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Hispanic link weekly report, February 9, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 9, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Congressman Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), returning from a five-day fact-finding trip to Central America, says he will seek cuts in U.S. military aid to El Salvador and tie future aid to improvements in civil rights... Florida Gov. Bob Martinez names Hugo Melendez, 56, as the state secretary of labor and employment security. Melendez, the only minority in the Martinez cabinet, was formerly special agent in charge of the Southeast region for the U.S. Labor Department.. Texas state Rep. Al Luna (D-Houston), also chair of the Legislature’s Mexican American Caucus, receives the chairmanship of the Committee
on Science and Technology... Apolinar Trinidad, a memberof the New York City Community School Boards District 67 Manhattan, charges Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones with being “an overseer of the educational plantation that has relegated people of color to inferior status.”... Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Director Jos6 Ortiz-Da Hot announces the appointment of Laura Maria Irizarry as an attorney in the agency’s legal division... A military judge in Chile releases on bail the last militiaman held in the death of Washington,
.D.C., resident Rodrigo Rojas. Nineteen-year-old Rojas died from extensive burns reportedly at the hands of the Chilean army... Julio C€sar Chavez, the unbeaten super featherweight champion, is honored as one of two boxers of the year for 1986 by the World Boxing Council...
y^Noel) HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Molina Wins Easily in LA. Council Race
Gloria Molina decisively defeated three opponents Feb. 3 to become the first Latina ever to serve on the Los Angeles City Council.
In the special election, she gained 57% of the vote in a 60% -H ispanic downtown district created as a result of federally ordered reap-portionment to improve Hispanic representation on the 15-member council.
The lone Hispanic on the council, Richard Alatorre, supported Larry Gonzalez, who ran second.
The results, with 99% of the precincts reporting:
Votes Percent
Gloria Molina 6,302 57%
Larry Gonzalez 2,862 26%
Leland Wong 1,126 10%
Paul Moore 846 8%
Both Molina, 38, and Gonz&lez, 32, who quit his Los Angeles school board seat to run, raised more than $200,000 fot the race.
Molina called her lopsided victory “absolutely amazing” and a strong statement that “the First District does not want machine politics.”
Latino 1st ’87 Execution
An hour after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his appeal Jan. 30, Ramon Hernandez became the first inmate to be executed in the United States this year.
Hernandez, 44, was executed by lethal injection in Huntsville, Texas, at 1:13 a.m. He is the 21 st Texas inmate to be put to death since the state resumed its lethal injection law in 1982.
A former construction worker and community college student, Hernandez was convicted for killing a gas station attendant during a burglary in El Paso in 1980.
He had earlier refused the offer of help from the state district judge who sentenced him. He also rejected the offer of legal aid from his court-appointed lawyer, fearing that he would lose the right to represent himself. The lawyer filed an appeal anyhow.
Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox, who called Hernandez to tell him the final appeal to the Supreme Court had been denied, said,“He was a real good jailhouse lawyer-better than most.” j
MBDA Director Called Ineffective
The proposed reduction in funding for the Minority Business Development Agency from $39 million this fiscal year to $4.6 million in 1988 and the loss of 100 employees can be traced in large part to the ineffective leadership of MBDA Director James Richardson Gonzales, a 15-year veteran of the agency charged Jan. 30.
Herman Rivera, a business development specialist with MBDA and president of the National Federation of Federal Employees, Local 2008, termed Richardson’s leadership “defunct”
“He(Richardson) has been concerned with his personal agenda and not with the management of MBDA,” said Rivera.
MBDA was created to offer technical and management assistance to minority entrepreneurs through more than 100 business development centers scattered throughout the nation. It was mandated by a presidential executive order in 1969.
H&ctor de Leon, an MBDA spokesman, said Rivera’s charges had no“valid basis”
Rivera’s allegations are the second time since October that Richardson has been charged with mismanagement. On Oct. 14,
W. Va. Drafts English Bill
West Virginia has entered the English-only arena with a state Senate committee reporting to the floor a bill based on a Jan. 29 press release.
State Treasurer A James Manchin read a press release calling for English to be the official language of the United States to the Senate Government Organization Committee. Manchin’s nephew, Sen. Joe Manchin (J> Marion), moved that a committee bill be re^ ported to the floor for passage.
Since there was no actual bill, the committee decided to use Manchin’s remarks as a preface to the action.
“I believe that multiple languages and the* ethnic separatism which they support threaten America’s heritage. Such items as bilingual ballots, foreign language signs, forms, contracts, and tests postpone the integration of non-English-speaking adults into the mainstream of American life,” Manchin said in his release.
regional director for MBDA’s San Francisco office Xavier Mena filed a lawsuit against l Richardson alleging that he awarded contracts | on the basis of political patronage and that he used discriminatory employment practices Mena’s suit is pending.
Richardson has been MBDA director for three years.
Rivera told Weekly Report that the union has initiated a campaign aimed at individuals or organizations familiar with MBDA to contact their congressional representatives to protest the merger of the agency with the Small Business Administration. He also said it was seeking congressional sponsors who would reintroduce a bill from last year that would strengthen MBDA’s purview. The precursor to this bill died in the House last year.
The Reagan administration has for the last two years attempted to move MBDA under the umbrella of SBA. The administration has also been calling, although unsuccessfully, for the phasing out of SBA over the same period.
Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas), chairman of a small business subcommittee in the House, said he sees little chance for the merger. He added, however, that the administration has done the equivalent of abolishing the agencies “through lack of funding or administrative decay.”
Early last month, an anonymous letter was delivered to Commerce Secretary Malcolm
continued on page 2
D.C.’s Rosario, 65, Dies
Carlos Rosario, a former director of the Washington, D.C., Office of Latino Affairs and a prominent figure in that city’s Hispanic community, died Feb. 1 after a heart attack.
Rosario died at a hospital in Dorado, Puerto Rico. He was there vacationing.
The 65-year-old Rosario was born in Ciales, Puerto Rico. He was instrumental in establishing the bilingual education program in the nation’s capital.
He is survived by his wife, Carmin Maria; sons Carlos, Jos6 and Reinaldo; two daughters, Leticia and Vilma Tirado; two sisters and five grandchildren.


Educator Denounces Florida College Admission Test
Recently mandated higher minimum scores for a required state test are blocking advancement from two- to four-year colleges for many Florida Hispanics, the president of Miami Dade Community College told Weekly Report Jan. 30.
Miami Dade has54% Hispanic enrollment.
“Most of those students (who fail the admission test) would be successful,” president Robert McCabe said. “We are in fact dumping talent because of blind faith in a standardized! test.”
He estimated that 90% of those failing the test could graduate from a four-year school with a C average or better.
The exam, known as the College Level Academic Skills Test, is required by state law and has been administered since 1984 to all
Florida public college students before their junior year. It includes a reading, writing, computation and essay section.
Last September, the state board of education raised the passing score by 5 points on the writing subtest, by 10 on the reading and by 15 on the computation. The passing score on the essay section was not changed.
In 1982, 3,634 Hispanic students were eligible to attend four-year colleges after! their sophomore year, McCabe said. In 1986, | 1,927 were eligible. He projected that fori 1989, when the testing standards will be raised again, only 767 Hispanics will be eligible, a drop of 79% since 1982.
Students whose first language is not English, have particular difficulty with the essay test, McCabe pointed out “They are still translating
back to their native language. The timed test just kills them.”
In 1989, the state will raise the essay minimum from four to five points out of a possible eight. Five is the median test score; thus, if test scores do not rise, half the students will fail on the essay portion alone, McCabe said.
“With, some of the Hispanic population who are new to this country, the whole business of this kind of examination is not part of their experience and they just don’t do well on them, ” he said.
McCabe called for a blue ribbon committee that includes minority representation to look at the impact of testing and make recommendations as to future testing practices.
- Mike Orenstein
NABE Raps Bilingual Ed Consultant
MALDEF Set Back in Watsonville Case
Three days after a U.S. District Court judge ruled in favor of a reportedly anti-Hispanic election system in Watsonville, Calif., the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed Feb. 2 additional arguments to support its contention.
On Jan. 30, Judge William Ingram ruled against MALDEF, reasoning that the redistricting plan drafted by the civil rights organization did not adequately empower all the city's*. Latinos.
Attorney Joaquin Avila submitted a plan that would have increased the Latino constituency in two City Council districts to approximately 80% each. Ingram held that because the two districts contained only37% of the city’s Hispanics, the remaining 63% were being left out.
In his decision, the judge made a provision for further argument.
Avila, a San Francisco Bay Area attorney who handled the case for MALDEF, argued that because the other 63% of the Latino population was dispersed throughout the city, it was impossible to draw a district that would include them.
“If we were to use that (Ingram’s) standard, we would have to do away with many redistricted cities,” he said.
Watsonville is more than half Hispanic and has yet to elect a Latino to its seven-member City Council.
Asst Chief Zamora Retires
Guillermo Zamora, Miami’s acting assistant police chief, announced Jan. 27 that he was retiring after 25 years on the force.
Police Chief Clarence Dickson called Zamora a “good, good cop” and credited him with boosting the morale of the department at a time when it was at a low ebb.
Zamora, along with 24 other former and current Miami policemen, has had his personnel files subpoenaed by the FBI in its investigation into police corruption.
Zamora has denied any wrongdoing.
A consultant hired by the U.S. Department of Education last fall to evaluate materials used in bilingual teacher-education courses drew fire Feb. 3 from a national bilingual organization administrator for his ties to U.S. English and past criticism of bilingual educatioa
“A good researcher wouldn’t go into that task with the kind of background he exhibits,” Joseph Beard, national administrator for the National Association of Bilingual Educators, said about Gary R. Imhoff.
Imhoff s project for the Department of Edu-
MALDEF Board to Meet
A meeting of the 34-member board of directors of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will be held Feb. 28 to determine whether Antonia Hernandez will be retained as president and general counsel.
It will also review the legality and role of MALDEFs personnel and nominations committee, which recommended to its executive committee Jan. 17 that she be replaced by Toney Anaya, the former governor of New Mexico.
The MALDEF board is presently being polled on whether the special meeting should be held in Los Angeles or San Antonio.
AIDS Victim Eulogized
The Columbia University Senate passed without dissent Jan. 30 a resolution calling for the establishment of a scholarship in honor of one the outstanding members of its 1984 class, Stuart Garcia, who died of AIDS last year.
Garcia, a native of Austin, Texas, died at the age of 23. He served for two years in the senate, a 102-member body comprised of students, faculty*administrators and alumni. He was president of his freshman and sophomore classes and a member of a senior honor society at the New York City university.
The Stuart Garcia Memorial Fund was established shortly after Garcia’s death. It hopes to generate $25,000.

Ed
cation’s Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs calls for him to determine whether training materials for bilingual teachers “value... the maintenance of non-English languages and the preservation of traditional cultures more highly than the attainment of English language proficiency and the ability to acculturate to this society.”
In a book he co-authored with former Colorado Gov. Richard D. Lamm, Imhoff said, “I believe that it makes no sense for the government to discourage foreign language speakers from speaking English.”
Other articles written by Imhoff, including one with the executive director of U.S. English, stress that bilingual education isolates and delays the assimilation of non-English-speaking children.
Imhoff has said he plans to do an unbiased study and that his research methodology would eliminate any personal biases.
OBEMLA- funded teacher-training colleges and universities have been asked to submit a list of their current bilingual education materials, This year, OBEMLA is administering 136 grants totalling $18.8 million to such institutions.
Imhoff is being paid approximately $25,000 for the project, which is expected to be completed by October.
Union Blasts MBDA Head
continued from page 1
Baldridge outlining a series of accusations against Richardson. MBDA falls under the aegis of the Commerce Department.
The letter, which Rivera said generally reflected the beliefs of many of the staffers at the agency, said Richardson’s management practices were “near criminal” and that he “alienated’ management and employees “He has displayed no knowledge of an effective federal policy to enhance the development of minority owned businesses...it said.
Out of its 223 employees, MBDA has 31 that are Hispanic. The 100 that would be lost should the merger occur would be forced into early retirement or transferred, said Rivera.
- Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Roberto Rodriguez, guest columnist
Always a Wetback?
The other day I was dver at my aunf s house, feet up, head back, sitting therewith her watching a local Los Angeles news show. The reporter was describing a Latino gang fight in which one boy had been killed the night before.
My aunt shook her head.
“Why can’t we get along?” she asked, half to the reporter on the screen and half to me. “Why can’t our own people get along?”
The reporter faded into a commercial and I alone was the object of my aunt’s attention.
She proceeded to tell me about a fight she had. broken up right in her own front yard. Two kida Small kida Neighbor kida No weapons other than their immature fists. She pulled them apart and demanded to know why they were trying to pound each other into the ground.
G u I pi ng for breath, one of t he com batants wiped his bloody nose on his upper sleeve and told her, “He called me a TJ. He called me a wetback.”
She turned to the other boy and asked him if that’s what he had said. He had, he nodded. So she scolded, “But I thought you were from Tijuana, too.”
“I am, ” he said. “I was. But I been here a lot longer than he has.”
“TJ” is Tijuana, that Mexican frontier city beneath San Diego. In East Los Angeles, anybody who emigrated from south of the border, legally or otherwise, is labelled a “TJ.”
Wetback Same thing.
I was a wetback I started kindergarten in Los Angeles as a wetback During my family’s migration north, we paused - like so many others - for a couple of years in Tijuana. So I was a TJ, too.
I REMEMBER MINIATURE FASCISTS I entered kindergarten knowing not a word of English. Today, at age 32, I still remember those kids who taunted me with names. I remember them not as misguided children easily ignored; I remember them as miniature fascists. Only five or six years old themselves, they chanted their hatred of Mexicans like me.
Ironically, those kids who screamed the words in my face were, like me, of Mexican origin.
Recently, I had an experience that brought back some of those memories. It made me wonder if there’s a rules committee which determines when someone stops being a wetback Is being a wetback a temporary condition? Or, once a wetback, always a wetback?
I was trying to give some junior high school students - Latino students - a gentle lesson in ethnic pride. I mixed them a blend of Mexican history and 20th century reality.
“I was born in Mexico,” I told them.
“Wetback!” came the instant response from a boy in the audience.
It got a laugh.
MY AUNT WAS THE MAYOR
I tried not to let on that I was offended. But there I was, with my college education and my fine command of the English language, still a wetback
f kept on talking. I talked about a trip I made to Southern Mexico the year before. I visited an aunt who was the mayor in her town. The town was purportedly some 4,000 years old.
I traced my ancestors back as far as I could and commented with pride on the ancestry that we shared.
“The day you can trace your history is the last day you’ll call another Latino a wetback,” I said
It wasn’t an original line. It’s one someone tried on me when I was about their age. For me, it worked.
Maybe it worked on some of them.
(Roberto Rodriguez, formerly editor of Caminos magazine, announced plans this month to publish a monthly bilingual magazine, Americas 2001.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report^ Feb.
Sin pelos en la lengua
TOILET TRAINING: Way back when, California’s March Fong Eu was a colorless assemblywoman ignored by the press. Then, in the early ’70s she introduced a bill to outlaw pay toilets in such public gathering places as airports and bus stations.
The media made her an instant celebrity and she rode her popularity and fame to office as California’s secretary of state, a post she still holds.
California Senator Art Torres was barely toilet trained when that was going on, but he’s a good student of political history.
On Jan. 27, he introduced a bill designed to eliminate those long lines feeding into the ladies’ rooms at theaters and sporting events. Any new public or private arena holding up to 400 people must provide a minimum of eight toilets for women (and three toilets and three urinals for men), Torres^ legislation mandates.
The press loved it. Female colleagues in the capital all but cried because they didn’t think of it first.
Political insiders view it as a certain sign that Torres’ next move will be to replace Tom Bradley if Tomas ever retires as Los Angeles mayor.
It reminds us that the federal government still refuses to require agribusiness patrones to provide toilets for the women working in their fields. Now, with Torres carrying the standard, they may at least be able to go to a Raider game or an opera house and find relief.
WILLIE & GARY: Down the freeway in Anaheim, it was California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown who was stirring 5,000 delegates to the California Association for Bilingual Education conference to frenzy pitch with cannons aimed at Gov. George Deukmejian, who vetoed that state’s bilingual education bill last year. Take to the streets, he urged.
But in Washington, the news was bad for folks who believe in bilingual ed. Gary Bauer, who regularly threw spears at bilingual classrooms while serving as chief aide to Secretary of Education William Bennett, has been pulled into the White House as President Reagan’s chief advisor on domestic policy development
At the U.S. Conference of Mayors last month, the 40-year-old conservative ex-lobbyist growled, “Don’t sit in your cities and tell us what our budget should be. I don’t have time for Pentagonbashing.”
Winter's not over yet.
TORTILLA TIDBITS: In Texas, times are tough, too. If I am to believe what I read in The Dallas Morning News, fashionable hostesses are now rolling tortillas like Cuban cigars and passing them off as the hors d’oeuvre of the decade.
Columnist Marlyn Schwartz predicts that “tortilla pinwheels” will be to the ’80s what pigs-in-a-blanket were to the ’50s.
What’s a tortilla pinwheel?
Marlyn unites eight ounces of cream cheese, a half pint of sour cream, some minced green onions and three fresh jalapehos, spreads them on flour tortillas, rolls them up “like a jelly roll” and cuts them into 1 /3-inch slices.
I almost forgot: lime juice to taste.
And a side of tequila? _______________________~ Kay Barbaro
Quoting..
ANTHONY QUINN, accepting a “career achievement” award at the Foreign Press Association’s Golden Globe awards banquet Jan. 31, recalling advice he gave his children:
"You can only be as bad as you dare to be good.”
ROGER CONNOR, executive director, Federation for Immigration Reform, on funding cuts proposed by the Reagan administration to implement immigration legislation:
j “Opponents of immigration reform are planning to kill the baby in ■the cradle by moving politically to deny funding for the new law.”
), 1987
3


COLLECTING
GRADUATE ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIPS: In its Winter 1986 issue, Hispanic Engineer magazine has an article on scholarships available to students interested in graduate degrees, including information on requirements and where to apply. Also included is a free computerized resume service. To obtain the issue, send $5 (or $15 for the five yearly issues) to: 1007 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 (301) 224-7101.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY: College Cost Planner, a monthly higher education newsletter, includes in its January issue a formula on how a student can figure out his or her eligibility for financial aid. The cost for the issue is $3. To order, write to: 2025 I St. NW, Suite 105, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-5866.
SPANISH BOOKLET ON AIDS: The Centers for Disease Control has put out a Spanish booklet titled “What Everyone Should Know About AIDS.” For a free copy (up to 25), write to: Office of Public Inquiries, Centers for Disease Control, Building 1, Room B-63,1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Ga. 30333.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION RESEARCH: The National Association for Bilingual Education’s Fall 1985 Journal contains some of the latest information on bilingual education research. The 82-page booklet, which contains four articles, can be obtained by sending $10 to: NABE, 1201 16th St. NW, Room 407, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7870.
HISPANIC LITERACY: The National SER Policy and Research Institute issued a report Feb. 5 on “Literacy in the Hispanic Community.” The three-part report includes statistics on Hispanic illiteracy, an action plan to alleviate the problem and details on SER’s proposed Family Learning Centers for teaching literacy. A copy of the report is available free of charge from the SER Institute at 1320 10th St. N W, Washington, D.C. 20001, or by callling Al Schmidt at(202) 328-0466.
HISPANICS IN THE ARTS: The Association of Hispanic Arts publishes i AHA! - Hispanic Art News 10 times yearly. Included in the 10-25 page newsletter are a calendar of Hispanic art events around the nation, profiles of Hispanic artists, a listing of Hispanic art organizations nationally and articles on different exhibits, plays and films by Latinos. To subscribe for a year, send$15to: Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 E. 87th St., New York, N.Y. 10028.
CONNECTING
80 LEARNING CENTERS PLANNED
Plans for 80 learning centers nationwide to alleviate Hispanic illiteracy rates through courses emphasizing literacy and job skills were announced by National SER-Jobs for Progress in Washington Feb. 5.
SER, based in Dallas, recently submitted a $3 million proposal to the Department of Labor for 40 family learning centers which would teach such classes in predominantly Hispanic areas of California, Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, New York, Florida and Illinois.
The organization released a report, “Literacy in the Hispanic Community,” after a White House briefing, also Feb. 5, between Amigos de SER senior executive council members and regional officers on the Hispanic literacy agenda National LULAC President Oscar Moran and G.l. Forum President Ed Bernaldez were at the meeting and are involved with SER’s goal of reducing Hispanic illiteracy.
According to the report, issued by National SER Policy and Research Institute, there are seven million functionally illiterate Hispanics 16 years or older and nearly half of them are unemployed or not in the labor force. The report defined functionally illiterate as the inability to read, write or reason well enough to find or hold a job.
As of April 1986, the Hispanic population 16 years and over was 12,184,000.
In a five-year period, SER hopes to serve 60,000 Hispanic youth and adults, including 8,000 in the first year of learning center operations. The Centers will serve welfare recipients, unemployed Hispanic adults, migrant farm workers,youth and soon-to be-released prisoners.
Private funds for the program currently total $375,000, including a two-year $100,000 grant from AT&T to establish centers in New York City and Miami.
Forty of the centers would be funded by the Labor Department and 40 through private funds.
Pilot programs in Washington, D.C., Denver and Milwaukee have been operating for 16 months. They have served 800 students, 70% of whom were Hispanic. The majority of the students fell between the ages of 18 and 44.
- Melinda Machado
Calendar
THIS WEEK |
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Feb. 12
The Mexican American Alumni Association of the University of Southern California will hold a dinner to raise scholarship monies and to recognize donations made by foundations, corporations and other donors George Pla (213) 743-2456
HISPANIC CAREER FAIR San Antonio Feb. 12,13
The U.S. Department of Labor is hosting a careerfair to help increase the agency’s internal Hispanic work force. Personnel representatives from Washington, D.C., and the Dallas regional office will accept job applications at the fair and are especially seeking computer specialists, claims examiners, accountants, economists and support staff.
Elia R. Kerr (202) 523-6545
‘RE-HISPANICIZATION’ OF CALIFORNIA San Francisco Feb. 12,13 Immigration patterns and demographic trends in California will be discussed during “The Re-His-panicization of California? Challenges for the 21 st Century' conference sponsored by Stanford University,
4
UC- Berkeley and the Com monwealth Club of Californ ia U.S. Sen. Paul Simon (D-lll.) and former Mexican finance minister Jesus Silva Herzog are featured speakers.
Laura Pauli (415) 723-2558
INSTALLATION BANQUET Las Vegas Feb. 13
The Latin Chamber of Commerce is hosting an installation banquet and dance. Rudy Beserra, associate director in the Office of Public Liaison at the White House, will be the keynote speaker.
Victoria Abernathy (702) 385-7367
IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE El Paso, Texas Feb. 13,14
A symposium for journalists about the U.S. Immigration and Reform Act is being sponsored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Region 5. The conference includes a tour of the El Paso/ Juarez border by the U.S. Border Patrol.
Roy Ortega (915) 532-7777
JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA Gainesville, Fla. Feb. 13-17 A conference on “The Jewish Presence in Latin America” will address the Latin American Jewish response to anti-Semitism, intellectual life and preserving historical memories. The conference is sponsored by the University of Florida’s Center for Latin American Studies and the Center of Jewish Studies.
Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880 Feb. 9, 1987
HISPANIC DRUG WORKSHOP
Corpus Christi, Texas Feb. 14
The Parents Association for Drug Rehabilitation
and Educational Services is sponsoring a daylong
workshop on drugs and the second annual “Family
of the Year"’ banquet.
Ronnie Rincon (512) 851-2133
HISPANICS IN SCIENCE Chicago Feb. 14
The Association of Puerto Ricans in Science and Engineering is sponsoring a workshop on Hispanic involvement in those two fields during the national convention of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Eric Munoz (718) 470-7212
COMING SOON
MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Howard University Washington, D.C. Feb. 18-20 Virginia Stewart (202) 636-7491
CORRECTION: The Coalition of Concerned Hispanics is presenting a Michigan Hispanic Statewide Leadership Conference and not the Michigan Spanish Speaking Commission as listed in the Jan. 5 state events calendar for 1987. The event will be in Flint, Mich.,on Junel8-20 andthecontactperson is Paul Vasquez (313) 766-7418. Weekly Report regrets any inconvenience to the commission and our readers.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1987-88
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research* and the Social Science Research Council announce three fellowship competitions.
• Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the centers of the I UP or with the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. One year stipend of $22,500. Deadline: March 15, 1987.
8 SummerWorkshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Transportation and living expenses for four-week program. Deadline: April 24,1987.
• Latino Graduate Student Training Seminar at Stanford University. Transportation and living expenses for two-week summer program. Deadline: March 15, 1987.
For more information contact IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, SSB 4.120, Austin, TX 78712 (512) 471-1817.
COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR
National Civil Rights Organization seeks person to direct and implement MALDEPs national media strategy and produce publications; such astheAnnual Report and newsletter. Requires extensive contact with the press and public ' relations firms working with funders Requirements: BA/MA in English/journalism or communications, i Proficient in English/Spanish (written and spoken).
! Excellent writing and radio/TV skills, experience in publicity work and producing publications. Send resume with references to: Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor,' Los Angeles, Calif. 90014. By 2/17/87. •
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251 -2252.
PROGRAM DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR !
Two positions with KUVO, Denver's bilingual public radio station. One fundraising; one programming. Seek experienced candidates Salary $16,000-$24,000 depending on qualifications. Apply by April 1, contact Florence Hernandez-Ramos, KUVO, P.O. Box 11111, Denver, Colo. 80211. (303) 934-5880.
*The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquehos, Hunter College;'
Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas; Chicano Studies Research Center,
University of California, Los Angeles; and the . USED OFFICE FURNITURE - Good quality Stanford Center for Chicano Research. good price (202) 628-4074.
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields:
Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degree and full-time graduate students pursuing master’s and/or doctorate degrees in the above fields Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered.
The program consists of 90 or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the June-September session must submit their applications no later than April 10, 1987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment.
For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620.
IMMEDIATE OPENING
OFFICE FURNITURE
JOURNALISM
Dean, University of Colorado School of Journalism and Mass Communication
The University of Colorado is a strong, research-oriented university. The School is one of eight professional schools on the Boulder campus. The School offers instruction in advertising, broadcasting, news-editorial and public relations. Accredited by AGEJMC, the School has 15 full-time faculty, 320 junior and senior majors and 55 Master’s students.
The Dean’s mission includes leading the expansion of the School’s graduate and research programs, encouraging curriculum advances to promote the School within the state and the nation, innovatively managing the School’s operations and building a strong sense of community within the program while at the same time encouraging diversity by recruiting minority faculty and students.
Qualifications: The successful applicant will be an individual of national stature and outstanding credentials. Preference will be given to individuals with demonstrated leadership a strong academic and research record, experience in obtaining grants, and fund-raising and professional accomplishments.
Application: Direct nominations, inquiries and applications(with at least three names we can contact for references) postmarked by March 15,1987, to Professor Sandra Moriarty, Chair, Dean’s Search Committee, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Campus Box 287, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 80309.
Special notice: The University of Colorado has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people including women, members of ethnic minorities and disabled individuals.
The American Friends Service Committee, a religious, pacifist, social change organization, seeks:
Education and communications director to work with the immigration law enforcement monitoring project Mexico-U.S. Border Program.
The director is responsible for gathering and processing data on abuses and for developing and implementing a varied and effective communications strategy to advance the goals of the border program’s work in defense of immigration rights.
Qualifications: Strong experience in print and broadcast media, knowledge of immigration issues, fluent Spanish.
Send resume: Bahia Roberts, American Friends Service Committee, 1501 Cherry St, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102, Affirmative Action Employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts&_ Entertainment
REEL NEWS: Critics around the country are raving about Platoon, a likely 1988 Oscar contender that features actor Charlie Sheen in a starring role.
Platoon is “the most impressive movie to deal with the fighting in Vietnam,” writes Time’s Richard Corliss, while the Washington Post’s Paul Attanasio calls it “the first serious youth movie in ages, for at its heart, the war is treated as a rite of passage in its most intense form.”
About Sheen, whose father Martin and brother Emilio Estevez are well-established film personalities, Attanasio writes: “(he) exerts a quiet authority at the film’s center, a bright alertness - he’s not sensitive, exactly, but sensitized. . .he anchors the more florid performances of the two sergeants warring for his soul.”
Platoon, which grossed $11.1 million in its first four weeks of release, won three Golden Globe awards Jan. 31, including “best picture.”
Another Hispanic actor is featured in the box office hit Critical Condition, which grossed $5.7 million during its first week of release. Ruben Blades playsan orderly who befriends Richard Pryoi’scharacterin this hospital comedy from Paramount Pictures.
Films from Latin America, meanwhile, are featured prominently in the IV Miami Film Festival which concludes this week.
The Festival began Feb. 6 with the premiere of Robert Altman’s Beyond Therapy. Latino films to be screened through Feb. 15 include La pelicula del rey by Argentine director Carlos Sorin, La ciudad y losperros by Peru’s Francisco J. Lombardi, Hombre mirando al sudeste by Lorenzo Quinteros from Argentina and La gran fiesta by Puerto Rictf s Marcos Zurinaga
Chile’s Miguel Littin, Mexico’s Paul Leduc and Colombia’s Jorge All Triana were among the Latin American directors invited to a Latin American Film Festival held Feb. 1-8 at the University of California Santa Barbara campus.
ONE LINERS: Some 50 Cuban American singers have recorded Yo vuelvo a ti, a song and videocassette expected to raise $1 million fora non-profit group to aid exiled Cubans... The world’s top Hispanic performers return this week to Chile’s Vina del Mar for the beach resort’s song festival that begins Feb. 11.. .A Baile Anual de San Valentin,to be held Feb. 15 in Washington, D.C., brings together the Honduran group Los profesionales, Guatemalan marimba player Fidel Funes, Salvadoran singer Alvaro Torres and the Chilean group Lucho Munoz con Los Galos. . . and Cuban American Fernando Bujones has accepted an invitation to dance with the Soviet Union’s Bolshoi Ballet in November, while the Botshoi’s 61-year-old prima ballerina Maya Plisetskaya will take over, also in November, as artistic director of Spain’s Ballet NacionaL..
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
AMERICAS 2001: Roberto Rodriguez, former editor of Caminos magazine, plans to launch a monthly magazine, Americas2001,, this spring. He is aiming for an initial publication date of March 15 with a run of 20,000 copies.
The magazine, he says, will “provide a forum for the discussion and debate of ideas and issues that affect the Latino community.”
Plans call for free distribution of the first 48-page issue at major Hispanic conferences around the country through the spring and summer.
Guidelines for writers, artists and photographers are available by contacting Rodriguez care of P.O. Box 4028, Terminal Annex, Los Angeles, Calif. 90051-2028 (213) 223-0317.
Individuals wanting a copy of the prototype by mail should send $1.50 to cover postage
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orehstein No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
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and handling.
RADIO DRAMA: Juan Guedella profiles Eduardo Caballero^ Caballero Spanish Media president, in February's Hispanic Business magazine. Caballero left Cuba at age 29 in 1961, settled first in Dallas (where, says Guedella, “he could understand neither the English nor the Spanish vernacular of the Texas Mexican Americans”), and moved to New York, where he founded CSM in 1973.
Caballero now represents 72 of the nation’s largest radio stations, with annual billings of $22 million last year.
SHORT TAKES: Univision’s Sunday sports magazine debuted Feb 1 (5:30 pm. EST/PS1)...
The Washington Times quotes estimates by “knowledgeable sources?’ that Mexico magnate Mario V&zquez Raha is losing money at UPI at the rate of about $20 million a year...
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has disbanded its nominations
committee and is inviting members to run for its eight officer and eight regional director positions by collecting 18 signatures of voting members. Petitions must be postmarked no later than March 11...
PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTORY: The Hispanic Public Relations Association has published a professional services directory /for Greater Los Angeles listing more than 100 p.r.-related service providers.
Included are ad agencies, photographers, printers, video production units, graphic design shops, public relations and marketing firms, mailing houses, translation services and a number of event production and other business services.
It’s available for$10 from HPRA by contacting Stella Bustos, 1412 1/4 N. Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90046. Telephone: (213) 851-1338.
HPRA the only organization of its kind, was founded in 1984. -Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week on Science and Technology ... Apolinar Trinidad, a men::'beiof the New York City Community School Boa_r..d _ , _ 6:'"Manhattan, charges Schools Chancellor Nathan Quij'lohtls with being "an overseer of the educational plantation that has relegated people of color to inferior status ." . .. Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Director Jose OrtizDaliot announces the appointment of Laura Maria Irizarry as an attorney in the agency's legal di . vision ... A military judge in Chile releases on bail the last militiaman held in the death of Washington, o , c., resident Rodrigo Rojas. Nineteen-year-old Rojas died from ' extensive burns reportedly at the hands of the Chilean army ... Julio Cesar Chavez, the unbeaten super featherweight champion, is honored as one of two boxers of the year for 1986 by the World (3oxing Council ... Vol. 5 No.6 HISPANIC LINK WEE EPORT Feb.9, 1.987 !"'olina Wins MBDA Director Called Ineffective 1n LA. Council Race . . . 1 d . t f MBDA' s The proposed reduction 1n fund1ng for the reg1ona 1rec or or s an t-ranc1sco Gloria Molina decisively defeated three Minority Business Development Agency from office Xavier Mena filed a lawsuit against opponents Feb. 3 to become the first Latm _ a $39 million this fiscal year to $4.6 million in 1 Richardson alleging that he awarded contracts ever to serve on the Los Angeles C1ty Council. 1988 and the loss of 1 oo employees can be I on the basis of political patronage and that In the special she gained 57% _of traced in large part to the ineffective leader _ he used discriminatory employment practices. the vote 1n a60% H1spamc downtown d1stnct ship of MBDA Director James Richardson Mena' s suit is pending. created as a result of federally ordered reapGonzales a 1 5-year veteran of the agency Richardson has been MBDA director for to improve Hispanic represertcharged Jan. 30_ three years . . tat1on on the 15-member council. Herman Rivera a business development Rivera told Weekly Report that the union The lone Hispanic on the cou.ncil, Richard specialist with M'BDA and president of the has initiated a campaign aimed at individuals Alatorre, supported Larry Gonzalez , who ran National Federation of Federal Employees, or organizations familiar with MBDA to con second. Local2008, termed Richardson's leadership tact their congressional representatives to The results, with 99% of the precincts re-"defunct." protest the merger of the agency with the porting: "He(Richardson) has been concerned with Small Business Administration . He also said Votes Percent his personal agenda and not with the manageit was seeking congressional sponsors who Gloria Molina 6,302 57% ment of MBDA," said Rivera . would reintroduce a bill from last year tha_ t Larry Gonzalez 2,862 26% MBDA was created to offer technical and would strengthen MBDA's purview . The pre-Leland Wong 1 • 126 10% management assistance to minority entrecursor to this bill died in the House last year. Paul Moore 846 8% preneurs through more than 100 business The Reagan administration has for the last Both Molina, 38, and Gonzalez , 32, who development centers scattered throughout two years attempted to move MBDA under quit his Los Angeles school board seat to run, the nation. It was mandated by a presidential the umbrella of SBA. The administration has raised more than $200,000 fo\' the race . executive order in 1969. also been calling, although unsuccessfully, Molina called her lopsided victory "absolutely Hector de Leon, an MBDA spokesman , said for the phasing out of SBA over the same amazing" and a strong statement that "the Rivera ' s charges had no " valid basis. " period . First District does not want machine . politics . " Rivera ' s allegations are the second time Rep . Henry B . Gonzalez (DTexas), chairman since October that Richardson has been of a small business subcommittee in the Latino 1st '87 Execution charged with mismanagement. On Oct. 14, House , said he sees little chance for the An hour after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his appeal Jan . 30, Ramon Hernandez became the first inmate to be executed in the United States this year . Hernandez , 44, was executed by lethal injection in Huntsville, Texas , at 1 : 13 a.m . He is the 21st Texas inmate to be put to death since the state resumed its lethal injection law in 1982. A former construction worker and com munity college student, Hernandez was convicted for killing a gas station attendant during a burglary in El Paso in 1980. He had earlier refused the offer of help from the state district judge who sentenced him . !1e also rejected the offer of legal aid from his court-appointed lawyer, fearing that he would lose the right to represent himself. The lawyer filed an appeal anyhow . Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox, who called Hernandez to tell him the final appeal to the Supreme Court had been denied, said, " He was a real good jailhouse lawyer better than most" W. Va. Drafts English Bill West Virginia has entered the English-only arena with a state Senate committee reporting to the floor a bill based on a Jan. 29 press release. State Treasurer A James Manchin read a , press release calling for English to be the official language of the United States to the Senate Government Organization Committee . Manchin' s nephew, Sen. Joe Manchiri (0Marion) , moved that a committee bill be r& ported to the floor for passage . Since there was no actual bill, the committee decided to use Manchin's remarks as a preface to the action. " I believe that multiple languages and the ethnic separatism which they support threaten America's heritage. Such items as bilingual ballots, foreign language signs, forms, cort tracts, and tests postpone the integration of nort-Englishspeaking adults into the main stream of American life, " Manchin said in his release . merger . He added, however , that the adminis tration has done the equivalent of abolishing the agencies "through lack of funding or administrative decay. " Early last month , an anonymous letter was delivered to Commerce Secretary Malcolm continued on page 2 D.C.'s Rosario, 65, Dies Carlos Rosario, a former director of the Washington, D . C., Office of Latino Affairs and a prominent figure in that city's Hispanic community, died Feb. 1 after a heart attack. Rosario died at a hospital in Dorado; Puerto Rico. He was there vacationing. The 65-year-old Rosario was born in Ciales, Puerto Rico . He was instrumental in establish ing the bilingual education program in the nation's capital. He is survived by his wife, Carmin Maria ; sons Carlos , Jose and Reinaldo ; two daugh ters , Leticia and Vilma Tirado; two sisters and five grandchildren.

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Educator Denounces ' Fiorida1College Admission Tes t Recently mandated higher minimum scores for a required state test are blocking advance ment from two-to four-year colleges for many Florida Hispanics, the president of Miami Dade Community College told Weekly Report Jan. 30. Miami Dade has 54% Hispanic enrollment. "Most of those students (who fail the ad mission test) would be successful , " president : Robert McCabe said. "We are in fact dumping . talent because of blind faith in a standardized ! ' He estimated that 90% of those failing the I test could graduate from a four-year school with a C average or better. The exam, known as the College Level Academic Skills Test, is required by state law and has been administered since 1984 to all MALDEF Set Back in Watsonville Case Three days after a U.S. District Court judge ruled in favor of a reportedly anti-Hispanic election system in Watsonville, Calif., the Mexican American Legal Defense and Edu cational Fund filed Feb. 2 additional arguments to support its contention. On Jan. 30,Judge William Ingram ruled against MALDEF, reasoning that the redistrict ing plan drafted by the civil rights organization did not adequately empower all the city's. Latinos. Attorney Joaquin Avila su bmitted a plan that would have increased the Latino constituency in two City Council districts to ap proximately 80% each. Ingram held that because the two districts contained only37% of the city's Hispanics, the remaining 63% were being left out. In his decision, the judge made a provision for further argument. Avila, a San Francisco Bay Area attorney who handled the case for MALDEF, argued that because the other 63% of the Latino population was dispersed throughout the city, it was impossible to draw a district that would include them. " If we were to use that(lngram's) standard, we would have to do away with many redistricted cities," he said. Watsonville is more than half Hispanic and has yet to elect a Latino to its seven-member City Council. Asst Chief Zamora Retires Guillermo Zamora, Miami's acting assistant police chief, announced Jan. 27 that he was retiring after 25 years on the force. Police Chief Clarence Dickson called Zamora a "good, good cop" and credited him with boosting the morale of the department at a time when it was at a low ebb. Zamora, along with 24 other former and c urrent Miami policemen, has had his personnel files subpoenaed by the FBI in its investigation into police corruption. Zamora has denied any wrongdoing. Florida public college students before their junior year. It includes a reading , writing, computation and essay section. Last September, the state board of education raised the passing score by 5 points on the writing subtest, by 10 on the reading and by 15 on the computation. The passing score on the essay section was not changed. In 1982, 3,634 Hispanic students were eligible to attend four-yea r colleges after; their sophomore year, McCabe said. In 1986, : 1,927 were eligible. He projected that for! 1989, when the testing standards will b e : raised again, only 767 Hispanics will be eligible, a drop of 79% since 1982. Students whose first language is not English , have particular difficulty with the essay test, McCabe pointed out "They are still translating back to their native lan.guage. The timed test just kills them." In 1989, the state will raise the essay minimum from four to five points out of a possible eight. Five is the m e dian test score ; thus, i f test scores do not ris e , half the students will fail on the essay portion alone, McCabe said. " With . some of the Hispanic population who are new to this count ry , the whole business of this kind of e xamination is not part of their experience and they just don' t do well on them," he said . McCabe called for a blue ribbon committee tha t includes minority representation to look at th e i mpact of testing and make recommen dations as to future testing practices. Mike Orenstein NABE Raps Bilingual Ed Consultant A consultant hired by the U . S . Department of Education last fall to evaluate materials used in bilingual teacher-education courses drew fire Feb. 3 from a national bilingual organization administrator for his ties to U.S. English and past criticism of bilingual educati o n " A good researcher wouldn' t go into t hat task with the kind of background he e x hibits," Joseph Beard, na t ional administrator fo r the National Assoc iat i on of Bi lingua l Educat ors , said about Gary R. Imh o ff . lm hoffs p r o j ect for the D e pa rtment of Edu-M ALDEF B o ard to Meet A meeting of the 34-member board of direc tor s of the Mex ican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will be held Feb . 28 to determine whether Antonia Hernandez will be retained a s president and general counsel. It will also review the legality and role of MALDEPs personnel and nominations c o m mittee, which recommended to its executive committee Jan. 17 that she be replaced by Toney Anaya , the former governor of New Mexico. The MALDEF board is presently being polled on whether the special meeting should be held in Los Angeles or San Antonio. AIDS Victim Eulogized The Columbia University Senate passed without dissent Jan. 30 a resolution calling for the establishment of a scholarship in honor of one the outstanding members of its 1984 class , Stuart Garcia, who died of AIDS last year. Garcia, a native of Austin, Texas, died at the age of 23. He served for two years in the senate, a 1 02-member body comprised of students, faculty, administrators and alumni. He was president of his freshman and sopho more classes and a member of a senior honor society at the New York City university . The Stuart Garcia Memorial Fund was established shortly after Garcia's death. It hopes to generate $25,000. cation' s Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs calls for him to determine whether training materials for bi lingual teachers"value ... the maintenance of nonEnglish languages and the preservation of traditional cultures more hig h ly than t he attainment of English language p r o ficienc y a nd the ability to acculturate t o th is society. " I n a book he co-authored w ith fo r mer Colo rad o Gov . R ichard D. Lamm, Imh o f f sa id, "I believe t ha t it makes no sense f ort h e govern ment to d isco u rage foreign l an gua ge s pe,o.k ers from speaking English. " Other articles written by Imhoff , including one with the executive directo r of U.S. Engl i s h , stress that bilingual education isolates and delays the assimilation of non-English-speaking children. Imhoff has said he plans to do an unbiased study and that his research methodology would eliminate any personal biases. OBEMLAfunded teacher-training colleges and universities have been asked to submit a list of their current bilingual education materials. This year, OBEMLA is administering 136 grants totalling $18.8 million to such institutions. Imhoff is being paid approximately $25,000 for the project, which is expected to be com pleted by October. Union Blasts MBDA Head co ntinu e d from page 1 Baldridge outlining a series of accusations against Richardson. MBDA falls under the aegis of the Commerce Department. The letter, which Rivera said generally reflected the beliefs of many of the staffers at the agency, said Richardson's management practices were "near criminal" and that he "alienated ' management and employees. "He has displayed no knowledge of an effective federal policy to enhance the development of minority owned businesses . . . ," it said. Out of its 223 employees, MBDA has 31 that are Hispanic. The 100 that would be lost should the merger occur would be forced into early retirement or transferred, said Rivera. Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Roberto Rodriguez, guest columnist Alw ays a Wetback? The o t her day I was dver at my aunt's house , feet up, head back, sitting therewith her watching a local Los Angeles news show. The reporter was descr ibing a Latino gang fight i n which one boy had been killed the night before. My aunt shook he r head. "Why can ' t we get along?" she asked, half to the reporter on the screen and half to me. "Why can ' t our own people get along? " The reporter faded into a commercial and I alon e was the objec t of my aunt's attention. Sh e proceeded to tell me about a fight she broken up right in her own front yard . Two kids. Small kids. Neighbor kids . No weapons other th a n their immature fis t s . She pulled them apart and demande d to know why they were try ing to pound each other into the gro und. Gulping for breath , one of the combatants wiped his bloody nose on his upp e r sleeve and told her, " He called me aT J . He called me a wetback." Sh e turned to the other boy and asked him if thafs what he had said . He had , h e nodded. So she scolded, "But I thought you were f r om Tijuana , too." " I am, " he said. " I was . But I been here a lot longer than he has." " T J " is Tijuana , that Mex ican frontier city beneath San Diego . In E as t Los Angeles , a n ybody who emigrated from south of the border, l eg all y or othe rwise , is labelled a " T J." W et b ack. S a m e thing. I was a we tba ck. I started kindergarten in Los Angeles as a wetback. D u rin g m y fa mily's migr a tion north , we pausedl ike so ma n y others-for a couple of ye ar s in Tijuana. So I was aT J , too . I REMEMBER MINIATURE FASCISTS I entered kindergarten knowing not a word of English. Today , at ag e 3 2 , I still remember those kids who taunted me with names . I remember them not as misguided children easily i gnored ; I remember them as miniature fas c ists . Only five or six years old themselves, they chanted their hatred of Mexicans like me. Ironically , those kids who screamed the words in my face were, like me , of Mexican origin . Recently, I had an experience that brought back some of those memories. It made me wonder if there' s a rules committee which determines when someone stops being a wetback. Is being a wetback a temporary condition? Or, once a wetback, always a wetback? I was trying to give some junior high school students-Latino students-a gentle lesson in ethnic pride. I mixed them a blend of Me x ican history and 20th century reality. " I was born in Mexico," I told them. " Wetback! " came the instant response from a boy in the audience. It got a laugh. MY AUNT WAS THE MAYOR I tried not to let on that I was offended. But there I was, with my college education and my fine command of the English language, still a wetback. i kept on talking. I talked about a trip I made to Southern Mexico the year before. I visited an aunt who was the mayor in her town. The town was purportedly some 4,000 years old. I traced my ancestors back as far as I could and commented with pride on the ancestry that we shared . "The day you can trace your history is the last day you'll call another Latino a wetback, " I said . It wasn't an original line. lfs one someone tried on me when I was about their age. For me , it worked. Maybe it worked on some of them. (Roberto Rodriguez, formerly editor of Caminos magazine, an nounced plans this month to publish a monthly bilingual magazine, Americas 2001.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua TOILET TRAI N lNG: Way back when, California's March Fong Eu was a colorless assemblywoman ignored by the press. Then , in the early '70s she introduced a bill to outlaw pay toilets in such public gathering places as airports and bus stations. The media made her an instant celebrity and she rode her popularity and fame to office as California' s secretary of state, a post she still holds. California Senator Art Torres was barely toilet trained when that was going on , but he ' s a good student of political history. On Jan. 27, he introduced a bill designed to eliminate those long lines feeding into the ladies' rooms at theaters and sporting events . Any new public or private arena holding up to 400 people must provide a minimum of eight toilets for women (and three toilets and three urinals for men) , Torres' legislation mandates. The press loved it. Female colleagues in the capital all but cried because they didn't think of it first. Political insiders view it as a certain sign that To r res ' next move will be to replace Tom Bradley if Tomas ever retires as Los Angeles mayor. It reminds us that the federal government still refuses to require agribusiness patrones to provide toilets for the women working in their fields . Now, with Torres carrying the standard, they may at least be able to go to a Raider game or an opera house and find relief . WILLIE & GARY: Down the freeway in Anaheim, it was California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown who was stirring 5,000 delegates to the California Association for Bilingual Education conference to frenzy pitch with cannons aimed at Gov. George Deukmejian, who vetoed that state' s bilingual education bill last year. Take to the streets, he urged. But in Washington, the news was bad for fol k s who believe in bilingual ed . Gary Bauer, who regularly threw spears at bilingual classrooms while serving as chief aide to Secretary of Education William Bennett, has been pulled into the White House as President Reagan's chief advisor on domes t ic policy development At the U . S . Conference of Mayors last month, the 40-year-old conservative ex-lobbyist growled, "Don't sit in your cities and tell us what our budget should be. I don't have time for Pentagon bashing . " Winter's not over yet. TORTILLA TIDBITS: In Texas, times are tough, too. If I am to believe what I read in The Dallas Morning News, fashionable hostesses are now rolling tortillas like Cuban cigars and passing them off as the hors d'oeuvre of decade. Columnist Marlyn Schwartz predicts that "tortilla pinwheels" will be to the '80s what pigs-in-a-blanket were to the '50s. Whafs a tortilla pinwheel? Marlyn unites eight ounces of cream cheese, a half pint of sour cream, some minced green onions and three fresh jalapenos, spreads them on flour tortillas , rolls them up" like a jelly roll " and cuts them into 1/3-inch slices. I almost forgot: lime juice to taste. And a side of tequila? Quoting. • • Kay Barbaro ANTHONY QUINN, accepting a "career achievemenf' award at the Foreign Press Association ' s Golden Globe awards banquet Jan. 31, recalling advice he gave his children: "You can only be as bad as you dare to be good. " ROGER CONNOR, executive director, Federation for Immigration Reform, on funding cuts proposed by the Reagan administration to implement immigration legislation: j " Opponents of immigration reform are planning to kill the baby in the cradle by moving politically to deny funding for the new law ." Hi s p a mc Link Weekly Report Feb .9, 1987 3

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COLLECTING GRADUATE ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIPS: In its Winter 1986 issue , Hispanic Engineer magazine has an article on scholarships available to students interested in graduate degrees, including information on requirements and where to apply. Also included is a free computerized resume service. To obtain the issue , send $5 (or $15 for the five yearly issues) to: 1007 N . Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 (301) 224-7101. COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY: College Cost Planner , a monthly higher education newsletter, includes in its January issue a formula on how a student can figure out his or her eligibility for financial aid. The cost for the issue is $3. To order, write to: 2025 I St. NW, Suite 105, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-5866. SPANISH BOOKLET ON AIDS: The Centers for Disease Control has put out a Spanish booklet titled "What Everyone Should Know About AIDS." For a free copy (up to 25), write to: Office of Public Inquiries, Centers for Disease Control, Building 1, Room B-63, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Ga . 30333. BILINGUAL EDUCATION RESEARCH: The National Association for Bilingual Education's Fall 1985 Journal contains some of the latest information on bilingual education research. The 82-page booklet, which contains four articles, can be obtained by sending $10 ,to: NABE, 1201 1 16th St. NW , Room 407, Washington, D.C . 20036 (202) 822-7870.' HISPANIC LITERACY: The National SER Policy and Research Institute issued a report Feb . 5 on "Literacy in the Hispanic Community . " The three-part report includes statistics on Hispanic illiteracy, an action plan to alleviate the problem and details on SEA' s proposed Family Learning Centers for teaching literacy. A copy of the report is available free of charge from the SER Institute at 1320 1Oth St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20001, or by callling AI Schmidt at(202) 328-0466. HISPANICS IN THE ARTS: The Association of Hispanic Arts publishesi AHA!-Hispanic Art News 10 times yearly . Included in the 10-25 page newsletter are a calendar of Hispanic art events around the nation, profiles of Hispanic artists, a listing of Hispanic art organizations nationally and articles on different exhibits, plays and films by Latinos. To subscribe for a year, send $15 to: Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 E. 87th St., New York, N . Y . 10028. CONNECTING 80 LEARNING CENTERS PLANNED Plans for 80 learning centers nationwide to alleviate Hispanic illi teracy rates through courses emphasizing literacy and job skills were announced by National SER -Jobs for Progress in Washington Feb. 5. , SER , based in Dallas, recently submitted a $3 million proposal to the Department of Labor for 40 family learning centers which would teach such classes in predominantly Hispanic areas of California, Texas , Colorado, New Mexico, New York, Florida and Illinois. The organization released a report, "Literacy in the Hispanic Community," after a White House briefing, also Feb . 5, between Amigos de SER senior executive council members and regional officers on the Hispanic literacy agenda National LULAC President Oscar Moran and G .l. Forum President Ed Bernaldez were at the meeting and are involved with SEA's goal of reducing Hispanic illiteracy. According to the report, issued by National SER Policy and Research Institute, there are seven million functionally illiterate Hispanics 16 years or older and nearly half of them are unemployed or not in the labor force. The report defined functionally illiterate as the inability to read, write or reason well enough to find or hold a job. As of April 1986, the Hispanic population 16 years and over was 12,184,000. In a five-year period, SER hopes to serve 60,000 Hispanic youth and adults, including 8,000 in the first year of learning center operations. The Centers will serve welfare recipients, unemployed Hispanic adults, migrant farm workers, youth and soon-to-be-released prisoners. , Private funds for the program currently total $375,000, including a two-year $100,000 grant from AT&T to establish centers in New York City and Miami. Forty of the centers would be funded by the Labor Department and 40 through private funds. Pilot programs in Washington, D . C . , Denver and Milwaukee have been operating for 16 months. They have served 800 students, 70% of whom were Hispanic. The majority of the students fell between the ages of 18 and 44. Melinda Machado Calendar UCBerkeley and the Commonwealtn Club of California U . S . Sen . Paul Simon (D -Ill.) and former Mexican finance minister Jesus Silva Herzog are featured speakers . HISPANIC DRUG WORKSHOP Corpus Christi , Tex as Feb. 14 The Parents Association for Drug Rehabilitation and Educational Services is sponsoring a daylong workshop on drugs and the second annual" Family of the Year " banquet. 'THIS WEEK 1 . . SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Feb . 12 The Mexican American Alumni Association of the University of Southern California will hold a dinner to raise scholarship monies and to recognize donations made by foundations, corporations and other donors. George Pia (213) 7 43 HISPANIC CAREER FAIR San Antonio Feb. 12, 13 The U . S . Department of Labor is hosting a career fair to help increase the agency's internal Hispanic work force. Personnel representatives from Wash ington , D.C., and the Dallas regional office will accept job applications at the fair and are especially seeking computer specialists , claims examiners, accountants, economists and support staff. Eli a R. Kerr (202) 523 'RE-HISPANICIZATION' OF CALIFORNIA San Francisco Feb . 12, 13 Immigration patterns and demographic trends in California will be discussed during "The ReHis panicization of California? Challenges for the 21st Century' ' conference sponsored by Stanford University, 4 Laura Pauli (415) 723-2558 INSTALLATION BANQUET Las Vegas Feb . 13 The Latin Chamber of Commerce is hosting an installation banquet and dance. Rudy Beserra, as sociate director in the Office of Public Liaison at the White House , will be the keynote speaker. Victoria Abernathy (702) 385 7367 IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE El Paso , Texas Feb. 13 , 14 A symposium for journalists about the U . S . Im migration and Reform Act is being sponsored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Region 5 . The conference includes a tour of the t:l Paso/ Juarez border by the U .S. Border Patrol. Roy Ortega (915) 532-7777 JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA Gainesville, Fla. Feb. 13-1 7 A conference on " The Jewish Presence in Latin America" will address the Latin American Jewish response to anti-Semitism, intellectual life and pre serving historical memories . The conference is sponsored by the University of Florida ' s Center for Latin American Studies and the Center of Jewish Studies. Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880 Feb . 9 , 1987 Ronn i e Rincon (512) 851 HISPANICS IN SCIENCE Chicago Feb . 14 The Association of Puerto Ricans in Science and Engineering is sponsoring a workshop on Hispanic . involvement in those two fields during the national convention of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Eric Muiioz (718) 470 COMING SOON MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Howard University Washington , D . C . Feb . 18 Virginia Stewart (202) 636 CORRECTION: The Coalition of Concerned Hispanics is presenting a Michigan Hispanic State wide Leadership Conference and not the Michigan Spanish Speaking Commission as listed in the Jan. 5 state events calendar for 1987. The event will be in Flint, Mich. , on June 18 and the contact person is Paul Vasquez (313) 766-7418. Weekly Report regrets any inconvenience to the commission and our readers. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS LATINO P UBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHI PS FOR 198788 The Inter Univers ity Prog r am for Lat i n o Re se arc h* and the Soci al Sci e nce Research Cou n c i l announce three fellowsh ip comp e t itions. • P o s tdoctoral Fello w ships workin g w i t h one o f the centers o f the I UP or with the Broo k ings In s titut i o n , Washing ton, D .C . One , year stipend of $22,50 0. D e ad li n e : M a rch 1 5, 1987. • SummerWorkshop In Sta tistical Methods a t the U n iv e r sity o f M i c hig an, Ann Arb o r . Trans, portation an d l iving expenses for f our w eek program. Deadline: April 24, 1987 . • Latino Graduate Student Trainin g Seminar at Stanford University . Transportation and l i v i n g ex penses for two-week summer program. De adl i ne: M arch 15, 1 9B7. F o r m ore inf ormation contact IUP/SSRC, Center fo r Mexican American Studies, University of Te x as at Austin , SSB 4.120, Austin, TX 78712 (512) 471-1817. JOURNALISM Dean, Un i versity of Colorado School of Journalism and Mass Communication The Universit y of Colorado is a strong, research-oriented university. The School is one of eight profe s sional s c hool s o n t h e Boulder campus. The School offers instructi o n in adve r ti s in g , broadcasting, n e ws-editor i al and public relations. A c c redited by AG EJMC, the S choo l ha s 15 fulltime faculty, 320 junior and s enior majors and 55 Master's students. The De a n ' s mission includes leading the e xpansion of th e School' s gradua t e and rese a r c h p ro g r ams, encouraging c urricul u m advances to promote the Schoo l w ithin th e state and th e nation, innovati vely managing the School's ope r ations and building a st ro ng s ense of community within th e pro gram w hile at the same time encouraging diversity by recruiting minority faculty a nd students. Quali fications: The success ful applicant will be an individual of nationa l stature and outsta n ding credentials. Prefe r enc e will be given to individuals with demonstrated leadership, a stro n g academic and resear c h record, experience in obtaining g rants, and fund-raising and pro f essional accomplishments. Applica ti on : Direct nominations, inquiries and applications(with at least three names we ca n contac t for refer e nces) postmark ed by March 15, 1987, to Professor Sandra Moriarty, Cha i r , D ea n's Sea rch Committee, Sch o ol of J o urnalism and Mass Communication, C ampus Bo x 287, Univ ers it y o f Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 80309. Sp e cial n o t i ce: The Univ e r s it y of Colorado has a strong institutional comm itm ent to the principl e o f di v e rsity. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in rec e ivin g a ppli cations f rom a bro ad spectrum of peopl e in c luding women, members of ethnic minorities a n d di sa bl e d indi v id uals. * The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de E t d . p t . -H I c II I I I COMMUNICATION S D I RECTOR s u 10 5 ueromquenos, un er 0 ege; OFFICE F U RNITUR E Nation aiCiviiRi ghtsOrganiz ationseeksperson Ce nt e r f o r M e x ic a n A m erican St u d ies, Universi ty , _________ ;__ ______ ........J_ to direc t and implement MALDEPs nati o nal of Texas: Chicano Studies Research Cen te r , Univers ity of C ali fo rnia, L os A ngeles; and the U SE D OFFICE F URNITUREG o od q u a lity medi a s t r a tegy a n d produce p u b lica t ionS: such Stanford Center fo r Ch ican o Researc h . d (202) 628 40 4 as the Annu a l Report and newsletter. R e quires goo pnce 7 ex t e ns ive c on tac t w i t h th e p ress a nd public GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION O PP ORTUNITIES AT THE LIBR ARY OF CONG RESS Gra duate Cooperati ve Ed ucati o n o p port unities du r i .ng 1987 m ay be o ff ered in th e followin g f iel ds: Librarian/Library Technician Social Science A nalyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Res earch Assist ant Foreign Affai r s Analyst/Resea rch Assistant Eligibility includes person s w ith m as t er's and/or doct ora t e de g ree a n d full t i m e grad u a t e st u de nts pursuing m as t er's a nd/or doctorate degree s in th e abo ve fields. Perso n s int e r e st e d in com p e ting for those oppo rtunities should c om p lete and submit a St a nd a r d Form 171 , Pe rson a l Qu a lifi c ations S t a t e m en t , indicating for w hich o f t h e above fi e ld s t he y w i s h to be co n s id e red. T h e program c on s is t s of 9 0 o r 120-day appointme nts t o professional work assignments p unctuated w ith o rientat ions and seminars ab o ut the Libra ry, its mission a nd opera tions. S ession s for 1987 w ill be off e red January-April an d June-Sept e mber. Individuals interested in th e June-September sessi o n must submit their applications no later than April 10, 1 987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120-day exp e rience, individuals with completed master' s degree s will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment. For additiona l information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator a t (202 ) 2 87. IMMEDIAT E OPENING r elat i o n s firms w or k ing wi t h funders Requiremen ts: . BNMA i n Englis h /journa l ism or com muni c at ions. i Prof i c i e n t in Englis h/S p ani s h( wr ittenand s poken). I Excellent w r i ting a nd r adi o/TV skills, e x p erience in p ubli c i ty work a nd prod uci n g pu blication s . send r e sum e with r e f e r e n c e s to: Ms. A. Her nimdez, MALDEF, 6 3 4 S. S p ring St. , 11th Floor, Los Ang e l e s , Calif. 90014. B y 2 /1 7 /87 . . ENTRY LEVEL POS I T IONS: wi t h Mont g omery County, Md . , are availabl e o n a continuous ba sis. Call (301) 251252. PROG RAM DIRECTOR DIRECTOR; T w o positions with KUVO, Denver's bilingual public radio station. One fundraising; one pro gramming. Seek e x pe r ienced candidates. Salary $16,000$24,000 depending on qualifications. Apply by April!, contact Florence Hernandez Ramos, KUVO, P.O. Box 11111, Denver, Colo. 80211. (303) 9345880. The American Friends Service Committee, a religious , pacifist, social change organi zation, seeks: Education and communications director to work with the immigration law enforcement monitoring Mexico-U .S. Border Program. The director is responsible for gathering and processing data on abuses and for developing and implementing a varied and effective com munications strategy to advance the goals of the border program ' s work in defense of immigration rights. DEAR PERSONNEL No other publication or system lets you target a nat1onal pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place a Corporate Classified ad , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washingtc;:m, o .c: 20005 or phone(202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received(mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (En Tuesday w111 be m Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Qualifications: Strong experience in print and broadcast media, knowledge of immigration i s sues, fluent Spanish. Send resume : Bahia Roberts, American Friends Service Committee, 1501 Cherry St, Philadelphia, Pa . 19102. Affirmative Action Employer. Hi s p a ni c Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by----------Title -:------------Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name _________ _ Bill To------------Address __ _ City, State & Zip ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment The Festival began Feb . 6 with the prem iere of Robert Altman' s Beyond Therapy. Latino films to be screened through Feb . 15 include La pelicula del rey by Argentine director Carlos Sorin, La ciudad y los perros by Peru ' s Francisco J. Lombardi , Hombre mirando a/ sudeste by Lorenzo Quinteros from Argentina and La gran fiesta by Puerto Ricds Marcos Zurinaga. 6 REEL NEWS: Critics around the country are raving about Platoon, a likely 1988 Oscar contender that features actor Charlie Sheen in a starring role . Platoon is " the most impressive movie to deal with t he f ighting in Vietnam," writes Time ' s Richard Corliss , while the Washington Post ' s Paul Attanasio calls it "the f irst serious youth movie in ages , for at its heart , the war is treated as a rite of passage in its most intense form." Chile' s Miguel Littin , Mexico's Paul Leduc and Colombia's Jorge Ali Triana were among the Latin American directors invited to a Latin American Film Fest i val held Feb . 1-8 at the University of California Santa Barbara campus. About Sheen, whose father Martin and brother Emilio Estevez are well-established film personalities, Attanasio writes: " (he) exerts a quiet authority at the film's center, a bright alertness -he' s not sensitive, exactly, bu t sensitized ... he anchors the more florid performances of th e two sergeants warring for his soul. " ONE LINERS: Some 50 Cuban American singers have recorded-Yo vuelvo a ti, a song and videocassette expected to raise $1 million for a non-profit group to aid exiled Cubans ... The world' s top Hispanic performers return this week to Chile's Vifla del Mar for the beach resort's song festival that begins Feb . 11 . . . A Baile Anual de San Valentin ,to be held Feb . 15 in Washington , D . C . , brings together the Honduran group Los profesionales, Guatemalan marimba player Fidel Funes, Salvadoran singer Alvaro Torres and the Chilean group Lucho Munoz con Los Galas . . . and Cuban American Fernando Bujones has accepted an invitation to dance with the Soviet Union' s Bolshoi Ballet in November, while the Bolshoi ' s 61-year-old prima ballerina Maya Plisetskaya will take over, also in November, as artistic director of Spain's Ballet Nacional ... Platoon , w hich grossed $11.1 million in its first four weeks of release, won three Golden Globe awards Jan. 31, including " b est picture." Another Hispanic actor is featured in the box office hit Critical Condition, which grossed $5. 7 million during its f irst week of release . Ruben Blades plays an orderly who be f riends Richard Pryor's character in this hospital comedy from Paramount Pictures. Films from Latin America, meanwhile, are featured prominently in the IV Miami Film Festival which concludes this week. AMERICAS 2001: Roberto Rodriguez, former editor of Caminos magaz ine, plans to launch a monthly magaz i ne ,Americas2001, . this spring. He is aiming for an in i tial publication date of March 15 with a run of 20,000 copies. The magazine , he says, will " provide a forum for the discussion and debate of ideas and issues that affect the Latino community. " Plans call for free distribution o f the first 48-page issue at major Hispanic conferences around the country through the spring and summer. Guidelines for writers, artists and photog r a phers are available by contacting Rodriguez care of P .O. Box 4028, Termi n al Annex , Los Angeles, Calif. 90051-2028 (213) 223-0317. Individuals wanting a copy of the prototype by mail should send $ 1 .50 to cover postage I and handling . I RADIO DRAMA: Juan Guedell a profiles Eduardo Caballero, Caballero Spanish Media president, in February's Hispanic Business magazine. Caballero left Cuba at age 29 in 1961 , settled first in Dallas (where, says Guedella , " he could understand neither the English nor the Spanish vernacular of the Texas Mexican Americans " ) , and moved to New York, where he founded CSM in 1973. Caballero now represents 72 of the nation ' s largest radio stations, with annual billings of $22 million last year . SHORT TAKES: Univision'sSunday sports magazine debuted Feb. 1 (5:30 p .m. EST/PSl) ... Th e Washington Times quotes estimates by " knowledgeable sources" that Mexico magna t e Mario Va z quez Rana is losing money at UPI at the rate of about $20 million a year . . . The Na tiona l Association of Hispanic Journalists h a s disbanded its nominations _:-Antonio Mejias-Rentas committee and is inviting members to run for its eight officer and eight r egional c;lirector positions by collect i ng 18 signatures of voting members. Petitions must be postmarked no later than March 11 . . . PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTORY: The Hispanic Public Relations Association has published a professional services directory t for Greate r Los Angeles listing more than 100 p . r . -related service prov i ders. Included are ad agencies, phofQgraphers, printers , video production units, graphic design shops , public relations and marketing . firms, mailing houses , translation services and a number of event production and other business services . lfs available for$1 0 from H PRA by contacting Stella Bustos, 1412 1 /4 N . Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles , Calif. 90046. Telephone: (213) 851-1338. HPRA, the only organization of its kind, was founded in 1984. -Charlie Ericksen HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Chief, we 3ot one of -them illegal aliens. 0 0 a national publi c a t i o n of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' S treet NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234280 or 234-0737 Pub lis h er. H ec tor Eri c ks en-Mendo z a Edit or. F e l ix Perez R epo rting : Cha rli e Erick sen , A nt o nio Mejias-R e n t as , Meli n d a M acha do, Mi ke Ore n stein No porti o n of H is pani c Lin k W eek ly Report m a y be reprodu ced o r broadcast in any form w i t ho ut advance permiss ion. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. T rial subscription (13 Issues) $2. 6 . C ORPOR ATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per w or d . Disp l a y a d s are S35 p e r qo lumn inch . Ads pla c ed b y T u e s da y wi ll run in We ek ly Reports mailed F r ida y o f s ame week. Multipl e use rates o n request. n u.s. IMMIGRATiON SERViCE g Hi spa ni c Lin k Weekly R e p o rt