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Hispanic link weekly report, February 16, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 16, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.), the House Majority Whip, says President Reagan “seems seriously disengaged from the business of governing” and invites him to “come off the sideline.” ... The Colorado Senate state affairs committee votes unanimously to recommend confirmation to the full senate of Irene Ibarra as executive director of the state Department of Social Services. Ibarra, 34, was nominated by Gov. Roy Romer... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo names Victor Marrero, former head of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, to his Task Force on Bias-Related Violence... Nebraska Gov. Kay Orr proposes phasing out state financial support over two years to the state’s Mexican American Commission. . . First Lady Nancy Reagan lunches with Diane
G6mez and eight other teen-agers as part of a of ^ouga
America” promotion. G6mez, born deaf 18 years ago, seftree atf&f tutor for other Miami-area deaf youths and plays varsity volleyball... Executive Educator magazine chooses Mario Chac6n, principal of San Francisco’s Horace Mann Middle School, as one of the 100 most outstanding school managers of North America. . . Hispanics in Denver demand a closed meeting with Mayor Federico Pefta to discuss the passing over of Rudy Sandoval, the city’s highest ranking Hispanic police officer, to fill a vacant division chief job... Nancy L6pez, who sat out 1986 on maternity leave, wins the Ladies Professional Golf Association’s Sarasota Classic. Because it was her 35th career win, Lopez becomes the 11th player to qualify for the LPGA Hall of Fame... Miami resident Cristy Pena convinces a Dade County judge that she was ticketed unnecessarily for driving in a car-pool lane without a visible passenger. Seven months pregnant, Peha was carrying a fetus that was legally a person, the judge held...

Gifted Hispanics Underidentified in Classrooms
Thousands of gifted Hispanic children are being denied access to “gifted and talented” classrooms in the U.S. public education system, federal Department of Education figures show.
The children are kept out by cultural prejudice and poor measurement techniques employed by school administrators and teachers, and by a failure of parents to recognize their sons? and daughters? “giftedness,” a survey of nine experts has found. The survey was conducted by Weekly Report
N. M. Nixes English Only
The New Mexico State House rejected, 69-
O, Feb. 5 a proposal to make English the state’s official language.
State Rep. Martha Lambert (R-Albuquerque), the proposal's author, said she introduced the measure because “this is an English-speaking country and so many illegal aliens are becoming citizens, taking drivers’ tests and becoming jurors without knowing English.”
About 3% of all children, regardless of race or ethnic background, qualify as gifted, according to national authority James Webb, author of “Guiding the Gifted Child.”
Yet, of the nation’s 1,637,702 children in gifted programs in 1984, only 76,191 were Latino. That’s 1.9% of their total number in the school population, an underenrollment of 31,764.
By contrast, whites in gifted programs exceeded the 3% expectation rate at 4.8%, an overenrollment of nearly half a million.
Overall, Hispanics comprise 9.1% of the national public school enrollment, but only
MALDEF to Meet in LA.
The board of directors of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has chosen Los Angeles as the site for its Feb. 28 special meeting to decide whether Antonio Hernandez will be retained as president and general counsel.
4.7%,of the gifted classroom students. Percentages for other racial/ethnic groups:
Whites
Blacks
Asians
% of school enrollment 71.2% 16.2 2.5
% of gifted enrollment 81.4% . 8.4 5.0
“There is no test for giftedness as such,” says Ernest Bernal, a pioneer researcher on gifted Hispanic children. “Being gifted and being smart are not the same thing: It’s more than just intelligence. Gifted children are creative and engage in long-term highly risky activities”
Intelligence, or IQ tests, achievement tests and teacher nominations are the most common methods used to select children for gifted programs Bemal sees many primarily Spanishspeaking Hispanics hampered on timed tests because of their dependency on another language.
continued on page 2
GIFTED AND TALENTED ENROLLMENT IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS KINDERGARTEN THROUGH 12TH GRADE - 1984
HISPANIC WHITE HISPANIC WHITE
Number of % of Number of % of Number of % of Number of % Of
Students total Students total Students total Students total
ARIZONA NEW MEXICO
Total 111,126 21.5% 322,010 62.3% Total 119,652 43.4% 123,743 44.9%
Gifted 2,003 9.2 17,854 82.4 Gifted 1,252 19.7 4,719 74.3
CALIFORNIA NEW YORK
Total 1,285,907 29.2% 2,288,976 52.0% Total 362,158 13.6% 1,714,668 64.4%
Gifted 25,575 11.1 160,436 69.3 Gifted 15,410 9.4 111,088 67.9
FLORIDA TEXAS
Total 130,272 8.1% 1,087,108 67.7% Total 891,266 27.9% 1,807,962 56.6%
Gifted 785 1.9 38,920 91.8 Gifted 17,413 15.0 89,232 76.6
ILLINOIS NATIONAL
Total 133,995 8.0% 1,081,163 64.7% Total 3,598,511 9.1% 28,106,295 71.2%
(Sifted 2,427 2.7 66,943 75.4 Gifted 76,191 4.7 1,333,849 81.4
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
SOURCE Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights 1984 Elementary and Secondary Public School Civil Rights Survey. National Total Public School Enrollment: 39,89 7,451.



Prisons Address Latino Inmate Growth
The New York state Commissioner of Correctional Services said Feb. 3 that the Hispanic population in state prisons has doubled to 29% within the last 15 years, creating a need for cultural and linguistic adaptations.
‘The shift” said Commissioner Thomas Coughlin, will have “as pronounced an effect on this system as did the shift from a basically white population for the first time since the 1960 a”
Petrita Hemandez-Rojas, director of Hispanic and Cultural Affairs for the correctional body, told Weekly Report Feh 5 that prison authorities now conduct more programming, such as antidrug abuse and literacy classes, in Spanish She added that a task force is currently trying to adapt prison programs to Hispanic^ cultural needs Some prison employees now get training in Hispanic culture and “colloquial” Spanish, she pointed out
A Parents Guide on ‘Giftedness’
Weekly Report has compiled a list of characteristics to detect giftedness especially for Hispanic parents, from guidelines suggested by several noted experts including Ernest Bernal, who has done substantial research on gifted Mexican American children, and James Webb, author of “Guiding the Gifted Child:’’
1. Uses an unusually large vocabulary
2. Speaks earlier than most other children
3. Teaches self to read and write before entering school
4. Acquires a second language, such as English
5. Comprehends the subtleties of word meanings 6 Displays persistence and intense concentration
7. Possesses long attention span for a wide range of interests
8. Asks a limitless number of questions and has a highly developed curiosity
9. Displays interest in experimenting and doing things differently, including risk-taking behavior
10. Puts ideas or things together in unusual ways
11. Retains a great deal of information, such as phone numbers or names
12. Plays on words, creates puns and has an unusual sense of humor
13. Demonstrates leadership ability
14. Plays with older children, likes to talk to adults
15. Accepts home responsibilities, takes care of siblings
16. Is streetwise - can adapt in the Anglo-dominated community
17. Displays unusual talents in music, drawing, rhythms or other art forms
Additional criteria for preschool or primary children:
1. Likes to make up complicated games that' try to organize people and things
2. Creates imaginary playmates (
Sanitation Ruling Cheered, Doubted
The representatives of two well-known farm worker organizations disagreed on the effect of the Feb. 6 ruling by a three-judge federal appeals court panel ordering the U.S. Labor Department to issue sanitation guidelines for the nation’s field workers.
The decision brings to a close, at least temporarily, a 14-year battle that has been waged by farm worker representatives, the growers’ lobby, Congress, the courts and the executive branch of the federal government. At issue was whether farm workers should get drinking and washing water and toilets.
Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, called the ruling “a hollow exercise that doesn’t make much of a difference” at the local level. “Growers will always find a way to circumvent the law because OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)is severely understaffed,” Velasquez added.
OSHA, a branch of the Labor Department, is
N.Y. Resolves Police Suit
New York City’s Police Department now has 765 new sergeants after resolving time-consuming lawsuits filed by Hispanic and black groups over a 1983 exam.
The officers were promoted Feb. 3, almost four years after they took the sergeant’s test. Of those promoted, 605, or 79%, are white, 94, or 12.28%, are black and 66, or 8.62%, are Hispanic.
Those percentages are equal to the percentages of each group that took the original test.
There are a total of 27,730 police in New York. The department is 76.7% white, with Hispanics and blacks each making up 11.3%/
Groups representing black and Hispanic officers claimed the June 1983 exam had a “disparate impact’ on them because only 4.4% of Hispanics and 1.6% of blacks passed,; compared with 10.6% of whites.
After a suit was filed, the city decided it could not win and in 1986 agreed to promote officers through a quota system.
charged with enforcing such guidelines.
“A union is the only thing that will make a difference,” said Velasquez.
Valerie Wilk, an occupational health consultant for the Farmworkers Justice Fund in Washington, D.C., said the Justice Fund “was overjoyed with the decision.” She said that farm workers belonged to the only occupation in the country not covered by federal sanitation standards. Wilk added that the organization was reluctant to claim a victory until the Labor Department decided whether it will appeal.
The department has 45 days to seek a reheari ng by the panel. Seven days after that OSHA is required to issue guidelines.
The federal government estimates that 500,000 field workers could be affected by the guidelines.
Latino Joblessness Static
The Hispanic unemployment rate for January remained relatively unchanged from the previous month, growing to 10.6% from 10.5%, said the U.S. Department of Labor.
The overall jobless rate stayed at 6.7%.
1984 OVER/UNDER REPRESENTATION Gifted Classes K-12
Hispanic White
Arizona - 1,330 + 8,194
California -13,002 + 91,764
Florida - 3,123 + 6,307
Illinois - 1,592 + 34,509
New Mexico - 2,337 + 1,007
New York + 4,546 + 59,648
Texas - 9,324 + 34,994
National -31,764 +490,661
According to Dr. James Webb, author of “ Guiding the
Gifted Child,” an average of 3% of all children are gifted. The above figures reflect the number of children missing from or overrepresented in gifted classrooms when this guideline is* applied to 1984 U.S. Department of Education gifted enrollment figures.
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
INS to Open 108 Centers
Amnesty applications, as required by the new immigration law, will be accepted at 108 special Immigration and Naturalization Service centers, the agency announced Feb. 6.
The centers will open May 5, the first day undocumented aliens may apply to become legal residents, and INS anticipates a ceiling figure of 3.9 million applications, said INS spokesperson Verne Jervis.
Under the immigration bill signed by President Reagan on Nov. 6, amnesty may be given to aliens residing continuously in the United. States before Jan. 1,1982.
The agency plans to publish a complete list of the 108 centers by Feb. 25. All major Hispanic cities, including San Diego, Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and Chicago, will have one or more offices.
Gifted Encounter Hurdles
continued from page 1
Educators “tend to look at students who are most proficient in English and then recommended them,” agrees Richard Ronvik, director of the gifted and talented program for the Chicago schools.
The fact that there is no standard federal definition of giftedness and that each state has its own guidelines compounds the problem for Latino children.
When Joyce Carrasco moved a few years ago from Atlanta, Ga, where her son, Sam, was in a gifted class, to East Chicago, Ind., she met with resistance when she tried to enroll him in the gifted program there The school demanded a local teacher nomination Eventually Sam tested into the University of Chicago lab school for gifted students.
“A parent is the most important element in identifying a gifted child,” Carrasco reflects Bilingual or limited-Engllsh-proficient students face even more hurdles for getting into such programs “Ifs hard for a lot of teachers to believe that gifted youngsters can come from any background,” says Marilyn Gaddis, education professor at Southwest Texas State University. - Melinda Machado
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Melinda Machado, guest columnist
Bright and Brown
Confusion over the English word “key” let Jose Cardenas, executive director of the Intercultural Development Research Association in San Antonio, finish first grade in just six weeks.
Cardenas, who spoke only Spanish, began school at a time when Texas had no bilingual education classes. Six weeks into his first semester, he was enamored of the pronunciation of “key” in his teacher's statement,
“All pianos have keys.”
He asked a classmate what the word meant.
His friend answered “Haves," which are those small metal instruments used to open locks, instead of “teclas,” the black and white ivories used to play a piano.
Cardenas, whose family had a piano without a Have, insisted to the teacher that pianos do not need keys to be^ played. Arguments ensued and he was sent home.
His father returned to school with the boy, also vehement in his insistence that the family piano had no Have, but still played. The< exasperated teacher refused to allow Cardenas back into class. The principal resolved the dispute by promoting him to the second grade. Cardenas went on to enter the University of Texas at age 15.
Stories like these abound in classrooms throughout the nation, but the endings are not always so happy for precocious, gifted Hispanic students. Often their “giftedness” is misinterpreted and they are overlooked in the selection process for talented students.
BILINGUAL ‘GIFTEDNESS’ NOT UNDERSTOOD
“Bilingual education is almost viewed in a remedial sense, that it is some kind of compensatory program,” says Jerry Barkan, director of gifted education in Tucson, Ariz., and co-chair of the National Network of Bilingual/Gifted Education. “The whole conception of bilingual giftedness, to many educators, is something that doesn’t even cross their minds.”
For others, like Barkan and Robert Segura, a professor at California State University in Fresno, it has offered an exciting challenge. Segura initiated a program called MAGIC- Migrant and Gifted Impact Center - in 1981 to “help the students break the bonds of those compensatory education perspectives. They’ve been able to flow out of comp ed and into gifted programs, and thats tremendous'” The MAGIC program is now incorporated into the Fresno school district. It includes peer nomination.
“Encendiendo Una Llama" (Lighting a Flame) in Connecticut, the oldest federally funded bilingual program for gifted children, uses a more informal process to identify its participants, says its director, Dan Barstow.
The program first conducts open recruitment, which considers nominations from teachers, parents and students. This group then forms a talent pool which is approximately 15% of the total school population. Pull-out programs, such as enriched instruction in math or science, are developed for this group: And eventually, gifted students are identified.
TEACHER TRAINING ESSENTIAL
Because many programs rely on teacher-nomination, it is crucial that educators recognize the learning and motivational styles of culturally different students. “Unless we do teacher training, their gifts continue to go unrecognized,” says Ann Shaw, Texas’ director of gifted education.
On the federal level, the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Children and Youth Education Act, introduced Jan. 8 by Rep. Mario Biaggi (D-N.Y.), would place the highest priority on the identification of limited-english-proficient students, economically disadvantaged and handicapped youngsters. The bill authorizes $25 million to identify gifted children and strengthen special programs for them.
Shortly after the year2 000, Hispanics are projected to become the nation’s largest minority group. Currently, 20% of its population is under age 10. If these potential Einsteins and Edisons- and Chang-Dfazes- are not discovered and encouraged now, they may never be able to contribute to their country.
(Melinda Machado is a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report Feb.
SMOKELESS SIGNALS: This month The Miami Herald noted with a lengthy profile piece the first anniversary of Sergio Pereira’s tenure as Dade County’s first Latino county manager.
It included this paragraph describing the 42-year-old cigar-chewing cubano as he sat with his six “soberly dressed” Metro department heads (all male - three Anglos, two blacks and one Hispanic):
“He’s a fashion plate in a fitted European shirt, silk socks and a dark, tailored suit. His manicured nailsgleam. He wears gold, lots of gold - a gold Rolex watch, a gold pinky ring, a gold bracelet and, hidden under his shirt, a gold chain on which the Virgin of Guadalupe dangles next to a Playboy bunny charm.”
But beneath the gold plating the article found a competent, effective and industrious manager.
As for the cigar, one of his department chiefs confided that it was very useful in measuring his boss’s moods:
“When he’s talking to you and the cigar's on the left, you’re OK. When it’s on the right, you’re getting warm. When the cigar is in the middle, you’re in trouble.”
CULTURAL HORDES: Proponents of California’s Proposition 63 raised and spent more than a million dollars in November -compared with opponents’ $75,000 - in their successful drive to convince 73% of California’s voters to make it an “official English” state.
All for naught?
This past week, Stanford, UC-Berkeley and the Commonwealth Club brought together economists, social scientists, educators and politicians from across the nation to contemplate the probability that “California, a Mexican territory for 300 years before it was ceded to the United States in 1846, may become a primarily Hispanic culture once again before the turn of the century.. ”
The two-day event, open to the public, was titled: “The Re-Hispanicization of California? Challenges for the 21 st Century.”
That alone should stir nativist groups to send out a few million more mailers to tap the bolsas of timid “real Americans.” Somebody’s got to stop this onslaught of tacos, patios, Fernandomania and ranchero music once and for all.
The pitch is almost as good as Oral Roberts’ latest warning to the faithful.
THIS WEEK’S LIST: Our friends at the Independent Sector and United Way Institute have assembled 35 experts as speakers and panelists at a March 19-20 “spring research forum” in New York covering such topics as women in philanthropy, voluntary organizations and philanthropic activities among minority groups
How many of those 35 are Latina or Latino?
Need I tell you? They couldn’t find one who was qualified.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY: For the past seven years, Bob Valenzuela, who runs a video rental/used book store in San Francisco, has closed his establishment one day each year to honor a former U.S. president on his birthday.
No, notin February for George. Valenzuela closed on Jan. 9-for Richard Nixon. t - Kay Barbaro
Quoting.
NESTOR RODRIGUEZ, University of Houston sociologist, talking about his 2-year study on the estimated 50,000-100,000 undocumented Salvadorans in that city.
"Instead of undocumented workers, maybe they ought to be called undocumented consumers."
JORGE I. DOMINGUEZ, Harvard professor and author, in a Jan. 11 analysis written for The Miami Herald:
“Cuba’s internal circumstances today, and current U.S. migration policy toward Cuba, are setting classic conditions to repeat the MarieI events of 1980."
16,1987 3


COLLECTING
GIFTED MATERIALS, RESOURCES: Several newsletters* magazines* books and organizations are dedicated to helping parents and educators understand gifted children and help develop their talents: ORGANIZATIONS
American Association for Gifted Children, P.O. Box 2745, Dayton, Ohio 45401 (513)461-1687
Council for Exceptional Children, 1920 Association Drive, Reston, Va. 22091 (703)620-3660
National Association for Gifted Children, 4175 Lovell Road, Box30, Circle Pines, Minn. 55014 (612) 784-3475
National Network for Bilingual Gifted Education, c/o Daniel Barstow, Webster School, 5 Cone St., Hartford, Conn. 06105 (203) 722-8931
PAM PH LETS/HANDBOOKS
“The Culturally Diverse Gifted and Talented Child” is a one-page handout available free from: The Council for Exceptional Children, Gifted and Talented Division. Send a self-addressed, stamped envelope with your request
Free brochures on the “Encendiendo Una Llama” program for gifted students and the identification of such students are available from: Daniel Barstow, Project Director, “Encendiendo Una Llama.” (Address above.)'
A free catalog of 48 publications dealing with gifted and talented students and issues is available from: The National State Leadership Training Institute on the Gifted and Talented, 535 E Main St., Ventura, Calif. 93009.
N EWSLETTERS/M AGAZIN ES
The Gifted Child Today, P.O. Box 66654, Mobile, Ala. 36660; $17.50 for a one-year subscription.
Roeper Review, P.O. Box 329, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013; $17 fora one-year subscription.
Gifted Children Newsletter: for subscription information and a sample copy, write: Gifted and Talented Publications, P.O. Box 115, Sewell, N.J. 08080.
BOOKS/RESOURCES
“Guiding the Gifted Child,” J. Webb, E. Meckstroth, S. Tolan; Ohio Psychology Publishing Co., 5 E. Long St., Suite 610, Columbus, Ohio 43215.
“Gifted Programs for the Culturally Different,” E.M. Bernal Jr.; National Association for Secondary School Principals Bulletin, 1976.
For a two-page bibliography including books and periodical publications on gifted children, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Attention: Melinda Machado.
As part of the Stanford Chicano Graduate Students Association colloquium, Angela Valenzuela will discuss “Chicanos and Conformity.”
Mary Ann Seawell (415) 725-1945
HISPANIC FAMILY LECTURE Silver Spring, Md. Feb. 20
The Rev. Francisco Ponce will discuss the family and intergenerational differences with parents of youths 12 to 18 years, during a lecture sponsored by the National Hispanic Council on Aging’s ProyectoAmor, a 'drug and alcohol abuse prevention program.
'Raquel Baldwin (301) 745-2521
HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM DAY Washington, D.C. Feb. 20
National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Region 3, and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., are co-sponsoring a Journalism Day to inform minority high school students about educational and career opportunities in the media. Time magazine correspondent Ricardo Chavira will be the luncheon speaker.
Jocelyn Cordova (202) 783-6228
HISPANIC GIFTED CHILDREN Charlotte, N.C. Feb. 20, 21 The National Association of Gifted Children will discuss steps for unbiased identification of culturally diverse children, including Hispanics, during the organization’s mid-winter session. The conference is open to the public.
Helen Whaley (612) 784-3475
4 heo. to, ino/ Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC HEALTH CARE Chicago Feb. 17
A policy symposium on “Black and Hispanic Health Care Issues^ will be held during the American Association for the Advancement of Science Convention. Eric Munoz, head of the research division, department of surgery for the Long Island Jewish Medical Center, will be a featured speaker.
Eric Munoz (718) 470-7212
HISPANIC YOUTH SEMINARS
Feb. 18 Liberal, Kansas
Feb. 19 Garden City, Kansas
Feb. 20 Dodge City, Kansas
,The Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs,
along with local community colleges, is sponsoring a
series of youth seminars aimed at reducing high
school dropoutsand helping students prepare for their
future.
Steve Ramirez (913) 296-3465
MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Feb. 19-20 Howard University's School of Communications is sponsoring its 16th annual communications conference for minorities. The Rev. Jesse Jackson will be the keynote luncheon speaker Feb. 19. Recruiters from major newspapers, television and radio stations will be
featured
Virginia Stewart (202) 636-7491
LULAC BANQUET Washington, D.C. Feb. 19
LULACs Northeast Regional Office is hosting a banquet to benefit the organization’s Hispanic Dropout Prevention Program in the D.C. metro area. House Majority Whip Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) will be the guest speaker.
Yolanda L6pez (202) 376-0391
CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP San Antonio Feb. 19, 20
A Texas legalization/citizenship workshop is being sponsored by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials as part of its national effort to promote U.S. citizenship. The two-day session will address legalization, employer sanctions, how to prepare clients for the naturalization exam and community1 resources
Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536
CUBAN STUDIES SEMINAR Coral Gables, Fla Feb 20
“The Cuban Revolution: Critical Junctures^’ is the topic of the Cuban studies seminar sponsored by the Institute of Interamerican Studies at the University of Miami The seminar will deal with domestic and foreign policies and problems of the Cuban regime. Georgina Olano (305) 284-4303
CHICANO GRADUATE COLLOQUIUM Stanford, Calif. Feb. 20
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
LULAC WEEK CELEBRATIONS League of United Latin American Citizens Councils around the nation are sponsoring balls, dances, and banquets in honorof LULAC week, Feb. 15-21.
Regional offices in Chicago and San Antonio are hosting, as they do each year, Blanco y Negro balls. In Washington, D.C., Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.), the House Majority Whip, will address a luncheon banquet staged by the Northeastern region to raise scholarship funds. The function will recognize Maria Tukeva, executive director of the Multicultural Career Intern Program, as the LULAC educator of the year for the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area.
A reception in Arlington, Va., hosted by Arlington LULAC Council 4606 will also be held for the LULAC Scholarship Fund.
Nationally, this year's celebrations are geared to create awareness of LULACs interest in supporting English-Plus initiatives at local and state levels and to reduce the Hispanic high school dropout rate.
HISPANIC STARS PITCH IRS Four Hispanic stars - Rita Moreno, Cesar Romero, Alejandro Rey and Henry Silva - are among a dozen selected by the Internal Revenue Service to cut television and radio commercials explaining this year's IRS changes and available services. Reys and Silva’s pitches are in Spanish.
BEATRICE FOUNDATION COMPETITION BEGINS Chicago non-profit organizations may be eligible for the 1987 Beatrice Awards of Excellence. Three $25,000 awards will go to organizations that have improved their management procedures within the last three years and one $50,000 award will go to a group whose management performance over a 3-to-5 year period has resulted in improved or expanded programs and services. For more information contact the foundation’s executive director, Marlita C. Conley at 2 North LaSalle St., Chicago, III. 60602 (312) 558-4173.


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
IMMEDIATE OPENING
The American Friends Service Committee, a religious, pacifist, social change organization, seeks:
Education and communications director to work with the immigration law enforcement monitoring project Mexico*U.S. Border Program.
The director is responsible for gathering and processing data on abuses and for developing and implementing a varied and effective communications strategy to advance the goals of the border program’s work in defense of immigration rights.
Qualifications: Strong experience in print and (broadcast- media, knowledge of immigration issues, fluent Spanish.
Send resume: Bahia Roberts, American Friends Service Committee, 1501 Cherry St, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Affirmative Action Employer.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md.,. government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408.
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields:
Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant
Eligibility includes persons with master’s and/or doctorate degree and full-time graduate students pursuing master’s and/or doctorate degrees in the above fields Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered.
The program consists of 90 or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the June-September session must submit their applications no later than April 10, 1987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment.
For additional information, contact Carmen M6ndez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620.
The following position closes March 5, 1987.
REALTY SPECIALIST $26,634 - $32,634 Ann. #36407ADPW
Professional and technical work securing agreementsandnegotiatingforthe acquisition, lease and sale of real property for Arlington County. Employee writes reports, conducts negotiations, determines fair market value of real property, coordinates with other County agencies, civic organizations, community groups and commissions, researches land records, makes presentations and other related duties.
Requires BA in Public/Business Administration or related field plus two years experience in real property acquisitions and negotiations, real estate appraisal, right-of-way negotiations or related field.
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th St Arlington, Va 22201 EOE
Completed Official Arlington County Application Form must be received by closing date of March 5,1987, by 5 pm. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 orTDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1987-88
The Inter-University Program for Latino Rett ; search* and the Social Science Research Council ; announce three fellowship competitions
• Postdoctoral Fellowships wolfing with to I one of the centers of the IUP or with the fl: Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. One ty! year stipend of $22,500. Deadline: March 15, m 1987.
• Summer Workshop In Statistical Methods \& - at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Transit; portation and living expenses for four-week K) program. Deadline: April 24,1987.
‘ • Latino Graduate Student Training Seminar to at Stanford University. Transportation and living ;e expenses for two-week summer program. Dead-Mi Un* March 15,1987.
For more information contact IUP/SSRC, Center a); for Mexican American Studies, University of iT Texas at Austin, SSB 4.120, Austin, TX 78712 Si (612) 471-1817.
*The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de S Estudios Puertorriquehos, Hunter College; i) Center for Mexican American Studies, University to of Texas Chicano Studies Research Center, IJ, University of California, Los Angeles and the 8 Stanford Center for Chicano Research.
H Hispanic Link Weekly Report
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are# available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
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COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR National Civil Rights Organization seeks person to direct and implement MALDEPs national media strategy and produce publications such as the Annual Report and newsletter. Requires extensive contact with the press and public relations firms workingwith funders Requirements BA/MA in English/journalism or communications Proficient in English/Spanish(writtenand spoken). Excellent writing and radio/TV skills experience in publicity work and producing publications. Send resume with references to: Ms A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles Calif. 90014. By 2/17/87.
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Arts& Entertainment
STILL PICASSO: One of the world's best known modern artists continues making headlines around the world 14 years after his death.
When his widow committed suicide last October, it was speculated that 61 works by Pablo Picasso, readied for an exhibition in Madrid, would be kept by the Spanish government. Jacqueline Picasso had said it was her intention to give them to Spain, but the Ministry of Culture eventually announced that the oil paintings, drawings and sculptures would be returned to Picasso’s heirs in France since Spain had no judicial base to retain them.
A few weeks after, heirs of the parishioner in the Spanish province Santiago de Compostela found three Picasso paintings in the back room of the parish house. The deceased priest had bought them on a visit to Paris in 1920.
In December, five Picasso sketches 'Were stolen from Spain’s National Musuem of Contemporary Art Earlier this month the sketches were returned - in perfect condition - by a priest who says he received them under confession. (The priest, Jose Luis Martin Vigil, is also a writer who says the thief trusted in him because he is the author of several crime novels.)
Picasso is also remembered in the Uhited States, where critics are.
admiring the national tour of some 200 drawings from the artisfs sketchbook- believed to be the last works of Picasso u nknown to the public. The tour, which began in New York early last year and was seen in Los Angeles through last month, remains in San Francisco's Palace of the Legion of Honors through March 29.
The exhibit, Je Suis le Cahier The Sketchbooks of Picasso, will continue the three-year tour in Phoenix, Minneapolis, Chicago, Boston, Fort Worth and Fort Lauderdale before going to cities in Canada and Europe.
Closing this week in Los Angeles is Tauromaquia: Goya, Picasso and Bullfights, a collection of prints by the two Spanish painters at the University of Southern California.
And in New York, Picassos owned by the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art - including the masterpiece Gertrude Stein - have found a new home in the museum’s new wing.
ONE LINERS: Guitarist Carlos Montoya offers a recital Feb. 17 at Long Beach, Calif.’s, Terrace Theater... The Brazilian Dona Florand Her Two Husbands, based on the novel by Jorge Amado, airs on Galavision on Feb. 17,20,23... The Rosa Montoya Bailes Flamenco Company performs world premieres by Montoya and Charles Ferguson Feb. 20, 21 at San Francisco’s Herbst Theater. . .Tito Puente headlines Camaval Internacional ’87 Feb. 21 at The Galleria
in San Francisco... ' " ' _
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MEDIA SHARES BLAME: New York’s Newsday just completed a series on “ Racism in the City,” reporting views by whites, blacks and Hispanics on worsening race tensions there.
An accompanying poll showed Hispanics lay the blame on: whites and blacks equally (25%), whites (9%), blacks (6%), media (17%). politicians (11%) and police (8%).
Whites blamed the tensions mostly on the media-39%, while 17% of blacks blamed the media.
In the telephone poll, which reached 908 residents, the three groups were also asked who fundamentally disliked or feared whom. The reported Hispanic response was:
Whites dislike blacks (37%) and fear them (58%).
Whites dislike Hispanics (31%) and fear
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them (35%).
Hispanics dislike blacks (28%) and fear them (16%).
Hispanics dislike whites (27%) and fear them (19%).
Blacks dislike whites (49%) and fear them (21%).
Blacks dislike Hispanics (24%) and fear them (17%).
In recent months, race-related instances of violence against Latino youths by both whites and blacks have been reported in the New York press. In one incident black youths began beating up a fair-skinned Hispanic youth but stopped when they heard him speak Spanish.
NAM ES: Manuel de Dios, editor of El Diario La Prensa in New York Daisy Esposito, director of the Spanish division of New York ad agency Young& Rubicam, and Luis Nogales, president of Los Angeles-based Eco international television network will appearon a special media
edition of “Images/Imageries” on the New Jersey Network Feb. 21, with a repeat Feb. 23....
Annette L6pez-Munoz, a Radio Marti reporter who was transferred from her White House beat after asking President Reagan a question during a televised news conference in violation of agency guidelines, has resigned... The White House announced that Federal Communications Commission member Dennis Patrick will replace retiring chairman Mark Fowler. Senate confirmation of Patrick a conservative ex-White House staffer who is expected to continue Fowler’s sweeping deregulation policies, is not required.
Chicago writer Achy Obejas has joined the staff of the Committee to Re-elect Harold Washington as its media liaison... First Lady of Nicaragua Rosario Murillo has confirmed as an April 23 speaker at the National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles...
- Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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... ,(;"" Making The News This Week G6mez and eight other teen-agers as part of a If America" promotion. Gomez, born deaf 18 years ago, 'fet\el. .,., tutor for other Miami-area deaf youths and plays varsity volleybal L .. Executive Educator magazine chooses Mario Chac6n, principal of San Francisco's Horace Mann Middle School, as one of the 100 most outstanding school managers of North America. . . Hispanics in Denver demand a closed meeting with Mayor Federico Peiia to discuss the passing over of Rudy Sandoval, the city's highest ranking H i spanic police officer, to fill a vacant division chief job ... Nancy L6pez, who sat out 1986 on maternity leave , wins the Ladies U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho (b-Calif .), the House Majority Whip, says President Reagan " seems seriously disengaged from the business of governing" and invites him to "come off the sideiine . " . . . The Colorado Senate state affairs committee votes unanimously to recommend confirmation to the full senate of Irene Ibarra as executive director of the s tate Department of Soc i al Services . Ibarra, 34, was nominated by Gov. Roy Romer ... New York Gov . Mario Cuomo names Victor Marrero, former head of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, to his Task Force on Bias Related Violence . . . Nebraska Gov. Kay Orr proposes phasing out state financial support over two years to the state ' s Mexican American Commission . . . First Lady Nancy Reagan lunches with Diane . Professional Golf Association's Sarasota Classic . Because it was her '35th career win, Lopez becomes the 11th player to qualify for the LPGA Hall of Fame ... Miami resident Cristy Peiia convinces a Dade County judge that she was ticketed unnecessarily for driving in a car pool lane without a visible passenger. Seven months pregnant , Peiia was a fetus that was legally a person , the judge held .... . HISPANIC LINK W KLY REP . Feb. 16, 1987 Gifted Hispanics Underidentified in Classrooms Thousands of gifted Hispanic children are being denied access to " gifted and talented'' classrooms in the U.S. public education system, federal Department of Educat i on figures show. The children are kept out by cultural prejudice and poor measurement techniques employed by school administrators and teachers, and by a failure of parents to recognize their sons' and daughters' "giftedness, • a survey of nine experts has found The survey was conducted by Weekly Report N. M. Nixes English Only The New Mexico State House rejected , 690 , Feb . 5 a proposal to make English the state ' s official language . State Rep . Martha Lambert (A-Albuquerque) , the proposars author, said she introduced the measure because "this is an English . speaking country and so many illegal aliens are becoming citizens , taking drivers' tests and becoming jurors without knowing English. " About 3% of all children, regardless of race or ethnic background, qualify as gifted , accord ing to national authority James Webb, author of "Guiding the Gifted Child." Yet, of the nation ' s 1,637,702 children in gifted programs in 1984, only 76,191 were Latino. Thafs 1 .9% of their total number in the school population, an underenrollment of 31,764. By contrast , whites in g i fted programs ex ceeded the 3% expectation rate at 4 . 8 % , an overenrollment of nearly half a million . Overall , Hispanics comprise 9.1% of the national public school enrollment , but only . MALDEF to Meet in LA. The board of directors of the Mexican Amer ican Legal Defense and Educational Fund has chosen Los Angeles as the site for its Feb . 28 special meeting to decide whether Antonio Hernandez will be retained as president and general counsel . 4 . 7% ,of the gifted classroom students. Percentages for other racial/ethnic groups: % of school % of gifted enrollment enrollment Whites 71. 2% 81.4% . Blacks 16.2 8 . 4 Asians 2 . 5 5.0 " There is no test for giftedness as such, " says Ernest Bernal , a pioneer researcher on gifted Hispanic children. " Being gifted and being smart are not the same thing: lfs more than just intelligence . Gifted children are crea tive and engage in long-term highly risky activities. " Intelligence , or 10 tests, achievement tests and teacher nominations are the most common methods used to select children for gifted programs. Bernal Sees many primarily Spanish speaking Hispanics hampered on timed tests because of their dependency on another language . contin'!ed on page 2 GIFTED AND TALENTED ENROLLMENT IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS KINDERGARTEN THROUGH 12TH GRADE-1984 HISPANIC WHITE HISPANIC WHITE Number of % of Number of % of Number of % of Number of % of Students total Students total Students total Students total ARIZONA NEW MEXICO Total 111. ,126 21.5% 322,010 62.3% Total 119,652 43.4% 44.1% Gifted 2,003 9.2 17,854 82.4 Gifted 1,252 19.7 4 ,719 74. 3 CALIFORNIA NEW YORK Total 1,285 ,907 29.2% 2 ,288,976 52.0% ' Total 362,158 13.6% 1,714 ,668 64.4% Gifted 25,575 ' 11.1 160,436 69.3 Gifted 15,410 9.4 111 ,088 67.9 .FLORIDA TEXAS Total 130,272 8.1% 1 ,087,108 67.7%: Total 891 , 266 27.9% 1 ,807,962 56.6% Gifted 785 1.9 38,920 91.8 Gifted 17,413 15.0. 89,232 76.6 ILLINOIS NATIONAL Total 133,995 8.0% 1 , 081 ,163 64.7% Total 3 ,598, 511 9 .1% 28,106,295 71.2% 2 ,427 2.7 66,943 75.4 Gifted 76,191 4.7 1 ,333,849 81. 4 -'Hispanic Link Weekly chart SOURCE: D e p a rtm e n t o f Education, O ff ic e f o r Ci vil R i gh ts 1 9 8 4 Ele m en ta r y and Secon d a ry Publi c Sch oo l Ci vil Rights S urv ey . N a t iona l T o tal Publi c Sch oo l Enrollm e nt: 39,89l,45 1 .

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l' . T. nsons Address Latino Inmate Growth A Parents Guide on 'Giftedness' The New York state Commissioner of Cor rectional Services said Feb. 3 that the Hispanic population in state prisons has doubled to29% within the last 15 years, creating a need for cultural and linguistic adaptations. "The shift," said Commissioner Thomas Cough Iii\ will have "as pronounced an effect on this system as did the shift from a basically white population for the first time since the 1960 s." Petrita Hemandez-Rojas, director of Hispanic and Cultural Affairs for the correctional body, told Weekly Report Feb. 5 that prison authorities now conduct more programming, such as anti drug abuse and literacy classes, in Spanish. She added that a task force is currently trying to adapt prison programs to Hispanics' cultural needs. Some priSon employees now get training in Hispanic culture and "colloquial" Spanish, she pointed out Weekly Report has compiled a list of charac teristics to detect giftedness, especially for Hispanic parents, from guidelines suggested by several noted experts, including Ernest . Bernal, who has done substantial research on gifted Mexican American children, and James Webb, author of "Guiding the Gifted Child:" 1. Uses an unusually large vocabulary 2. Speaks earlier than most other children 3. Teaches self to read and write before entering school 4. Acquires a second language , such as English 5 . Comprehends the subtleties of word meanings 6. Displays persistence and intense concentration . 7 . Possesses long attention span for a wide range of interests 8. Asks a limitless number of questions and has . a highly developed curiosity 9. Displays interest in experimenting and doing things differently, including risk-taking behavior Sanitation Ruling Cheered, Doubted The representatives of two well-known farm worker organizations disagreed on the effect of the Feb . 6 ruling by a three-judge federal appeals court panel ordering the U.S. Labor Department to issue sanitation guidelines for the nation ' s field workers. The decision brings to a close, at least temporarily, a 14-year battle that has been waged by farm worker representatives, the growers' lobby, Congress , the courts and the executive branch of the federal government. At issue was whether farm workers should get drinking and washing water and toilets. Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, called the ruling "a hollow exercise that doesn't make much of a difference" at the local level . "Growers will always find a way to circumvent the law because OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) f s severely uriderstaffect," Velasquez added. _ a branch of the Labor is N.Y. Resolves Pol ice Suit New York City's Police Department now has 765 new sergeants after resolving time consuming lawsuits filed by Hispanic and black groups over a 1 983 exam . The officers were promoted Feb. 3, almost four years after they took the sergeanfs test. Of those promoted, 605, or 79%, are white, 94, or 12.28%, are black and 66, or 8.62%, are Hispanic. Those percentages are equat to the percentages of each group that took the original test. There are a total of 27,730 police in New York. The department is 76.7% white, with Hispanics and blacks each making up 11.3%, : Groups representing black and Hispanic officers claimed the June 1983 exam had a "disparate impacf' on them because only 4.4% of Hispanics and 1.6% of blacks passed, : compared with 1 0.6% of whites. After a suit was filed, the city decided it could not win and in 1986 agreed to promote_ officers through a quota system . 2 charged with enforcing such guidelines. "A union is the only thing that will make a difference, " said Velasquez . Valerie Wilk, an occupational health consultant for the farmworkers Justice Fund in Washington, D.C., said the Justice Fund"was overjoyed with the decision." She said that farm workers belonged to the only occupation in the country not covered by federal sanitation standards . Wilk added that the organization was reluctant to claim a victory until the Labor Department decided whether it will appeal. The department has 45 days to seek a rehearing by the panel. Seven days after that OSHA is required to issue guidelines . The federal government estimates that 500,000 field workers could be affected by the guidelines. Latino Joblessness Static The Hispanic unemployment rate for January remained relatively unchanged from the pre vious month, growing to 1 0 . 6% from 1 0.5%, said the U .S. Department of Labor. The overall jobless rate stayed at 6.7%. 1984 OVER/UNDER REPRESENTATION Gifted Classes K-12 Hispanic White Arizona 1,330 + 8,194 California -13,002 + 91,764 Florida 3 ,123 + 6,307 Illinois 1,592 + 34,509 New Mexico 2,337 + 1,007 New York + 4,546 + 59,648 Texas -9,324 + 34,994 National -31,764 +490,661 According to Dr . James Webb , author of " Guiding the Gifted Child, " an average of 3% of all children are gifted . The above ligures reflect the number of children missing from or overrepresented in gifted classrooms When this guideline is applied to 1984 U.S. Department of Education gifted enrollment figures. Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart 10. Puts ideas or things together in unusual ways 11. Retains a great deal of information , such as phone numbers or names 12. Plays on words, creates puns and has an unusual sense of humor 13 . Demonstrates leadership ability 14. Plays with older children, likes to talk to adults 15 . Accepts nome responsibilities, takes care of siblings 16. Is streetwise can adapt in the Anglo dominated community 17. Displays unusual talents in music, drawing, rhythms or other art forms Additional criteria for preschool or primary children: '1. Likes to make up compl i cated games that try to organize people and things 2 . Creates imaginary playmates INS to Open 1 08 Centers Amnesty applications, as required by t . he new immigration law, will be accepted at 108 special Immigration and Naturalization Service centers, the agency announced Feb. 6 . The centers will open May 5, the first day undocumented aliens may apply to become legal residents, and INS anticipates a ceiling figure of 3 . 9 million applications, said INS spokesperson Verne Jervis . Under the immigration bill signed by P r esident Reagan on Nov . 6, amnesty may be given to aliens residing continuously in the United . States before Jan . 1, 1982. The agency plans to publish a complete lis t of the 1 08 centers by Feb. 25. All major Hispanic cities, including San Diego, Los Angeles , Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and Chicago , will have one or more offices. Gifted Encounter Hurdles continued from page 1 "tend to look at students who are most profidEmt in English and then re com mended them," agrees Richard Ronvik, director of the gifted and talented program for the Chicago schools. The fact that there is no standard federal definition of giftedness and that each state has its own guidelines compounds the problem for Latino children. When Joyce Carrasco moved a few years ago from Atlanta, Ga., where her son, Sam, was in a gifted class, to East Chicago, Ind., she met with resistance when she tried to enroll him in the gifted program there. The school demanded (1 local teacher nomination. Eventually Sam tested into the University of Chicago lab school for gifted students. "A parent is the most important element in identifying a gjfted child," Carrasco reflects. Bfllngual or limilea-Engfish-proficient stu dents face even more hurdles for getting into such programs. "lfs hard for a lot of teachers to believe that gifted youngsters can come from any background," says Marilyn Gaddis, education professor at Southwest Texas State University. -Melinda Machado Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Melinda Machado, guest columnist Bright and Brown Confusion over the English word "key'' let Jose Cardenas, executive director of the Intercultural Development Research Association in San Antonio, finish first grade in just six weeks. Cardenas, who spoke only Spanish , began school at a time when Texas had no bilingual education classes. Six weeks into his first semester, he was enamored of the pronunciation of "key'' in his teacher's statement, "All pianos have keys . " He asked a classmate what the word meant. His friend answered "/laves," which are those small metal instruments used to open locks, instead of "tee/as, " the black and white ivories used to play a piano. , Cardenas, whose family had a piano without a 1/ave, insisted to the teacher that pianos do not need keys to be . . played. Arguments ensued and he was sent home. His father returned to school with the boy, also vehement in his insistence that the family piano had no /lave, but still played. The<' exasperated teacher refused to allow Cardenas back into class. The principal resolved the dispute by promoting him to the second grade. Cardenas went on to enter the University of Texas at age 15. Stories like these abound in classrooms throughout the nation , but the endings are not always so happy for precocious, gifted Hispanic students. Often their "giftedness" is misinterpreted and they are ov e rlooked i n the selection process for talented students. BILI NG UAL 'GIFTEDNESS' NOT UNDERSTOOD " Bilin g ual education is almost viewe d in a remedial sense, that it is some kind of compensatory program," s a ys J e rry Barkan , director of g i ft e d e ducation in Tucson , Ariz. , and co-c hai r o f th e National Network of B ilingual/Gifted Education. "The whole conception of bilingual gift e d ness , to many educ ators, is something t hat doesn' t even cross t hei r minds. " For others, like Barkan and Robert Segura, a professor at California State University in Fresno, it has offered an e x citing challenge. Segura initiated a p rogram called MAGIC Migrant and Gifted Impact Center in 1981 to " help the students break the bonds of those compensatory education perspectives. They've been able to flow out of comp ed and into gifted programs , and thafs tremendous! " The MAGIC program is now incorporated into the Fresno school district. It includes peer nomination. " Encendiendo Una Llama " (Lighting a Flame) in Connecticut, the oldest federally funded bilingual program for gifted children, uses a more informal process to identi fy its participants, says its director, Dan Barstow. The program first conducts open recruitment, which considers nominations from teachers, parents and students. This group then forms a talent pool which is approximately 15% of the t otal school population. Pull-out programs, such as enriched instruction in math or sc ience, are developed for this group. And eventually , gifted students are identified. TEACHER TRAINING ESSENTIAL Becau se many p r ograms rely on teacher-nomination, it is crucial t hat educator s recognize the learning and motivational s t yles of , culturally different students. " Unless we do teacher training, their gifts continue to go unrecognized, " says Ann Shaw, Te x as ' director of gifted education. On the federal level , the Jacob K . Javits Gifted and Talented Children and Youth Education Act , introduced Jan. 8 by Rep . Mario Biaggi (D-N .Y.), would place the highest priority on the identification of limited-english-proficient students, economically disadvantaged and handicapped youngsters. The bill authorizes $25 million t o identify gifted children and strengthen special programs for them. Shortly after the year2 000, Hispanics are projected to become the SMOKELESS SIGNALS: t _ his month T[1e Miami Herald noted with a lengthy profile piece the first anniversary of Sergio Pereira's tenure as Dade County's first Latino county manager. It included this paragraph describing the 42-year-old cigarchewing cubano as he sat with his six "soberly dressed" Metro department heads (all male-three Anglos, two blacks and one Hispanic): ' " He ' s a fashion plate in a fitted European shirt, s ilk socks and a dark, tailored su it. His manicured nails gleam. He wears gold, lots of gold -a gold Rolex watch , a gold pinky ring , a gold bracelet hidden under his shirt, a gold chain on which the Virgin of Guadalupe dangles next to a Playboy bunny charm." But beneath the gold plating the article found a competent, effective and industrious manager. As for the cigar, one of his department chiefs confided that it was very useful in measuring his boss ' s moods: "When he ' s talking to you and the cigar's on the left, you' re OK. When ifs on the right, you're getting warm. When the cigar is in the middle, you ' re in trouble. " CULTURAL HORDES: Proponents of California's Proposition 63 raised and spent more than a million dollars in Novembercompared with opponents' $75,000in their successful drive to convince 73% of California' s voters to make i t an "official English" state. All for naught? This past week, Stanford , UC-Berkeley and the Commonwealth Club brou ght together economists, social sc ientists, educators and poli t icians from across the nation to contemplate the probability that "California, a Mexican territory for 300 years before it was ceded to the Uni t ed States in 1846, may become a primarily Hispanic c ulture once again before the turn of the century . . . " The two-day event, open to the public, was titled: "The Re Hispanicization of California? Challenges for the 21st Century." That alon e should stir nativist groups to send out a few million more mailers to tap the balsas of timid " real Americans. " Some body's got to stop this onslaught of tacos, patios, Fernandomania . and ranchero music once and for all . The pitch is almost as good as Oral Roberts' latest warning to the faithful. THIS WEEK ' S LIST: Our friends at the Independent Sector and United way Institute have assembled 35 experts as speakers and panelists at a March 19-20 "spring research forum" in New York covering such topics as women in philanthropy, voluntary organizations and philanthropic activities among minority groups. . How many of those 35 are Latina or Latino? Need I tell you? They couldn' t find one who was qualified. HAPPY 81 RTH DAY: For the past seven years, Bob Valenzuela, who runs a video rental/used book store in San Francisco, has closed his establishment one day each year to honor a former U.S . president on his birthday. No, not in February for George. Valenzuela closed on Jan. 9-for . Richard Nixon. • :.. Kay Barbaro Quoting. . . . NESTOR RODRIGUEZ, University of Houston sociologist, talking about h i s 2-year study on t he estimated 50,000-1 00,000 undocumented Salvadorans in that city: "Instead of undocumented workers, maybe they ought to be called • undocumented consumers. " nation ' s largest minority group. Currently, 20% of its population is JORGE I. DOMINGUEZ, Harvard professor and author, in a Jan. under age 1 o . If these potential Einsteins and Edisons-and Chang1 1 analysis written for The Miami Herald: Diazes-are not discovered and encouraged now, they may never be "Cuba's internal circumstances today, and current migration able to contribute to their country. policy toward Cuba, are setting Classic conditions to repeat the Marie/ (Melinda Machado is a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service . ) eve'!_fs of 1980 . " . H is p a m c Link W ee kly Report Feb . 16 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING GIFTED MATERIALS; RESOURCES: Several newsletters, magazines, books and organizations are dedicated to helping parents and educators understand gifted children and h -elp develop their talents: -ORGANIZATIONS American Association for Gifted Children, P . O . Box 2745, Dayton, Ohio 45401 (513) 461-1687 Council for Exceptional Children, 1920 Association Drive, Reston, Va. 22091 (703) 620 National Association for Gifted Children, 4175 Lovell Road, Box30, Circle Pines, Minn. 55014 (612) 7843475 National Network for Bilingual Gifted Education, c/o Daniel Barstow, Webster School, 5 Cone St., Hartford, Conn. 061 05 (203) 7 22 PAM PH LETS/ HANDBOOKS "The Culturally Diverse Gifted and Talented Child' is a one-page handout available free from: The Council for Exceptional Children, Gifted and Talented Division. Send a self-addressed, stamped envelope with your request Free brochures on the "Encendiendo Una Llama " program for gifted students and the identification of such students are available from: Daniel Barstow, Project Director," Encendiendo Una Llama" (Address above.)" A free catalog of 48 publications dealing with gifted and talented students and issues is available from: The National State Leadership Training Institute on the Gifted and Talented, 535 E Main St., Ventura, Calif . 93009. NEWSLETTERS/MAGAZINES The Gifted Child Today, P . O . Box 66654, Mobile, Ala. 36660; $17.50 for a one-year subscription. Roeper Review, P.O. Box 329, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013; $17 fora one year subscription. Gifted Children Newsletter: for subscription information and a sample copy, write: Gifted and Talented Publications, P.O. Box 11 5, Sewell , N.J. 08080. BOOKS/RESOURCES "Guiding the Gifted Child," J . Webb, E. Meckstroth, S. Tolan ; Ohio Psychology Publishing Co., 5 E. Long St. , Suite 610, Columbus, Ohio 43215. "Gifted Programs for the Culturally Different," E.M. Bernal Jr. ; National Association for Secondary School Principals Bulletin , 1976. For a two-page bibliography including books and periodical public ations on gifted children, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St., N .W., Washington, D . C . 20005. Attention: Melinda Machado. featured. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U .S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) LULAC WEEK CELEBRATIONS League of United Latin American Citizens Councils around the nation are sponsoring balls, dances, and banquets in honor of LULAC week, Feb. 15. Regional offices in Chicago and San Antonio are hosting, as they do each year, Blanco y Negro balls. In Washington, D .C., Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.), the House Majority Whip, will address a luncheon banquet staged by the Northeastern region to raise scholar ship funds. The function will recognize Maria 'rukeva, executive director of the Multicultural Career Intern Program, as the LULAC educator of the year for the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. A reception in Arlington, Va., hosted by Arlington LULAC Council 4606 will also be held for the LULAC Scholarship Fund . Nationally, this year's celebrations are geared to create awareness of LULAC's interest in supporting English-Plus initiatives at local and state levels and to reduce the Hispanic high school dropout rate. HISPANIC STARS PITCH IRS Four Hispanic stars Rita Moreno, Cesar Romero, Alejandro Rey and Henry Silva -are among a dozen selected by the Internal Revenue Service to cut television and radio commercials explaining this year's IRS changes and available services. Rey's and Silva's pitches are in Spanish . BEATRICE FOUNDATION COMPETITION BEGINS Chicago non-profit organizations may be eligible for the 1987 Beatrice Awards of Excellence . Three $25,000 awards will go to organizations that have improved their management procedures within the last three years and one $50,000 award will go to a group whose management performance over a 3-to-5 year period has resulted in improved or expanded programs and services . For more information contact the foundation's executive director, Marlita C . Conley at 2 North LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. 60602 (312) 558. calendar Virginia Stewart (202) 636-7491 As part of the Stanford Chicano Graduate Students Association colloquium, Angela Valenzuela will discuss " Chicanos and Conformity . " THIS WEEK HISPANIC HEALTH CARE Chicago Feb. 17 A policy symposium on" Black and Hispanic Health Care Issues " will be held during the American Association for the Advancement of Science Convention . Eric Munoz, head of the research division, department of surgery for the Long Island Jewish Medical Center, will be a featured speaker. Eric Munoz (7.18) 470 HISPANIC YOUTH SEMINARS Feb. 18 Liberal, Kansas Feb . 19 Garden City, Kansas Feb . 20 Dodge City, Kansas , The Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs, along with local community colleges, is sponsoring a series of youth seminars aimed at reducing high school dropouts and helping students prepare for their . future . Steve Ramirez (913) 296 MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Feb. 19 Howard University's School of Communications is sponsoring its 16th annual communications conference for minorities. The Rev . Jesse Jackson will be the keynote luncheon speaker Feb. 19 . Recruiters from major newspapers, television and radio stations will be 4 LULAC BANQUET Washington, D .C. Feb. 19 LULACs Northeast Regional Office is hosting a banquet to benefit the organization's Hispanic Dropout Pre vention Program in the D.C. metro area . House Majority Whip Tony Coelho (DCalif . ) will be the guest speaker. Yolanda Lopez (202) 376 CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP San Antonio Feb. 19, 20 A Texas legalization/citizenship workshop is being sPc>nsored by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials as part of its national effort to promote U.S. citizenship. The two-day session will address legalization, employer sanctions, how to pre pare clients for the naturalization exam and community ' resources. Kelly Parks (202) 546 CUBAN STUDIES SEMINAR Coral Gables, Fla Feb. 20 "The Cuban Revolution: Critical Junctures" is the topic of the Cuban studies seminar sponsored by the institute of lnteramerican Studies at the University of Miami The seminar will deal with domestic and foreign P01icies and problems of the Cuban regime . Georgina Olano (305) 284 CHICANO GRADUATE COLLOQUIUM Stanford, Calif. Feb. 20 Feb. 16, 1987 Mary Ann Seawell (415) 725-1945 HISPANIC FAMILY LECTURE Silver Spring, Md. Feb. 20 The Rev. Francisco Ponce will discuss the family and intergenerational differences with parents of youths 1 2 to 18 years, during a lecture sponsored by the National Hispanic Council on Aging's ProyectoAmor. a • drug and alcohol abuse prevention program. ''Raquel Baldwin (301) 7 45 HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM DAY Washington, D . C . Feb. 20 National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Region 3, and the Hispanic News Media Assoc i ation of Wash ington, D.C., are co-sponsoring a Journalism Day to inform minority high school students about educa tional and career opportunities in the media. Time magazine correspondent Ricardo Chavira will be the luncheon speaker. Jocelyn Cordova (202) 783 HISPANIC GIFTED CHILDREN N.C. Feb . 20! 21 The National Association of Gifted Children will discuss steps for unbiased identification of culturally diverse children, including Hispanics, during the organization's mid-winter session. The conference is open to the public . Helen Whaley (612) 784 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I , . }. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS IMMEDIATE OPENING The Ameri c an Friends Committee, a religious , pacifist , social change organization, seeks : Education and communications director to work with the immigration law enforcement monitoring Mexico-U.S. Border Program . The director is responsible for gathering and processing data on abuses and for developing and implementing a varied and effective com munications strategy to advance the goal!> ohhe border program ' s work in defense of immigration rights . Qualifications: Strong experience in print and ; broadcastmedia, knowledge of immigration issues, fluent Spanish. Send resume : Bahia Roberts, American Friends Service Committee, 1501 Cherry St, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102.. Affirmative Action Employer. PRiNCE GEOR .GE'SCOUNTY, Md.,. govem ment office on personnel has a JOB hotlin I 1 (301) 9523408. GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields: Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Forei!Jn Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degree and full time graduate students pursuing master's and/or doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered. The program consists of 90 or 120day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the June-September session must submit their applications no later than April 10, 1987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment. For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287. GAO EVALUATOR The following position closes March s ; 1987. The U.S. General Accounting Office is looking ior individuals with a bachelor's (2 . 9 GPA or higher) or graduate degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities. REALTY SPECIALIST $26,634-$32,634 Ann. #36407 ADPW Professional and technical work securing agreements and negotiating fort he acquisition, lease and sale of real property for Arlington County. Employee writes reports, conducts negotiations, determines fair market value of real p roperty, coordinates with other County agencies, civic organizations, community groups and commissions, researches land records, makes presentations and other related duties. Requires BA in Public/Business Administration or related field plus two y e ars experience in real property acquisitions and negotiations, rea l e state right of-way negotiations or related field. ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N . 1 4th St. Arlington, Va 22201 EOE Completed Official Arlington County Application Form must be received byclosingdate of March 5, 1987, by5 pm. To request application material , please call(703) 5582167 orTDD (703) 284 (hearing impaired only) . LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1987 We are interested in business, aconomics, computer science, government or public affairs majors to work in Washington, D.C., oroneofour 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you . To obtain an application (deadline to apply is April1 0) contact U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington, D . C . 20548, Attn: Laura Talbott (202) 275. An Equal Opportunity Employer COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR National Civil Rights Organization seeks person to direct and implement MALDEPs national media strategy and produce publications, such as the Annual Report and newsletter. Requires extensive contact with the and J:lllb .lic .. , relations firmsworking"\v11ii ruooers. Requfrements: : BAtMA in English/journalism orcom mu . nications. The Inter-University Program for Latino Re-search * and the Social Science Research Council 1.1; announce three fellowship competitions. . e Postdoctoral Fellowships working with I() one of the centers of the IUP or with the 8 Brookings Institution, Washington, D .C. One 1'1 year stipend of $22,500. Deadline: March 15, Proficient in spoken) . . . 1 Excellent writing and . . in publicity work and '----------------.....1 Send resume with references to: Ms. A. Her ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. OFFICE FURNITURI; !!, .. . . . . . • Summer Workshop In Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Tran .elll portation and living expenses for four-week Kl April24,1987 ..... • Latino Greduete Student Training Seminar 111 at Stanford University. Transportation and living 1e . expenses for two-week summer program. Dead-MI 'lineo March 15, 1987. . . For more inforimition contact IUPtSSRC, Center :>1, for Mexican American Studies, University of IT Texas at Austin, SSB 4 .120, Austin, TX 78712 i!:) (512) 471-1817. *The iUP is operated jointly by the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, Hunter College; : ) Center for Mexican Studies, University !li of Texas ; Chicano Studies Research Center, 11, University of California, Los Angeles; and the e, Stanford Center for CHicano Research. H Hispanic Link Weekly Report U . S ED OFFICE FURNITURE-Good qualiiy nandez, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St. , 11th Floor, good price (202) 628. Los Calif. 90014 . . 2/1 , No publica.tion or system lets a P .ool.of Latmo executtves and professtonals wtth the effectiveness and speed of H1span1c Lmk Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail.to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washil)gton, Q .C: 20005 or phqne (202) or(202) 234. Ad copy receil(ed (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (En Tuesday wtll be m Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the ,same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by--------Title Advertiser Name __________ ....;,_ __ _ Bill To------------Address City, State & Zip ....... ,:;.._5

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Art$ & Entertainment STILL ' PICASSO: One of the world ' s best known modern artists continues making headlines around the world 14 years after his death. When his widow committed suicide last October, it was speculated that 61 works by Pablo Picasso , readied for an exhibition in Madrid , would be kept by the Spanish government. Jacqueline Picasso had said it was her intention to give them to Spain, but the Ministry of Culture eventually announced that the oil paintings, drawings and sculptures would be returned to Picasso's heirs in France since Spain had no judicial base to retain them . A few weeks after, heirs of the parishioner in the Spanish province Santiago de Compostela found three Picasso paintings in the back room of the parish house. The deceased priest had bought them on a visit to Paris in 1 920. In December, five Picasso sketches ' were stolen from Spain's National Musuem of Contemporary Art. Earlier this month the sketches were returned in perfect condition by a priest who says he . received them under confession. (The priest , Jose Luis Martin Vigil , is also a writer who says the thief trusted in him because he is the author of several crime novels.) Picasso is also remembered in the Uhited States, where critics are them(35%) . admiring the national tour of some 200 drawings from the artisfs sketchbookbelieved to be the last works of Picasso unknown to the public. The tour, which began in New York early last year and was seen in Los Angeles through last month, remains in San Francisco's Palace of the Legion of Honors through March 29. The exhibit, Je Suis le Cahier: The Sketchbooks of Picasso, will continue the three-year tour in Phoenix, Minneapolis, Chicago, Boston, Fort Worth and Fort Lauderdale before going to cities in Canada and Europe . Closing this week in Los Angeles is Tauromaquia: Goya, Picasso and Bullfights, a collection of prints by the two Spanish painters at the University of Sou t hern California . And in New York, Picassos owned by the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art including the masterpiece Gertrude Stein have found a new home in the museum's new wing. ONE LINERS: Guitarist Carlos Montoya offers a recital Feb. 17 at Long Beach, Calif.'s , Terrace Theater ... The Brazilian Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands, based on the novel by Jorge Amado, airs on Galavision on Feb. 17, 20, 23 . .. The Rosa Montoya Bailes Flamenco Company performs world premieres by Montoya and Charles Ferguson Feb. 20, 21 at San Franciscds Herbst Theater ... Tito Puente headlines Carnavallnternacional '8 7 Feb. 21 at The Galleria in San Francisco . . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report Hispanics dislike blacks (28%) and fear them (16%). edition of "lmages/lmagenes" on the New Jersey Network Feb. 21, with a repeat Feb . 23 .... 6 MEDIA SHARES BLAME: New York's Newsday just completed a series on " Racism in the City," reporting views by whites, blacks and Hispanics on worsen i ng race tensions there. An accompanying poll showed Hispanics lay the blame on : whites and blacks equa:Uy (25%) , whites (9%), blacks (6%) , media (17%) , politicians (11 %) and police (8%). Whites blamed the tensions mostly on the media-39%, while 17% of blacks blamed the media . In the telephone poll, which reached 908 residents , the three groups were also asked who fundamentally disliked or feared whom . The reported Hispanic response was : Whites dislike blacks (37%) and fear them (58%). Whites dislike Hispanics (31%) and fear HISPANIC LINK . WEEKLY R . EPORT . . "'' a n':t . i onal publicat i on of H 'lisp !llnlc News Service Inc. 1421;;.'N'street NW D .C. 20005 or 234.0737 .... .. . Pub lisii er..,.Hectpr Ericksen-Men , doza Per ez . . Re#ttr arlie Ericksen, Antonio MeJias-Rentas , ' a do, M : ke Julie;> spanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced any form without advance permission. scription (56 Issues) $96. , I on 11 :f lssues!'$26. . • " E CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per adsares3s per'column inch . Ads placed by ' ) • iUf(tl n flepg r ts mailed Friday of same ul fl ple use rates on request. . . Hispahics dislike whites (27%) and fear them (19%) . Blacks dislike whites (49%) and fear them (21%). Blacks dislike Hispanics (24%) and fear them (17%). . In recent months , racerelated instances of violence against Latino youths by both whites and blacks have been reported in the New York press . In one incident , black youths began beating up a fair-sk i nned Hispanic youth but stopped when they heard him speak Spanish . NAMES: Manuel de Dios, editor of El Diario La Prensa in New York, Daisy Esposito, director hf the Spanish division of New York ad agency Young& Rubicam, and Luis Nogales, president of Los Angeles-based Eco international tele vision network, will appear on a special media Annette L6pez-Muiioz, a Radio Martire porter who was transferred from her White House beat after asking President Reagan a question during a televised news conference in violation of agency guidelines, has resigned . . The White House announced that Federal Communications Commission member Dennis Patr ick will replace retiring chairman Mark Fowler. Senate confirmation of Patrick; a conservative ex-White House staffer who is expected to continue Fowler's sweeping deregulation policies , is not required. Chicago writer Achy Obejas has joined the staff of the Committee to Re-elect Harold Washington as its media liaison . . . First Lady of Nicaragua Rosario Murillo has confirmed ' as an April 23 speaker at the National Hi• panic Media Conference in Los Angeles ... Charlie Ericksen Hispan i c L i nk Weekly Report