of Higher Education and the City University of New York Each campus will design its own strategies for Hispanic retention, said OMC associate director and coordinator of the project, Sarah E. Melendez. These strategies may range from support services for students, recruitment and the hiring of Latino faculty , she added . Airway Pioneer Dies at 81 Jose Antonio de Zalduondo, whose concept for an international airway document created . the international cargo industry, died of Alzheimer's disease on Dec. 21 in Boston. The former Pan American executive was 81. Originally from Spain , de Zalduondo joined Pan Am in Mexico in 1929 and then worked as a sales manager for its Latin American division in Miami from 1937 to f946. De Zalduondo convinced Latin American governments to eliminate prior consular appro val for foreign shipments and replace it with the airway document that accompanied each shipment. The document was accepted inter nationally . ADVANCE PAROLE APPROVED INS is prepared to grant "advance parole," permission for undocumented workers who qualify for amnesty to legally leave the U.S. for emergency reasons, INS press officer Duke Austin said. Austin admitted there had been confusion in the Western Region, which includes Los Angeles, about the guidelines. CHURCH OFFERS SANCTUARY Dolores Mission Church , a Catholic parish in East Los Angeles, has offered sanctuary to Mexican immigrants expected not to qualify for amnesty under INS regulations . ELEVEN DOMINICANS DIE Eleven undocumented Dominicans sailing to Puerto Rico died when their boat capsized near the shore. Authorities believe 40 to 48 people were aboard and several others are missing. SCAM WARNING ISSUED More than 20 undocumented workers lost $2,000 each to a man impersonating an INS officer in Los Angeles who told them he could secure early legalization for them INS officials warn against such scams and advise those seeking amnesty that no applications will be accepted before May . Applicants should secure advise from recognized voluntary groups for free or a nominal fee. Disability Study Reveals Latino Needs cont inue d from page 1 insurance. Only 55% of blacks and Hispanics had private health insurance, while80% of whites did. The proportion of persons covered by employment-related health insurance was 65% among whites, 49% Hispanics and 46% among blacks . The data, based on information compiled from 26,000 households, came from the Bureau's survey of income and program participation. It is detailed by age groupings, income and educational level, for those living alone, married persons, those receiving program benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid, and those in the labor force. people, including 3.8 million Hispanics, are not covered by health insurance. NEED ASSISTANCE WITH ACTIVITIES (15 years old and over) Hispanic White One or more activities 4.2% 4 . 1% Getting around 2 . 0 2 . 0 Housework 2.8 3 . 1 Meal preparation 2.3 2 . 2 . Personal care 1.4 1.3 Source: U.S. Census Bureau Black 5.7% 2 . 9 4 . 6 3.5 2.0 -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart Altogether, the report found 31.3 million . L----------------__J Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Omar Chapa, guest columnist Beyond the Border We are the Antonios, Marl as and Robertos of the North , our names bastardized, mispronounced or shortened by the dominant Anglo culture. We've become Tony, Mary and Bob, joining the country club, sitting in board rooms, running for office and speaking less Spanish than our neighbors trekking off to Cancun. ' We are Americans involved in a movement thafs been a long time coming, our roots in this country many generations deep, our leaders finally emerging, our strength coming from what Mexico couldn't give us and the United States finally did : opportunity, free dom and new lives. The United States has shaped our attitudes and values, expanded our vision and allowed us to embrace the best of two distinctly different worlds : one of Yankee drive and ingenuity and the other of rich Mexican cultural heritage . We are Mexican Americans , Chicanos , Hispanics , whatever suits you, the most numerous members of a minority group dubbed "The Sleeping Gianf' in a country that prides itself in superlatives. In 1848, with a document called the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo , our Mexican forefathers signed away half of the motherland, donating the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico , Texas, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wyoming to the present experiment of immigration and the "American melting pot." Our land was parceled and sold from under us, our dignity lost and regained amid the incredible challenges of a reconfigurated nation. We 1\)ersevered, we survived, becoming contributors to the larger econolnic and social milieu. Our music and culture have been infusive, gaining a foothold on the landscape as prevalent as fast food restaurants and computer software. Our cuisine fills fiestas with the . scent of cilantro and fresh guacamole , with tasty pan dulce and spicy red and green sauces . We have come a long way . Yet, for want of political clout, perhaps only our numbers will ensure that our children keep chasing a growingly elusive , cherished American dream . VIEW FIXATED ON BORDER Unfortunately, this nation's view of us is fixated on a 2,000-mile border that conveniently renders us as migrants, peasants or the stereotypical Mexican parody of ourselves perpetuated in literature or dozens of inane commercials or movies: someone who is unattractive , who is easily outmaneuvered, exploited and uneducated . This nation lives in a fastasy with regard to its ethnic minorities, claiming that we a l l melt down to some bland, ethnocentric Anglo, when in reality all of our customs, traditions , languages and perhaps even racial and ethnic dispositions have coverged on the country to make it the most diverse , strongest, richest nation on earth . The United States will always be primarily an English-speaking country, but thafs not to say that its character and stature do not undergo changes with the ebb and flow of contributions made by its ethnically rich citizens and residents . If it is ever to live up to its potential as a world leader, it must change its continued paternalistic, stale attitude toward us . It must do so if for no other reason than that we are now becoming its leaders . As a group, we have developed our unique ways to succeed. A good number of us are ascending the system to realize our own dreams or those born of previous generations, of parents and grandparents who risked plenty and made it through a life-changing frontier. We are a people with bonds and without bonds. We are individuals. We ourselves need to affirm that as much as the country does. We are like the rest, and unlike them. We are Americans well beyond the border. (Omar Chapa, a personnel management consultant residing in Lafayette, Calif., immigrated at age 6 from Paras, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, to East Chicago, Indiana, where his father was a steelworker) Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sin pelos en Ia lengua . BIGGEST MOMENT: What was the big moment of 1986 for U.S. Latinos-the outstanding event or accomplish ment to make the year memorable? How about Bob Martinez's election as Florida ' s first Latino governor? No. It was a sweet victory, especially considering that the 51year-old exTampa mayor is the first Latino.in the nation to be elected governor as a Republican . But Democrats like . Jerry. Apodaca and Toney Anaya, both of New Mexico, and Raul Castro of Arizona had reached that pinnacle before. Maybe the political breakthroughs in cities such as Los Angeles and Chicago, where mandated city council redistricting removed discriminatory barriers which had blocked the Latino community's political progress for decades? Nope . Those were heady wins , admittedly . In Chicago , the elimination of gerrymandered districts enabled Latinos to increase theh number on the City Council Jrom one to four . In Los Angeles, only one Hispanic had been elected to the Council in this century prior to Richard Alatorre's December i 1985 special election win. A reapportionment plan approved by the U.S. Justice Department in August should assure a minimum of two Hispanic representatives on that 15-member body this spring. Important, but. . . 1 What about sports? Los Angeles Dodger Fernando Valenzuela . became the highest paid pitcher in major league histoiy. That won't get my vote, either. . I Then how about Henry Cisneros' astute and acclaimed leader ship of the National League of Cities during his busy year as its . president? The San Antonio mayor certainly enhanced his chances as the Democratic Party's vice presidential candidate in '88. Cisnero's grasp of national and international affairs, his track . record in San Antonio, and his integrity and sensitivity make him a lot more qualified presidential candidate than most of those being promoted for the No . 1 spot on either major ticket Vice president? Big deal. So what gets my vote as the Hispanic big moment of 1986? Luis Nogales changed jobs. Thafs my choice. I pick it as the year's outstanding event not because Nogales, a 43-year-old former migrant farmworker, is any more special than Cisneros or Martinez or other present-day pathfinders like Antonia Hernandez, Xavier Suarez or Franklin Chang Diaz. Nogales' career change symbolizes a new era for U.S. Hispanics. As the year opened , he was the highly visible president and chief executive officer of the nation's No . 2 wire service, United Press International. He was credited, since taking over UPI in September 1984, with steering it from sure disintegration to profitability . He did it with compass i on and class. Nogales guided UPI through bankruptcy proceedings and its , sale for $41 million to Mexican media magnate Mario Vazquez Raila. Vazquez Raiia either underestimated the ability of his Chicano executive officer or overestimated the acceptance that he, as a foreigner , would get from his U.$. media brethren. After finalizing . the deal this summer , he insisted on running the show personally, so Nogales quit in July. Vazquez Raiia has had nothing but problems since . , Now Nogales has been hired by yet another Mexican multimillionaire, i Emilio the _ godfather of the mighty SIN television network, with 409 affiliates nationally. Nogales will head ECO, a new international television news network which will serve SIN affiliates in the United States and other clients worldwide . A generation ago, the power players of both Mexico and the , United States rejected U.S.-born Mexicans as less than equals . As Nogales has moved from print media to broadcast media, from a dominant English-speaking boardroom to a dominant Spanish-speaking one, he has shown this nation the true potential and value of its bilingual, bicultural . children. Kav Barbaro 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING DISABILITIES AND HEALTHINSURANCE: The U.S. Census Bureau.has released a 50page study with statistics on Hispanic disabilities and health insurance protection . Request " Disabilities, Functional Limitation and Health Insurance Coverage: 1984/85," Current Population Report Series P-70, No.8, from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402. (Price not available at press time. ) VOTING ASSISTANCE: The U.S . General Accounting Office pU blished a report recently titled "Bilingual Voting Assistance : Costs of and Use During the November 1984 General Election." A free copy of the 63-page report can be obtained by writing to: GAO , P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241. SOCIAL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: The Rockefeller Found ation, under its Equal Opportunity Program , announced recently 15 minority fellowships for individuals who haved earned a Ph. D . and are interested in areas such as education , employment , housing and civil . rights. Applicati9ns for the fellowships, which will begin in September and will not exceed $25,000, must be postmarked by Jan . 15. For information, write: Research Fellowship Program for Minority Groups' Scholars, Rockefeller Foundation, 1133 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 (212) 869-8500. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION FELLOWSHIPS: Latinos, blacks, other minorities and women who have at least three years of administrative experience and are interested in public administration and rural development are encouraged to apply to a 14month fellowship program sponsored by the National Urban/Rural Fellows. Between 30 and40 fellowships will be awarded in June 1987 and will range from $14,000 to $16,000. The deadline to apply is Feb . 20. Information and applications can be obtained by writing to : National Urban Fellows, 570 Seventh Ave . , Suite 905, New York, N.Y. 10018 (212) 221-7090. HISPANIC ISSUES RESEARCH GRANTS: Poverty/incom e dis tribution, employment, the criminal justice system and changing family structures are the themes for grants on contemporary research on Latinos sponsored by the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council. The grants, which will range from $30,000 to $50,000, will be awarded in April 1987. Entry deadline is Feb. 1. For applications, write to : Lonnie Sherrod/Mintari Preston, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave., New York, N . Y . 10158 (212) 661-0280. CONNECTING (Late news on whafs occurring within the U .S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) -FEW CUBAN EXECUTIVES IN DADE COUNTY Despite the success of Cuban Americans in the Miami area, few are on the executfve level, a survey reported by Guillermo Martinez, columnist for the Miami Herald , found. Of Dade County's 25 largest employers, excluding eight public agencies , only two have one local Hispanic on their board of directors, Martinez reported recently. "How can we speak about working together, about integrating this community, if the largest private corporations in town are st ill a bastion of the white-American establishmenf? " he quoted an anonymous Cuban American executive. AGENCY AWARDS $36 MILLION CONTRACT MAECORP, a Hispanic-owned hazardous waste management company in Chicago, was awarded a three-year, $36 million contract from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide emergency response clean-up services for Superfund sites in six Midwest states. The contract was a result of $1. 7 million in venture capital raised for MAECORP by Amoco Venture Capital Company, including a $450,000 investment by Amoco . Henry C . Mendoza is chairman and chief executive officer of MAECORP . MAES JOINS CONSULTING FIRM Jim Maes, a former executive assistant to past National Image President David Montoya , is now recruiting engineers for AMS Consultants. A 15-year employee of the federal Environmentai . Protection Agency , Maes may be reached at P . O . Box 16222, Santa Fe, N.M. 87506 (505) 4739280. POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS AVAILABLE The National Research Council plans to award35 Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowships for minority scientists, engineers and scho l ars in the humanities . The national competition is open to those preparing or already teaching at the college-level and who have doctoral or other terminal degrees . Applications for the one-yearfellowsh i p may be obtained from : Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington , D .C. 20418. The deadline is Jan. 16. Calendar CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIAASSOCIA TION Training Conference San Diego Sept 10 Following are the major state and regional conferences, conventions, seminars and events for 1987: STATE EVENTS 1987 CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL .EDUC.ATION Conference Anaheim, Calif . Jan. 28:31 Margo Ferris (714) 962-3710 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF AZTLAN . Scholarship Banquet Los Angeles, Jan. 29 Rosemarie Zapata Ramirez (818) 449 . ' OHIO COMMISSION ON ' SPP
PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS CHANCELLOR INDIANA UNIVERSITY EAST Indiana Universi t y invites applications and nominations for the position of Chancellor at its Ind iana University East Campus, located in Richmond, Indiana. The chancellor reports to 'the President of the Indiana University System and is responsible for the leadership, planning , management and evaluation of the ca mpu s programs. Candidates should have a . strong academic background, an earned doctorate, a record of successful administrative experience and the ability to work with external constituencies. Familiarit y with the operation of a multi -cam pus system is desirable. Th e campus presently offers a range of two year programs and a limited number of baccalaureate programs and g raduate courses serving 1,400 commuter students. Nominations a nd letters of application with appropriate material (including resume) should be submitted to: Chancellor Search Committee Indiana University East 2325 Chester Boulevard Richmond, Indiana 47374 The committee expects to submit its report to the President by midFebruary , 1987. Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity Employer DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION The Children's Defense Fund is seeking a Director of Finance a nd Administration. T he Director is responsible for managing the financial , personnel and office systems in a 70-person, $5 million nonprofit, privately funded child advo cacy group. Qualifications are: e Management-level experience in developing and maintaining accounting , financial and support systems in a nonprofi t environment: e Knowledge of personnel p olicies, benefits administration and office procedures; e Familiarity with automated and computer based financial systems; and , e Advanced degree/training in Accounting or Administration and 10 years experience pre ferred Salary range mid $30's to $40's, depending on experience. Please send resumes to: Ms. Pamela Cary Administrative Assistant Children's Defense Fund 122 C St. NW, Suite 400 Washington, D.C. 20001 CDF IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER NAHj JOB EXCHANGE EDITOR Professional membership association seeks experienced professional editor . Minimum three years e x perience and Bachelors degree prefer red. Proofreading , editing and production work re quired for p rofessio nal journals and b oo ks. Mu s t be well orga nized with irrdepth knowled . ge of English required , knowledge of behav i oral science preferred. Starting salary l ow twe nties plus excellent benefit s . Send resume to : Employ ment Specialist, National Association of Social Workers , 7981 Eastern Ave. , Si l ve r Spri n g , Md . 20910. EOE 1987 NAHJ CALENDAR A 1987 calendar showcasing the talents of • 12 Hispanic photojournalists with 22 photo . graph s is for sa le for $8 by the Nation a l Association of Hispanic Journalists. Th e 11 x 14inch calendar also lists more than 100 major'S? media and Hispanic organiza tional events by date. Contact persons and their phone numbers are included. The $8 purchase price covers postage a nd handling . Order from NAHJ, Suite 634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C . 20045. Or call (202) 783-6228. FUNDRAISER National civil rights organization seeks vice president for development to raise $3 million annually from foundations, corporations and individuals; perform outreach/solicitation; and develop/implement strategy to solicit$250 thousand annually in new funding. Requirements: Five years fund-raising/ marketing experience; knowledge of foundation/ corporation giving and deferred/planned giving; experience with boards of directors; excellent communication skills; some knowledge of legal issues and b ilingual ability (English / Spanish) helpful. Resumes with references toMs A Hermi ndez, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St. , 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 1/26/87. CHICANO STUDIES The Department o f Chicano Studies anti cipates a tenure track appointment in one of the f ollowing disciplines: e Anthropology e Economics • Political Science • Psy chology Appointment will either be a joint appoint ment or a full appoint m ent m Ch icano Studies Po sit ion effective July 1 . 1987. Ph . D . by time of appointment and evi dence of excellence in te ac h ing and resear c h are required. Assis tant Professor level preferred. although ex ceptionally welf-qualified persons whose back ground and experience wa rrant a tenure level appointment are a lso encouraged to apply. Salary and rank depend e nt on qualifications. Applicant& should send vitae and pertinent documents, including copies of main publi cations (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed chapters), and arrange to have a t least three profess ion al evaluations sent by Jan. 31, 1987 to: Dr . Mario T. Garcia Chair, Department of C hicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara , Calif. 931 06 An Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington , D.C., provides: e Design e Illustration e Type . setting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St. NW , Wash i ngton , 2001.0 (202l 483-1140. PRINCE GEORGE ' S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. New employm ent referral service for Hispani c professionals and students in the media, serving the East Coast South and Midwest Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newsp a pers, magazines, television, radio and other media, Engli sh or Spanish . Contact Lucienne Loman National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228 DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of His panic Lin k Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) I:>Y p.m . (ED Tuesday will be Weekly Reports mailed Frid a y of the same week. DIRECTOR OF THE BECHTEL INTERNA TIONAL CENTER at Stanford Uni vers it y sought Salary range is $50-55,000 per yea r (de pending on q u a lificat ion s and experience) . Applications m us t be postmarked by Feb. 10, 1 987. For further information contact: Kathy DeMoulin Personnel Department Stanford University Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-0918 Equal Opportunity Employer through Affirmative A ction. His panic Link W eekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES ( Ad s with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by---------Title -----'---------Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name---------To ____________ _ Address --:-::-:---------City, State & Zip---------5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment STAGE: Broadway's surprise hit in 1986 was a play about a teenager and his drug dealer father written by a 26-year-old New York Puerto Rican. For his Cuba and His Teddy Bear -which opened in April starring Robert De Niro and Ralph Macchio playwright Reinaldo Povodwon in October the George Oppenheimer Award for best new writer to have a play staged in New York. new opera based on the folk tradition of the Fiesta de Santiago de los Caballeros opened in October at the Centro de Bellas Artes. El mensajero de plata was composed by Robert Sierra with a libretto by Myrna Casas Gian Carlo Menotti wrote Goya, an opera based on the life of the Spanish painter premiered by the Washington Opera at the Kennedy Center in November. Placido Domingo sang the title role; Chilean : mezzo Victoria de Alba sang the Duchess of Alba. Last year's Broadway hit-Tango Argentino-began its national tour in Miami in May, the same month it was nominated for three Tony awards. The show picked up a nomination in the "best musical" category; its dancers were nominated for "best choreography'' and Claudio $egovia and Hector Orezzoli for" best direction of a musical." TELEVISION: After a 1 0-year dispute among its stockholders, 10 SIN TV stations were put on sale. The possibilities of U.S. Hispanic ownership of the nation's first Spanish-language network apparently died when its parent company accepted a $301.5 million bid from Hallmark Cards Inc. and FirstChicago Venture Capital. (The sale awaits final approval by the Federal Communications Commission.) Also nominated for Tonys in 1986 were Chita Rivera ("best actress in a musical" for Jerry's Girls) and Jose Quintero ("best director of a play" for The Iceman Cometh). One of SIN's highest-rated programs, Televisa's Siempre en Domingo, moved from Mexico City to Miami for three Sundays in August. In the summer, New York's Festival Latino increased its scope with visiting Hispanic theater companies from around the country. Other important theater events held in the summer were the International Chicano Latino Theater Festival, in Morelos, Mexico, and the first Zarzuela Festival in El Paso, Texas . Twenty-two shows began the fall prime time television season in September, and not one featured a Hispanic actor or actress in a lead role. Of the new programs, CBS' Kay O'Brien featured Priscilla Lopez and NBC's L. A. Law had Jimmy Smits-both Latinos in secondary roles . In July, the Costa Mesa, Calif., South Coast Repertory's Hispanic Playwright's Project culminated with staged readings of plays by Arthur Giron, Lisa Loomer and Eduardo Machado. The project is now set as an annual event. A pilot episode for the sitcom The Family Martinez, starring Robert Beltran and Anne Betancourt, aired on CBS in August. The show has been talked about as a" mid-season" replacement, but no announcements have been made. On cable, the successful Sanchez of Bel Air, on the USA Network, Two Hispanic-theme operas premiered in 1986. In Puerto Rico, a has been signed for a new season. _ (4.ntonio MejiasRental? M d • R rt ' Contact: James Denley (205) 325-2214. e 18 ep. o Sacramento, Calif . Jan . 29-31, Sacramento Inn. Contact Mike Flanagan (916) 321-1009. CONFERENCESANDCAREERS: Hispanics in the media and those interested in the field have a full agenda of events in 1987. Fol lowing is a chronological listing of the major meetings and job fairs throughout the United States: The American Society of Newspaper Editors. Local and regional minorities job fair/conferences will be held at: Ann Arbor, Mich. Jan. 15-17, Campus Inn . Contact: Herb Boldt (313) 222-2319. Louisville, Ky. Jan. 15-17, Brown Hotel. Contact Mervin Aubespin (502) 582-4191. Akron, Ohio Jan. 29-31, Cascade Holiday Inn. Contact: John Greenman (216) 375-8293. Birmingham, Ala . Jan. 29-31, Ramada Hotel. , HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a nationa1 publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publisher Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio MejiasRentas, Melinda Machado No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96: . Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 . NEWSDAY: The Long Island daily will sponsor a job opportunity conference for minorities Jan . 23, 24 in Long Island, New York For more information, contact: Reginald Tuggle (51 6) 454-2183. NATIONAL HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS: Puerto Rican preacher Jose D . Camacho will address the Hispanic banquet Feb. 4 in Washington, D.C. during the National Religious Broadcasters con vention Jan . 31-Feb. 4. For registration infor mation contact Duane Ward (202) 628-4831 . JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES CONFER ENCE FOR MINORITIES: Sponsored by the California Chicano News Media Association in Los Angeles on Feb. 6, 7, it is the largest media job fair on the West Coast for minority professionals and students. Registration information is available from: Magdalena H . Beltran (213) 7 43-7158. HOWARD UNIVERSITY: A job opportunity conference for minorities will be held Feb. 18-21 at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Contact Virginia Stewart (202) 636-7491. INSTITUTE FOR JOURNALISM EDU CATION: The National Conference on Miorities in the Media, sponsored by IJE, will held in Washington, D .C. on March 9, Top minority journalists and alumni of IJE programs have been invited to the conference. For more information, contact Charles Martin (415) 642-3503. MINORITY JOB CONFERENCE: Hosted by the Washington Post, recruiters from the newspaper industry will interview minority students and professionals . for jobs and internships in marketing, sales, circulation, advertising and data processing positions in Washington, D .C. March 19-21 . Registration information for the conference, sponsored by the American Newspaper Publishers A& sociation and the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business, is available, from Sandra Moiler at (800) 544-7678. NATIONAL HISPANIC VIDEO SHOW: This event will address all aspects the Hispanic video market in Dallas on March 28, 29. Contact Candelario Gutierrez (800) 331-4502. FILM FESTIVAL: UNO Productions and the Stage of Arts Productions will present the Latin American Film Festival in Los Angeles from April 10-19. Contact (213) 271-2144. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: NAHJ will host its fifth National Media Conference in Los Angeles April 2225. A job fair will also be held during the conference. Contact Frank Newton (20) 783-6228. Melinda Machado Notice to Subscribers Effective 1987, Hispanic Link Weekly Report will convert to publishing 50 issues annually, including two special 8-page editions. One of the 8-page editions will focus on the media and be coordinated with the annual National Hispanic Media Conference held every April. The other will be a year end specia( coming out just before Christmas The week following each of these editions, we will take a one-week break. All present Weekly Report readers will receive 52 issues on their current $96 an nual subscriptions. Any subscribers who renew this month -no matter when date falls -will also have their renewals extended two additional issues in 1988. Weekly Report began as a 4-page publication in September 1983 and expanded to 6 pages in September 1986. Thanks for your continued support. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher Hispanic Link Weekly Report