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Hispanic link weekly report, January 19, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 19, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez is sworn in as the state’s 40th chief executive. The day-long, privately financed inauguration festivities cost $500,000... Former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya says he is “shocked by it, but not surprised” when asked what he thought of the telephone tapping devices found in the state Capitol... New Mexico Gov. Garrey Carruthers rescinds Anaya’s proclamation declaring the state a sanctuary for Central American refugees... The White House reappoints Laredo, Texas, teacher Esther Arroyo-Gonzdlez Buckley to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Her term is for six years... Connecticut State Treasurer Francisco Borges says he will seek legislation to divest holdings in South Africa and Northern
Ireland. . . Playboy magazine, which honored San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros as one of the 10 best dressed men of 1985, criticizes the mayor for his support of an ordinance that would bar children less than 14 years of age from attending rock and roll shows described as obscene... New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones introduces a curriculum on racial topics in the aftermath of a widely publicized death resulting from a racial incident... The Washingtonian magazine chooses Washington, D.C., Superior Court Judge Ricardo Urbina as one of the capital’s 10 outstanding residents. . . Gilbert Casellas, past president of the National Hispanic Bar Association, becomes chairman of the Young Lawyers Section of the Philadelphia Bar Association... Augustine Medina, 64, crashes his car into the Department of Motor Vehicles in Chula Vista, Calif., after suffering a mild stroke. Twenty^three people were injured...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
INS: 1 -3.9 Million to Seek Status
Gov. Martinez Assails Prosecutor's Conduct
Florida’s Republican Gov. Bob Martinez called Jan. 9 for a review of U.S. Attorney Robert Merkle’s conduct in office after testifying as a defense witness in a mail-fraud trial.
Martinez denied he took illegal campaign contributions and bribes from a cable TV company seeking Tampa’s cable franchise during the time Martinez was running for mayor in 1979.
Neither Martinez nor his long-time friend and supporter, Tampa contractor Eddie Per-domo, who testified he passed $8,000 in cash and checks to Martinez on behalf of Coaxial Communications, have been charged with a crime. The trial concerns Nelson Italiano who is charged with bribing two Hillsborough County commissioners when the county was hiring a cable company.
Merkle said in court that the alleged bribes occurred too long ago for charges to be brought against Martinez or Perdomo.
The governor said he did nothing to influence the city’s decision about a cable franchise and criticized the Republican prosecutor for allowing the allegations to be made public before he could reply.
The Baytown, Texas, City Council has until March to draw up plansforsix single-member districts, including a minority district, in the east Harris County community.
Chief U.S. District Judge John V. Singleton issued the ruling Jan. 7 as a result of a lawsuit filed by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project on behalf of plaintiffs Tony Campos and Vernon Shields.
“No minority has ever been elected to the Council,” said Rolando Rios, SVREP litigation director. Campos has run for office several times, Rios said, adding that while Campos won in the minority community, he lost at large.
Baytown council members must live within one of six geographic areas but are elected at large. Hispanics and blacks are 25% of Baytown’s 57,000 residents. There are 9,348 Latinos in the city, according to SVREP.
A spokesman for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service told Weekly Report Jan. 12 that the agency is planning for between
1 and 3.9 million undocumented aliens to apply for legalization under the new federal immigration law.
The INS will accept applications for residency status beginning May 5 at approximately 100 INS offices nationwide.
Mario Moreno, an attorney with the Washington, D.C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said the3.9 million figure is a “vast oversimplification.” He said the ceiling is 500,000 people too many. Moreno added that there are several obstacles faced by prospective applicants. One such barrier is a provision in the new federal tax code which requires persons applying for permanent resident status to pay back taxes for the years they have lived here.
INS spokesman Duke Austin said the estimate range is based on 1980 census estimates of
2 to 3 million undocumented aliens residing here, the agency’s “gut feeling” that 500,000 of the non-residents who visit here annually decide to stay and several independent studies Austin cautioned, however, that the range is
Singleton’s ruling gives the city 60 days to draft a new plan.
SVREP has filed almost 80 such cases challenging the at-large election systems in cities and school districts in Texas, California, New Mexico and other Southwestern states.
Hotline Used by 45,000
Harry Pachon, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, told Weekly Report Jan. 9 that the organization’s citizenship hotline had received over 45,000 requests for information for the six months it was in operation in 1986.
Pachon said the hotline has been called by such varied parties such as “priests, employers and teachers.” He added that roughly 20% of the calls dealt with legalization questions arising from the new federal immigration law.
an extrapolation, not hard and fast numbers. “There just isn’t hard information in this area”
The 3.9 million figure was released Jan. 5 and was the first time federal officials gave an estimate after prodding by Hispanic and other civil rights organizations. MALDEF, along with the National Council of La Raza, the League of United Latin American Citizens and the American Civil Liberties Union, has been meeting regularly with INS officials to help formulate the regulations for the 21/2-month-old Immigration Reform and Control Act.
Harry Pachon, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, termed INS’ range as a “futile exercise except to justify the (President Reagan’s) budget” He said it was impossible to know how many people will apply. NALEO operates a citizenship hotline it established last summer.
The president’s budget proposal for 1988 appropriates $3.9 million for processing legalization applications. The 50% increase called for by immigration law in the number of border patrol agents would not be met by the budget proposal. Currently, there are 3,300 agents For fiscal year 1988, Reagan’s budget would fund roughly 1,000 more positions, said Austin.
Austin said the top five states INS is expecting applications from are California, Texas, Illinois* Florida and New York.
‘Refugee’ Skips Hospital
A man found clinging to a buoy off the coast of Miami escaped Jan. 10 from his hospital room just as authorities concluded that he was not a Cuban political refugee
The man, who had identified himself as Hector Morales of Cuba, was found clinging to the bell buoy by the Coast Guard Jan. 8. Suffering from physical and mental exhaustion, Morales told authorities that he had stowed away on a freighter for a week without food and jumped ship.
When asked where he lived, Morales, 21, said he lived in the Oriente region but could not name a town. Officials believed he was from the Dominican Republic.
Single-Member District Plan Ordered


Hispanic Engineering Frosh Decline in 1985-86
Forthe second time in the 13 years that records have been kept, the number of His-panics enrolling as freshmen in U.S. engineering schools dropped, figures given to Weekly Report Jaa 12 by the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering on the 1985-86 academic year showed.
Of 102,285 freshmen enrolling, 3,849 (376%) were Hispanic, NACME statistics compiled for its 1986 annual report revealed.
In the 1984-85 academic year, 90 more Hispanics - 3,939 - enrolled, making up
3.78% of 104,374 frosh. Since reaching a high of 114,517 in 1982-83, the total number of freshmen enrolling has declined annually.
NACME research director Luis Miranda noted that the total number of Hispanic engineering students grew in ’85-86 by 749 over the previous year, while overall enrollment dropped by more than 9,000.
“Freshmen involvement continued to plateau,” he said. “We need to work more with Hispanic organizations and with high school students to improve their preparation.”
The graduation rate for minority engineering students is between 30% and 40%, he added, and 70% for white, non-Hispanic students.
“If we could raise the Hispanic graduation rate to 60%, we could almost double the number of Hispanic engineers graduating,” Miranda said.
In 1984-85,77,529 bachelor's degrees in engineering were granted. Only 1,731 of them (2.2%) were Hispanic.
The figures cited in the NACME tally do not include graduates from Puerto Rico.
ENROLLMENT, DEGREES GRANTED IN ENGINEERING SCHOOLS 1973-1986
Fall Semester Freshman Fall Semester Undergraduate Bachelor’s Degrees Granted
Academic Year Black Hispanic* Total Minority Totai Freshmen* Black Hispanic* â–  Total Minority Total Underqrad* Black Hispanic* Total Minority Total Degrees*
.1973-74 1,684 525 2.249 51,207 4,869 2,371 7,444 183,520 756 636 1,423 41,010
1974-75 2,447 888 3.424 62,582 6,319 3,158 9,837 197,899 724 685 1,453 37,794
1975-76 3,840 1.384 5.344 74,558 8,258 3,941 12,516 228,183 lil 680 â–  1,498 37,609
1976-77 4,372 1.766 6.309 81,652 9,828 5,138 15,412 254,797 844 702 1,582 39,718
1977-78 4,728 2,161 7.133 88,256 11,388 5,944 17,950 286,500 894 748 1,679 45,753
1978-79 • 5,493 2,664 8,382 95,171 12,954 7,158 20,737 308,556 1,076 841 1,976 52,161
1979-80 6,339 3,136 9,792 103,090 14,786 8,454 23,999 337,807 1,320 1,003 2,383 58,413
1980-81 6,661 3,373 10,399 109,314 16,181 9,043 26,127 362,300 1,445 1,193 2,728 62,615
1981-82 7,015 3,689 11,116 114,201 17,611 10,200 28,781 384,162 1,646 1,270 3,007 66,652
1982-83 6,715 3,635 10,721 114,517 17,598 10,683 29,359 400,038 1,862 1,534 3,493 72,122
1983-84 6,342 3,885 10,603 108,763 17,817 11,599 30,543 402,561 2,022 1,683 3,817 76,576
1984-85 6,245 3,939 10,594 104,374 17,451 12,192 30,829 388,992 2,043 1,731 3,883 77,529
*1985-86 6,374 3,849 1 10,588 102,285 17,994 12,941 32,055 379,830 — — — —
•Figures do not include the University of Puerto Rico.
Notes: Annual reports, bulletins, and publications of the Engineering Manpower Commission (EMC) were used as sources for these tables. EMC cautions information is subject to error.
‘Results’ Test Ordered for Voting Act
Proposed election changes maybe rejected on the basis of discriminatory results rather than intent under regulations to strengthen the Voting Rights Act issued by the Justice Department Jan. 6.
The regulations, effective Feb. 5, are a reversal of the department’s August announcement in which Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds said discriminatory results would not be considered in reviewing proposed election plans.
While civil rights groups are pleased with the new regulations, many are now concerned the rules may leave the burden of proving the election change is discriminatory on the local community.
Hispanic Jobless Increase
The Hispanic unemployment rate for December increased to 10.5% from 9.6% the previous month despite a dip in the national jobless rate, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Overall, the number of Hispanics who were unemployed went to 874,000 in December from 789,000 in November.
The national unemployment rate fell to 6.7% from 6.9%. It was the lowest since March 1980.
The Latino jobless rate for the first 11
months of 1986 were:
Jan. 10.1%
Feb. 12.3
March 10.3
April 10.4
May 11.0% June 10.6 July 10.5 Aug. 11.0
Sept. 11.1% Oct. 10.5 Nov. 9.6 Avg. 10.6
2
“The jurisdiction proposing the changes should have to prove to the department that they are not discriminatory,” said Jose Garza, director of political access for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund San Antonio office.
The Voting Rights Act of 1965 requires certain states, including Arizona, Texas and parts of Florida, California and New York, to obtain “preclearance” from the Justice Department before making election changes
Runner Late But Game
Citizens from the home town of Peruvian marathoner Felix Alejandro Flores Pacheco pitched in to pay his passage to compete in the22-mile American Savings Orange Bowl Marathon in Miami Jan. 10.
He arrived at the Miami International Airport during the early morning hours the day of the race believing it was scheduled for the following day. While reading a local newspaper at 9 a.m., he realized the race had started two hours earlier. Not wanting to disappoint his friends, he jumped into a cab, only to find traffic was backed up for four miles.
Flores abandoned the cab and made his way to the starting line.
At 1 p.m., 3 1/2 hours after the winner finished but two hours ahead of the final straggler, he crossed the finish line - in his slacks, a pair of loafers and carrying a duffle bag.
UFW to Appeal Decision
The United Farm Workers Union plans to appeal a $1.7 million judgment against it in a suit by a California vegetable grower. The intended decision, expected to be finalized next month, was announced Jan. 12 by Imperial County Superior Court Judge William Lehnhardt.
It gives Maggio Inc. $900,000 for lettuce losses, $500,000 for broccoli losses and $160,000 for carrot losses, plus lesser damage awards, suffered during a violent 1979 strike.
The judge ruled that UFW authorized and participated in repeated acts of violence.
The UFW claimed the violence started only after strikers were “run down, shot at, and otherwise provoked” by growers, private guards and armed field workers.
One UFW striker,, Rufino Contreras, was killed by an unknown assailant during the January violence. Several other picketers were wounded by gunfire.
Perez-Lopez Appointed
Jorge Perez-Lopez was named director of the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of International Economic Affairs Jan. 8 by Deputy Under Secretary of Labor Robert Searby.
Perez-Lopez will be responsible for directing and coordinating the development of Labor Department positions on international economic policy issues in areas such as foreign trade and investment.
A native of Santa Clara, Cuba, he had served since 1984 as deputy director of the office.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Achy Obejas, guest columnist
Squeezing the Good Thief
It was shortly after my briefcase was stolen that I called my mother. I needed comfort and wisdom, and who but a mother can provide the best of that?
Gone were my checkbook, my wallet, my telephone/address book, my calendar. The whole incident had taken place in broad daylight and I was feeling kind of helpless and dumb.
But I wasn’t exactly prepared for our conversatioa “I’m sorry, honey,” she told me in her native Spanish. “But I know how you can get your things back.”
Assuming that she was going to advise me to file a police report (which I already had done) or trot down to the Missing Things Department and look through mountains of recovered goods (which I wasn’t about to do), I figured, heck, I’d humor her.
“Okay, Mami, ” I said, “just how can I get my stuff back?”
“Well,” she replied, “by offering a prayer to St Dimas.”
“St. Dimas?” Even though I was raised fairly Catholic, the name did not ring a bell.
“St. Dimas,” she said. “He’s called ‘The Good Thief.’ ”
“Mami- eh - this St. Dimas. Does Rome deal with this guy?” “Rome? Oh, I don’t know,” my mother said. “You know, Rome has changed so much. St. Christopher isn’t even a saint anymore.” “Okay,” I offered. “I’ll send up a little prayer to St. Dimas.”
Of course, it wasn’t that simple. My mother, a devout Catholic, is also a devout Cuban. And when things get tough for devout Cubans, they tend to resort to some, well, rather unorthodox practices.
“Get a piece of leather,” she told me. “Then tie a knot in it.”
An S&M saint? I wondered.
She continued: “Then you say, ‘St. Dimas, I won’t stop squeezing your balls until I get my things back.’ ”
“Mami” I replied, “I have a feeling we’re not in Rome anymore.”
A friend procured a leather strip for me, and when nobody was looking I practically left St. Dimas childless.
Days passed. Every time I looked at the leather knot decorating the top of my dresser, I kicked myself forgiving in to my mother’sThird World, underdeveloped notion of St. Dimas - undoubtedly some rechristened African diety who had traveled to Cuba hundreds of years ago. Amazing, I thought, that a woman as educated and savvy as my mother would have suggested something so patently primitive.
TVE GOT YOUR WALLET
Then I went to my bank, just a routine visit to make a deposit. The Puerto Rican teller supervisor greeted me, “We’ve got a phone message for you.” She gave me the number to call, which I did.
“I’ve got your wallet,” a man who identified himself as a parking lot manager told me. “Well, not your wallet, exactly, but everything in it, all tied up in a rubber band - your credit cards, your IDs, your bank card. That’s how I found you.”
I rushed downtown and retrieved it
When I returned home I found a fat envelope from the American Medical Association waiting for me. I slit it open. Out popped my checkbook. The sender, who works for the AMA, had found it.
“Mami, this St Dimas is amazing!” I yelped as soon as my mother picked up the phone. “I got my wallet back, my checkbook. This is great!”
“See? I told you so.” Mothers have a way of saying that
“Wait ’til I tell my friends.”
“Your friends?” She seemed surprised “You mean your American friends?”
“Sure. Everybody. Nobody’s going to believe this!”
“No, honey, no. Don’t tell your friends.”
“Why not?” I asked, disappointed.
“Well,” she said, “I’m not sure St. Dimas works for Americans. Don’t they have St Anthony?”
(Achy Obejas, of Chicago, III., is a free-lance writer.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
ATTENTION ALL EXPERTS: In September, I mentioned the 1986/87 Talk Show Guest Directory which - according to its publicity- is subscribed to by 82% of the leading news/talk radio stations in the USA - plus 60 Minutes, Phil Donahue, MacNeil, Lehrer and even Oprah Winfrey.
Of 2,192 “experts and spokespersons” listed (including 10 on AID§ 16 on animals and 61 on women), only three were knowledgeable about Hispanics; none at all about Mexican Americans.
No wonder the average TV viewer doesn’t know Guadalupe Hidalgo from Trini Lopez. Or Cinco de Mayo from Dieciseis de Septiembre.
I promptly registered my complaint with editor Mitchell Davis.
So in last week’s mail I received an application form to join Davis‘ laundry list of authorities PLUS an invitation to recruit others who are willing to spare a few minutes of their day or evening to sit and chat with Joan Rivers or David Letterman or whomever else happens to be in need of a good conversation partner.
I have always maintained that if there are 20 million Hispanics in this nation, there are 20 million Hispanic authorities.
If you’re the best on your block at making a pihata, whipping up a taco salad or speaking Spanglish, write Mitchell Davis today at Broadcast Interview Sources, 2600 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Suite 930, Washington, D.C. 20007. Or call him at (202) 333-4904. He’ll send you a form for your free listing.
Last year, Davis says, 99% of all returned forms were run. The 1% rejections included those whose handwriting he couldn’t read and some folks who forgot to fill in their addresses and phone numbers.
How can you beat an offer like that? I NS should make legalization so easy.
TWIN THREATS: Last week, Sin Pelos mentioned with pride the dexterity of Chicano Luis Nogales, who shifted from CEO of a predominantly English-language print media empire (UPI) to president of the Spanish-language international television news network Eco.
Correspondent John Mendez of Los Angeles reminds us of another bicultural winner whose career also demonstrates that being Mexican American offers double the pleasure and double the treasure of being just Mexican or just American: Frank Cruz, former reporter and anchor with KN BC-TV in Burbank, is presently vice-president of Los Angeles’ fast-growing Spanish-language KVOA-TV.
POLITICAL POSTSCRIPT: Chicago Mayor Harold Washington bypassed a black candidate for city clerk to endorse attomey/business-woman Gloria Chevere in the city’s Feb. 24 primary. Chevere happens to be a Puerto Rican married to a Mexican American. Your move, Jane Byrne. - Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
HERMAN BACA, chairman of the San Diego-based Committee on Chicano Rights, in calling for the creation of a new agency to administer the provisions of the Simpson-Rodino immigration act’s$600 million amnesty provisions:
“How can Congress entrust it to an agency (Immigration and Naturalization Service) which has not even completed the paperwork for thousands of applicants who wish to enter this country legally? They are just beginning to take a look at those who applied in 1977.” RAUL ALLEGRE, New York Giants placekicker, describing his phone call to his mother in Torreon, Mexico, following the Giants’ 17-0 win over the Washington Redskins to reach the Super Bowl:
“The first time I called, she wasn’t there. She’d gone to Mass to give thanks for our victory.”
DONNA ASHLOCK, 15-year-old Patterson, Calif., recipient of the heart of Felipe Garza, on the first anniversary of the transplant:
“It is so sad. His face keeps popping up in my mind. It hurts to think about it.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jan. 19,1987


COLLECTING
SELECTING A CREDIT CARD: For a list of the nation’s 40 most inexpensive bank credit cards, in terms of interest rates and yearly fees, send $1 to: Bankcard Holders, Dept C, 333 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-5805.
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION INTERNSHIPS: The Smithsonian Institution has available an internship program, offering experience in fields such as archaeology, biology, library science and history, for high school students graduating in 1987. There are two internship sessions during the summer. The application deadline is March 20. For an application, write to: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560 (202) 357-3049.
UNDOCUMENTED MEXICAN WOMEN: The Migration and Settlement of Undocumented Women” is a 69-page booklet by Gilberto Cardenas and Estevan Flores which examines social, legal and economic aspects. The work is based on a study of 138 families in Houston. For a copy, send $3.50 to: CMAS Publications, Center for Mexican American Studies, SSB 4.120, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712.
ENGINEERING PROGRAMS: The current newsletter of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering includes information on programs it sponsors for minority students. For a free copy, contact: Ronni Denes, Communications Director, NACME, 3 W.35th St., New York, N.Y. 10001.
A GUIDE TO U.S. CENSUS REPORTS: The 472-page “Census Catalog and Guide 1986” details the bureau’s latest reports and offers information on its factfinder services and programs. For a copy, send a $23 prepaid order to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
CHILDREN AND READING: Waldenbooks has put out a brochure, “Reading Personality Questionnaire,” which helps parents select books their children will enjoy. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Waldenbooks, 201 Ridge Road, Stamford, Conn. 06904.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY: The “‘Minority Business Telephone Book” is a 350-page national directory that includes more than 13,000 businesses in 1,700 categoriea For a copy, send $30, plus $2.50 for shipping and handling, to: B.E. Publishers, 955 Connecticut Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 06607 (800) 826-8692.
CONNECTING
SMITHSONIAN REACHES OUT The Smithsonian Institution, which includes 14 museums in the nation’s capital, announced the creation of a new “cultural education committee” Jan. 9 to strengthen its ties with heretofore underserved cultural populations, including Hispanics.
Institution Secretary Robert McC. Adams commented at a lunch meeting with ethnic press representatives that the committee would help to “reshape the way we think about what we’re doing.”
The 12-member committee, strictly advisory but with support from and access to top Institution officials, includes two Latinos: Frank Cota-Robles Newton, executive director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and Ricardo Urbina, presiding judge of the family division of the Washington, D.C., Superior Court.
ARCHITECTURE WINNER SELECTED
University of Miami student Dagoberto Diaz won the $4,000 first prize in the McDonald’s/American Institute of Architectural Students design competition Jan. 12. The competition, to develop an architectural design inspiring a new look for McDonald’s restaurants, drew participants from more than 100 colleges and universities.
Diaz’s winning effort used a two-story classical Spanish mission design.
LA. CHAMBER TAPS VILLANUEVA Danny Villanueva, president and general manager of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, has been named to the executive committee of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce for a one-year term.
When inaugurated Jan. 23, he will become the first Hispanic named to the committee in the chamber’s 98-year history.
$136,000 THEATER ARCHIVES AWARD Salvador Guerena, librarian of the Coleccion Tloque Nahuaque at the University of California, Santa Barbara, expects to have the archives of El Teatro Campesino and its director/creator, Luis Valdez, available to students and scholars within three years.
The university’s library announced Jan. 6 that it had been awarded $136,000 by the Ford Foundation to process the papers of the nation’s largest and most influential bilingual Chicano theater. The papers were acquired last year.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
DIABETES AND MEXICAN AMERICANS Austin, Texas Jan. 19
The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organization is sponsoring a one-day conference on diabetes.
Phil Fry (512) 343-6981.
LITERARY PRIZES Miami Jan. 22
Letras de Oro will hold a banquet to recognize winners in the association’s Spanish literary contest Ambler Moss (305) 284-4303
HISPANIC CORPORATE COUNCIL New York Jan. 22, 23
The National Hispanic Corporate Council will sponsor seminars and presentations on Hispanic marketing and a luncheon with minority businesses.
Olga Aros (602) 961-6015
CHICANO COLLOQUIUM 4
Stanford, Calif. Jan. 23
Martha Menchaca will speak on “Native Chicanos vs. Immigrants” as part of a program sponsored by the Stanford Chicano Graduate Students Association to share information on the Mexican-American com-munity in the Southwest.
Kathleen O'Toole (415) 723-2558
NEWSPAPER JOB FAIR
Long Island, N.Y. Jan. 23, 24
Newsday is sponsoring a job opportunity conference
for minority students and professionals interested
in newspaper careers.
Reginald Tuggle (516) 454-2183.
HISPANIC ENGINEERS
West Sacramento, Calif. Jan. 24
The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will
host a banquet and awards ceremony.
Robert Guzman (213) 722-0139
COMING SOON
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Jan. 28-31 Margo Ferris (714) 962-3710
INSTALLATION BANQUET Jan. 19, 1987
Association of Hispanic Federal Executives Washington, D.C. Jan. 29 Gil Chavez (202) 732-3673
i • >
NEWSPAPER JOB FAIRS
The American Society of Newspaper Editors
Akron, Ohio Jan. 29-31
John Greenman (216) 375-8293
Sacramento, Calif. Jan. 29-31
Mike Flanagan (916) 321-1009
Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 29-31
James Denley (205) 325-2214
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET
Personnel Management Association of Aztlan,
Los Angeles-Orange County Chapter Los Angeles Jan. 29
Rosemarie Zapata Ramirez (818) 449-2345
COMMISSION RETREAT
Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs
Columbus, Ohio Jan. 31, Feb. 1
Ramiro Estrada (614) 466-8333
RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS CONFERENCE National Hispanic Religious Broadcasters Washington, D.C. Feb. 4 Duane Ward (202) 628-4831
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DEPUTY PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR $41,454 to $62,192
The City of Phoenix is seeking exceptionally competent individualstofill three newly created Deputy Public Works Director positions. Each Deputy will be responsible for one of the following General Services Group, Solid Waste Management, Group and Support Services Groupi All three positions require competence both as an administrator and as a strategic planner and reporting to the Public Works Director.
Five years of related administrative/mana-gerial experience in a medium-to-large organization and a Bachelor's degree in a related field A MPA or MBA is highly desirable.
Individuals hired have twenty-four months to move into the boundaries of the City of Phoenix Applications will be accepted for this process until a selection has been made; subject to closing without further notice. To request application, call (602) 262-6277 or write City of Phoenix, Personnel Department, 300 W. Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003.
Equal Opportunity Employer M/F
GAO EVALUATOR
TheU.& General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelor's (2.9 GPA or higher) or graduate degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities. We are interested in business, economics, computer science, government or political affairs majors to work in Washington, D.C., or one of our 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you. To obtain an application (deadline to apply is April 10) contact: U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington Regional Office, 441 G St. NW, Room 5077, Washington, D.C. 20548, Attn: Laura Talbott (202) 275-8904.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md.,. government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408.
DIRECTOR, Indiana University Art Museum. The museum is an I.M. Pei-designed building (dedicated 1982) with an outstanding general art collection composed of 25,000 objects.
Qualifications: Experienced scholar-art museum director with Ph.D. or equivalent scholarly publications and curatorial or administrative art museum experience. Interpersonal skills to work effectively with university administration, School of Fine Arts and various university departments. A thorough understanding of the didactic mission of the I.U. Art Museum. An effective and convincing communicator regarding the importance of the Art Museum to the campus and community at large. Faculty or research rank and salary commensurate with qualifications.
Deadline: March 15,1987.
Please submit letter of application and current resume to Anya Peterson Royce, Dean of the Faculties and Chair, Search and Screen Committee, Bryan Hall 109, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405. Indiana University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.
LITIGATION ATTORNEY
Major Washington, D.C., corporation is seeking an attorney with five years litigation experience. Excellqnfopportunity to develop litigation strategy, and manage a high volume of cases including hiring and supervising outside counsel.
Civil litigation experience with major law firm or corporation required. Litigation experience with justice department or attorney general's office would be considered. Admission to the bar required. Antitrust and franchise experience of added value. Compensation: $75,000.
Please contact Martha McGinnis at (212) 697-8682.
ASSOCIATE DEAN
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in ALBANY, N.Y., a leader in non-traditional higher education, seeks Associate Dean to begin 5/87. Students work one-to-one with faculty to develop degree programs & evaluate experimental learning. Responsible for academic program including: academic/assessment quality & systems; pro-gram/faculty development. Doctorate, substantial college-level teaching, administrative experience & interest in adult education required. Salary: low to mid 40s. Letter and resume by 2/20/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director, Personnel and Affirmative Action, SUNY/ESC, Room 802, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. For more information call Dean Delong (518) 447-6746. AA/EOE.
The following two positions are with COSSMHQ Send the required information to: COSSMHO, 1030 15th St NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005. By Jan. 30.
HEALTH SPECIALIST for health promotion/ disease prevention project at national Hispanic organization. Focus on maternal, child health and diabetes. Experience in research, writing, and community based prevention strategies. MPH required. Bilingual/bicultural preferred. Send resume and writing sample.
HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST seeks MPH for new public education health project Good writing skills necessary, fluency in Spanish required; bilingual and bicultural preferred. Experience in bilingual materials development also sought. Areas of interest include: Diabetes, maternal/child health and AIDS. Responsibilities include: Health materials development, media liaison and community network for information dissemination. Send letter and resume.
The following two positions are with Arlington County, Virginia. Official Arlington County application form required To request application materials, please call (703) 558-2167 and refer to announcement number. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than the closing date shown for the position.
SOCIAL WORKER-BILINGUAL
$21,116 Ann. #65227 DBHS Professional social work in the Division of Social Services assigned to the Family Services Unit. Employee works primarily with the Spanish-speaking families to meet their needs and to prevent/reduce problems that Impede family stability.
Requires Bachelor's degree in Social Work or closely related field and fluency in both Spanish and English. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in family services or a Master's degree.
The position of Social Worker-Bilingual closes Jan. 29, 1987.
LIBRARIAN OPPORTUNITIES Arlington County is accepting applications for the following positions in the Department of Libraries:
LIBRARIAN I (REFERENCE)
$20,128 - $22,152 Ann. #71127 CLIB
LIBRARIAN II (CATALOGER)
$22,152-$24,381 Ann. #71197BLIB
LIBRARIAN II (CHILDREN’S)
$22,152-$24,381 Ann. #71197ALIB These positions require a minimum of ALA, accredited MLS or 5-year Bachelor of Library Science degree.
The librarian opportunities close Feb. 5, 1987.
Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St North Arlington, Va. 22201
Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington,' D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, ;D.C. 20010(202) 483-1140.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
LATINO ENTERTAINERS FARED POORLY IN the year's first round of entertainment nominations, announced this month.
Nominations for the 29th annual Grammy Awards were announced Jan. 8 by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, and Placido Domingo is the only Hispanic performer nominated in categories outside the “Latin” field.
Domingo is nominated twice in the same category - “best opera recording” - as principal soloist in Verdi: Don Carlos (released by Deutsche Grammophon) and in Verdi: Otello (Angel). Brazilian singer Flora Purim is nominated in the “best jazz vocal performance, female” category for Esquinas, a track from The Magicians (Crossover).
Various Latino acts are nominated in the three “Latin field” categories established in 1983. Nominees and record labels follow:
Best Latin Pop Performance: Pandora, for the trackcComo te va mi amor? from Pandora (Odeon); Danny Rivera for the album Inolvidable Tito... A mi me pasa lo mismo que a usted( DNA/Puerto Rico); Jose Feliciano for LeLoLai, a track from the Te amare album (RCA); Jose Jose for the single Pruebame (Ariola) and Yuri for the track Yo te pido amor from the album with the same title (Ode6n).
Best Tropical Latin Performance: Mario Bauza and Graciela for the album Afro-Cuban Jazz (Caiman); Ruben Blades for the album Escenas (Elektra); Willie Colon for the album Especial No. 5 (Sonotone); Celia Cruz and Tito Puente for the album Homenaje a Benny More-Vol. Ill (Vaya/Musica Latina lntfl) and Willie Rosario for the album Nueva cosecha (Bronco).
Best Mexican/American Performance: Flaco Jimenez for the album Ay te dejo en San Antonio (Arhoolie); Los Yonics for the single Corazon vacio (Profono); Los Tiqres del Norte for the album El otro Mexico (Profono Int’l); Juan Valentin for the album Juan Valentin (Musart); Steve Jordan for the album Turn Me Loose (RCA); Salvador Torres for the single Unidos cantemos( Mas) and Rafael Buendiafor the album Y... iZas! (Ariola).
The Grammys will be announced in a live ceremony televised by CBS on Feb. 24.
No Hispanic performers at all are nominated for Golden Globe awards, to be handed out later this month, or for Awards for Cable Excellence to be given out this week.
The National Academy of Cable Programming hands out its ACEs Jan. 20 in a Los Angeles ceremony that will be cablecast by WTBS. While no Latinos are listed among the performers, producers, directors and other entertainment professionals nominated, the World Championship Boxing: Hector Camacho vs. Edwin Rosario fight carried by Home Box Office is afriong the sports special events nominated.
No Latinos are nominated for Golden Globes, but the members of the Hollywood Foreign Press will give the group’s Cecil B. De Mille Award for lifetime achievement to Anthony Quinn at its ceremony on Jan. 30.
Anthony Quinn, coincidentally, starred in Los hijos de Sanchez, a film based on the novel by Oscar Lewis that won Chuck Mangione a Grammy award for the score in 1978. Lewis based his novel on the life of Mexican worker Santos Hernandez Rivera, who died Jan. 5 in Mexico City at the age of 81, hit by an unidentified vehicle.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NEWS NETWORK LAUNCHED: The Hispanic American Broadcasting Corporation, conceived in October, launched its weeknight Noticiero Telemundo, in Miami, Chicago, New York and Los Angeles on Monday, Jan. 12.
Based in Florida, the Spanish-language news operation is under direction of Gustavo Godoy, who quit as news director of SIN television network earlier last fall.
Co-anchoring the show, which takes on SIN’s nightly newscast head-to-head, are Uruguay-born Jorge Gestoso, 35, and Lana Montalvan, a 29-year-old Argentine actress and radio journalist.
Amancio Victor Suarez, owner of Miami’s
WAQI-AM, is said to have invested $8 million to start the new network.
SUMMER INTERNS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund continues its summer intern program for college sophomores this year. Ten students will be selected to participate in a two-week writing seminar in June and spend the summer working for selected newspapers Then they’ll be awarded $1,000 each toward their junior year tuition.
Application forms may be obtained from the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P.O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540-0300. Deadline to submit applications is Jan. 31.
IN MOTION: Roberto Fabricio, former editor of El Miami Herald, will join the Fort Lauderdale News & Sun-Sentinel as Latin American editor this month. . . Helga Silva, former
political writerfor The Miami Herald, has left Radio Marti, where she was deputy news director, to head the Washington bureau of the new Hispanic American Broadcasting Corporation...
MORE NEWS NAMES: Mexico poet/author/ philosopher Octavio Paz keynotes the first Letras de Oro awards dinner Jan. 22 at the
Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, Fla__The
Washington Post has hired Jeanne Fox-Alston, who worked with three major Midwest dailies* as its recruiting contact for minorities..
John Rosales has joined the San Antonio Light as a reporter after completing a Kiplinger fellowship at Ohio State University’s School of Journalism... The Wichita, Kans., bilingual monthly tabloid El Perico begins its 10th year of publication this month.
- Charlie Ericksen
10.5% ' LATINOS
"5.8%
WHITES
Unemployment Dec 1986
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado
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I HAVE BEEN TO THE MOUNTAINTOP ...5
Martin Luther King 1929-1968
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Ireland. . . Playboy magazine , which honored San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros as one of the 1 0 best dressed men of 1985, criticizes the mayor for his support of an ordinance that would bar children less than 14 years of age from attending rock and roll shows described as obscene ... New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones introduces a curriculum on racial topics in the aftermath of a widely publicized death resulting from a racial incident. .. The Washingtonian magazine chooses Washington, D.C., Superior Court Judge Ricardo Urbina as one of the capital's 10 outstanding residents. . . Gilbert Casellas, past president of the National Hispanic Bar Association, becomes chairman of the Young Lawyers Section of the Philadelphia Bar Association . . . Augustine Medina, 64, crashes his car into the Department of Motor Vehicles in Chula Vista , Calif. , after suffering a mild stroke. Twenty-three people were injured ... Florida Gov . Bob Martinez is sworn in as the state' s 40th chief executive. The day-long, privately financed inauguration festivities cost $500,000 ... Former New Mexico Gov . Toney Anaya says he is "shocked by it, but not surprised" when asked what he thought of the telephone tapping devices found in the state Capitol. .. New Mexico Gov. Garrey Carruthers rescinds Anaya's proclamation declaring the state a sanctuary for Central American refugees ... The White House reappoints Laredo, Texas, teacher Esther Arroyo-Gonzalez Buckley to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Her term is for six years ... Connecticut State Treasurer Francisco Borges says he will seek legislation to divest holdings in South Africa and Northern HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REP Jan.19, Gov. Martinez Assails Prosecutor's Conduct INS: 1-3.9 Million to Seek Status Florida's Republican Gov . Bob Martinez called Jan. 9 for a review of U.S. Attorney Robert ll.(erkle ' s conduct in office after testifying as a defense witness in a mail-fraud trial. Martinez denied he took illegal campaign contributions and bribes from a cable TV company seeking Tampa ' s cable franchise during the time Martinez was running for mayor in 1979. Neither Martinez nor his long-time friend and supporter, Tampa contractor Eddie Per domo, who testified he passed $8,000 in cash and checks to Martinez on behalf of Coaxial Communications, have been charged with a crime . The trial concerns Nelson Italiano who is charged with bribing two Hillsborough County commissioners when the county was hiring a cable company. Merkle said in court that the alleged bribes occurred too long ago for charges to be brought against Martinez or Perdomo. The governor said he did nothing to influence the city's decision about a cable franchise and criticized the Republican prosecutor for allowing the allegations to be made public before he could reply . A spokesman for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service told Weekly Report Jan. 12 that the agency is planning for between 1 and 3.9 million undocumented aliens to apply for legalization under the new federal immigration law. The INS will accept applications for r e sidency status beginning May5 at approximately 100 INS offices nationwide. Mario Moreno, an attorney with the Wash ington , D . C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said the3. 9 million figure is a "vast oversimplification . " He said the ceiling is 500,000 people too many. Moreno added that there are several obstacles faced by prospective applicants. One such barrier is a provision in the new federal tax code which requires persons apply ing for perma,nent resident status to pay back taxes for the years they have lived here. INS spokesman Duke Austin said the estimate range is based on 1980 census estimates of 2 to 3 million undocumented aliens residing here , the agency's "gut feeling" that 500,000 of the non residents who visit here annually decide to stay and several independent studies. Austin cautioned, however, that the range is Single-Member District Plan Ordered The Baytown, Texas , City Council has until March to draw up plans for six single-member districts, including a minority district, in the east Harris County community. Chief U.S . District Judge John V. Singleton issued the ruling Jan. 7 as a result of a lawsuit filed by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project on behalf of plaintiffs Tony Campos and Vernon Shields. "No minority has ever been elected to the Council," said Rolando Rios, SVREP litigation director. Campos has run for office several times, Rios said, adding that while Campos won in the minority community, he lost at large. Baytown council members must live within one of six geographic areas but are elected at large . Hispanics and blacks are 25% of Baytown ' s 57,000 residents . There are 9 ,348 Latinos in the city, according to SVREP. Singleton' s ruling gives the city 60 days to draft a new plan . SVREP has filed almost 80 such cases challenging the at-large election systems in cities and school districts in Texas, California , New Mexico and other Southwestern states. Hotline Used by45,000 Harry Pach6n, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, told Weekly Report Jan. 9 that the organization's citizenship hotline had received over 45,000 requests for in formation for the six months it was in operation in 1986. Pach6n said the hotline has been called by such varied parties such as " priests, employers and teachers. " He added that roughly20% of the calls dealt with legalization questions arising from the new federal immigration law . an extrapolation, not hard and fast numbers. "There just isn't hard information in this area" The 3.9 million figure was released Jan. 5 and was the first time federal officials gave an estimate after prodding by Hispanic and other civil rights organizations. MALDEF, along with the National Council of La Raza , the League of United Latin American Citizens and the Ameri can Civil Liberties Union, has been meeting re gularly with INS officials to help formulate the regulations for the 2 1 /2-month-old Immigration Reform and Control Act. Harry Pach6n , executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, termed INS' range as a "futile exercise except to justify the (President Reagan's) budget" He said it was impossible to know how many people will apply. NALEO operates a citizenship hotline it established last summer. The presidenfs budget proposal for 1988 appropriates $3. 9 million for processing legalization applications. The 50% increase called for by immigration law in the number of border patrol agents would not be met by the budget proposal. Currently, there are 3,300 agents. For fiscal year 1988, Reagan ' s budget would fund roughly 1,000 more positions, said Austin . Austin said the top five states INS is expecting applications from are California, Texas, Illinois, Florida and New York. 'Refugee' Skips Hospital A man found clinging to a buoy off the coast of Miami escaped Jan . 10 from his hospital room just as authorities concluded that he was not a Cuban political refugee. The man , who had identified himself as Hector Morales of Cuba, was found clinging to the bell buoy by the Coast Guard Jan. 8. Suffering from physical and mental exhaustion , Morales told authorities that he had stowed away on a freighter for a week without food and jumped ship. When asked where he lived , Morales, 21, said he lived in the Oriente region but could not name a town. Officials believed he was from the Dominican Republic.

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Hispanic Engineering Frosh Decline in 1985-86 Fort he second time in the 13 years that records have been kept, the number of His panics enrolling as freshmen in U.S. engineer ing schools dropped , figures given to Weekly Report Jan 12 by the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering on the 1985-86 academic year showed. Of 102 , 285 freshmen enrolling , 3.849 (3.76Q.oo) were Hispanic, NACME statistics compiled for its 1986 annual report r evealed. In the 1984-85 academic year, 90 more Hispan ics -3,939 enrolled, making up 3.78% of 104,374 frosh . Since reaching a high of 114,517 in 1982-83, the total number of freshmen enrolling has declined annually. NACME research director Luis Miranda noted that the total number of Hispanic engineering students grew in '85-86 by 7 49 over the previous year, wnile overall enrollment dropped by more than 9,000. " Freshmen involvement continued to plateau," he said . "We need to work more wi t h His panic organizations and with high school students to improve their preparation." The graduation rate for minority engineering students is between 30% and 40%, he added, and 70% for white, non-Hispanic students. " If we could raise the Hispanic graduation rate to 60%, we could almost double the number of Hispanic engineers graduating," Miranda said. In 1984-85,77,529 bachelor's degrees in engineering were granted. Only 1 , 731 of them (2.2%) were Hispanic. The figures cited in the NACME tally do not include graduates from Puerto Rico . ENROLLMENT, DEGREES GRANTED IN ENGINEERING SCHOOLS 1973 Fall Semester Freshman Fall Semester Undergraduate Bachelor's Degrees Granted Academic Total Total T o tal Tota l Total Total Year Black Minonty Freshmen Black HisQan ic ' U nde rgrad' Black D eg rees' 1973-74 1.68 4 525 2.2 4 9 51.207 4.869 2.371 7,444 183.520 756 636 1 .423 4 1 . 010 1974-75 2.447 888 3.424 62.582 6.319 3,1 58 9,837 197,899 724 685 1.453 37.794 1975-76 3,840 1.384 5.344 7 4 .558 8.258 3,941 1 2,5 1 6 228. 1 83 77'7 680 1.498 37 . 609 1976-77 4.372 1 .766 6 . 309 81. 652 9 . 828 5.138 1 5.412 254,797 844 702 1.582 39.718 1977-78 4 .728 2.161 7.133 88.256 11,388 5.94 4 1 7 . 950 286,500 894 748 1,679 45.753 1978-79 5 .49 3 2.664 8.382 95 . 171 12,954 7,158 20,737 308,556 1 . 076 841 1,976 52.161 1979-80 6.339 3 , 136 9.792 1 03.090 14.786 8.454 23,999 337,807 1 .320 1,003 2,383 58.413 1980-81 6.66 1 3,373 10,39 9 109,3 1 4 16,181 9 , 043 26.127 362.300 1.445 1 , 193 2.728 62,615 1 981-82 7 ,015 3,689 11,11 6 114 .20 1 17. 6 1 1 1 0,200 28 ,781 384,162 1,646 1 ,270 3,007 66 , 652 1982-83 6.715 3,635 10.721 114,51 7 17,598 1 0 , 683 29 ,35 9 400,038 1,862 1,534 3,493 72.122 1983-84 6 , 342 3.8 8 5 1 0,603 108.763 1 7,817 11.599 30,543 4 02.561 2,022 1 ,683 3,81 7 76.576 1 984-85 6,2 4 5 3 , 939 10,594 104,374 17.45 1 12 ,192 30,829 388,992 2,0 4 3 1.731 3 , 883 77,529 985-86 6,374 3,849 10 ,588 1 02,285 17,994 12.941 32,055 379,830 " F i gures do not inc lude the Unive r sity of Puerto R ico. Notes: Annual reports. bulletins. and publications of the Engineering Manpower Commission (EMC) were used as so u rces for these tables . EMC cautions info r mation IS subject to error . 'Results' Test Ordered for Voting Act Proposed election changes may be rejected on the basis of discriminatory results rather than intent under regulations to strengthen the Voting Rights Act issued by the Justice Department Jan. 6 . The regulat ions, effective Feb. 5 , are a reversal of the department's August announcement in which Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds said discriminatory results would not be considered in reviewing proposed election plans . While civil rights groups are pleased with the new regulations, many are now concerned the rules may leave the burden of proving the election change is discriminatory on t he local community. Hispanic Jobless Increase The Hispanic unemployment rate for De cember increased to 10.5% from 9.6% the previous month despite a dip in the national jobless rate, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Overall, the number of Hispanics who were unemployed went to 874,000 in December from789,000 in November. T he national unemployment rate fell to 6 . 7% from 6.9%. It was the lowest since March 1980. The Latino jobless rate fo r the f i rst 11 months of 1 986 were: Jan. 1 0.1% May Feb. 12.3 June March 10. 3 July April 10.4 Aug. 2 11.0% 10. 6 10. 5 11.0 Sept.11. 1% Oct. 10.5 Nov . 9 . 6 Avg. 1 0.6 "The jurisdiction proposing the changes should have to prove to the department that they are not discriminatory," said Jose Garza, director of political access for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund San Antonio office. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 requires certain states, including Arizona, Texas and parts of Florida , California and New York, to obtain "preclearance" from the Justice Department before making election changes. Runner Late But Game Citizens from the home town of Peruvian marathoner Felix Alejandro Flores Pacheco pitched in to pay his passage to compete in the 22-mile American Savings Orange Bowl Marathon in Miami Jan. 10. He arrived at the Miami International Airport during the early morning hours the day of the race believing it was scheduled for the following day. While reading a local newspaper at 9 a.m . , he realized the race had started two hours earlier. Not wanting to disappoint his friends, he jumped into a cab, only to find traffic was backed up for four miles . Flores abandoned the cab and made his way to the starting line . At 1 p.m. , 3 1 /2 hours after the winner finished but two hours ahead of the final straggler, he crossed the f i nish line in his slacks, a pair of loafers and carrying a duffle bag . UFW to Appeal Decision The United Farm Workers Union plans to appeal a $1.7 million judgment against it in a suit by a California vegetable grower. The intended decision, expected to be finalized next month, was announced Jan. 12 by Imperial County Superior Court Judge William Lehnhardt. It gives Maggio Inc . $900,000 for lettuce losses, $500,000 for broccoli l osses and $160,000 for carrot losses, plus lesser damage awards, suffered during a violent 1979 strike. The judge ruled that UFW authorized and participated in repeated acts of violence. The U FW claimed the violence started only after strikers were " run down, shot at, and otherwise provoked" by growers, private guards and armed field workers. One UFW striker, Rufino Contreras, was k i lled by an unknown assailant during the January violence. Several other picketers were wounded by gunfire. PerezLopez Appointed Jorge Perez-Lopez was named director of the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of International Economic Affairs Jan. 8 by Deputy Under Secretary of Labor Robert Searby. Perez-L o pez will be responsible for directing and coordinating the development of Labor Depart m ent positions on internat i onal economic policy issues in areas such as foreign trade and i nv estment. A native of Santa Clara , Cuba , he h ad served since 1984 as deputy director of the office . Hispanic Link Weekly Report l I i 1 1 l

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Achy Obejas, guest columnist Squeezing the Good Thief It was shortly after my briefcase was stolen that I called my mother. I needed comfort and wisdom, and who but a mother can provide the best of that? Gone were my checkbook, my wallet, my telephone/address book, my calendar. The whole incident had taken place in broad daylight and I was feeling kind of helpless and dumb. But I wasn't exactly prepared for our "I' m sorry, honey," she told me in her native Spanish. "But I know how you can get your things back." Assuming that she was going to advise me to file a pol ice report (which I already had done) or trot down to the Missing Things Department and look through mountains of re covered goods(which I wasn't about to do), I figured, heck, I ' d humor her. " Okay, Mami, " I said, "just how can I get my stuff back? " " Well," she replied, "by offering a prayer to St. Dimas . " " St. Dimas? " Even though I was raised fairly Catholic, the name did not ring a bell. " St. Dimas," she said. "He's called 'The Good Thief.'" "Mami-ehthis St. Dimas . Does Rome deal with this guy?" "Rome? Oh, I don't know," my mother said. "You know, Rome has changed so much. St. Christopher isn ' t even a saint anymore. " "Okay," I offered. " I'll send up a little prayer to St. Dimas." Of course, it wasn't that simple . My mother, a devout Catholic, is also a devout Cuban. And when things get tough for devout Cubans, they tend to resort to some, well, rather unorthodox practices. "Get a piece of leather," she told me. "Then tie a knot in it." An S&M saint? I wondered. She continued: "Then you say, ' St. Dimas, I won ' t stop squeezing your balls until I get my things back.'" "Mami," I replied, "I have a feel i ng we're not in Rome anymore.'' A friend procured a leather strip for me, and when nobody was looking I practically left St. Dimas childless. Days passed. Every time I looked at the leather knot decorating the top of my dresser, I kicked myself forgiving in to my mother's Third World, underdeveloped notion of St. Dimas -undoubtedly some rechristened African diety who had traveled to Cuba hundreds of years ago. Amazing, I thought, that a woman as educated and savvy as my mother would have suggested something so patently primitive. 'I'VE GOT YOUR WALLET' Then I went to my bank, just a routine visit to make a deposit. The Puerto Rican teller supervisor greeted me, "We' ve got a phone message for you . " She gave me the number to call, which I did. " I've got your wallet, " a man who identified himself as a parking lot manager told me . "Well, not your wallet, exactly, but everything in it , all tied up in a rubber band-your credit cards, your IDs, your bank card. '!'hat's how I found you." I rushed downtown and retrieved it. When I returned home I found a fat envelope from the American Medical Association waiting for me. I slit it open. Out popped my checkbook. The sender, who works for the AMA, had found it. "Mami, this St. Dimas is amazing!'' I yelped as soon as my mother picked up the phone. "I got my wallet back, my checkbook. This is great!" "See? I told you so.'' Mothers have a way of saying that. "Wait 'til I tell my friends.'' "Your friends?" She seemed surprised. '"You mean your American friends?" "Sure. Everybody. Nobody's going to believe this!'' "No, honey, no. Don't tell your friends.'' "Why not?" I asked, disappointed. "Well," she said," I ' m not sure St. Dimas works for Americans. Don't they have St. Anthony?" (Achy Obejas, of Chicago, Ill., is a free-lance writer.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua ATTENTION ALL EXPERTS: In September, I mentioned the 1986/87 Talk Show Guest Directory which according to its publicityis subscribed to by82% of the leading news/talk radio stations in the USA-plus 60 Minutes, Phil Donahue, MacNeil, Lehrer and even Oprah Winfrey. Of 2,192 "experts and spokespersons" listed (including 10 on AIDS, 16 on animals and 61 on women), only three were knowledgeable about Hispanics; none at all about Mexican Americans. No wonder the average TV viewer doesn't know Guadalupe Hidalgo from Trini L6pez. Or Cinco de Mayo from Dieciseis de Septiembre. I promptly registered my complaint with editor Mitchell Davis. So in last week's mail I received an application form to join Davis' laundry list of authorities PLUS an invitation to recruit others who are willing to spare a few minutes of their day or evening to sit and chat with Joan Rivers or David Letterman or whomever else happens to be in need of a good conversation partner. I have always maintained that if there are 20 million Hispanics in this nation, there are 20 million Hispanic authorities. If you're the best on your block at making a pinata, whipping up a taco salad or speaking Spanglish, write Mitchell Davis today at Broadcast Interview Sources, 2500 Wisconsin Ave . NW, Suite 930, Washington, D . C . 20007. Or call him at (202) 333-4904. He'll send you a form for your free listing . Last year, Davis says, 99% of all returned forms were run . The 1% rejections included those whose handwriting he couldn' t read and some folks who forgot to fill in their addresses and phone numbers. How can you beat an offer like that? INS should make legalization so easy . TWIN THREATS: Last week, Sin Pelos mentioned with pride the dexterity of Chicano Luis Nogales, who shifted from CEO of a predominantly English-language print media empire (UPI) to president of the Spanish-language international television news network Eco. Correspondent John Mendez of Los Angeles reminds us of another bicultural winner whose career also demonstrates that being Mexican American offers double the pleasure and double the treasure of being just Mexican or just American: Frank Cruz, former reporter and anchor with KN BC-TV in Burbank, is presently vice-president of Los Angeles' fast-growing Spanish-language KVOA TV . POLITICAL POSTSCRIPT: Chicago Mayor Harold Washington bypassed a black candidate for city clerk to endorse attomey/busineS& woman Gloria Chever. e in the city's Feb . 24 primary . Chevere happens to be a Puerto Rican married to a Mexican American. , Your move, Jane Byrne. Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • HERMAN BACA, chairman of the San Diego-based Committee on Chicano Rights, in calling for the creation of a new agency to administer the provisions of the Simpson-Rodino immigration act's$600 million amnesty provisions: "How can Congress entrust it to an agency (Immigration and Naturalization Service) which has not even completed the paperwork for thousands of applicants who wish to enter this country legally? They are just beginning to take a look at those who applied in 1977." RAUL ALLEGRE, New York Giants placekicker, describing his phone call to his mother in Torreon, Mexico, following the Giants' 170 win over the Washington Redskins to reach the Super Bowl: "The first time I called, she wasn't there. She ' d gone to Mass to give thanks for our victory." DONNA 15year-old Patterson, Calif., recipient of the of Felipe on the first anniversary of the transplant It ts so sad. Hts face keeps popping up in my mind. It hurts to think about it." Hisp a ni c Link Weekly Report Jan. 19, 1987'

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COLLECTING SELECTING A CREDIT CARD: For a list of the nation's 40 most inexpensive bank credit cards, in terms of interest rates and yearly fees, send $1 to: Bankcard Holders, Dept. C, 333 Pennsyivania Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-5805. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION INTERNSHIPS: The Smithsonian Institution has available an internship program, offering experience in fields such as archaeology, biology, library science and history, for high school students graduating in 1987. There are two internship sessions during the summer. The application deadline is March 20. For an application, write to: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution , Washington, D.C. 20560 (202) 357-3049. UNDOCUMENTED MEXICAN WOMEN: "The Migration and Settl& ment of Undocumented Women" is a 69-page booklet by Gilberto Cardenas and Estevan Flores which examines social , legal and economic aspects. The work is based on a study of 138 families in Houston. For a copy, send $3.50 to: CMAS Publications, Center for Mexican American Studies, SSB 4.120, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712. ENGINEERING PROGRAMS: The current newsletter of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering includes information on programs it sponsors for minority students. For a free copy, contact: Ronni Denes, Communications Director, NACME, 3 W. 3 .5th St., New York, N.Y . 10001. A GUIDE TO U.S. CENSUS REPORTS: The 472-page "Census Catalog and Guide 1986" details the bureau ' s latest reports and offers information on its factfinder services and programs . For a copy, send a $23 prepaid order to : Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402 (202) 783 3238. CHILDREN AND READING: Waldenbooks has put out a brochure, "Reading Personality Questionnaire," which helps parents select books their children will enjoy. For a free copy, send a self-addressed , stamped envelope to: Waldenbooks , 201 Ridge Road, Stamford , Conn. 06904. BUSINESS Dl RECTORY: The" Minority Business Telephone Book' ' is a 350-page national directory that includes more than 13,000 businesses in 1 ,700 categories. For a copy, send $30, plus $2.50 for shipping and handling, to : B.E. Publishers, 955 Connecticut Ave. , Bridgeport, Conn. 06607 (800) 826-8692. Stanford, Calif. Jan. 23 CONNECTING SMITHSONIAN REACHES OUT The Smithsonian Institution, which includes 14 museums in the nation's capital, announced the creation of a new "cu It ural education committee" Jan. 9 to strengthen its ties with heretofore underserved cultural populations, including Hispanics . Institution Secretary Robert McC. Adams commented at a lunch meeting with ethnic press representatives that the committee would help to "reshape the way we think about what we ' re doing ." The 12-member committee, strictly advisory but with support from and access to top Institution officials, includes two Latinos: Frank Cota-Robles Newton , executive director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and Ricardo Urbina, presiding judge of the family division of the Washington, D.C., Superior Court. ARCHITECTURE WINNER SELECTED University of Miami student Dagoberto Diaz won the $4,000 first prize in the McDonald's! American Institute of Architectural Students design competition Jan . 12 . The competition, to develop an archi tectural design inspiring a new look for McDonald's restaurants, drew participants from more than 1 00 colleges and universities . Diaz's winning effort used a two-story classical Spanish mission design. LA. CHAMBER TAPS VILLANUEVA Danny Villanueva, president and general manager of KMEX TV in Los Angeles, has been named to the executive committee.of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce for a on&year term . When inaugurated Jan. 23, he will become the first Hispanic named to the committee in the chamber's 98-year history . $136,000 THEATER ARCHIVES AWARD Salvador Guerena, librarian of the Colecci6n Tloque Nahuaque at the University of California, Santa Barbara, expects to have the archives of El Teatro Campesino and its director/creator, Luis Valdez, available to students and scholars within three years. The university's library announced Jan . 6 that it had been awarded $136,000 by the Ford Foundation to process the papers of the nation ' s largest and most influential bilingual Chicano theater. The papers were acquired last year. Calendar THIS WEEK Martha Menchaca will speak on "Native Chicanos vs . Immigrants" as part of a program sponsored by the Stanford Chicano Graduate Students Association to share information on the Mexican-American com munity in the Southwest. Association of Hispanic Federal Executives Washington, D . C . Jan . 29 Gil Chavez (202) 732 i ' NEWSPAPER JOB FAIRS r'h e American Society of Newspaper Editors Akron, Ohio Jan . 29 DIABETES AND MEXICAN AMERICANS Austin, Texas Jan . 19 The Nat i onal Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organization is sponsoring a one-day con ference on diabetes. Phil Fry(512) 343. LITERARY PRIZES Miami Jan. 22 Letras de Oro will hold a banquet to recognize winners in the association ' s Spanish literary contest Ambler Moss (305) 284 HISPANIC CORPORATE COUNCIL New York Jan. 22, 23 The National Hispanic Corporate Council will sponsor seminars and presentations on Hispanic marketing and a luncheon with minority businesses . Olga Aros (602) 961 CHICANO COLLOQUIUM 4 Kathleen O ' Toole (415) 723 NEWSPAPER JOB FAIR Long Island, N .Y. Jan . 23, 24 Newsday is sponsoring a job opportunity conference for minority students and professionals interested in newspaper. careers. Reginald Tuggle (516) 454. HISPANIC ENGINEERS West Sacramento, Calif . Jan . 24 The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will host a banquet and awards ceremony. Robert Guzman (213) 722 COMING SOON BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Jan. 28 Margo Ferris(714) 962-3710 INSTALLATION BANQUET Jan. 19, 1987 John Greenman (216) 375 Sacramento , Calif. Jan . 29 Mike Flanagan (916) 321 009 Birmingham, Ala . Jan . 29 James Denley (205) 325 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Personnel Management Association of Azthiln, Los Angeles-Orange County Chapter Los Angeles Jan . 29 Rosemarie Zapata Ramirez (818) 449 COMMISSION RETREAT Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs Columbus, Ohio Jan . 31, Feb. 1 Ramiro Estrada (614) 466 RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS CONFERENCE National Hispanic Religious Broadcasters Washington, D.C. Feb. 4 Duane Ward (202t628 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DEPUTY PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR $41 ,454 to $62,192 The City of Phoenix is seeking exceptionally competent individuals to fill three newly created Deputy Public Works Director positions Each Deputy will be responsible for one of the following: General Services Group, Solid Waste Group and Support Services Group. All three positions require competence both as an administrator and as a strategic planner and reporting to the Publ i c Works Director. Five years of related administrative/ mana gerial experience in a medium-to-large or ganization and a Bachelor's degree in a related field. A MPA or MBA is highly desirable. Individuals hired have twenty-four months to move into the boundaries of the City of Phoenix. Applications will be accepted for this process until a selection has been made; subject to closing without further notice. To request application, call (602) 262-6277 or write City of Phoenix, Personnel 300 W. Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003. Equal Opportunity Employer M / F GAO EVALUATOR The U.S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals w i th a bachelor's (2 . 9 GPA or higher) or graduate degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities . We are interested in business, economics, computer science, government or political affairs majors to work in Washington, D.C . , or one of our 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you . To obtain an appli cation (deadline to apply is April 1 O) contact: U.S . General Accounting Office, Washington Regional Office, 441 G St. NW, Room 5077, Washington, D.C. 20548, Attn : Laura Talbott (202) 275-8904. An Equal Opportunity Employer PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md.,. govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. DIRECTOR, Indiana University Art Museum. The museum is an I.M . Pei-designed building (dedicated 1982) with an outstanding general art collection composed of 25,000 objects. Qualifications: Expe r ienced scholar-art museum director with scholarly publi cations and curatorial or administrative art museum experience. Interpersonal skills to work effec tively with urriversity administration, School of Fine Art s and various university departments A thorough understanding of the didactic mission of the I.U. Art Museum. An effective and con vincing communicator regarding the importance of th e Art Museum to the campus and community at large . Faculty or research rank and salary commensurate with qualifications. De adline: March 15, 198 7. Pl ease submit letter of application and current re s um e to Anya P eterson Royce , Dean of the F ac ulti es and Chair, Search and Screen Com mittee, Bryan Hall 109, Indiana University, Blo omin gton , Indian a 47405. Indiana University is a n equ a l opportunity/ affirmative a c tion em ployer . Hi s p a n ic Link Weekl y R e port LITIGATION ATTORNEY Major Washington , D.C., corporation is seeking an attorney with five years litigation experience . Excelle ,rn'Q pportunity to develop litigation strate gy, and manage a high volume of cases including hiring and supervising outside counsel. Civil litigation experience with major law firm or corporation required. Litigation experience with justice department or attorney general' s office would be considered. Admission to the bar required . Antitrust and franchise experience of added value . Compensation: $75,000. Please contact Martha McGinnis at (212) 697-8682. ASSOCIATE DEAN SUNY/EMPIRESTATECOLLEGE in ALBANY, N.Y . , a leader in non-traditional higher education , seeks Associate Dean to begin 5 / 87. Students work one-to-one with faculty to develop degree programs & evaluate experimental learning. Responsible for academic program including: academic/assessment quality & systems; pro gram/faculty development. Doctorate, sub stantial college-level teaching, administrative e x perience & interest in adult education required. Salary: low to mid 40s. Letter and resume by 2 /20/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director, Personnel and Affirmative Action, SUNY / ESC , Room 802, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N . Y . 12866. For more information call Dean Delong (518) 44 7-6746. ANEOE. The following two positions are with COSSMHO Send the required information to : COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053 , Washington, D.C. 20005. By Jan. 30. HEALTH SPECIALIST!or health promotion / disease prevention project at national His panic org a nization. Focus on maternal , child health and diabetes Experience in research , writing, and community based prevention strategies MPH required BilinguaVbicultural preferred. Send resume and writing sample. HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST seeks MPH for new public education health project Good writing skills necessary, fluency in Spanish required; bilingual and bicultural preferred. Experience in bilingual materials development also sought. Areas of interest include: Diabetes, maternal/child health and AIDS. Responsibilities include: Health ma : terials development, media liaison and com munity network for information dissemination. Send letter and resume . The following two positions are with Arlington County, Virginia Official Arlington County application form required To request application materials, please call (703) 558-2167 and refer to announcement number. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than the closing date shown for the position. SOCIAL WORKER-BILINGUAL $.21,116 Ann . #65227 DBHS Professional social work in the Division of Social Services assigned to the Family Ser vices Unit. Employee works primarily with the Spanish-speaking families to meet their needs and to prevenVreduce problems that '-i((lpede family stability. Requires Bachelor's degree in Social Work or closely related field and fluency in both Spanish and English. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in family services or a Master's degree. The position of Social Worker-Bilingual closes Jan. 29, 1987. LIBRARIAN OPPORTUNITIES Arlington County is accepting applications for the following positions in the Department of Libraries : LIBRARIAN I (REFERENCE) $20,128-$22,152 Ann . #71127 GLIB LIBRARIAN II (CATALOGER) $22,152-$24, 381 Ann. #71197BLIB LIBRARIAN II (CHILDREN'S) $22,152$24,381 Ann . #71197 A LIB These positions require a minimum of ALA, a c credited MLS or5-year Bachelor of Library Science degree. The librarian opportunities close Feb. 5 , 1987. Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St. North Arlington , Va. 22201 Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer GRAPHICS: /Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration e Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and e Stat& El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW , Washington, . D.C . 2001.0 (202)483-1140. . DEAR No other publication or system lets you target a nat tonal pool of Latmo execut1ves and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of H tspamc Lmk Weekly Report. _ To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mat I to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW Washington o c 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy (mail or 9Y 5_ p ,m. (En Tue _sday wtll be 111 Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words ; telephone number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by----------Title ________ _ Advertiser Name _________ _ Bill To -----,.--------Address City, Stat-e-:::&-:Z::-:i-p--------5

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Arts & Entertainment LATINO ENTERTAINERS FARED POORLY IN the year's first round of entertainment nominations, announced this month. Nominations for the 29th annual Grammy Awards were announced Jan. 8 by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, and Placido Domingo is the only Hispanic performer nominated in categories outside the" Latin" field. Domingo is nominated twice in the same category"best opera recording" -as principal soloist in Verdi : Don Carlos (released by Deutsche Grammophon) and in Verdi: Otello (Angel). Brazilian singer Flora Purim is nominated in the "best jazz vocal performance, female'' category for Esquinas, a track from The Magicians (Crossover). Various Latino acts are nominated in the three "Latin field" categories established in 1983. Nominees and record labels follow: Best Latin Pop Performance: Pandora, for the trackc:C6mo te va mi amor? from Pandora (Ode6n); Danny Rivera for the album lnolvidable Tito . . . Ami ine pas a lo mismo que a us ted (DNA/Puerto Rico); Jose Feliciano for LeLoLai, a track from the Te amare album (RCA); Jose Jose for the single Pruebame (Ariola) and Yuri for the track Yo te pido amor from the album with the same title (0de6n). Best Tropical Latin Performance: Mario Bauza arid Gracie Ia for the album Afro-Cuban Jazz (Caiman); Ruben Blades for the album Escenas( Elektra); Willie Colon for the album Especial No. 5 (Sonotone); Celia Cruz and Tito Puente for the album Homenaje a Benny MoreVol. Ill (Vaya/Musica Latina lnt'l) and Willie Rosario for the album Nueva cosecha (Bronco). Best Mexican/American Performance: Flaco Jimenez for the album Ay te deja en San Antonio(Arhoolie); Los Yonics fort he single Coraz6n vacio (Profono); Los Tiares del Norte for the album El otro Mexico (Profono lnt' Q; Juan Valentin for the album Juan Valentin (Musart); Steve Jordan for the album Turn Me Loose (RCA); Salvador Torres for the single Unidos cantemos (Mas) and Rafael Buendia for the album Y. . . iZas! (Ariola). The Grammys will be announced in a live ceremony televised by CBS on Feb. 24. No Hispanic performers at all are nominated for Golden Globe awards , to be handed out later this month, or for Awards for Cable Excellence to be given out this week The National Academy of Cable Programming hands out its ACEs Jan. 20 in a Los Angeles ceremony that will be cablecast by WTBS. While no Latinos are listed among the performers, producers, directors and other entertainment professionals nominated, the World Championship Boxing: Hector Camacho vs. Edwin Rosario fight carried by Home Box Office is among the sports special events nominated. No Latinos are nominated for Golden Globes, but the members of the Hollywood Foreign Press will give the group's Cecil B. De Mille Award for lifetime achievement to Anthony Quinn at its ceremony on Jan. 30. Anthony Quinn, coincidentally, starred in Los hijos de Sanchez , a film based on the novel by Oscar Lewis that won Chuck Mangione a Grammy award for the score in 1978. Lewis based his novel on the life of Mexican worker Santos Hernandez Rivera, who died Jan. 5 in Mexico City at the age of 81, hit by an unidentified vehicle. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas WAQI-AM, is said to have invested $8 million to start the new network. political writer for TheM iami Herald, has left Radio Marti, where she was deputy news director, to head the Washington bureau of the new Hispanic American Broadcasting Corporation ... NEWS NETWORK LAUNCHED: The His panic American Broadcasting Corporation, conceived in October, launched its weeknight Noticiero Telemundo, in Miami, Chicago, New York and Los Angeles on Monday, Jan. 12. Based in Florida, the Spanish-language news operation is under direction of Gustavo Godoy, who quit as news director of SIN television network earlier last fall. Co-anchoring the show, which takes on SIN's nightly newscast head-to-head, are Uruguay-born Jorge Gestoso, 35, and Lana Montalvan, a 29-year-old Argentine actress and radio journalist. 6 Amancio Victor Suarez, owner of Miami's HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Stre.et NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksim-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio MejiasRentas , Melinda Machado No portion of Hispanic Lin k Weekly Report may be reproduced or broa dca s t i n any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly..Re.pnrts mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. SUMMER INTERNS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund continues its summer intern program for college sophomores this year. Ten students will be selected to participate in a two-week writing seminar in June and spend the summer working for selected newspapers. Then they'll be awarded $1,000 each toward their junior year tuition. Application forms may be obtained from the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P .O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540-0300. Deadline to submit applications is Jan. 31. IN MOTION: Roberto Fabricio, former editor of El Miami Herald, will join the Fort Lauder dale News& Sun-Sentinel as Latin American editor this month. . . Helga Silva , former MORE NEWS NAMES: Mexico poeVauthor/ philosopher Octavio Paz keynotes the first Letras de Oro awards dinner Jan . 22 at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, Fla .. .. The Washington Post has hired Jeanne Fox Alston, who worked with three major Midwest dailies, as its recruiting contact for minorities. . . John Rosales has joined the San Antonio Light as a reporter after completing a Kiplinger fellowship at Ohio State University's School of Journalism . . . The Wichita, Kans., bilingual monthly tabloid El Perico begins its 1Oth year of publication this month. Charlie Ericksen ' I HAVE BEEN TO THE .MOUNTAINTOP ' • • • Onemployment Dec. 1986 Hispanic Link Weekly Report