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Hispanic link weekly report, February 2, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 2, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese claims that as many as half the people accused of selling cocaine in Southern California counties are undocumented aliens... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo awards the New York state Martin Luther King Freedom Medal to state Supreme Court Judge John Carro. Carro, who sits on the Appellate Division, was recognized for his work in the area of human rights, nonviolent social change and economic development... Federal District Judge Kenneth Ryskamp says a change of venue maybe necessary for the second racketeering and drug trial of seven Latino expolicemen in Miami accused of operating a multi-million dollar drug ring. A mistrial was declared after jurors failed to agree on a verdict for five defendants and, after guilty verdicts were announced on two others, one juror switched his vote. . . Al Rodriguez, recently
appointed head of the Arizona State Liquor Department, is under investigation for the ambush death of a M^xjcan cifoe^Q$Jf 954 in Douglas, Ariz. Rodriguez was a policeman ih Douglaa^vhen the man was slain. . . Roman Catholic Archbishop Roger Mahony of Los Angeles is appointed to the new 12-member federal Commission on Agricultural Workers provided under the immigration act. . . Dr. Carlos Godinez resigns as the head of the Texas state Board of Medical Examiners. The body is under siege for alleged delays in the disciplining of doctors accused of malpractice and negligence... The Houston-area woman, Terry Rouse, who filed a $30 million libel lawsuit last month against TV reporter Geraldo Rivera after her arrest during a nationally televised drug raid, is arrested for selling marijuana... Police arrest the second Anglo youth, Arthur Biazzo, in connection with the racially motivated beatings of two Hispanic youths two hours before and less than two miles from a similar assault at Howard Beach, N.Y., that resulted in the death of a black man...

English-Only Proposals Offered in Conn., Ariz.
Arizona and Connecticut have introduced | bills to make English their official language.
A Connecticut legislative proposal will require all state documents to be printed in | English and will end bilingual education, an aide to state Senator Thomas Scott, the bill’s author, said Jan. 23. Under the proposal,
| non- English speaking students would attend
a three-year English immersion program after j which they would be mainstreamed.
In Arizona, both a constitutional amendment and bill are under consideration. The amendment must receive voter approval. The proposals leave bilingual education intact. Both proposals require “every document of the state, city and country (to be) printed in English,” Arizona Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Peter Kay (R-Phoenix) said.
The state will continue to use bilingual ballots as required by federal law, he said.
Spanish-speaking neighborhoods create Spanish-only economics, hurting job prospects for English speakers, he said.
“Most of our Democratic Caucus is opposed’ I to the proposals, assistant Senate minority J leader Lela Alsted (D- Phoenix) said.
‘Panic1 Spurs N.Y. Firings
In response to several complaints that employers are dismissing employees because of their lack of understanding of the federal immigration act, the chair of New York state’s newly created immigration task force announced Jan. 23 that the body has started warning employers that such actions are illegal.
Chairman Cesar Perales, also New York Commissioner of Social Services, said employers were being informed that undocumented workers hired before the act was signed into law may continue working without the possibility of a penalty to the employer.
“The federal government has been derelict in not fully explaining people’s rights under the new law, and a great many employers are panicking, ” said Perales.
Texas Border Assistance Asked
\ Legislation to alleviate high unemployment and poverty faced by Hispanics along Texas’ 1,250-mile border with Mexico was introduced in January in response to a report from the state’s Border Economic Development Task
Calif. Shuts Restaurants
Five restaurants in the popular California “Red Onion” chain will be closed down for five to 10 days each in May for violating state anti-discrimination laws. It is the first time a restaurant has been closed in California as a result of discrimination charges.
The chain reached an agreement with the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control last week following numerous complaints from blacks, Latinos and Middle Easterners that they were kept from entering its restaurants because they ostensibly did not comply with dress codes or did not look like the pictures on their driver's licenses.
The affected restaurants are in Santa Ana, Riverside, Palm Desert, Lakewood and Fullerton.
Force.
Compared to Latinos in border cities such as Las Cruces, N.M., San Diego and Tucson, Ariz., residents ih the heavily Mexican-American cities and towns from the Gulf of Mexico and Brownsville on the east to El Paso on the west face the lowest per-capita incomes in the United States.
Laredo, which is 92% Hispanic, is the bottom-ranked U.S. metropolitan area in terms of per-capita personal income, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Out of the 316 statistical areas, McAllen and Brownsville rank 315 and 314, Las Cruces ranks 312 and El Paso 311.
In contrast, San Diego which is only 15% Hispanic, ranks 67 and Tucson, with a 21% Hispanic population, ranks 188.
Companion bills filed by Sen. Hector Uribe (D-Brownsville) and Rep. Alex Moreno (D-Edinburg) propose the creation of a Border Development Commission forthe 16-county
continued on page 2
Contracts Chief Quits, Raps Meese
The U.S. Labor Department official whose job it is to ensure federal contractors comply with hiring goals for Hispanics* blacks, other minorities and women said Jan. 21 that he resigned due to the efforts of certain Reagan administration officials to render anti-discrimination laws ineffective.
Joseph Cooper, director of the Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance forthe past 17 months, charged “these vocal dissenters promote the idea that goals and timetables are quotas and that reverse discrimination is a reality. . . that affirmative action has done too much, gone too far, become too powerful.”
Cooper said that Attorney General Edwin Meese and Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Bradford Reynolds were two of the officials attempting to abolish or stymie the numerical hiring goals set forfirms with federal contracts. The rules calling for the
goals, contained in an executive order signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965, are currently being studied by Reagan to determine whether they should be eliminated or revised.
The hiring goals apply to more than 20,000 contractors with 23 million workers at 70,000 sites.
A spokesman for the House Education and Labor Committee said the committee was releasing a report next month which would lend credence to many of Cooper's allegations.
Cooper said that certain administration officials “did not understand what this program is all about, and they looked at it from a perspective of race and that there is a move to do too much for blacks or minorities or handicapped... ” Cooper, who is a black, is a life-long Republican.


CABE Lambastes Bilingual Ed. Bill
New At- Large Actions Hinge on Calif. Verdict
At-large city council elections in Watsonville, Calif., are unfair to Latinos because the city is racially polarized, a suit funded bythe Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has charged.
Watsonville, south of San Jose, is more than 50% Hispanic but its voters have never elected a Latino to its seven-member governing body, former MALDEF president Joaquin Avila charged in a Jan. 20-26 trial in San Jose’s U.S. District Court. Judge William Ingram’s decision is imminent.
Ninety-four percent of California’s 445 incorporated cities elect their councils by the at-large method. MALDEF spokespersons say that if the Watsonville suit is successful, it will consider actions soon in several other cities, including Sacramento and Stockton.
Plaintiff Waldo Rodriguez, a paralegal and former farm worker represented by Avila, asked the court to create seven election districts, including two with overwhelmingly Hispanic constituencies.
The case hinges on whether the at-large system promotes racially polarized voting that denies minority representation, a Voting Rights Act violation.
Rolando Rios, litigation director for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project in San Antonio, Texas, and a co-counsel in the suit, said that based on a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last summer, plaintiffs may legally challenge at-large elections without having to prove intentional discrimination.
Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, in his first interview since being defeated at the polls in November, criticized the politicization of the court and said he would not accept if offered a reappointment
In an interview with The Sacramento Bee published Jan. 16, Reynoso said: “I never joined the judiciary to be a politician.” He blamed Gov. George Deukmejian for degrading the court by attacking it along partisan lines.
“He (Deukmejian) started that as attorney general I believe (there was) a determination on his part that the attacks on the judiciary were good for him politically.”
Reynoso, 55, recently joined a private law firm and relishes his being able to air his views publicly now. “I’m giving up one title, .‘justice,’ for another title ‘citizen’ ” The former justice, however, lamented the future of the
Gonzalez Files in Dallas
Dallas City Council candidate Al Gonzalez opened his campaign headquarters Jan. 19 after filing for the Place 10 position Jan. 6.
Gonzalez, owner of Gulf-Tex Construction Company, faces two non-Hispanic opponents for the post and described himself as the “consensus” candidate in the April 4 race.
Currently there are no Hispanics on the 11-member city council in Dallas, which has a Latino population of about 15%.
2
The California state legislator who chaired the campaign to make English the official language in that state said that he planned to introduced a bill late last week that would do away with teaching non- and limited-English speaking children in their native language.
Assemblyman Frank Hill (R-Whittier) said, as an alternative to placing.the students in a classroom where instruction is in the native language, the students would learn English more quickly if they were placed in English-only classes and were given the help of bilingual aides.
“I reject the concept of native-language instruction,” Hill said. “We want to give the flexibility to school districts to determine how they can assimilate students...”
Shelley Speigel-Coleman, the president of the California Association for Bilingual Education, told Weekly Report that Hill's proposal would “dismantle” the state’s bilingual education program. “Hill does not offer the school districts any guidelines, and what will happen is that the districts will base their decisions on the availability of money, not the quality of instruction,” said Speigel-Coleman.
There are currently about 525,000 students enrolled in bilingual programs throughout the state.
Gov. George Deukmejian vetoed legislation last year that would have extended the bilingual education program past its expiration date of June 1987. It will take two-thirds of the Legislature to pass an emergency extension this session.
Supreme Court
“I just can’t help but continue to have this sense of emptiness. Our duty as citizens continues. Nonetheless, I think we’ve lost something precious”
Alvarado Seeks Ed. Post
Anthony Alvarado, former New York City Schools Chancellor, announced Jan. 26 that he submitted an application for superintendent at a Manhattan school district.
Alvarado, 44, who resigned as head of the nation’s largest school system in 1984 after one year on the job, is looking to return to public education as superintendent of Community School Board 3. According to officials on the city’s Board of Education, he is the front-runner.
The position pays $83,000 a yean Alvarado was being paid $95,000 a year when he quit the chancellorship. He now heads an adult literacy and education program for several unions.
Alvarado resigned as chancellor after it was uncovered he had accepted more than $80,000 in loans from subordinates, had thousands of dollars in outstanding parking fines and used employees to perform personal errands.
He was not prosecuted and paid $569 in institution.
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) introduced legislation in December that would extend the bilingual education law until 1992. It included several changes to placate the law’s critics. Speigel-Coleman said CABE was in favor of Brown’s version.
Hill said he would consider it a victory if neither bill received sufficient votes to pass. More important, he said, was that the current law expire.
Texas Border Aid Sought
continued from page 1
region adjacent to the Rio Grande.
“It proposes to stimulate development, improve the quality of life and employment opportunities, and maximize the potential of the region as an asset versus a liability,” said Armando Diaz, legislative aide to Uribe.
According to the 23-member task force’s report, issued Jan. 13, the border region costs Texas twice as much as it generates in income. To revitalize the area, the taskforce emphasized improvements and development in education, water and water quality, and business expansion assistance.
Along with creating a Border Development Commission, the task force recommends one staff member concentrate on border production-sharing opportunities. Other recommendations call for
• the Legislature to mandate a state revolving loan fund targeted to small businesses in economically distressed areas
• degree programs and disciplines at institutes of higher education along the border area to be extended and area representatives included among appointments to the Texas College and University System Coordinating Board.
• the U.S. Census Bureau to consolidate the Brownsville-Harlingen and the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission metropolitan statistical areas into one Lower Rio Grande Valley metropolitan area for statistical purposes to help attract businesses.
“To do less will condemn the border to a continuing decline in living standards compared to the rest of the state, to increasing poverty and to ever-increasing dependency instead of economic independence,” the report concludes.
- Melinda Machado
Texas Latino Pop. to Vault
In 50 years, Texas Hispanics will account for39.3%ofthestate’sestimated30.2 million people, a significant increase from their current 22.7% of the population, a demographic study released recently said.
According to the study by the Population Reference Bureau, a non-profit educational organization in Washington, Anglos will represent 43.4% of Texans in 2035. They made up 63% of the state’s population last year.
Because of the youth of Texas^ Hispanic population, Latinos under 15 years of age will equal the number of Anglos in that category by 2035. Anglo children will lose their majority by the end of the century, said the study.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Reynoso Laments Politicized Court


Arturo Villar, guest columnist
Opening the Window
Three years ago, when I started looking at the Hispanic market in the United States for a possible magazine publishing project, I was told repeatedly that Hispanics did not read. My informants kept pointing at the relatively low circulation figures for quality Spanish-language newspapers in cities such as New York, Los Angeles and Miami.
A small group of colleagues and I kept looking and asking We found some English* language newspapers that had experimented with different ways to reach their Hispanic readers. This meant that there were a few newspaper marketing people at least who knew there were Hispanics who read.
We decided to pursue the possibility of reaching Hispanics with a newspaper magazine.
First, we had to raise money for the project For that we needed a market acceptance study to confirm our theory that Hispanics indeed do read.
A recognized market research company was retained. Its study (950 household interviews in 11 heavily Hispanic cities) showed that 51% read a newspaper nearly every day, 78% read a Sunday newspaper and 92% would read a publication like the one we hoped to create - Vista - if it were delivered by their favorite newspaper.
Additionally, the survey showed that 71% read English well or very well and that 58% preferred a magazine in English.
REACHED 12 OF 18 MARKETS
With a freshly produced prototype, we visited newspapers in the top 18 Hispanic markets in the country. Soon we had 12 newspapers under contract to deliver it to their Hispanic readers on the first weekend of every month.
On Sept 7,1985, we launched Vista Initial circulation was 427,000.
Eighteen months later - in February 1987 - Vista distributes 1,117,700 copies through 27 newspapers, a circulation verified by the Audit Bureau of Circulation, of which Vista is a member. Some newspapers - like the Chicago Sun-Times, The Denver Post, The Miami News and The Houston Post - distribute Vista selectively in areas of their circulation zone with high Hispanic concentration. Others distribute it in their full run.
This places it in the role of catalyst for a national Hispanic agenda What better way for Hispanics from different countries of origin and U.S. regions to get to know and understand each other than by reading about each other’s varied accomplishments, concerns and aspirations?
It is not easy to balance the editorial content of a national magazine and make it interesting to all readers. This has been our biggest challenge. We have succeeded because of our human interest focus, the quality of our writing and our evenhanded approach to sensitive issues.
REPORTERS SEE TRUE DIMENSION
Two other elements in Vista's success make us feel good. First, we are also reaching some non-Hispanics. Vista has become a window on Hispanic America for them. Second, the reporters and editorial writers of the papers that distribute Vista now have an opportunity to read about Hispanics in their true dimension. And they are the ones who cover and write about Hispanics as well as others in their communities.
We are very happy with our pioneering role in identifying and targeting an important segment of the Hispanic market We have helped establish a new category within the market the bilingual Hispanic who prefers to read in English. We have created a quality medium to serve these Hispanics and we have put together a distribution system to reach them efficiently and effectively.
This was our goal and, yes, we are proud to have proven that Hispanics do read.
(Arturo Villar is publisher of Vista, the Hispanic magazine.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Feb. 2,
Sin pelos en la lengua
GANG OF NINE: Philip Mbntez, Western regional director with the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, once wrote a column for Hispanic Link News Service in which he claimed that he could stand in a room with five Mexican Americans, one each from Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and California, and within moments be able to tell where each was from.
For starters, M6ntez,an educational psychologist, diagnosed:
“If one of the five opens the conversation with, ‘Well, so long as we have a quorum, let s elect a chairman,’ that one is probably from New Mexico.”
If the same individual nominates himself, he definitely is from New Mexico, Mdntez, a native Californian, concluded.
Does that give us a clue to explain the current craziness at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund?
Twq weeks ago, a New Mexico-led executive committee Gang of Nine decided to fire MALDEF President Antonia Hernandez without even consulting the 34-member board that hired her 18 months before.
It was their way of taking care of Toney Anaya, who had just left the New Mexico governor’s mansion with a public approval rating slightly lower than that of Oliver North. They wanted to give Hernandez’s job to Toney after sweetening it with a $30,000 raise and an extra office in Santa Fe.
They overlooked two things: 1) Their action was illegal, and 2) Hernandez, supported by MALDEFs staff, refused to be pushed aside.
MALDEFs lawyers quickly nullified a pronouncement by its board chair, Eric Serna, of the New Mexico Corporation Commission, that Anaya was taking over Feb. 1. They went to court and got an injunction.
In Los Angeles on Feb. 21, the full MALDEF board will meet and vote on Serna’s scheme. It promises to be close, but already there are two losers:
1) Toney Anaya. His willingness to participate in the shabby coup attempt did nothing to boost his rating.
2) MALDEF itself. The whole affair is bound to rub wrong with the organization’s much-needed present and potential funders.
REMEMBERING JOAQUIN: Meanwhile, Joaquin Avila, MALDEFs president between 1983-1985, was arguing a voting rights suit financed by MALDEF that could knock down political barriers for Latino voters in many California cities
He was challenging at-large city council elections in Watsonville, south of San Jose, contending that voters in the Monterey Bay area city were politically polarized.
The community is 50% Latino but has never elected one to its seven-member governing body. According to Los Angeles Times reporter Mark Stein, opposing counsel explained the phenomenon as caused in part by'Hhe high quality of local Anglo politicians.”
Stein’s article described Avila asMthe former leader of (MALDEFs) San Francisco chapter.”
High quality reporting, too. - Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
ANGEL CORDERO, jockey aboard favored Broad Brush, after photo-finish loss to 24-1 longshot Variety Road ridden by Laffit Pincay in the Jan. 18 San Fernando Handicap at California’s Santa Anita Race track, commenting on whip-burns on his right forearm inflicted by Pincay in the stretch drive:
“Now I know why horses run for ’Laffit"
CRUZ REYNOSO, who lost his-California Supreme Court reconfirmation election in November, to a Sacramento Bee reporter “A good judge is there to make many people unhappy. That's what judging is all about, not patting people on the back and making everybody happy."
1987
3


COLLECTING
VISTA MAGAZINE: For a sample copy of Vista magazine (see guest column), send $1 to cover postage and handling to Arturo Villar, Publisher, Horizon Communications Co., 2355 Salzedo St., Suite 301, Coral Gables, Fla. 33134.
Newspapers which carry Vista:
Arizona: Tucson Citizen, Phoenix Gazette; California: Los Angeles Herald Examiner, Stockton Record, Salinas Californian, Visalia Times-Delta, Long Beach Press Telegram, Oakland Tribune, Bakersfield Californian; Colorado: The Denver Post; Florida: Palm Beach Post, Miami News, Tampa Tribune; Illinois: Chicago Sun-Times; New Jersey: Union City Dispatch; NewMexico: Santa Fe New Mexican; Texas: San Antonio Express News, Houston Post, El Paso Times, Dallas Morning News, Corpus Christi Caller-Times, McAljen Monitor, Austin American Statesman, Harlingen Valley Morning Star, Brownsville Herald, Laredo Times and Waco Tribune Herald.
TEXAS BORDER COMMUNITIES: The Texas Border Economic Development Task Force has released an 85-page report which includes 16 recommendations on bettering the quality of life in the depressed area. For a free copy, write to: Eduardo Nunez, Texas Economic Development Commission, 415 E. Fifth St., P.O. Box 12728, Capitol Station, Austin, Texas 78711.
GRADUATE SCHOOL, ACADEMIC RESEARCH: The University of California, Santa Barbara, will begin its Summer Academic Research Institute this summer for minority undergrads looking for hands-on research with faculty and graduate students in science, engineering and other math-based fields. Preference will be given to California school students. A $1,000 stipend and academic credit will be given for the six-week session. For further information, write to: Office of Public Information, UCSB, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106 or call Kathryn Joyce at (805) 961-3798.
DECIPHERING CONGRESS: For an easy-to-read booklet on understanding legislative jargon and knowing the key players in Congress, try “The House and Senate Explained: A TV Viewer's Fingertip Guide.” For a copy, send $4.95, plus $1.50 for handling, to: The Streamside Co., Box 73, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. 10522-0073.
GAININGCOLLEGECREDIT: Most colleges and universities are willing to grant college credit for coursework or learning that takes place outside a college setting, according to a survey by the American Council on Education. Copies of the report, which contains data from more than 400 schools, are available for $8 by writing to: ACE, Division of Policy Analysis and Research, 1 Dupont Circle, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036-1193.
CONNECTING
LETRAS DE ORO PRIZES AWARDED
The Letras de Oro competition, created by American Express and the University of Miami to encourage literary production and reward creative excellence in Spanish, announced its first winners at a banquet attended by some 600 supporters in Miami Jan. 22.
It attracted 366 entries, from 37 states and Puerto Rico, in seven categories. General awards were endowed with $2,000 prizes; student awards, $500.
Winners, with their country of origin in parenthesis, were:
Novel, Guillermo Rosales, 40, Miami (Cuba); Student Novel, Alejandro Varderi, 26, Urbana, III. (Venezuela); Poetry, Andres Reynaldo, 34, Santurce, Puerto Rico (Cuba); Student Poetry, Noel Jardines, 30, Union City, N.J., (Cuba); Short story, HiberConteris,54, Madison, Wise. (Uruguay); Drama, Guillermo Schmidhuber, Cincinnati (Mexico); and Essay, Eduardo Neale-Silva, 80, Madison, Wise. (Chile).
Rosales, whose novel told the story of a Cuban exile’s effort to survive in Miami, left Cuba in 1979.
HISPANIC AGENCIESMERGE WITH MINGO-JONES
Codero & Associates, a Hispanic advertising agency, and Danetco Public Relations, have given controlling interest to J. Melvin Muse Inc., a subsidiary of Mingo-Jones Advertising in New York City. Muse, a Los Angeles-based marketing communications agency, is now the largest such company serving all U.S. minority markets, it claims.
Mavis Cordero is president of Cordero & Associates of Los Angeles, and Danetco is a newly-formed Los Angeles public relations company directed by Lisa Baca
Muse and Mingo-Jones clients include Pacific Bell, Miller Brewing Co., Kentucky Fried Chicken and Walt Disney Productions.
BARRETO, DEUKMEJIAN MEET
Hector Barreto, president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, was to meet with California Gov. George Deukmejian to discuss Hispanic business growth Jan. 30, following the release of the governor's latest Hispanic appointments.
Fifty-six Hispanics were appointed to boards, commissions, agencies and departments in 1986, bringing the total to 291.
A complete listing of Deukmejian’s appointments is available by writing to the Office of Community Relations, Governor’s Office, Sacramento, Calif. 95814 or by contacting Lynda Frost at (916) 445-1114.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
PENA RECEPTION/FUND-RAISER Washington, D.C. Feb. 3
Friends of Denver Mayor Federico Peha are sponsoring a reception and fund-raiser to benefit his re-election campaign this spring.
Hannah Hunt (202) 547-5000
CENTRAL-AMERICAN MIGRATION Seguin, Texas Feb. 5,6
Texas Lutheran College is hosting a symposium titled “Journey: Central American Migration,” which features Wayne Smith, former chief of the U.S. Interests Section in Havana, Cuba. The symposium will address U.S. immigration policies and Central Americans, the impact of migration on the United States and perspectives on the sanctuary movement Juan Rodriguez (512) 379-4161
CHICANO HEALTH COLLOQUIUM Stanford, Calif. Feb. 6
A presentation on “Chicano Health and Acculturation” will be part of the Stanford Chicano Graduate Students Association winter quarter colloquium on “Academia
â– 
in Aztlan: Raza Research at Stanford.”
Kathleen O’Toole (415) 725-1939
MINORITY JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES Los Angeles Feb. 6, 7
The California Chicano News Medi^Association is sponsoring the 8th annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities. It is the largest media job fair on the West Coast for minority professionals and students.
Lourdes Cbrdpva Martinez (213) 743-7158
COMING SOON
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER
University of Southern California Mexican American
Alumni Association
Los Angeles Feb. 12
USC Mexican American Programs Office (213)743-2456.
HISPANIC CAREER FAIR HJ.S. Department of Labor San Antonio Feb. 12,13 Elia R. Kerr (202) 523-§545
JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA Latin American Jewish Studies Association, University of Florida at Gainesville Gainesville, Fla Feb. 13-17
Feb. 2,1987
Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880
HISPANIC DRUG WORKSHOP Parents Association for Drug Rehabilitation and Educational Services Corpus Christi, Texas Feb.’14 Ronnie Rincon (512) 851-2133
HISPANICS IN SCIENCE Association of Puerto Ricans in Science and Engineering
Chicago Feb. 14
Eric Muftoz (718) 470-7212
HISPANIC HEALTH ISSUES APRSE
Chicago Feb. 17
Eric Muftoz (718) 470-7212
DROPOUT PREVENTION BANQUET
League of United Latin American Citizens, Northeast
Region
Washington, D.C. Feb. 19 Laura De Herrera (202) 628-9600
CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP
National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed
Officials
San Antonio Feb. 19,20 Kqlly Parks (202) 546-2536
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR National Civil Rights Organization seeks person to direct and implement MALDEPs national media strategy and produce publications, such as the Annual Report and newsletter. Requires extensive contact with the press and public relations firms working with funders Requirements BA/MA in English/journalism or communications Proficient in English/Spanish (written and spoken). Excellent writing and radio/TV skills experience in publicity work and producing publications. Send resume with references to: Ms A. Hernandez, MALDEF.634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014. By 2/17/87.
CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER
$25,000 - $35,000 Ann. #33117BDMF
Arlington County has a great opportunity for a person knowledgeable in technical & engineering related construction work Position is responsible for direct coordination and onsite supervision of all major renovation & construction of County facilities with project costs ranging from $100,000 to $25 million. Employee is responsible for ensuring that contractors meet all contract specifications, applicable codes and site plan details.
Qualifications are high school diploma with 4 years experience in construction engineering. Preference will be given to applicants with an additional 2 years in construction contract management or construction project management (6 years total). Applicants with associate’s or bachelor's degree will be credited for u p to 2 years experience.
Completed Official Arlington County Application Form must be received by closing date of Feb. 12,1987, by 5 p.m. To request application materials please call (703) 558-2167 or TTY (703) 558-2028 (hearing impaired only). Contact Clarence McGill at(703) 558-2167 for further information.
Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th St.
Arlington, Va 22201 EOE
YELLOW PAGES
I am compiling a list of cities and comm unities in which Hispanic “Yellow Pages^’ are published. If you publish a directory or know of one published in your community, please let me know so that my coverage will be as complete as possible.
Hispanic Link’s news service and Weekly Report will carry an article and listing. Thanks for your help.
Contact Reporter Mike Orenstein, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Telephone: (202) 234-0737.
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE
New employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, serving the East Coast South and Midwest Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish. Contact Lucienne Loman
National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228
DEAN OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES DEAN OF NATURAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Lehman College of The City University of New York is seeking two outstanding scholars to serve as Dean of the Division of Arts and H umanities and Dean of the Division of Natural and Social Sciences.
The Division of Arts and Humanities consists of the following academic departments: Academic Skills; Art Black Studies; Classical, Oriental, Germanic, and Slavic Languages; English; History; Music; Philosophy, Puerto Rican Studies; Romance Languages; and Speech and Theatre. These departments employ approximately 150 tenure-track and tenured faculty and 95 adjunct faculty members.
The Division of Natural and Social Sciences consists of the following academic departments: Anthropology; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Economics and Accounting Geology and Geography; Mathematics and Computer Science; Physics and Astronomy; Political Science; Psychology; and Sociology and Social Work These departments employ approximately 130 tenure-track and tenured faculty and 70 adjunct faculty members.
Lehman College, a senior col lege of The City University, enrol Is 9,400 undergraduate and graduate students in its three divisions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Social Sciences, and Professional Studies, which includes Education, Health Services and Nursing. Located in the northwest Bronx, the College attracts students from the five boroughs of New York and from WestchesterCountyto its beautiful 37-acre campus of Gothic towers and modern structures, including an art building designed by Marcel Breuer and the Lehman Center for the Performing Arts.
Candidates should have the following qualifications: an earned doctorate; a national reputation for scholarship and research; successful experience in university teaching; and evidence of the ability to offer educational and administrative leadership in a liberal arts college.
The salary range fora Dean in the Executive Compensation Plan of CUN Y is$70,669— $78,629. Excellent fringe benefits package. The appointment will begin no later than Sept. 1,1987.
Nominations and applications, including a complete curriculum vitae, and the names of five references, should be submitted by March 15 to: Melvyn B. Nathanson, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lehman College, Bedford Park Blvd. West, Bronx, N.Y. 10468.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
LEHMAN
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY PROGRAM DIRECTOR
FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1987-88 DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research* and the Social Science Research Council announce three fellowship competitions.
• Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the centers of the I UP or with the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. One year stipend of $22,500. Deadline: March 15, 1987.
• Summer Workshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Transportation and living expenses for four-week program. Deadline: April 24,1987.
• Latino Graduate Student Training Seminar at Stanford University. Transportation and living expenses for two-week summer program. Deadline: March 15,1987.
For more information contact IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, SSB 4.120, Austin, TX 78712 (512) 471-1817.
*The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquehos, Hunter College; Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas: Chicano Studies Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles; and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research.
Two positions with KUVO, Denver's bilingual public radio station. One fundraising; one programming. Seek experienced candidates Salary $16,000-$24,000 depending on qualifications Apply by April 1, contact Florence Hern6ndez-Ramos, KUVO, P.O. Box 11111, Denver, Colo. 80211. (303) 934-5880.
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats El Barrio Graphics 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202) 483-1140.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classif ied ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ES7) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35percolumn inch.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
CONTINUING THIS WEEK: A new series about U.S. Hispanics produced for public television stations continues this week with the airing of a documentary about a handicapped painter from San Antonio.
Jesse Trevino: A Spirit Against All Odds, narrated by Martin Sheen, debuts on Vistas Feb. 6 on Los Angeles’ KCET(dates for other PBS stations may vary). The film profiles Trevino, an artist who lost his “painting hand” during the Vietnam War.
The documentary is produced and written by Skip Cilley; Joseph Kramer and Mike Stroot are the executive producers. It is a Busch Creative Services Corp. project in association with Sheen/Greenblatt Productions.
Produced by the Latino Consortium at KCET, Vistas replaces the group’s series Presente. Coordinated by executive producer Mark Carreno, the series includes productions from participating public television stations as well as acquisitions from independent producers.
Actress Rita Moreno is the hostess for Vistas, which premiered last month with the film Graffiti. It was produced by Dianne Costello and directed by Matthew Patrick. E.J. Castillo, Ivy Broya star in the film, based on a story by Julio Cortazar, which was an Oscar nominee in 1985.
Some 54 PBS stations around the country are members of the Latino Consortium, and they have the option of airing V7sfas(check local listings). Other titles scheduled for this year are the documentary Maria Lionza, the docudrama Federico Garcia Lorca in New York and a Latin Jazz Special.
Also continuing this week is the First Latin American Writers Conference in New York, with two panels at the Ollantay Center for the Arts.
Both panels will be held Feb. 7. Publishing Opportunities begins the day with panelists Hugo Hanriot, Lee Goerner and Rosario Santos. Following will be Where Are We Going?, with Dolores Prida, Aida Gonzalez and Manuel Ramos Otero. Conference coordinator Laureano Corces will moderate both panels.
ONE LINERS: En Foco, a community visual arts agency in the Bronx, is screening portfolios and reviewing photographers for its Emerging Artists Program. Participants could have works exhibited in museums, galleries and alternate spaces.. Miguel Ferrer (Jose’s son) and Castulo Guerra have finished Houston Knights, a Columbia Pictures television production for CBS that is yet unscheduled... New York-based Maravilla Productions has taped two episodes of the one-hour syndicated series Geraldo Live. Geraldo Rivera hosts the talk show, produced in association with Tribune Entertainment, being offered to programmers for the fall...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
GERALDO’S RETORT: News personality Geraldo Rivera isn’t saying much about the new marijuana arrest near Houston of Terry Rouse, who hit him with a$30 million libel suit following her on-camera bust during Geraldo’s televised special on drugs.
“Innocent until proven guilty,” he commented.
But he did offer this aside about his critics in the media
“All things considered, I would have preferred it if (the police) had arrested some well-known television and newspaper critics who blasted our program before they knew the facts.”
HARK THE HERALD: The Miami Herald isn’t impressed by U.S. Education Secretary William Bennett’s persistence in reintroducing legislation to give local school districts full
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Reporting Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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autonomy to spend federal bilingual education dollars for whatever programs they wish.
“Bennett never knows when to quit,” it editorialized Jan. 20, adding:
“Secretary Bennett’s intransigence (on alternatives to transitional bilingual ed programs) is solid evidence that he is less interested in the pedagogic argument than he is in gutting bilingual education programs. If he were sincere in his motives, Mr. Bennett would wait until the test programs put into effect in 1984 produce tangible evidence. Then Congress would have solid data on which to base any change of direction.” BYRNE BURNED: Waves created by Jane Byrne’s inference that Puerto Ricans aren’t U.S. citizens have reached Washington.
Bryne, seeking to recapture Chicago’s City Hall from Mayor Harold Washington in April, made the comment last month that “We have many, many aliens that came to Chicago - who for reasons of their own, up
until probably amnesty got passed - are not counted (in the U.S. Census). We have influxes of many, many Cambodians* Laotians, Koreans* Puerto Ricans, Hispanics, and the true count will probably not really come out again till the next census is taken because so many people were so concerned about being returned to their country.”
Byrne at first denied making the comment, but after a broadcast journalist played it back to her, she accepted that she had.
Her comment drew this rebuke from Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus:
“Ms. Bryne’s disparaging remarks about Hispanics and Puerto Ricans does little more than add to the nativist and xenophobic attitudes about ethnic Americans and recent immigrants to our country... All Hispanics are not aliens and Puerto Ricans have been U.S. citizens since 1917.”
- Charlie Ericksen
l§g
67
Ever since he made the cover of National Geographic, there’s been no talking to him.
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week U .S. Attorney General Edwin Meese claims that as many as half the people accused of selling cocaine in Southern California counties are undocumented aliens... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo awards the New York state Martin Luther King Freedom Medal to state Supreme Court Judge John Carro. Carro, who sits on the Appellate Division, was recognized for his work in the area of human rights, nonviolent social change and economic development. .. Federal District Judge Kenneth Ryskampsays a change of venue may be necessary for the second racketeering and drug trial of seven Latino ex policemen in Miami accused of operating a multi-million dollar drug ring. A mistrial was declared after jurors failed to agree on a verdict for five defendants and, after guilty verdicts were announced on two others, one juror switched his vote. . . AI Rodriguez, recently J'tj t,; h' appointed head of the Arizona State Liquor Department, under il)ltestigation for the ambush death of a in Douglas, Ariz. Rodriguez was a policeman ih the man was slain. . . Roman Catholic Archbishop Roger Mahony of Los Angeles is appointed to the new 12-member federal Co"mmission on ,o\gricultural Workers provided under the immigration act. . . Dr. Carlos Godinez resigns as the head of the Texas state Board of Medical Examiners. The body is under siege for alleged delays in the disciplining of doctors accused of malpractice and negligence.:. The Houston-area woman, Terry Rouse, who filed a $30 million libel lawsuit last month against TV reporter Geraldo Rivera after her arrest during a nationally televised drug raid, is arrested for selling marijuana ... Police arrest the second Anglo youth, Arthur Biazzo, in connection with the racially motivated beatings of two Hispanic youths two hours before and less than two miles from a similar assault at Howard Beach, N .Y., that resulted in the death of a black man . . . Vol. 5 No.5 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REP Feb. 2, 1987 Texas Border Assistance Asked Offered In Conn., Anz. * Legislation to alleviate high unemployment Force. Arizona and Connecticut have introduced and poverty faced by Hispanics along Texas ' Compared to Latinos in border cities such bills to make English their official language . 1,250-mile border with Mexico was introduced as Las Cruces, N.M., San Diego and Tucson, A Connecticut legislative proposal will re-in January in response to a report from the Ariz., residents in the heavily Mexican-quire all state documents to be printed in state's Border Economic Development Task American cities and towns from the Gulf of English and will end bilingual ed!Jcation, an Mexico and Brownsville on the east to El aide to state Senator Thomas Scott, the bill ' s Cal if. Shuts Restaurants Paso on the west face the lowest per-capita author, said Jan. 23. Under the proposal, incomes in the United States. Five restaurants in the popular California nonEnglish speaking students would attend "Red Onion" chain will be closed down for Laredo, which is 92% Hispanic, is the a three-year English immersion program after bottom-ranked U.S. metropolitan area in terms which they would be mainstreamed. five to 10 days each in May for violating state of per-capita personal income, according to anti-discrimination laws . It is the first time a In Arizona, both a constitutional amendment restaurant has been closed in California as a the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Out and bill are under consideration. The amendresult of discrimination charges. of the 316 statistical areas, McAllen and ment must receive voter approval. The proBrownsville rank 315 and 314, Las Cruces posals leave bilingual,education intact. Both The chain reached an agreement with the ranks 312 and El Paso 311. state Department of Alcoholic Beverage proposals require "every document of the Control last week following numerous comstate, city and country (to be) printed in plaints from blacks, Latinos and Middle East English," Arizona Senate Judiciary Committee erners that they were kept from entering its Chairman Peter Kay (A-Phoenix) said. restaurants because they ostensibly did not The state will continue to use bilingual comply with dress codes or did not look like ballots as required by federal law, he said. the pictures on their driver's licenses. Spanish-speaking neighborhoods create Th ff t d t t s t A e a ec e res auran s are tn an a na, Spanish-only economics, hurting job prospects Riverside, Palm Desert, Lakewood and Fullerton for English speakers, he said . In contrast, San Diego which is only 15% Hispanic, ranks 67 and Tucson, with a 21% Hispanic population, ranks 188. Companion bills filed by Sen . Hector Uribe ([)-Brownsville) and Rep . Alex Moreno ([) Edinburg) propose the creation of a Border Development Commission for the 16-county continued on page 2 "Most of our Democratic Caucus is opposed' to the proposals, assistant Senate minority leader Lela Alsted(D-Phoenix) said . Contracts Chief Quits, Raps Meese 'Panic' Spurs N.Y. Firings In response to several complaints that em ployers are dismissing employees because of their lack of understanding of the federal immigration act, the chair of New York state's newly created immigration task force an nounced Jan. 23 that the body has started warning employers that such actions are illegal. Chairman Cesar Perales, also New York Commissioner of Social Services, said em ployers were being informed that undocumented workers hired before the act was signed i nto law may continue working without the pos sibility of a penalty to the employer . "The federal government has been derelict in not fully explaining people's rights under the new law , and a great many employers are panicking," said Perales . The U.S. Labor Department official whose job it is to ensure federal contractors comply with hiring goals for Hispanics, blacks , other minorities and women said Jan. 21 that he resigned due to the efforts of certain Reagan administration officials to render anti-dis crimination laws ineffective. Joseph Cooper, director of the Labor Departmenfs Office of Federal Contract Compliance for the past 17 months, charged "these vocal dissenters promote the idea that goals and timetables are quotas and that reverse discrimination is a reality ... that affirmative action has done too much, gone too far, become too powerful." Cooper said that Attorney General Edwin Meese and Assistant Attorney Genera l for Civil Rights Bradford Reynolds were two of the officials attempting to abolish or stymie the numerical hiring goals set for firms with federal contracts. The rules calling for the goals, contained in an executive order signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965, are currently being studied by Reagan to de termine whether they should be eliminated or revised . The hiring goals apply to more than 20,000 contractors with 23 million workers at 70,000 sites . A spokesman for the House Education and Labor Committee said the committee was releasing a report next month which would lend credence to many of Cooper's allegations. Cooper said that certain administration officials "did not understand what this program is all about, and they looked at it from a perspective of race and that there is a move to do too much for blacks or minorities or handicapped ... " Cooper, who is a bla ck, is a lif e-long Republican.

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New At Large Actions Hinge on Calif. Verdict At-large city council elections in Watsonville, Calif., are unfair to Latinos because the city is racially polarized, a suit funded by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has charged. Watsonville, south of San Jose, is more than 50% Hispanic but its voters have never elected a Latino to its seven-member governing body, former MALDEF president Joaquin Avila charged in a Jan. 20-26 trial in San Jose's U.S. District Court. Judge William Ingram's decision is imminent. Ninety-four percent of California's 445 in corporated cities elect their councils by the at-large method MALDEF spokespersons say that if the Watsonville suit is successful, it will consider actions soon in several other cities, including Sacramento and Stockton. Plaintiff Waldo Rodriguez, a paralegal and former farm worker represented by Avila, asked the court to create seven election districts, including two with overwhelmingly Hispanic constituencies. The case hinges on whether the at-large system promotes racially polarized voting . that denies minority representation, a Voting Rights Act violation. Rolando Rios, litigation director for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Pro ject in San Antonio, Texas, and a co-counsel in the suit, said that based on a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last summer, plaintiffs may legally challenge at-large elections without having to prove intentional discrimination. CABE Lambastes Bilingual Ed. Bill The California state legislator who chaired the campaign to make English the official language in that state said that he planned to introduced a bill late last week that would do away with teaching nonand limited-English speaking children in their native language. Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) introduced legislation in December that would extend the bilingual education law until 1992. It included several changes to placate the law's critics. Speigei-Coleman said CABE was in favor of Brown ' s version . Hill said he would consider it a victory if neither bill received sufficient votes to pass. More important, he said, was that the current law expire. Assemblyman Frank Hill (A-Whittier) said, as an alternative to placing . the students in a classroom where instruction is in the native language, the students would learn English more quickly if they were placed in Englishonly classes and were given the help of Texas Border Aid Sought bilingual aides. continued from page 1 "I reject the concept of native-language region adjacent to the Rio Grande . instruction," Hill said. "We want to give the "It proposes to stimulate development, flexibility to school districts to determine how improve the quality of life and employment they can assimilate students ... " opportunities, and maximize the potential of Shelley Speigei-Coleman, the president of the region as an asset versus a liability," said the California Association for Bilingual EduArmando Diaz, legislative aide to Uribe. cation, told Weekly Report that HiWs proposal According to the 23-member task force's would "dismantle" the state's bilingual edureport, 1ssued. Jan. 13, the ?order cation program. "Hill does not offer the school costs Texas much as 1t generates m districts any guidelines, and what will happen .. 1ncome . . To the area, the task force is that the districts will base their decisions emphasized Improvements and development on the availability of money, not the quality of in e . ducation, and water quality, and instruction," said Speigei-Coleman . busmess assistance. There are currently about 525,000 students w1th creatmg a Border Development enrolled in bilingual programs throughout Comm1ss1on, the task force recommends the state. one staff member concentrate on border Gov. George Deukmejian vetoed legislation opportunities. Other relast year that would have extended the bilingual commendations call for. education program past its expiration date of • the Legislature to mandate a state June 1987. It will take two-thirds of the Legisfund targeted to small businesses lature to pass an emergency extension this m economically distressed session . • degree programs and disciplines at in-Reynoso Laments Politicized Court stitutes of higher education along the border area to be extended and area representatives included among appointments to the Texas College and University System Coordinating Board . Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, in his first interview since being defeated at the polls in November, criticized the politicization of the court and said he would not accept if offered a reap pointment. In an interview with The Sacramento Bee published Jan. 16, Reynoso said: "I never joined the judiciary to be a politician." He blamed Gov . George Deukmejian for degrading the court by attacking it along partisan lines. "He (Deukmejian) started that as attorney general I believe (there was) a determination on his part that the attacks on the judiciary were good for him politically." Reynoso, 55, recently joined a private law firm and relishes his being able to air his views publicly now. "I'm giving up one title, .'justice,' for another title, 'citizen' " The former justice, however, lamented the future of the Gonzalez Files in Dallas Dallas City Council candidate AI Gonzalez opened his campaign headquarters Jan. 19 after filing for the Place 10 position Jan . 6. Gonzalez, owner of GulfTex Construction Company, faces two non-Hispanic opponents for the post and described himself as the "consensus" candidate in the April 4 race. Currently there are no Hispanics on the 11-member city council in Dallas, which has a Latino population of about 15%. 2 Supreme Court. "I just can't help but continue to have this sense of emptiness . Our duty as citizens continues. Nonetheless, I think we've lost something precious." Alvarado Seeks Ed. Post Anthony Alvarado, former New York City Schools Chancellor, announced Jan. 26 that he submitted an application for super intendent at a Manhattan school district. Alvarado, 44, who resigned as head of the nation's largest school system in 1984 after one year on the job, is looking to return to public education as superintendent of Com munity School Board 3. According to officials on the city's Board of Education, he is the front-runner . The position pays $83,000 a year, Alvarado waspeing paid$95,000 a year when he quit the chancellorship. He now heads an adult literacy and education program for several unions. Alvarado resigned as chancellor after it was uncovered he had accepted more than $80,000 in loans from subordinates, had thousands of dollars in outstanding parking fines and used employees to perform per sonal errands. He was not prosecuted and paid $569 in • the U.S. Census Bureau to consolidate the Brownsville-Harlingen and the McAllen Edinburg-Mission metropolitan statistical areas into one Lower Rio Grande Valley metropolitan area for statistical purposes to help attract businesses. "To do less will condemn the border to a continuing decline in living standards corn pared to the rest of the state, to increasing poverty and to ever-increasing dependency instead of economic independence," the report concludes. Melinda Machado Texas Latino Pop. to Vault In 50 years, Texas Hispanics will account for 39.3o/o of the state's estimated 30.2 million people, a significant increase from their current 22.7o/o of the population, a demographic study released recently said . According to the study by the Population Reference Bureau, a non-profit educational organization in Wash!ngton, Anglos will re present43.4o/o of Texans in 2035. They made up 63o/o of the state's population last year . Because of the youth of Texas' Hispanic population , Latinos under 15 years of age will equal the number of Anglos in that category by ?035. Anglo children will lose their majority by the end of the century, said the study. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Arturo Villar, guest columnist Opening the Window Three years ago, when I started looking at the Hispamc market in the United States for a possible magazine publishing project, I was told repeatedly that Hispanics did not read. My informants kept pointing at the relatively low circulation figures for quality Spanish-language newspapers in cities such as New York, Los Angeles and Miami. A small group of colleagues and I kept looking and asking . We found some English language newspapers that had experimented with different ways to reach their Hispanic readers . This meant that there were a few newspaper marketing people at least who knew there were Hispanics who read . We decided to pursue the possibility of reaching Hispanics with a newspaper magazine. First, we had to raise money for the project For that we needed a market acceptance study to confirm our theory that Hispanics indeed do read. A recognized market research company was retained . Its study (950 household interviews in 11 heavily Hispanic cities) showed that 51% read a newspaper nearly every day , 78% read a Sunday newspaper and 92% would read a publication like the o . ne we hoped to create-Vista-if it were delivered by their favorite newspaper . Additionally, the survey showed that 71% read English well or very well and that 58% preferred a magazine in English . REACHED 12 OF 18 MARKETS With a freshly produced prototype, we visited newspapers in the top 18 Hispanic markets in the country . Soon we had 12 newspapers under contract to deliver it to their Hispanic readers on the first weekend of every month . On Sept 7 , 1985, we launched Vista Initial circulation was427,000 . . Eighteen months later in February 1987 -Vista distributes 1,117,700 copies through 27 newspapers , a circulation verified by the Audit Bureau of Circulation, of which Vista is a member. Some newspapers like the Chicago SunTimes, The Denver Post , The Miami News and The Houston Postdistribute Vista selectively in areas of their circulation zone with high Hispanic concentration . Others c;listri bute it in their full run . This places it in the role of catalyst for a national Hispanic agenda What better way for Hispanics from different countries of origin and U .S. regions to get to know and understand each other than by reading about each other's varied accomplishments, concerns and aspirations? It is not easy to balance the editorial content of a national magazine and make it interesting to all readers. This has been our biggest challenge. We have succeeded because of our human interest focus, the quality of our writing and our evenhanded approach to sensitive issues. REPORTERS SEE TRUE DIMENSION Two other elements in Vista's success make us feel good . First, we are also reaching some nonHispanics. Vista has become a window on Hispanic America for them. Second, the reporters and editorial writers of the papers that distribute Vista now have an opportunity to ' read about His panics in their true dimension . And they are the ones who cover and write about Hispanics as well as others in their communities . We are very , happy with our pioneering role in identifying and targeting an important segment of the Hispanic market. We have helped establish a new category within the market the bilingual Hispanic who _ prefers to read in English. We have created a quality medium to serve these Hispanics and we have put together a distribution system to reach them efficiently and effectively . This was our goal and, yes, we are proud to have proven that Hispanics do read. (Arturo Villar is publisher of Vista. the Hispanic magazine.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua GANG OF NINE: Philip M6ntez, Western regional director with the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights , once wrote a column for Hispanic Link News Service in which he claimed that he could stand in a room with five Mexican Americans , one each from Texas, Arizona, New Mexico , Colorado and California, and within moments be able to tell where each was from . For starters, M6ntez, an educational psychologist, diagnosed : "If one of the five opens the conversation with, 'Well, so ' long as we have a quorum , lef select a chairman,' that one is probably from New Mexico . " If the same individual nominates himself , he de finitely is from New Mexico, M6ntez, a native Californian, conch:Jded . Does that give us a clue to explain the cur.re ntcr-a ziness at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund? Twoweeks ago, a New Mexico-led executive Gang of Nine decided to fire MALDEF Pres i dent Antoni a -Hernandez without even consulting the 34-member board that,nired her 18 months before . It was their way of taking of Toney Anaya, who had just left the New Mexico governor's mansion with a .public approval rating slightly lower than that of Oliver North. They wanted to give Hernandez's job to Toney after sweetening it with a $30,000 raise and an extra office in Santa Fe . They overlooked two things : 1) Their action was illegal , and 2) Hernandez, supported by MALDEPs staff , refused to be pushed aside . MALDEPs lawyers quickly nullified a pronouncement by its board chair , Eric Serna, of the New Mexico Corporation Commission, that Anaya was taking over Feb . 1 . They went to court and got an injunction. In Los Angeles on Feb . 21, the full MALDEF board will meet and vote on Serna ' s scheme . It promises to be close, but already there are two losers: 1) Toney Anaya. His willingness to participate in the shabby coup attempt did nothing to boost his rating . 2) MALDEF itself . The whole affair is bound to rub wrong with the organization ' s much-needed present and potential funders . REMEMBERING JOAQUIN: Meanwhile, Joaquin Avila, MALDEPs president between 1983-1985, was arguing a voting : rights suit financed by MALDEF .that could knock down political barriers for Latino voters in many California cities. He was challenging at-large city council elect i ons in Watsonville, south . of San Jose, contending that voters in the Monterey Bay area city were polit i cally polarized . The community is 50% Latino but has never elected one to its seven-member governing body . According to Los Angeles Times reporter Mark Stein, opposing counsel explained the phenomenon as caused in part by " -the high quality of Anglo politicians." Stein's article described Avila as " the former leaderof(MALDEPs) San Francisco chapter . " High quality reporting , too . -Kay Barbaro • • ANGEL CORDERO, jockey aboard favored Broad Brush, after photo-finish loss to 24-1 longshot Variety Road ridden by Laffit Pincay in the Jan. 18 San Fernando Handicap at. California ' s Santa Anita Race track, commenting on whil)"burns on his right forearm inflicted by Pincay in the stretch drive: " Now I know why horses run for Laffit . " CRUZ REYNOSO, who lost his . california Supreme Court recon firmation election in November, to a Sacramento Bee reporter. " A good judge is there to make many people unhappy . That's what judging is all about not patting people on the back and making everybody happy." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Feb. 2, 1987 3

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COLLECTING VISTA MAGAZINE: For a sample copy of Vista magazine (see guest column) , send $1 to cover postage and handling to Arturo Villar, Publisher, Honzon Communications Co., 2355 Salzedo St. , Suite 301 , Coral Gables, Fla . 33134. Newspapers which carry Vista : Arizona: Tuc son Citizen , Phoeni x Gazette; California: Los Angeles Herald E x amm e r , Stockton Record , Salinas Californ i an , Visali a Times-Delta, Long Beach Press Telegram, Oakland Tribune , Bakersfield Californian; Colorado: The Denver Post; Florida: Palm Beach Post, Miami News, Tampa Tribune; Illinois: Ch1cago Sun-T1mes; New Jersey: Union City Dispatch ; New Mexico: San t a Fe New Mexi can ; Texas: San Antonio E x press News, Houston Post, El Paso T1mes, Dallas Morning News, Corpus Christi Caller-Times , McAI)en Monitor, Austin Amencan Statesman, Harlingen Valley Morning Star , Brownsville Herald , Laredo T1mes and Waco Tribune Herald . TEXAS BORDER COMMUNITIES: The Texas Border Economic Development Task Force has released an 85-page report which mcludes 16 recommendations on bettering the quality of life in the depressed area . For a free copy, write to: Eduardo Nunez , Texas Economic Deve 'lopment Commission, 415 E. Fifth St., P .O. Box 12728, Capitol Station, Austin, Texas 78711. GRADUATE SCHOOL, ACADEMIC RESEARCH: The University of California, Santa Barbara, will begin its Summer Academic Research Institute this summer for minority undergrads looking for hands on research with faculty and graduate students in science, engineering and other math-based fields . Preference will be given to California school students. A$1 ,000 stipend and academic credit will be given for the s ix-week session . For further information , write to: Office of Public Information , UCSB , Santa Barbara , Calif . 93106 or call Kathryn Joyce at (805) 961-3798. DECI PHERIN G CONGRESS: For an easy-to-read booklet on underst anding leg i slative jargon and knowing the key players in Congress , try " The House and Senate E x plained: A TV Viewer's Fingertip Guide." For a copy, send $ 4 .95, plus $1.50 for handling , to : The Streamside Co. , Box 73, Dobbs Ferry , N . Y . 10522-0073. GAINING COLLEGE CREDIT: Most colleges and universities a re willing to grant college credit for coursework or learning that takes p l ace outside a college setting, according to a survey by the American Council on Education . Copies of the report, which contai ns data from more than 400 schools, are ava i lable for $8 by writing to: ACE , Division of Policy Analysis and Research, 1 Dupont Circle, Suite 800, Washington, D .C. 20036-1193. CONNECTING LETRAS DE ORO PRIZES AWARDED The Letras de Oro competition, created by American Express and the University of Miami to encourage literary producti on and reward creative excellence in Spanish, announced its first winners at a banquet attended by some 600 supporters in Miami Jan . 22 . It attracted 366 entries, from 37 states and Puerto Rico, in seven categories. General awa r ds were endowed with $2,000 prizes; student awards , .$500. Winners , with their country of origin in parenthesis, were : Novel,. Guillermo Rosales, 40, . Miami (Cuba) ; Student Novel, Alejandro Varderi , 26, Urbana, Ill . (Venezuela) ; Poetry , Andres Reynaldo , 34, Santurce, Puerto Rico (Cuba) ; Student Poetry, Noel Jardines, 30, Union City, N .J., (Cuba) ; Short story, Hiber Conteris, 54, Madison, Wise . (UruguaY) ; Drama, Guillermo Schmid huber , Cincinnati (Mexico) ; and Essay, Eduardo Neale-Silva, 80, Madison , Wise. (Chile). Rosales, whose novel told the story of a Cuban exile ' s effort to survive in M i ami, left Cuba in 1979. HISPANIC AGENCIES MERGE WITH MINGC>-JONE S Codero & Associates , a Hispanic advertising agency, and Danetco Public Relations , have given controlling interest to J . Melvin Muse Inc., a subsidiary of M i ngo-Jones Advertising in New York City. Muse, a Los Angeles-based marketing communications agency, is now the largest such company serving all U . S . minority markets, it claims . Mavis Cordero is president of Cordero& Associates of Los Angeles , and Danetco is a newly-formed Los Angeles public relations company directed by Lisa Baca . Muse and Mingo-Jones clients include Pacific Bell, Miller Brewing Co . , Kentucky Fried Chicken and Walt Disney Productions . BARRETO, DEUKMEJIAN MEE T Hector Bar r eto , president of the U.S. Hispanic Chambe r o f Com m erc e , was to meet with California Gov . George Deukme j ian to d i scu ss Hispanic business growth Jan. 30, following the release of t he governor's latest H i spanic appointments. Fifty-six Hispanics were appointed t o boards , commissions , agencies and departments in 1986, bringing the total to 291. A complete listing of Deukmejian ' s appointments i s available by writing to the . Office of Community Relations , Governor's Office, Sacramento , Calif. 95814 or by contacting Lynda Frost at (91 6) 445-1114. Calendar in Aztlan : Raza Research'at Stanford. " Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880 THIS WEEK PENA RECEPTION/FUND-RAISER Washington , D .C. Feb . 3 Friends of Denver Mayor Federico Pena are sponsor i ng a reception and fund-raiser to benefit his reelection campaign 'this spring. Hannah Hunt (202) 547-5000 CENTRAL-AMERICAN MIGRATION Seguin, Texas Feb . 5 , 6 Texas Lutheran C<;>llege is hosting a symposium titled " Journey: Central Amer i can Migration," which features Wayne Smith , former chief of the U . S . Interests Sec"tion in Havana , Cuba. The symposium will address U . S . immig ' ratio . n policies and Central Americans, the impact of migration on the United States and perspectives on the sanctuary movement Juan Rodriguez (512) 379-4161 CHICANO HEALTH COLLOQUIUM Stanford, Calif. Feb . 6 A presentation on " Chicano Health and Acculturation " will be part of the Stanford Chicano Graduate Students Association winter quarter colloquium on "Academia 4 Kathleen O'Toole(415) 725-1939 MINORITY JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES Los Angeles Feb . 6, 7 The California Chicano News Medi a' Association is sponsoring the 8th annual Opportunities Conference for Minorities . It i s the largest media job fair on the West Coast for minority professionals and s tudents. C6rd . ova Ma . rtinez (213) 743-7158 COMING SOON SCHOLARSHIP DINNER University of Southern California Mexican American Alumni Association Los Angeles Feb. 12 USC Mexican America n Programs Office(213) 7 43HISPANIC CAREER FAIR us. Department of Labor San Antonio Feb . 12 , 13 Elia R. Kerr (202) JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA Latin American Jewish Studies Association , Uni versity of Flo . rida at Gainesville Gainesville, Fla. Feb. 13-17 Feb . 2,1987 HISPANIC DRUG WORKSHOP Parents Association for Drug Rehabilitation and Educational Services Corpus C h risti, Texas Feb."14 Ronnie Rincon (512) 851-2133 HISPANICS IN SCIENCE Assoc i ation of Puerto Ricans in Science and neering Chicago Feb . 14 Eric Munoz (718) 470-7212 HISPANIC HEALTH ISSUES APRSE Chicago Feb . 17 E r ic Munoz (718) 470-7212 DROPOUT PREVENTION BANQUET League of United Latin American Citizens, Northeast Region Washington , D .C. Feb. 19 Laura De Herrera (202) 628-9600 CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP Nat i onal Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Off icials San Antonio Feb . 19, 20 Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR National Civil Rights Organization seeks person to direct and implement MALDEPs national media strategy and produce publ ications, such as the Annual Report and newsletter. Requires extensive contact with the press and public relations firms working with funders Requirements: BNMA in English/journalism or communications. Proficient in English/Spanish (written and spoken) . E x cellent writing and radio/TV skills, experience in publicity work and producing publications. Send resume with references to: Ms. A. Her m1ndez , MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th Floor , Los Angeles , Calif . 90014. By 2/17/87. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER $25,000-$35,000 Ann. #33117BDMF Arlington County has a great opportunity for a person knowledgeable in technical & engineering related c onstruction work. Position is responsible for direct coordination and on site supervision of all major renovation & construction of County facilities with project costs ranging from $100,000 to$25 million. Employee i s responsible for ensuring that c ontractors meet all contract specifications , a pplicable codes and site plan details. Qualifications are high school diploma with 4 years ex perience in construction engineering. Pr e f e r e nce will be given to applicants with an additional 2 years i n construction contract management or construction project manage ment(6 years totaQ. Applicants with associate ' s or bachelor's degree will becreditedforupto 2 years e x perio;mce. Completed Official Arlington County Appli :ation Form must be received by closing date of Feb. 12 , 1987, by 5 p .m. To request application materials please call (703) 558 2167 or TTY (703) 558 (hearing impaired only) . Contact Clarence McGill at(703) 558 2167 for further information. Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 N .Mth St. Arlington, Va 22201 EOE YELLOW PAGES I am compiling a listofcitiesandcommunities in which Hispanic " Yellow Pages'' are published . If you publish a directory or know of one published in your community, please let me know so that my coverage will be as complete as possible . Hispan i c Link ' s news service and Weekly Report will carry an article and listing. Thanks for your help. Contact: Reporter Mike Orenstein, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005. Telephone: (202) 234. NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE New e mployment referral service for H i spanic prof e s s ionals and students in the media, serving the Eas t South and Midwest Opportunities f o r int ernshiPS entry-level and advanced positions i n n e w s p a pers, magazines, television , radio and o th e r media, Eng lish o r Spanish . Contact Lucienne Loman N a t io nal A s sociation of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783 Hi s p a n ic Link W eekly R e port DEAN OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES DEAN OF NATURAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES Lehman College of The City University of New York is seeking two outstanding scholars to serve as Dean of the Division of Arts and Humanities and Dean of the Division of Natural and Social Sciences. The Division of Arts and Humanities consists of the following academic departments: Academic Skills; Art ; Black Studies; Classical, Oriental, Germanic, and Slavic Languages; English; History ; Music ; Philosophy; Puerto Rican Studies ; Romance Languages ; and Speech and Theatre . These departments employ appro ximately 150 tenure-track and tenured faculty and 95 adjunct faculty members. The Division of Natural and Social Sciences consists of the following academic departments: Anthropology; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Economics and Accounting; Geology and Geography; Mathematics and Computer Science; Physics and Astronomy; Political Science ; Psychology; and Sociology and Social Work. These departments employ approximately 130 tenure-track and tenured faculty and 70 adjunct faculty members . Lehman College, a sen ior college of The City University , enrolls 9,400 undergraduate and graduate students in its three divisions : Arts and Humanities , Natural and Social Sciences, and Professional Studies, which includes Education, Health Services and Nursing . Located in the northwest Bronx, the College attracts students from the five boroughs of New York and from WestchesterCountyto its beautiful37-ac re campus of Gothic towers and modern structures, including an art building designed by Marcel Breuer and the Lehman Center for the Performing Arts . Candidates should have the following qualifications: an earned doctorate; a national reputation for scho l arship and research ; successful e x perience in university teaching; and evidence of the ability to offer educational and administ r ative leadership in a liberal arts college. The salary range fora Dean in the E xecutive Compensation Plan o f CUNY is$70,669 $78, 6 29. E xcellent fringe benefits package. The appointment will be g in no later than Sept. 1, 1987. Nominations and applications , including a complete curriculum vitae , and the names of five references, should be submitted by March 15 to: Melvyn B . Nathanson , Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lehman College, Bedford Par k Blvd. West, B r onx , N .Y. 10468. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFF_IRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1987 The Inter-University Program for Latino Re search* and the Social Science Research Council announce three fellowship competitions. • Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the centers of the IUP or with the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. One year stipend of $22,500. Deadline : March 15, 1987. • Summer Workshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor . Trans portation and living expenses for four-week program . Deadline: April 24, 1987. • Latino Graduate Student Training Seminar at Stanford University. Transportation and living expenses for two-week summer program . Dead line : March 15, 19S7. For more information contact IUP/SSRC , Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texa s at Austin , SSB 4.120, Austin, TX 78712 (512) 471-1817. *The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de Estudio s Puertorriqueiios, Hunter College; Center for Me x ican American Studies, University of Te x as: Chicano Studies Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles; and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research. LEHMAN PROGRAM DIRECTOR DEVELOPMEf':IT DIRECTOR Two positions with KUVO , Denver's bilingual public radio station. One fund raising; one pro gramming. Seek experienced candidates. Salary $16,000$24,000 depending on qualifications. Apply by April1, contact Florence Hernandez Ramos, KUVO , P . O . Box 11111 , Denver, Colo . 80211 . (303) 934. GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington , D . C . , provides : e Design • Illustration e Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and e Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, .D.C. 2001 . 0 (202)483. PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington , D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p.m .. (ES1) Tuesday will be c arried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates : 75 cents per word . Display rates : $35 per column inch . 5

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Arts & Entertainment Some 54 PBS stations around the country are members of the Latino Consortium, and they have the option of airing Vistas(check local listings) . Other titles scheduled for this year are the documentary Maria Lionza, the docudrama Federico Garcia Lorca in New York and a Latin Jazz Special. CONTINUING THIS WEEK: A new series about U.S. Hispanics produced for public television stations continues this week with the airing of a documentary about a handicapped painter from San Antonio. Jesse Trevino : A Spirit Against All Odds, narrated by Martin Sheen, debuts on Vistas Feb. 6 on Los Angeles' KCET(dates for other PBS stations may vary) . The film profiles Trevino, an artist who lost his "painting hand" during the Vietnam War. Also conti nuing this week is the First Latin American Writers Conference in New York, with two panels at the Ollantay Center for the Arts. The documentary is produced and written by Skip Cilley; Joseph Kramer and Mike Stroot are the executive producers. It is a Busch Creative Services Corp. project in association with Sheen/Greenblatt Productions. Both panels will be held Feb. 7. Publishing Opportunities begins the day with panelists Hugo Han riot, Lee Goerner and Rosario Santos. Following will be Where Are We Going? , with Dolores Prida, Aida Gonzalez and Manuel Ramos Otero . Conference coordinator Laureano .Corces will moderate both panels . ONE LINERS: En Foco , a community visual arts agency in the Bronx, is screening portfolios and reviewing photographers for its Emerging Artists Program . Participants could have works exhibited in museums , galleries and alternate spaces ... Miguel Ferrer(Jose' s son) and Castulo Guerra have finished Houston Knights, a Columbia Pictures television production for CBS that is yet unscheduled . . . New York-based Maravilla Productions has taped two episodes of the one-hour syndicated series Geraldo Live . Geraldo Rivera hosts the talk show, produced in association with Tribune Entertainment, being offered to programmers for the fall ... Produced by the Latino Consortium at KCET, Vistas replaces the group' s series Presente . Coordinated by executive producer Mark Carreno, the series includes productions from participating public television stations as well as acquisitions from independent producers . Actress Rita Moreno is the hostess for Vistas, which premiered last month with the film Graffiti. It was produced by Dianne Costello and directed by Matthew Patrick E.J. Castillo, Ivy Broya star in the f ilm, based on a story by Julio Cortazar, which was an Oscar nominee in 1985. Media Report GERALDO'S RETORT: News personality Geraldo Rivera isn ' t saying much about the new marijuana arrest near Houston of Terry Rouse , who hit him with a $30 million libel suit following her on-camera bust during Geraldds televised special on drugs. " Innocent until proven guilty," he commented But he did offer this aside abou t his critics i n the media : "All things considered , I would have preferred it if (the police) had arrested some well known television and newspaper critics who blasted our program before they knew the facts." HARK THE HERALD: The Miami Herald isn ' t imp r essed by U .S. Education Secretary William Bennetfs persistence in reintroducing legislation to give local school districts full HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a n a ti o nal publi c ati o n o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 , N ' Street NW Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publ is her. _ Hect o r Ericks enMendoza Edi t or. F e li x P e r ez R e porting: Charlie Eri c k sen. Antonio M ejia s Ren t as , Meli nda Mac h ado , Mike Orenst ein No port ion of H i spanic Link Weekl y Report may be r eprod u ced or b roadc as t in any f o r m witho ut adv an ce perm ission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96 . Trial subscription (13 i ssues ) $26. au t onomy to spend fede r al bilingual education dollars for whatever programs they wish . "Bennett never knows when to quit, " it editorialized Jan . 20, adding: "Secretary Bennetfs intransigence (on alternatives to transitional bilingual ed pro grams) is solid evidence that he i s less in terested in the pedagogic argumen t than he is in gutting bilingual education programs . If he were sincere in his motives , Mr. Bennett would wait until the test programs put into effect in 1984 produce tangible evide ' nce . Then Congress would have solid data on which to base any change of direction." BYRNE BURNED: Waves created by Jane Byrne ' s inference that Puerto Ricans aren ' t U.S . citizens have reached Washington. Bryne, seeking to recapture Chicago' s City Hall from Mayor Harold Washington in April, made the comment last month that: " We have many, many aliens that came to Chicago-who for reasons of their own, up -Antonio Mejias Rentas un t il probably amnesty got passed-are not counted(in the U.S. Census) . We ha v e influ x es of many, many Cambodians, Laotians, Koreans, Puerto Ricans , Hispanics, and the true count will probably not really come out again till the next census is taken because so many people were so concerned about be i ng returned to their country." Byrne at first denied making the comment, but after a broadcast journalist played it back to her, she accepted that she had . Her comment drew this rebuke from Rep . Esteban Torres (D-Calif . ) , chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus: "Ms. Bryne's disparag i ng remarks about Hispanics and Puerto Ricans does little more than add to the nativist and xenophobic attitudes about ethnic Americans and recent immigrants to our country .. . All Hispanics are not aliens and Puerto Ricans have been U .S. citizens since 1917." Charlie Ericksen COR P O R ATE CLASS I F IED : A d r a t es a r e 75 ce nts p e r word. Dis p layadsare$35 p e r colum n inch . A d s placed by T ues day w ill run i n Weekly R e p o r ts m ai le d Fr i d ay of sam e week. Mult ipl e u se rat es o n r eq u est. Ev e r since he made the cover o f National Geographic, there ' s been no talkin g to him. 6 Hispa ni c Lin k Wee k l y Report