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Hispanic link weekly report, January 12, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 12, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Pope John Paul II names the Rev. Armando Ochoa, the 43-year-old pastor of the Sacred Heart Parish in Los Angeles, as one of three auxiliary bishops to help manage the Los Angeles Archdiocese... California Gov. George Deukmejian announces that Associate Justice John Arguelles of the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles is one of six candidates to fill the three vacant spots on the state Supreme Court One of the vacancies was created by the defeat of Cruz Reynoso in the past November elections... As one of his last official acts, New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya cuts the sentence of former state disaster relief official Pete Mondragdn from 18 years to six years and that of former aide John Ramming from 18 to 3 years.
They were found guilty of steering nearly $3 million in state disaster funds to a contractor for $15,000 and a $25,000 truck... Denise Guzmdn, whose husband, Steve, lost five family members in the Aug. 31 midair wreck in Cerritos, Calif., becomes the president and chief spokesperson for CUFFS, Citizens United for Flight Safety. CUFFS was formed two weeks after the air disaster which took 82 lives... Ramon Castroviejo, a pioneering eye surgeon who performed an estimated 10,000 cornea transplants during a 60-year career, dies at age 82 of a heart ailment Castroviejo, who worked at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., for several years, returned to his native Spain in 1973.. .The Indian Creek Village Council, an island district of Miami, apologizes to Julio Iglesias for sending the singer a letter accusing his four dogs of doing “unmentionable” things on a neighbor's tree. Police apprehended the true perpetrator: a large, stray beagle...
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Half of Texas Latino Dropouts Exit by 8th Grade
Nearly half of Texas’ Hispanic dropouts are leaving school with less than a ninth grade education, compared to 18% of white and
TEXAS DROPOUTS WITH LESS THAN 9TH GRADE EDUCATION (Ages 16-24- 1980)
Male Female 48.5% 49.5%
18.0 19.0
16.8 15.6
Source: “Texas School Dropout Survey Project: A Summary of Findings." IDRA Center for the Prevention and Recovery of Dropouts
Race/Ethnicity Hispanic White Black
16% of black dropouts, a report by the Inter-cultural Development Research Association revealed.
The report, “Texas School Dropout Survey Project,” will be presented in San Antonio Jan. 16 as part of a Texas League of United Latin American Citizens daylong symposium on combating the dropout problem.
The conference, moderated by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, is aimed at linking educational remediation with corporations. Its recommendations will also be forwarded to the 69th Texas Legislature.
The IDRA study identified dropout rates of
Texas youth, ages 16 to 24, as:
Male Female Hispanic 35.1% 33.7%
White 15.0 14.5
Black 21.3 17.1
Dropouts are broadly defined as students who leave school before graduation for any reason except death. The report estimated the overall dropout rates to vary from 12.3 to 26.5 in 19 standard metropolitan statistical areas. The most urban and greatest Hispanic areas showed the higher rates, with heavily Hispanic South Texas highest of all. A sampling:
Rochester, N.Y., Addresses Dropouts
Hispanic history and culture will be added to next fall’s curriculum in the Rochester School District as part of a unique project in the New York city.
The Hispanic Studies Project developed in Rochester as a result of an effort between the district and Hispanic community members to address special problems Latino students encounter, said Judy Kerr, coordinator of the project
Of the districts 32,224 students, 4,008 are Hispanic. Eighty-five percent of the Latino students are Puerto Rican. Last June a task force empaneled by the district recommended eight priority areas to stem the Hispanic dropout rate and improve academic performance among these students, Kerr said.
The district is beginning to implement recommendations by interviewing for two new bilingual positions, one in the personnel department
Tomes Challenges Budget
President Reagan’s proposed $1.024 trillion budget for fiscal 1988 is more of the same-increasing military spending and less for domestic needs, Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, reacted Jan. 5.
Torres promised that the caucus will work to insure that the needs of its constituency are met in the 100th Congress. “This is not the time to cut back or zero out federal efforts to help our communities prosper,” he said.
and the other in the office of Parent and Community Involvement.
Curriculum Specialist Ellen Swartz said the Hispanic history supplement will focus on the contributions of Hispanics in the United States as well as the cultural history of Puerto Ricans, Cubans and Mexican Americans. The text will be used between the 5th and 8th grade levels.
No. of Youth Dropout
16-to-24 Rate
Brownsville-Har-
lingen-San Benito 9,200 26.5%
McAllen-Pharr-
Edinburg 11,900 26.2
Houston (Harris
County only) 93,000 21.7
Dallas-Fort Worth 98,100 19.4
San Antonio
(Bexar County) 33,200 18.4
Austin 15,100 12.3
Of the almost half-million Texans in that age group who were not in school and had
' continued on page2
TEXAS ENROLLMENT, ATTRITION RATES
1982-1983 and 1985-1986
9th Grade 12th Grade Expected Attrition
1982-83 1985-86 12th Grade No. %
Hispanic
Male 34,884 20,421 38,712 18,291 47%
Female 31,860 20,344 35,636 15,292 43
Black
Male 18,776 11,801 18,455 6,654 36
Female 17,937 12,336 17,950 5,614 31
White
Male 70,159 52,699 73,403 20,704 28
Female 65,761 51,347 69,360 18,013 26
All Groups *
Male 125,815 86,642 133,245 46,603 35
Female 117,304 85,645 125,318 39,673 32
Total 243,119 172,287 258,563 86,276 33%
* - Including Asian and American Indian. â– bLj?
Source: “Texas School Dropout Survey Project: A Summary of Findings” IDRA Center fortl and
Recovery of Dropouts
Mn 14 198?


Proposed Ed Cutbacks Assailed
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund assailed Jan. 6 President Reagan’s $1.02 trillion budget proposal for fiscal year 1988, charging that the elimination and reductions in'education programs would
Reynoso Joins L. A. Firm
Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, who was defeated at the polls in November, announced Jan. 2 that he will join a Los Angeles-based law firm.
ReynoSb, who was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1982 by then Gov. Jerry Brown, will join the 16-member firm of O’Donnell & Gordon. He will handle a variety of trial and appellate work, including cases dealing with the new federal immigration law.
The 55-year-old jurist said he was drawn to the firm because of its interest in public service. “I liked them because they were clearly a firm that looked at the law as a service as well as an occupation,” he said.
Reynoso was defeated in his election bid, along with his colleagues Chief Justice Rose Bird and Justice Joseph Grodin, after a well-financed campaign criticizing his re-’ cord on overturning death penalties.
Chicago’s Byrne Favored
Chicago Hispanics would favor candidate Jane Byrne in a head-to-head matchup with incumbent Mayor Harold Washington 56%-38% despite Washington enjoying an overall lead in the city of 54%-38%.
In a voter survey it reported Jan. 5, the Chicago Tribune said that 60% of Latinos in the nation’s third largest city felt Washington did not deserve to be re-elected.
The poll found Fhat RlspahTcs" supported the two front-runner candidates as follows:
Hispanics Washington Byrne Female 32.1% 60.7%
Male 44.6 50.0
All 38.0 55.7
The Democratic primary will be held Feb. 24 and the general election April 7.
be especially harmful to Hispanics.
John Trasvina, a legislative attorney with the Washington, D.C., office of MALDEF, said that the proposed budget for 1988, which begins Oct. 1, “starkly reveals that quality education for Hispanics is not a priority of the Reagan administration.”
Hispanic teenage students from low-income farmworker and migrant families would be hardest hit, said Trasvina Proposed for elimination are the High School Equivalency Program and College Assistance Migrant Programs Together funded at $7.5 million for the current fiscal year, these programs provide counseling and stipends to students seeking high school diplomas and entering college.
Also slated for elimination is the $75.5 million used for the special development needs of community colleges and Hispanic or predominantly Hispanic universities in Puerto Rico and the Southwest
Other programs which face cuts or eliminations that would adversely affect Hispanics are;
• Pell tuition grants would be cut from $3.8 billion to $2.7 billion. This would translate to one million fewer awards, with families having incomes of $20,000 to $28,900 being eliminated from eligibility.
• The elimination of 787,000 work-study grants, now worth $592 million.
• Support for bilingual vocational education, consumer education, basic grants and other programs, which this year amounted to $882 million, would be terminated.
The proposed budget would fund bilingual education at its present level without considering the growing identified need, inflation or other factors, said Jim Lyons, policy counsel to the National Association for Bilingual Education.
“The budget particularly chooses to eliminate smaller programs that have had big results in opening opportunities for the poor, minorities and. women,” he said.
Overall, federal government outlays for education would decrease from $17 billion to $14.7 billion.
Hispanic DEA Agent Killed in Border Raid
The second drug enforcement official -both Latinos- to be killed in the Rio Grande Valley area in Texas in the last two months died Dec. 31 near the city of Pharr while trying to arrest a narcotics suspect.
Drug Enforcement Administration Special | Agent William Ramos, 30, was shot to death during a tussle with the assailant in the parking lot of a supermarket. The incident took place three miles north of the Mexico border. Ramos had been a DEA agent at the Houston-based sector for 18 months
Felipe Molina Uribe, a 29-year-old Mexican H national, is in custody and charged with the murder. Molina suffered a gunshot wound to the leg. He and Benito Cavazos Lamas, 25 and also a Mexican national, were charged with possession with intent to distribute 303 pounds of marijuana
On Oct. 31, Manuel Segovia of the Hidalgo County Sheriff Department also died of gunshot wounds while on a raid at a trailer home in Mercedes Texas. Prior to Segovia the last enforcement agent to die in the line of duty was Enrique Camarena Salazar. He was killed in Guadalajara, Mexico, in February 1985.
Ramos was a native of the Bronx, N.Y., a former assistant prosecutor in Mojave, Ariz., j and a graduate of the University of Arizona law school.
Texas Dropouts Studied
continued from page 1
not finished the 12th grade, 197,000 were Hispanic Of these 85% were U.S. born, according to 1980 U.S. Census figures.
“For Texas and the country as a whole, there is a direct economic impact in terms of the quality of the labor pool that will be available in the future,” said Maria del Refugio Robledo, principal investigator for the IDRA study.
Existing dropout programs in Texas show little emphasis on pre-high school students, the IDRA report said.
“By the time kids get to the ninth grade, they’re dropping out like flies,” said LULAC State Education Chairman Enrique Gallegos. Jj “Something has to happen very quickly. The problem doesn’t belong to the schools alone.” -
IDRA also looked at attrition rates for the state, using ninth grade enrollment for 1982-83 and 12 th grade enrollment for 1985-86. It found the attrition rate among Hispanics to be 45%, blacks 34% and whites 27%. Approximately 86,000 students were lost, giving the state an overall attrition rate of 33%, it con- | eluded.
Robledo pointed out that the figure did not ! include students who dropped out before the ninth grade or those who left after the start of I the senior year.
She estimated that these 86,000 dropouts I will cost Texas $17 billion in foregone income, ' lost tax revenues, increased welfare, adult ; education and other p,>rvices, crime and in- . carceration.
Sorzano Named to Embattled NSC
Jose Sorzano, a Cuban emigrant and former deputy to United Nations Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick,began work Jan. 2 as head of the Latin American Affairs division of the National Security Council.
New national security adviser FrankCarlucci selected Sorzano to replace Raymond Burghardt, who is returning to the State Department. Carlucci was appointed NSC adviser after top presidential aides Vice Adm. John Poindexter and Lt. Col Oliver North resigned for alleged involvement in the selling of weapons to Iran and illegal transfer of arms sales profits to the Nicaraguan contras.
The NSC is charged with advising the president on domestic, foreign and military policies relating to national security.
A law student at the University ot Havana when he left Cuba for Washington during the beginning of Castro’s rule, Sorzano enrolled at Georgetown University, where he became a professor in 1969.
A former Democrat, Sorzano was director of the Peace Corps in Colombia between 1976 and 1979. He joined the Reagan campaign in 1980, working on foreign affairs issues with Kirkpatrick.
“We do have a very critical situation in Nicaragua The attention of the political machine is going to be focused on that. Because of that, it will be quite a challenge,” Sorzano said of his new position.
The 46-year-old former president of the Cuban American National Foundation lives in Arlington, Va, with his wife and two children.
2
- Melinda Machado
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Maggie Hall, guest columnist
Life as a Token Hispanic
By choice, and not necessity, I’ve accepted the responsibility of being a token Hispanic. No one forced me to go boldly where no Latin American has gone before, whether to fill a quota or to color an employer’s rainbow.
Invariably, I am the only Cuban among coworkers. When they do “discover'’ my roots, they view me with suspicion. They react with disappointment toward my lack of outward ethnicity.
I’ve been the only Cuban at chess clubs, on debating teams, in editing classes,on listings of Mensa members, in newsrooms and at almost every job I’ve held since 1974. With an Anglicized nickname and a Saxonized surname courtesy of my husband, Kevin, I have become an undercover Hispanic.
The alternative i is to make my nationality an issue in every conversation with someone I don’t know. In the 20 years I’ve lived in the United States, I have never attempted to deny where I came from. The confusion resulted from the perception of others who had a set idea of what a Hispanic was. I didn’t meet the stereotype.
IF ITS PREJUDICE, FIGHT IT
The reason for my being a workplace token is that I have never allowed my birthplace to determine where I belonged. Minorities complaining about locked doors should examine what keeps them barred from their goals. If it’s prejudice, then fight it with civil rights legislation. If the stumbling block is your own lack of determination, then you have no one to blame.
“You can do what you want to do as long as you’re educated,” my mother Haidee told me when I was ready for college. “You can make what you want from what you’re given in school.” A working woman at a time when most of her friends stayed home, my mother handed me a respect for learning and for hard work that I still carry. These have been more valuable to me than any affirmative action law.
My education - scholastic, moral and cultural - was more important to my parents than the state of the family car or our prospects for new living room furniture.
When we arrived in the United States after a Freedom Flight from Havana in 1966, my parents were given a choice of final destination. Most of our relatives, had opted for the comfort of Miami, a city that would soon rival Cuba for the most concentrated population of its
natives. M|AMrs OPPRESSIVE HOMOGENEITY
Armed with one suitcase and my mother's English-language-class skills, we set out for New York in defiance. If we were to accept the United States as our new home in gratitude for being taken in, my mother said, we would have to do our best to learn to succeed here. Moving to a city with the oppressive homogeneity of Miami’s Saguesera district would do her children a disservice in adulthood, she reasoned.
During the mid-1960s, New York’s public schools had no bilingual classes for their new arrivals. My sister Marla and I picked up English watching “I Dream of Jeannie” and listening to rock When we came home bewildered by phrases we didn’t understand, Mom would do her best to help and to encourage us to improve.
Our first allegiance was to find a place in our new home - a tenet almost as important as her law that we never forget where we’d come from.
My sister, my U.S.-born brother and I could spout all the English we wanted to among ourselves. But at home with our parents and with our elders, only Spanish could be spoken. We grew up Cuban American: Our Spanish is still there and our English is excellent.
I’ve gained access to places where my command of the language allows me to command my future while not surrendering my Latino roots.
My mother's teachings left the door wide open. My own curiosity set me off on my own journey. Thanks, Mom, for making me a token.
(Maggie Hall is a freelance writer who lives in St Petersburg, Fla.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
YEAR TO REMEMBER (AND FORGET): Before 1986 was even a few weeks old, the Census Bureau went and blabbed it that while the rest of the nation’s population was growing at a 3% rate between 1980 and 1985, Hispanics were doing it at 16%.
That set off bats in a lot of belfries.
In California, for example, there were “official English” mandates from voters in Monterey Park and then the whole state. A man in a Los Angeles restaurant was stabbed to death by a stranger for conversing in Spanish with a companioa And after an undocumented workerfrom Mexico won the state lottery, one legislator announced that he was going to introduce a bill making it illegal for indocumentados to win first prize.
There’s an old Southwestern saying about New Mexico having all of the pihones and California the rest of the nuts.
WE LOST SOME FRIENDS: The Hispanic community mourned the passing of the respected and highest ranked Latino in the U.S. Justice Department, Gil Pompa; a pioneer journalist, Marina Mireles MacPherson; television pioneer Desi Arnaz; former baseball pitching star Mike Garcia and a young man whose strange death gained more press attention than any of the others: Fifteen-year-old Felipe Garza Jr., an apparently healthy Patterson, Calif., schoolboy, died Jan. 4 from ruptured blood vessels in his head after telling his mother that he wanted his heart to be given to a 14-year-old friend, Donna Ashlock, who was on the verge of death from heart degeneration. Felipe’s heart was transplanted successfully into her body the following day.
WE ABSORBED SOME INSULTS: In 1986, it was almost as though there was a contest to see who could come up with the most outrageous anti-Latino insult. A stellar cast, including two Democratic governors, competed:
Colorado’s Dick Lamm accused us of fostering “deadly disunity” by not assimilating fast enough, of being a “social time bomb.” New York’s Mario Cuomo gave New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez a history lesson, explaining that when Puerto Ricans were immigrating to that city 10 or 15 years ago, they “didn’t have a pair of shoes until they got to the airport.”
Another Colorado politician, Republican state Rep. Walt Young-lund, killed a bill calling for field toilets for farm workers with the explanation that the workers were from Mexico and they didn’t know how to use toilets, anyway.
Dallas Democrat P.S. Ervin, a candidate for the Texas Railroad Commission, had a better solution. His immigration reform plan: “Shoot the first 25 Mexicans who cross the border after public warnings.”
Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone apparently got the idea that we were fair game. He joined in to accuse us of holding down the intelligence level of the United States.
Thank goodness we had friends like Jack Anderson and Jesse Helms around to stick up for us.
Jack highlighted our political potential by writing that by the turn of the century, “the babies of Mexico could be a greater threat to the United States than the nuclear missiles of the Soviet Union.” Jesse? Well, the sage of the U.S. Senate forgave us our other excesses by pointing out that “all Latins are volatile people.” MACHO OF THE YEAR: Within that context, I now submit my nominee for 1986 Latino “Macho of the Year.” San Jose State University quarterback Mike Perez, whose ancestors came from Guadalajara, Mexico, was penalized 15 yards in a game against Washington State this past fall for roughing the rusher. Now that’s macho\ - Kay Barbaro
Quoting. . .
HENRY B. GONZALEZ, 70, discussing the black eye he gave a San Antonio restaurant patron last month for allegedly calling the congressman - a boxer in his youth - a “communist.”
“If I had wanted to cold-cock him, I could have”
Jan. 12,1987


COLLECTING
TEXAS’ DROPOUT PROBLEM: “Texas School Dropout Survey Project: A Summary of Findings” addresses the magnitude of the Hispanic dropout problem in the state, including the number of students leaving school before ninth grade. For a copy of the 59-page report, send $5.50 to: Intercultural Development Research Association, 5835 Callaghan Rd., Suite350, San Antonio, Texas78228 (512) 684-SI 80.
HISPANICS IN ARIZONA: “Hispanics in Transition” is a 22-page booklet dealing with several characteristics, including work force participation and community leadership, of the Latino population in the state. Free single copies can be obtained by writing to: Public Information Office, Department of Economic Security, 1717 W. Jefferson, Phoenix, Ariz. 85007 (602) 255-4791.
CRIME PREVENTION IN CITIES: The National Crime Prevention Council has published a 124-page book, “Preventing Crime in Urban Communities,” which offers approaches on how to start crime prevention programs For a copy, send $10 to: NCPC,733 15th St. NW, Suite 540, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 393-7141.
JOB SEEKERS: The U.S. Labor Departments “Occupational Outlook Quarterly” contains information on new occupations, salaries and job trends. For a copy, send $5 to: Dept. 250P, Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
UNWORKABLE AND UNFAIR? “Justice Watch,” a quarterly newsletter of The Nation Institute, provides its assessment of new immigration and refugee law in its lead article, “Simpson-Rodino: Unworkable and Unfair?” For a copy of the fall ’86 newsletter and its 6-page analysis, send $1 to cover postage and handling to: Phillip Frazer, Justice Watch, The Nation Institute, 72 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10011.
WORLD POPULATION: “World Population Profile: 1985”isa53-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau based on data from 205 countries. It looks at growth rates from 1985-90 as well as contraceptive use, literacy and aging. For a copy (WP-85), write to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (Price not available at press time.) j
PUERTORRIQUENAS: “Hispanic Women in the United States: A Puerto Rican Woman’s Perspective” is a42-page booklet containing four speeches and an article on Hispanas, particularly Puerto Rican women. For a copy, send $3 to the attention of Laura Noble at Miranda ‘Associates, 818 18th St. NW, Suite 1020, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 857-0430.
CAREERS THAT COUNT: Single, free copies of the publication “Careers in the Bureau of Labor Statistics” are available by writing to College Recruitment/Special Programs, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 441 G St. NW, Room 2121, Washington, D.C. 20212.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it.)
FACES AND PLACES
Lillian Pubillones-Nolan, consultant with the U.S. House of Representatives’ subcommittee on Western Hemisphere Affairs (Foreign Affairs Committee) since 1981, has joined the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration in Washington, D.C., as special assistant to director Jose Ortiz-Daliot.
Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster, the island’s representative in Congress, has moved his D.C. offices to 427 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515, retaining his (202) 225-2615 telephone number.
The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration also moved its Washington offices. New address: 1100 17th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 778-0710.
Jose Font, longtime president of the capital’s Ibero American Chamber of Commerce, left IACC this month to open offices of his new International Development Group, 733 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has completed its move to larger quarters at the new Board of Trade Center in Kansas City, Mo. Its address: 4900 Main St, Kansas City, Mo. 64112 (816) 531-6363.
Gloria Barajas, president of the Mexican American Women’s National Association (MANA) and co-owner of Congressional Education Associates, has joined the National Education Association as a human and civil rights specialist.
NEW EXPORT GUIDE PRINTED
A 130-page guide to exporting has been published by the U.S. Department of Commerce. The book, “A Basic Guide to Exporting” (stock number 003-009-00487-0), is available for $8.50 from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3228.
AT&T, ‘SI’
AT&T received overwhelming response to a biling*. il mailout to attract Hispanics to a new telephone charge card. The response rate was double the expected return.
“The success of the AT&T printed bilingual insert demonstrates the strong media capability of the Carol Wright Hispanic program in communicating to this target’s market segment.” Said Donnelley Marketing Account Executive David Jaffin.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
DROPOUT SYMPOSIUM San Antonio. Jan. 15,16
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will moderate a symposium on Hispanic youth illiteracy and dropouts sponsored by Texas LULAC on Jan. 16. Secretary of Education William Bennett will be honored at a reception Jan. 15.
Enrique Gallegos (512) 342-5157
NEWSPAPER JOB FAIRS Ann Arbor, Mich. Jan. 15-17 Louisville, Ky. Jan. 15-17
The American Society of Newspaper Editors is sponsoring two minority job fairs for students interested in journalism careers and professionals looking to move.
Herb Boldt (313) 222-2319 (Michigan)
4
Mervin Aubespin (502) 582'4191 (Kentucky)
COMING SOON
DIABETES AND MEXICAN AMERICANS National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations Austin, Texas Jan. 19 Phil Fry (512) 343-6981
SPANISH LITERARY PRIZES Letras de Oro Miami Jan. 22
Ambler Moss (305) 284-4303
NEWSPAPER JOB FAIR Newsday
Long Island, N.Y. Jan. 23, 24 Reginald Tuggle (516) 454-2183
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Jan. 28-31 Kathy Villalpudua (916) 447-3986
Jan. 12,1987
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Personnel Management Association of Aztlan, Los Angeles-Orange County Chapter Los Angeles Jan. 29
Rosemarie Zapata Ramirez (818) 449-2345
COMMISSION RETREAT
Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs
Columbus, Ohio Jan. 31, Feb. 1
Ramiro Estrada (614) 466-8333
BANQUET AND CONCERT Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters Washington, D.C. Feb. 4 Duane Ward (202) 628-4831
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be j received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address ito.ns to: Calendar editor, 1 Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report [
I


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS___________________
COLUMN SERVICE AVAILABLE
The following two positions are with COSSMHQ Send the required information to: COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005. By Jan. 30.
HEALTH SPECIALIST for health promotion/ disease prevention project at national Hispanic organization. Focus on maternal, child health and diabetes. Experience in research, writing, and community based prevention strategies. MPH required. Bilingual/bicultural preferred. Send resume and writing sample.
HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST seeks MPH for new public education health project Good writing skills necessary, fluency in Spanish required; bilingual and bicultural preferred. Experience in bilingual materials development also sought. Areas of interest include: Diabetes, maternal/child health and AIDS. Responsibilities include: Health materials development, media liaison and community network for information dissemination. Send letter and resume.
FUNDRAISER
National civil rights organization seeks vice president for development to raise $3 million annually from foundations, corporations and individuals; perform outreach/solicitation; and develop/implement strategy to solicit$250 thousand annually in new funding.
Requirements: Five years fund-raising/ marketing experience; knowledge of foundation/ corporation giving and deferred/planned giving; experience with boards of directors; excellent communication skills; some knowledge of legal issues and bilingual ability (English/Spanish) helpful.
Resumes with references to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 1/26/87.
University of Southern Colorado
Continuing position, at rank of assistant professor with teaching responsibilities in Spanish and French or Italian.
Candidate will teach a full load and perform customary student advising activities, service. Scholarly productivity will be expected. Ph.D. and knowledge of Chicano literature required. Publications will be expected.
Starting date is Aug. 25. Salary is competitive, depending on qualifications. Apply to: Dr. Donald Milene, Chair, Search Committee, Department of English and Foreign Language, University of Southern Colorado, 2200 N. Bonforte Blvd., Pueblo CO 81001-4901.
Application deadline is March 1.
CALIFORNIA CITIZENSHIP COORDINA-
DIRECTOR, Indiana University Art Museum. The museum is an I.M. Pei-designed building (dedicated 1982) with an outstanding general art collection composed of 25,000 objects.
Qualifications: Experienced scholar-art museum director with Ph.D. or equivalent scholarly publications and curatorial or administrative art museum experience. Interpersonal skills to work effectively with university administration, School of Fine Arts and various university departments A thorough understanding of the didactic mission of the I.U. Art Museum. An effective and convincing communicator regarding the importance of the Art Museum to the campus and community at large. Faculty or research rank and salary commensurate with qualifications Deadline: March 15,1987.
Please submit letter of application and current resume to Anya Peterson Royce, Dean of the Faculties and Chair, Search and Screen Committee, Bryan Hall 109, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405. Indiana University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.
CHAIR OF
POLICY STUDIES M.A. PROGRAM SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE seeks associate professor to chair policy studies graduate faculty and assist dean with graduate program planning and administration. Doctorate and college teaching experience required. Scholarly achievement, grounding in policy studies, interest in teaching adults in modes other than traditional classroom; curriculum development and graduate student experience preferred.
Letter and resume by 2/17/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director, Pers/AA, SUNY/ESC, Room 702, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. For more information call Dean DiPadova at (518) 587-2100. An AA/EOE.
1987 NAHJ CALENDAR
A1987 calendar showcasing the talents of j 12 Hispanic photojournalists with 22 photo- j graphs is for sale for $8 by the National j Association of Hispanic Journalists. The 11x14-inch calendar also lists more than 100 major’87 media and Hispanic organizational events by date. Contact persons and their phone numbers are included.
The $8 purchase price covers postage and handling.
Order from NAHJ, Suite 634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045. Or call (202) 783-6228.
Hispanic Link News Service syndicates three opinion and feature columns weekly, in English and Spanish, to more than 200 newspapers nationally. The columns are written by the nation’s outstanding Hispanic experts, leaders and journalists. Our goal is to add Hispanic perspectives to the op/ed pages of U.G. national media.
If there is a newspaper in your community which does not carry Hispanic Link and which you would like to have it carry such perspectives on a regular basis, please fill out the form below or call me with the name of the publication.
I will follow up by contacting the editor personally and providing samples of the columns..
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GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington," D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 2001.0 (202).483-1140.
TOR: Individual will be responsible for coordinating U.S. citizenship campaigns throughout the state of California.
Position involves frequent travel both in and out of state although the majority of time will be spent at NALEO’s East Los Angeles Office; individual should be able to work with community-' based organizations, local school districts, the INS and elected/appointed officials to promote U.S. citizenship; individual should have the ability to work with local media in the promotion of project activities. Position also requires fluent English/Spanish bilingual, excellent communication skills and the ability to work in an unstructured environment. Salary is $20,000-$25,000.
Send resume to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
AND THE WINNER IS: The 1987 entertainment award season is likely to bring multiple Grammy nominations for the Miami Sound Machine, last year's most successful Hispanic musical performers.
According to year-end sales charts published in the Dec. 27 issue of Billboard, Miami Sound Machine ranked number one among“new” pop artists. Their album Primitive Love and four singles from it made the 1986 charts. Ironically, 1986 marked the 10th anniversary for the group, whose original members are the husband and wife team of Emilio and Gloria Estefan, Marco Avila and Kiki Garcia.
Miami Sound Machine was ranked in ten other Billboard categories -including pop albums {Primitive Love, No. 10), pop singles artists-duos/ groups (No. 1), dance sales artists (No. 5) and pop Latin artists (No. 6).
In Latin music categories, Billboard ranked the following in the number one slots: Jose Jose’s Promesas, pop Latin albums; Jose Jose, pop Latin artists; Franky Ruiz’s Solista pero no solo, tropical/salsa Latin albums; El Gran Combo, tropical/salsa Latin artists; Los Bukis’ Adonde Vas, regional Mexican albums; and Los Bukis, regional Mexican Latin albums.
Several of the above artists could be included among this year's list of Grammy nominees, unavailable at press time.
(The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences announced Grammy nominees Jan. 8 and the Hollywood Foreign Press As-
sociation made public its Golden Globe nominees Jan. 6; details here next week.)
The awards season gets underway Jan. 31 with the Golden Globes ceremony, where Anthony Quinn will be presented the HFPA’s Cecil B. De Mille Award for his entertainment contributions
The New York-based Asociacidn de Cronistas de Espectaculos, a grouping of entertainment journalists, got the jump on the nominations race by announcing candidates for its ACE Awards last month. Artists from Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Argentina are prominent among the scores of nominees for the awards to be handed out in New York in March.
The ACEs highest award - premio extraordinario ACE por distincidn y merito- goes this year to Celia Cruz. Other non-competitive awards go to singers Placido Domingo and Franco.
In other nomination news, four Latin American films are contenders for Oscar nods in the “foreign film” category- Mexico’s El imperio de la fortuna(directed by Arturo Ripstein), Argentina’s Tangos: elexilio de Garde!(Fernando Solanas), Colombia’s Tiempo de morir( Jorge All Triana) and Brazil’s Hour of the Star (Suzana Amaral).
Oscar nominees are announced Feb. 11.
ONE LI NERS: Alguna cosita que alivie el sufrir, by the late Cuban playwright Rene Aloma, opens the Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre’s season at its New York theater Jan. 14.. .Richard Yftiguez co-stars in Ohara, a Warner Bros Television series that debuts Jan. 17 on ABC.. And video distributors Tomas Martinez of Clovis, Calif., and Hector Gonzalez of Houston, Texas, are planning the first Hispanic Video Show, March 28-29 in Dallas... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SALINAS SELECTED: Marla Elena Salinas, popular news anchor and reporter with Los Angeles’ KMEX-TV, will anchor the nation’s first West Coast-based Spanish-language network television newscast when it is launched Jan. 19.
The one-hour program replaces 24 Horas, a newscast from Mexico City. It will air from Los Angeles weeknights at 11 EST, complementing the Univision (formerly SIN) network’s 6:30 p.m. EST Miami news show.
Luis Nogales, head of Univision’s new news arm,ECO, last month,has responsibility for both programs. They’ll be carried by 409 affiliates.
Salinas, a Los Angeles native, began her career with KMEX-TV as a cub reporter.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
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Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 76 cents per word. Display ads are $35 percolumninch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
GIFTED CHILDREN: The Fox television network, with stations and affiliates in many major Hispanic markets, will air a one-hour program on Hispanic gifted children on Sunday, Jan. 18, at 9 p.m.
The show was produced at WFLD in Chicago as part of a monthly “32 on Location” series. Public affairs director Wanda Wells and Car-melo Melendez, host of Esta Semana, will cohost.
AWARDS, FELLOWSHIPS: The Dec. 27 issue of Editor & Publisher contains more than 500 awards, scholarships, internships and contests available to professional journalists and students alike. They’re listed in detail in a special 60-page E&P insert.
For a copy, send $3.00 to “1987 Directory of Journalism Awards and Fellowships,” Editor & Publisher, 11 West 19th St., New York, N.Y. 10011.
DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT: The Hispanic Media Coalition, composed of 35 Southern California Latino organizations, has announced its intention to file a “pattern of discrimination” complaint against Los Angelesf KCBS-TV with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
HMC legal counsel John Huerta told reporters that the station’s employment of Latinos has fallen from 16% in 1980 to 14% currently. The station laid off 22 employees last year, a third of them Latinos, he said.
CCNMA ELECTIONS: Frank del Olmo, editorial writer with The Los Angeles Times, has been elected president of the executive board of the California Chicano News Media Association... Ernesto Portillo, San Diego Union reporter, has been elected president of CCNMA’s San Diego chapter...
- Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week They were found guilty of steering nearly $3 million in state disaster funds to a contractor for $15,000 and a $25,000 truck ... Denise Guzman, whose husband, Steve, lost five family members in the Aug. 31 midair wreck in Cerritos, Calif. , becomes the president and chief spokesperson for CUFFS, Citizens United for Flight Safety. CUFFS was formed two weeks after the air disaster which took 82 lives. . . Ramon Castroviejo, a pioneering eye surgeon who performed an estimated 10,000 cornea transplants during a 60-year career, dies at age 82 of a heart ailment. Castroviejo, who worked at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., for several years, returned to his native Spain in 1973 ... The Indian Creek Village Council, an island district of Miami, apologizes to Julio Iglesias for sending the singer a letter accusing his four dogs of doing" unmentionable" things on a neighbor's tree . Police apprehended the true perpetrator : : a large, stray beagle . .. Pope John Paul II names the Rev. Armando Ochoa, the 43-year old pastor of the Sacred Heart Parish in Los Angeles, as one of three auxiliary bishops to help manage the Los Angeles Archdiocese ... California Gov. George Deukmejian announces that Associate Justice John Arguelles of the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles is one of six candidates to fill the three vacant spots on the state Supreme Court . One of the vacancies was created by the defeat of Cruz Reynoso in the past November elections ... As one of his last official acts, New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya cuts the sentence of former state disaster relief official Pete Mondragon from 18 years to six years and that of former aide John Ramming from 18 to 3 years. . Vol. 5 No.2 ANIC LINK WEEKL REPORT Jan. 1 2, 1987 Half of Texas Latino Dropouts Exit by 8th Grade Nearly half of Texas' Hispanic dropouts are leaving school with less than a ninth grade education, compared to 18% of white and TEXAS DROPOUTS WITH LESS THAN 9TH GRADE EDUCATION (Ages 16-1980) Race/Ethnicity Hispanic White Black Male 48.5% 18. 0 16.8 Female 49.5% 19.0 15.6 Source: ''Texas School Dropout Survey Project: A Summary of Findings. " I ORA Center for the Prevention and Recovery of Dropouts. 16% of black dropouts, a report by the cultural Development Research Association revealed. The report , " Texas School Dropout Survey Project , " will be presented in San Antonio Jan . 16 as part of a Texas League of United Latin American Citizens daylong symposium on combating the dropout problem. The conference, moderated by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, is aimed at linking educational remediation with corporations. Its recommendations will also be forwarded to the 69th Texas Legislature . The lORA study identified dropout rates of Texas youth, ages 16 to 24, as: Hispanic White Black Male 35.1% 15.0 21.3 Female 33.7% 14.5 17.1 Dropouts are broadly defined as students who leave school before graduation for any reason except death. The report estimated the overall dropout rates to vary from 12.3 to 26 . 5 in 19 standard metropolitan statistical areas. The most urban and greatest Hispanic areas showed the higher rates, with heavily Hispanic South Texas highest of all. A sampling: No. of Youth Dropout 16-to-24 Rate Rochester, N.Y., Addresses Dropouts Brown svi lieHa r lingenSan Benito 9,200 26.5% Hispanic history and culture will be added to next fall's curriculum in the Rochester School District as part of a unique project in the New York city. The Hispanic Studies Project developed in Rochester as a result of an effort between the district and Hispanic community members to address special problems Latino students encounter, said Judy Kerr, coordinator of the project. Of the district's 32,224 students, 4,008 are Hispanic. Eighty-five percent of the Latino students are Puerto Rican. Last June a task force empaneled by the district recom mended eight priority areas to stem the His panic dropout rate and improve academic performance among these students, Kerr said. The district is beginning to implement recoin. mendations by interviewing for two new bilingual positions, one in the personnel department Torres Challenges Budget President Reagan ' s proposed $1.024 trillion budget for fiscal 1988 is more of the sameincreasing military spending and less for domestic needs, Esteban Torres (D-Calif .), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, reacted Jan. 5 . Torres promised that the caucus will work to insure that the needs of its constituency are met in the 1 OOth Congress. "This is not the time to cut back or zero outfederal efforts to help our communities prosper," he said. and the other in the office of Parent and Community Involvement. Curriculum Specialist Ellen Swartz said the Hispanic history supplement will focus on the contributions of Hispanics in the United States as well as the cultural history of Puerto Ricans, Cubans and Mexican Americans. The text will be used between the 5th and 8th grade levels. McAllen Pharr Edinburg 11,900 26. 2 Houston (Harris County only) 93,000 21.7 Dallas-Fort Worth 98,100 19.4 San Antonio (Bexar County) 33,200 18.4 Austin 15,100 12.3 Of the almost half-million Texans in that age group who were not in school and had continuedonpage2 TEXAS ENROLLMENT, ATTRITION RATES 1982-1 983 and 1985-1 986 9th Grade 12th Grade Expected Attrition 1982 1985 12th Grade No. % Hispanic Male 34,884 20,421 38,712 18,291 47% Female 31,860 20,344 35,636 15,292 43 Black Male 18,776 11,801 18,455 6,654 36 Female 17,937 12,336 17,950 5 ,614 31 White Male 70,159 52,699 73,403 20,704 28 Fernale 65,761 51,347 69,360 18,013 26 All Groups* Male 125,815 86,642 133,245 46,603 35 Female 117,304 85,645 125,318 39,673 32 Total 243,119 172,287 258,563 86,276 33% *Including Asian and American Indian . H.'' '""' l . Source: "Texas School Dropout Survey Project: A Summary of Findings." /ORA Center for and Recovery of Dropouts. JAN 14 1987 I

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Proposed Ed Cutbacks Assailed The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund assailed Jan. 6 President Reagan's $1.02 trillion budget proposal for fiscal year 1988, charging that the elimination and rec:iuctions in -education programswciuiif Reynoso Joins L. A. Firm Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, who was defeated at the polls in November, announced Jan. 2 t hat he will join a Los Angeles-based law firm. Reynost>, who was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1982 by then Gov. Jerry Brown , will join the 16-member firm of O'Donnell & Gordon. He will handle a variety of trial and appellate work, including cases dealing with the new federal immigration law. The 55-year-old jurist said he was drawn to the firm because of its interest in public service. "I liked them because they were clearly a firm that looked at the law as a service as well as an occupation, " he said . Reynoso was defeated in his election bid, along with his colleagues Chief Justice Rose Bird and Justice Joseph Grodin , after a well-financed campaign criticizing his record on overturning death penalties. Chicago's Byrne Fa v ored Chicago Hispanics would favor candidate Jane Byrne in a head-to-head matchup with incumbent Mayor Harold Washington 56% -38% despite Washington enjoying an overall lead in the city of 54%-38% . In a voter survey it reported Jan. 5 , the Chicago Tribune said that 60% of Latinos in the nation's third largest city felt Washington did not deserve to be re-elected. The -poi I found thaCRispanTcs supported the two front-runner candidates as follows: H ispanics Washington Byrne Female 32. 1% 60. 7% Male 44.6 50. 0 All 38.0 55. 7 The Democratic primary will be held Feb . 24 and the general election April?. be especially harmful to Hispanics. John Trasvina, a legislative attorney with the Washington, D . C . , office of MALDEF, said that the proposed budget for 1988, which begins Oct. 1, "starkly reveals that quality education for Hispanics is not a priority of the Reagan administration." Hispanic teenage students from low-income farmworker and migrant families would be hardest hit, said Trasvina Proposed for elimi nation are the High School Equivalency Pro gram and College Assistance Migrant Programs. Together funded at $7.5 million for the current fiscal year, these programs provide counseling and stipends to students seeking high school diplomas and entering college. Also slated for elimination is the $75.5 million used for the special development needs of community colleges and Hispanic or predominantly Hispanic universities in Puerto Rico and the Southwest. Other programs which face cuts or eliminations that would adversely affect Hispanics are : e Pell tuition grants would be cut from $3.8 billion to $2. 7 billion. This would translate to one million fewer awards, with families having incomes of $20,000 to $28,900 being elimi nated from eligibility. e The elimination of 787,000 work-study grants, now worth $592 million . e Support for bilingual vocational education, consumer education, basic grants and other programs, which this year amounted to $882 million, would be terminated. The proposed budget would fund bilingual education at its present level without con sidering the growing identified need , inflation or other factors, said Jim Lyons, policy counsel to the National Association for Bilingual Education . " The budget particularly chooses to elimi nate smaller programs that have had big results in opening opportunities for the poor, minorities and _ women , " he said . Overall. federal government outlays for educa! : on would decrease from $17 billion to $14. / billion . Sorzano Na,med to Embattled NSC 2 Jose Sorzano , a Cuban emigrant and former deputy to United Nations Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick, began work Jan. 2 as head of the Latin American Affairs division of the National Security Council. New national security adviser Frank Carlucci selected Sorzano to replace Raymond Burghardt, who is returning to the State Department Carlucci was appointed NSC adviser after top presidential aides Vice Adm . John Poindexter and Lt. Col Oliver North resigned for alleged involvement in the selling of weapons to Iran and illegal transfer of arms sales profits to the Nicaraguan contras. The NSC is charged with advising the president on domestic, foreign and military policies relating to national security. A law student at the University or Havana when he left Cuba for Washington during the beginning of Castro ' s rule , Sorzano enrolled at Georgetown University, where he became a professor in 1969. A former Democrat, Sorzano was director of the Peace Corps in Colombia between 1976 and 1979. He joined the Reagan campaign in 1980, working on foreign affairs issues with Kirkpatrick. " We do have a very critical situation in Ntcaragua The attention of the political machine is going to be focused on that. Because of that, it will be quite a challenge," Sorzano said of his new position. The 46-year-old former president of the Cuban American National Foundation lives in Arlington, Va, with his wife and two children. Hispanic DEA Agent Killed in Border Raid The second drug enforcement official -both Latinos-to be killed in the Rio Grande Valley area in Texas in the last two months d ied Dec. 31 near the city of Pharr while trying to arrest a narcotics suspect Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent William Ramos, 30, was shot to death during a tussle with the assailant in the parking lot of a supermarket. The incident took place three miles north of the Mexico border. Ramos had been a DEA agent at the Houston-based sector for 18 months. Felipe Molina Uribe, a 29-year-old Mexican national, is in custody and charged with the murder. Molina suffered a gunshot wound to the leg . He and Benito Cavazos Lamas , 25 and also a Mexican national, were charged with possession with intent to distribute 303 pounds of marijuana . On Oct 31, Manuel Segovia of the Hidalgo County Sheriff Department also died of gunshot wounds while on a raid at a trailer home in Mercedes, Texas . Prior to Segovia, the last enforcement agent to die in the line of duty was Enrique Camarena Salazar. He was killed in Guadalajara, Mexico, in February 1985. Ramos was a native of the Bronx, N.Y., a former assistant prosecutor in Mojave, Ariz., and a graduate of the University of Arizona law school. Texas Dropouts Studi ed c o nt inued lrom page 1 not finished the 12th grade, 197,000 were Hispanic. Of these 85% were U . S . born , accord ing to 1980 U.S . Census figures. "For Texas and the country as a whole, there is a direct economic impact in terms of the quality of the labor pool that will be available in the future , " said Maria del Refugio Robledo, principal investigator for the IDRA study. Exist i ng dropout programs in Texas show little emphasis on pre-high school students, the IDRA report said. " By the time kids get to the ninth grade, they're dropping out like flies," said LULAC State Education Chairman Enrique Gallegos . "Something has to happen very quickly. The problem doesn ' t belong to the schools alone . " IDRA also looked at attrition rates for the state, using ninth grade enrollment for 1982-83 and 12th grade enrollment for 1985-86. It found the attrition rate among Hispanics to be 45% , blacks 34% and whites 27% . Appro x i mately 86,000 students were lost , giving the state an overall attrition rate of 3 3%, it concluded. Robledo pointed out that the figure did not include students who dropped out before the ninth grade or those who left after the start of the senior year . She estimated that these 86,000 dropouts will cost Tex as $17 billion in foregone in co m e , lost tax revenues, increased welfare, adult education and other ""r vices , crime and in carceration. Melinda Machado Hi s p a ni c Link Weekl y R e p o r t i '

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Maggie Hall, guest columnist Life as a Token Hispanic By choice, and not necessity , I ' ve accepted the responsibility of being a token Hispanic. No one forced me to go boldly where no Latin American has gone before. whether to fill a quota or to color an employer's rainbow. Invariably, I am the only Cuban among co workers. When they do " discover" my roots, they view me with suspicion. They react with disappointment toward my lack of outward ethnicity. I ' ve been the only Cuban at chess clubs, on debating teams, in editing classes, on listing of Mensa members, in newsrooms and at almos t every job I've held since 197 4. With an Anglicized nickname and a Saxonized surname courtesy of my husband , Kevin , I have become a n undercover ic . The alternative i is to make my nationality an issue in every conversation with someone I don' t know. In the 20 years I've lived in the United States, I have never attempted to den y where I came from . The confusion resulted from the perception of others who had a set idea of what a Hispanic was. I didn' t meet th e stereotype. I.F ITS PREJUDICE, FIGHT IT The reason for my being a workplace token i s that I have ne ver allowed my birthplace to determine where I b elonged. Minorities complaining about locked doors should examine w hat keeps them barred from their goals. If ifs prejudice, then fight it with civil r ights legislation. If the stumbling block is your own lack of determination, then you have no one to blame. "You can do what you want to do as l ong as you're educated," my mother Haidee told me when I was ready for coll ege. " Yo u c an make what you want from what you're given in school." A working woman at a time when most of her friend s stayed h ome, my mother handed me a respect for learning and for hard work that I sti ll carry. These have been more valuable to me th an any affirmative action law. My education-scholastic, mor a l and culturalwas m o r e important to my parents than the state of the family car or our prospects for new living room furniture. When we arr i ve d in t he United States after a Freedom Flight from Havana in 1966, my parents were given a choice of final destination. Most of our relatives , had opted for the comfort of Miami, a city that would soon rival Cuba for the most concentrated population of its natives. MIAMI'S OPPRESSIVE HOMOGENEITY Armed with one suitcase and my mother's English-language-c lass skills, we set out for New York in defiance. If we were to accept the United States as our new home in gratitude for being taken in , my mother said , we would have to do our best to learn to succeed here. Moving to a city with the oppressive homogeneity of Miami's Saguesera district would do her children a disservice in adulthood, she reasoned. During the mid-1960 s, New York ' s public schools had no bilingual classes for their new arrivals. My sister Maria and I picked up English watching " I Dream of Jeannie" and listenin g to rock. When we came home bewildered by phrases we didn't understand, Mom would do her best to help and to encourage us to improve. Our first allegiance was to find a place in our new home-a tenet almost as important as her law that we never forget where we'd come from . My sister, my U . S .-born brother and I could spout all the English we wanted to among ourselves. But at home with our parents and with our elders, only Spanish could be spoken. We grew up Cuban American: Our Spanish is still there and our English is excellent. I 've gained access to places where my command of the language allows me to command my future while not surrendering my Latino roots. My mother's teachings left the door wide open. My own curiosity set me off on my own journey. Thanks, Mom, for making me a token. (Maggie Hall is a freelance writer who lives in St. Petersburg, Fla) Sin pelos en Ia lengua YEAR TO REMEMBER (AND FORGET): Before 1986 was even a few weeks old, the Census Bureau went and blabbed i t that while the rest of the nation's population was g rowing at a 3% rate between 1980 and 1985, Hispanics were doing it at 16% . That set off bats in a lot of belfries. In California, for example, there were "official English" mandates from voters in Monterey Park and then the whole state. A man in a Los Angeles restaurant was stabbed to death by a stranger tor conversing in Spanish with a companion . And after an undocumented worker from Mexico won the state lottery, one legislator announced that he was going to introduce a bill making it illegal tor indocumentados to win first prize. There' s an old Southwestern saying about New Mexico having all of the pinones and California the rest of the nuts. WE LOST SOME FRIENDS: The Hispanic community mourned the passing of the respected and highest ranked Latino in the U . S . Justice Department, Gil Pompa; a pioneer journalist, Marina Mireles MacPherson; television pioneer Desi Arnaz; former baseball pitching star Mike Garcia and a young man whose strange death gained more press attention than any of the others: Fifteerryear -old Felipe Garza Jr., an apparently healthy Patterson, Calif., schoolb oy, died Jan. 4 from ruptured blood vessels in his head after telling his mother that he wanted his heart to be given to a 14-year-old friend, Donna Ashlock, who was on the verge of death from heart degeneration . Felipe' s heart was transplanted successfull y into her body the following day. WE ABSORBED SOME INSULTS: In 1986, it was almost as th o ugh there was a contest to see who could come up with the most outrageous an ti-Latino insult. A stellar cast, including two Democratic governors, competed: Colorado ' s Dick Lamm acc used us of fostering "deadly disunity" by not assimilating fast enough, of being a "social time bomb." New York ' s Mario Cuomo gave New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez a history lesson, explaining that when Puerto Ricans were immigrating to that city 10 or 15 years ago, they "didn't h a ve a pair of shoes until they got to the airport. " Another Colorado po liti cian, Republican state Rep. Walt Young lund, killed a bill ca lling tor field toilets for farm workers with the explanation that the workers were from Mexico and they didn' t know how to use toilets, anyway. Dall as Democrat P.S. Ervin, a candidate for the Texas Railroad Commission, h ad a better solution. His immigration reform plan: "Shoo t the first 25 Mexicans who cross the border after public warnings." Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone apparently got th e idea that we we re fair game. He joined in to accuse us of holding down the intelligence level of the United States. Thank goodness we had friends like Jack Anderson and Jesse Helms around to stick up for us. Jack highlighted our political potential by writing that by the turn of the century , "the babies of Mexico could be a greater threat to the United States than the nuclear missiles of the Soviet Union." Jesse? Well, the sage of the U.S. Senate forgave us our other excesses by pointing out that " all Latins are volatile people." MACHO OF THE YEAR: Within that context, I now submit my nominee for 1986 Latino "Macho of the Year." San Jose State Univ ersity quarterback Mike Perez, whose ancestors came from Guadalajara, Mexico, was penalized 15 yards in a game against Washington State this past fall for roughing the rusher. Now thafs macho! 'Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • HENRY B. GONZALEZ, 70, discussing the black eye he gave a San Antonio restaurant patron last month for allegedly calling the congressman-a boxer in his youth-a "communist." "If I had wanted to cold-cock him, 1 could have." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Jan. 12, 1987 3

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COLLECTING TEXAS' DROPOUT PROBLEM: "Texas School Dropout Survey Project: A Summary of Findings" addresses the magnitude of the Hispanic dropout problem in the state, including the number of students leaving school before ninth grade . For a copy of the 59page report, send $5.50 to: Intercultural Development Research Association, 5835 Callaghan Rd . , Suite350, San Antonio, Texas 78228 (512) 6848180. HISPANICS IN ARIZONA: "His panics in Transition" is a 22-page booklet dealing with several characteristics, including work force participation and community leadership, of the Latino population in the state. Free s ingle copies can be obtained by writing to: Public Information Office, Department of Economic Security, 1717 W. Jefferson, Phoenix, Ariz. 85007 (602) 255-4791. CRIME PREVENTION IN CITIES: The National Crime Prevention Council has published a 124-page book, "Preventing Crime in Urban Communities," which offers approaches on how to start crime prevention programs. For a copy, send $10 to: NCPC, 733 15th St. NW, Suite 540, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 393-7141. JOB SEEKERS: The U . S . Labor Departmenfs "Occupational Outlook Quarterly'' contains information on new occupations, salaries and job trends. For a copy, send $5 to: Dept. 250P, Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81 009. UNWORKABLE AND UNFAIR? "Justice Watch," a quarterly newsletter of The Nation Institute, provides its assessment of new im migration and refugee law in its lead article, "S.impson-Rodino: Un workable and Unfair?" For a copy of the fall '86 newsletter and its 6-page analysis, send $1 to cover postage and handling to: Phillip Frazer, Justice Watch , The Nation Institute, 72 Fifth Ave., New York, N . Y . 10011. WORLD POPULAT ION: "World Population Profile : 1985" is a 53-page report by the U . S. Census Bureau based on data from 205 countries. It looks at growth rates from 1985-90 as well as contra ceptive use , literacy and aging . For a copy(WP-85), write to: Super intendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office , Washington , D.C. 20402. (Price not available at press time. ) PUERTORR/QUENAS: "Hispanic Women in the United States: A Puerto Rican Woman' s Perspective" i s a42-page booklet containing four speeches and an article on Hispanas, particularly Puerto Rican women . For a copy, send $3 to the attention of Laura Noble at Miranda 'Associates, 818 18th St. NW, Suite 1020, Washington, D .C. 20006 (202) 857-0430. CAREERS THAT COUNT: Single, free copies of the publication "Careers in the Bureau of Labor Statistics" are available by writing to College Recruitment/Special Programs , U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics , 441 G St. NW, Room 2121, Washington, D . C . 2021 2 . CONNECTING (Late news on whars occurring within the U . S . Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it.) FACES AND PLACES Lillian Pubillones-Nolan, consultant with the U.S. House of Representatives' subcommittee on Western Hemisphere Affairs(Foreign Affairs Committee) s ince 1981, has joined the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration in Washington, D . C . , as special assistant to director Jose Ortiz-Daliot. Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster, the island ' s representative in congress, has moved his D .C. offices to 427 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D .C. 20515, retaining his (202) 225-2615 telephone number. The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration also moved its Washington offices. New address: 1100 17th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 778-0710. Jose Font, longtime president of the capital's lbero American Chamber of Commerce, l eft IACC this month to open offices of his new Internat i onal Development Group, 733 15th St. NW , Washington , D . C . 20005. The U . S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has completed its move to larger quarters at the new Board of Trade Center in Kansas City, Mo. Its address: 4900 Main St. , Kansas City, Mo. 64112 (816) 531-6363. Gloria Barajas, president of the Mexican American Women ' s National Asso c iation (MANA) and co-owner of Congressional Education As sociates, has joined the N ational Education Association as a human and civil rights specialist. NEW EXPORT GUIDE PRINTED A 130-page guide to e xporting has been published by the U .S. Department of Commerce. The book, " A Basic Guide to Exporting" (stock number: 003-009-00487-0), i s ava ilable for $8.50 from the Superintendent of Documents, U . S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402 (202) 783-3228. AT&T, 'S/' AT&T received overwhelming response to a biling, .ll mailout to attract Hispanics to a new telephone charge card. The response rate was double the expected return. "The success of the AT&T printed bilingual insert demonstrates the strong media capability of the Carol Wright Hispanic program in communicating to this targefs market segment. " Said Donnelley Marketing Account E x e c u t iv e David Jaffin. Calendar Mervin Aubespin (502) 5824191 (K e ntu c ky) SCHOLARSHIP BANOU.J=T THIS WEEK DROPOUT SYMPOSIUM San Antonio. Jan. 15, 1 6 San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will moderate a symposium on Hi sp anic y outh illiteracy a nd dropout s sponsored by Te x as LULAC on Jan. 16. Secretary of Education William Bennett will be honored at a reception Jan. 15. Enrique Gallegos (512) 342-5157 NEWSPAPER JOB FAIRS Ann Arbor, Mich. Jan. 15-17 Louisville, Ky. Jan. 15-17 The American Society of Newspaper Editors i s sponsoring two minority job fairs for students inter ested in journalism careers and professionals looking to move. Herb Boldt ( 3 13) 222-2319 (Michigan) 4 COMING SOON DIABETES AND MEXICAN AMERICANS National Coalition of Hi spanic H e alth and Human Services Organizations Austin , Texas Jan. 19 Phil Fry(512) 343-6981 SPANISH LITERARY PRIZES L etras de Oro Miami Jan. 22 Amb ler Moss (305) 284-43 0 3 NEWSPAPER JOB FAIR Newsday Long Island , N.Y . Jan. 23, 24 Reginald Tuggle (516) 454-2183 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif . Jan. 28-31 Kathy Villalpudua (916) 447-3986 Jan. 12, 1987 Personnel Man agement Association of Azt/{m , Los Angel es-Orange County Chapter L os Angeles Jan. 29 Rosemarie Zapata Ram i rez (818) 449-2345 COMMISSION RETREAT Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs Columbus, Ohio Jan. 31, Feb. 1 Ramiro Estrada (614) 466-8333 BANQUET AND CONCERT Hispani c National Religious Broadcasters Wa s hing ton, D . C . Feb. 4 Du ane Ward (202) 628-4831 Cal endar will announce events of interest to the nationa l His panic community. Items should b e rec eive d two Fridays before publication date . Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address i10.ns to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Wash ington, D .C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekl y Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS The following two positions are with COSSMHQ Send the required information to: COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D. C. 20005. By Jan. 30. HEALTH SPECIALIST for health promotion/ disease prevention project at national His panic organization. Focus on maternal, child health and diabetes. Experience in research , writing, and community based prevention strategies. MPH required BilinguaVbicultural preferred. Send resume and writing sample. HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST seeks MPH for new public education health project Good writing ski lls necessary, fluency in Spanish required; bilingual and bicultural preferred. Experience in bilingual materials development also sought. Areas of interest include: Diabetes, maternal/child health and AIDS. Responsibilities include: Health ma terials development, media liaison and com munity network for information dissemination. Send letter and resume . FUNDRAISER National civil rights organization seeks vice president for development to raise $3 million annually from foundations, corporations and individuals; perform outreach/solicitation; and develop/implement strategy to solicit$250 thousand annually in new funding. Requirements: Five years fund-raising / marketing experience; knowledge of foundation / corpora t ion giving and deferred/planned giving ; e x pe rience with boards of directors; excellent communication skills; some knowledge of legal issues and bilingual ability (English/Spanish) helpful. Resumes with references to Ms. A Hernandez , MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 1/26/87. University of Southern Colorado Continuing position, at rank of assistant pro fessor with teaching responsibilities in Spanish and French or Italian. Candidate will teach a full load and perform customary student advising activities, service. Scholarly productivity will be expected. Ph.D . and knowledge of Chicano literature required. Publications will be expected. Starting date is Aug. 25. Salary is competitive , depending on qualifications. Apply to: Dr . Donald Milene, Chair, Search Committee, Department of English and Foreign Language , University of Southern Colorado, 2200 N. Bonforte Blvd., Pueblo CO 81001-4901. Application deadline 1s March 1. CALIFORNIA CITIZENSHIP COORDINATOR: Individual will be responsible for coordinat ing U.S. citizenship campaigns throughout the state of California. Position involves frequent travel both in and out of state although the majority of time will be spent at N.A.LEO's East Los Angeles Office; individual should be able to work with communityb ased organizations, local school districts, the INS and elected/appointed officials to promote U . S . citizenship; individual should have the ability to work with local media in the promotion of project activities. Position also requires fluent Engli s h /Spanish bilingual, excellent communication skills and the ability to work in an un structured environment. Salary is $20,000-$25,000. S end re s ume to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington. D.C. 20003. Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report DIRECTOR, Indiana University Art Museum. The museum is an I.M. Pei-designed building (dedicated 1982) with an outstanding general art collection composed of 25,000 objects. Qualifications: Experienced scholar-art museum director with Ph.D. or equivalent scholarly cations and curatorial or administrative art museum . experience. Interpersonal skills to work effectively with university administration, School of Fine Arts and various university departments. A thorough understanding oft he didactic mission of the I.U. Art Museum. An effective and con vincing communicator regarding the importance of the Art Museum to the campus and community at large . Faculty or research rank and salary commensurate with qualifications. Deadline: March 15, 1987. Please submit letter of application and current resume to Anya Peterson Royce , Dean of the Faculties and Chair, Search and Screen Com mittee, Bryan Hall 109, Indiana University, Bloomington , Indiana 47405. Indiana University is an equal opportunity/ affirmative action em ployer. CHAIR OF POLICY STUDIES M.A. PROGRAM SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE seeks associate professor to chair policy studies grad uate faculty and assist dean with graduate program planning and administration. Doctorate and college teaching experience required. Scholarly achiev ement, grounding in policy studies, interest in teaching adults in modes other than traditional classroom ; curriculum development and graduate student experience preferred. Letter and resume by 2/1 7 / 87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director, Pers / AA , SUNY / ESC , Room 702, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. For more information call Dean DiPadova at (518) 587-2100. An ANEOE. 1987 NAHJ CALENDAR A 1987 calendar showcasing the talents of 12 Hispanic photojournalists with 22 photo graphs is for sale for $8 by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. The 11 x14inch calendar also lists more than 100 major'S? media and Hispanic organiza tional events by date. Contact persons and their phone numbers are included. The$8 purchase price covers postage and handling. Order from NAHJ , Suite 634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045. Or call (202) 783-6228. COLUMN SERVICE AVAILABLE Hispanic Link News Service syndicates three opinion and feature columns weekly, in English and Spanish, to more than 200 news papers nationally. The columns are written by the nation's outstanding Hispanic experts, leaders and journalists. Our goal is to add Hispanic perspectives to the op/ed pages of U.'S. national media. If there is a newspaper in your community which does not carry Hispanic Link and which you would like to have it carry such perspectives on a regular basis, please fill out the form below or call me with the name of the publication. 1 will follow up by contacting the editor personally and providing samples of the co lumns.. Charlie Ericksen Syndication Service Manager Hispanic Link News Service Telephone: (202) 234-0280 To: Hispanic Link 1420 N St . NW Washington, D.C. 20005 Please contact the following newspaper(s) : My name is: ___________ _ Address:------------Telephone:------------0 Please send me some column samples, too. 0 Please send me your writer's guidelines as I may be interested in submitting columns for Hispanic Link syndication. GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington,"' D.C. , provides: e Design e Illustration • Type . setting • Layout e Silkscreen and • Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, ..D . C . . ?001_ 0 DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: . No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by----------75 cents per word (city, state & zip Title---------------code count as 2 words; telephone Area Code & Phone ________ _ number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates Advertiser Name _________ _ on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Bill To------------Address City, State & Zip ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment AND THE WINNER IS: The 1987 entertainment award season is likely to bring multiple Grammy nominations for the Miami Sound Machine, last year's most successful Hispanic musical performers. According to year end sales charts published in the Dec. 27 issue of Billboard, Miami Sound Machine ranked number one among"new" pop artists. Their album Primitive Love and four singles from it made the 1986 charts. Ironically, 1986 marked the 1Oth anniversary for 'the group, whose original members are the husband and wife team of Emilio and Gloria Estefan, Marco Avila and Kiki Garcia. Miami Sound Machine was ranked in ten other Billboard categories including pop albums (Primitive Love , No. 1 0), pop singles artistsduos/ groups (No. 1 ), dance sales artists (No.5) and pop Latin artists (No.6). In Latin music categories, Billboard ranked the following in the number one slots: Jose Jose's Promesas, pop Latin albums; Jose Jose, pop Latin artists; Franky Ruiz's Splista pero no solo, tropical/salsa Latin albums; El Gran Combo, tropical/salsa Latin artists; Los Bukis ' Adonde Vas, regional Mexican albums; and Los Bukis; regional Mexican Latin albums. Several of the above artists could be included among this year's list of Grammy nominees, unavailable at press time. (The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences announced Grammy nominees Jan. 8 and the Hollywood Foreign Press As sociation made public its Golden Globe nominees Jan. 6 ; details here next week.) The awards season gets underway Jan. 31 with the Golden Globes ceremony, where Anthony Quinn will be presented the H FPA's Cecil B . De Mille Award for his entertainment contributions. The New York-based Asociaci6n de Cronistas de Espectaculo_s, a grouping of entertainment journalists; got the jump on the nominations race by announcing candidates for its ACE Awards last month . Artists from Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Argentina are prominent among the scores of nominees for the awards to be handed out in New York in March. The ACE's highest award-premia extraordinario ACE par distinci6n y merito-goes this year to Celia Cruz. Other non-competitive awards go to singers Placido Domingo and Franco. In other nomination news , four Latin American films are contenders for Oscar nods in the "foreign film " category-Mexico' s El imperio de Ia fortuna (d irected by Arturo Ripstein) , Argentina's Tangos : el exilio de Gardei(Fernando Solan as), Colombia's Tiempo de morir(Jorge Ali Triana) and Brazil's Hour of the Star (Suzan a Amaral). Oscar nominees are announced Feb. 11. ONE LINERS: Alguna casita que alivie el sufrir, by the late Cuban playwright Rene Aloma, opens the Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre' s season at its New York theater Jan. 14 ... Richard Yniguez co-stars in Ohara, a Warner Bros Television series that debuts Jan. 17 on ABC .. And video distributors Tomas Martinez of Clovis , Calif., and Hector Gonzalez of Houston, Texas , are planning the first Hispanic Video Show, March 2829 in Dallas. . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report SALINAS SELECTED: Maria Elena Salinas; popular news anchor and reporter with Los Angeles' KMEXTV, will anchor the nation's first West Coast-based Spanish-language net work television newscast when it is launched Jan. 19. GIFTED CHILDREN: -The Fox television network, with stations and affiliates in many major Hispanic markets, will air a one-hour program on Hispanic gifted children on Sunday , Jan. 18, at 9 p.m. DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT: The Hispanic Media Coalition , composed of 35 Southern California Latino organizations; has announced its intention to file a "pattern of discrimination " complaint against Los Angeles' KCBS.TV with the U . S . Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The one-hour program replaces 24 Horas, a newscast from Mexico City. It will air from Los Angeles weeknights at 11 EST , comple menting the Univision (formerly SIN) net work's 6 :30 p . m . EST Miami news show. Luis Nogales, head of Univision's new news arm ,ECO, Iast month, has responsibility for both programs . They'll be carried by409 affiliates. Salinas , a Los Angeles native , began her career with KMEXTV as a cub reporter. 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national pub li cat i o n o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publi s h e r Hector Eri c k sen Mendoza E ditor F e li x P erez Rep orting: Charlie Eri cksen, Antonio M ejias-R e nt as, Melinda Machado No portion o f Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without a d vance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial sUbscription (13 issUes) s26. cORPORATECLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents pe r word . Displayadsare$35 per column in c h . Ads placed b y , Tu esday will run in Weekly Reports m a iled Frid ay of same week. Multiple use rate s on request The show was produced at WFLD in Chicago as part of a monthly "32 on Location" series. Public affairs director Wanda Wells and Car melo Melendez, host of Esta Semana, will cohost. AWARDS, FELLOWSHIPS: The Dec. 27 issue of Editor & Publisher contains more than 500 awards , scholarships, internships and contests available to professional jour nalists and students alike . They're listed in detail in a special 60-page E&P insert. For a copy, send $3.00 to "1987 Directory of Journalism Awards and Fellowships;" Editor & Publisher, 11 West 19th St., New York, N . Y . 10011. HMC legal John Huerta told re porters that the station's employment of Latinos has fallen from 16% in 1980 to 14% currently. The station laid off 22 employees last year, a third of them Latinos, he said . CCNMA ELECTIONS: Frank del Olmo, editorial writer with The Los Angeles Times, has been elected president of the executive board of the California Chicano News Media Association ... Ernesto Portillo, San Diego Union reporter, has been elected president of CCNMA's San Diego chapter ... Charlie Ericksen D fdNT FEEL A'Ny BUMPS, 'DIP You? Hispanic Link Weekly R e port 1 r r: I !