Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, February 23, 1987

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, February 23, 1987
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This
' Florida Gov. Bob Martinez writes to the White House suggesting two possible replacements for U.S. Attorney Robert Merkle. Martinez has been seeKing the ouster of the controversial Merkle since he publicly accused Martinez of accepting bribes while he was mayor of Tampa. .. California Gov. George Deukmejian reappoints John Acosta to the California Commission on Aging. Acosta is a member of the Santa Ana City Council. . . Joseph Fern&ndez, deputy superintendent of Florida’s Dade County Public Schools, is named by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators to a task force that will devise ways to persuade students to stay in schools in 12 cities across the nation... The Rev. Vernella Alford-Brown, 59, becomes the first Hispanic in the state of Connecticut to
be ordained as an Episcopalian deacon. Alfred-Brown is of Cuban heritage... The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California announces Lucretia Bermudez, along with two other plaintiffs, reached a settlement with the city of San Francisco for ihjuries suffered at the hands of city police during protests at the 1984 Democratic National Convention. The three plaintiffs split approximately $100,000... The Santa Ana, Calif., chapter of LULAC honors Carole Vargas, Teresa Saldivar, Olga Niebla, Judy Campos and Lydia Ledesma as Hispanic Women of the Year for their involvement in cultural and civic organizations... Ernesto Freyre, a Cuban exile instrumental in the negotiated release of 1,113 prisoners captured during the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, is buried. Freyre, 76, died of heart failure. . . Mercedes Fajardo, a longtime San Francisco entrepreneur and feminist leader among her fellow Nicaraguan women, dies at the age of 94 after a suffering a long illness...

Dropout Research Dearth Decried
Chicago Hispanics Split On Washington, Byrne
Chicago’s Hispanic voters, 7% of the electorate, are expected to split their choice between Mayor Harold Washington and former Mayor Jane Byrne in the Feb. 24 Democratic primary, according to several polls and political strategists.
“If s a very close race, as far as Hispanics are concerned, between Byrne and Washington,” said Peter Martinez, associate director of the Latino Institute in Chicago.
Also, for the first time in history, Latinos are expected to fill four aldermanic seats for full four-year terms.
Until 1983, there were no Hispanics on the 50-member Chicago Council. That year, 31 st Ward Alderman Miguel Santiago became the first. A special election held as a result of court-ordered redistricting in 1986 placed three more Hispanics on the Council and their seats are now up for re-election.
Of the 1.56 million registered voters in Chicago, Hispanics are more than 100,000 of the electorate.
In efforts to attract this vote, both Byrne and Washington have campaigned heavily on Spanish-language media and in the four inner-city Hispanic wards.
Ward Hispanic %
22 78.1%
25 73.0
26 64.2
31 59.5
This year, Hispanic registration in these four wards dropped by 3,195, according to Chicago Board of Election figures. However, the 7% registration figure remains the same as in 1983.
In these wards, Aldermen Jesus Garcia (22 nd Ward) and Luis Gutierrez (26th Ward) support the mayor and Juan Soliz (25th Ward) and Santiago are backing Byrne.
Washington has placed city clerk candidate Gloria Chevere, 34, a Puerto Rican, on his ticket. Carmen M. Lopez is running for that position in the Republican primary.
“Hispanics are a substantial block of votes which candidates have no choice but to go for. So what it means is that the agenda of the Hispanic community is taken seriously by both candidates,” Martinez said.
The failure of states and school districts to collect data on Hispanic dropouts and the differing definitions among those that,do retard efforts to measure and rectify the problem, according to educational experts and researchers.
This could hurt programs of such Hispanic groups as the League of United Latin American Citizens and Aspira, which are presently focusing on initiatives to keep Latino students in school.
If they cannot get an accurate measure on the problem, it’s difficult to formulate strategies to help solve it, Hispanic experts agree.
“The lack of dependable dropout statistics on Hispanics means that the problems that should be addressed - curriculum modification, expectations, inadequate funding and revised teaching materials - are not,” said Rafael Magadan, executive director of the Tom&s Rivera Center, a policy analysis research institute aimed at Hispanics.
Recent studies peg the national Hispanic dropout rate at anywhere from 19% to 50%.
“Anyone can take numbers and make them say whatever they want,” said Carole Bialek
Refugees Head to Canada
A substantial number of undocumented aliens, ineligible for legal status under the new U.S. immigration law, are migrating to Canada, Canadian officials reported recently.
Most of the refugees are from El Salvador and Guatemala They are often called “bus people” because of their means of travel -usually by bus from New York City.
The number of refugee applications at the Lacolle, Quebec, border station rose from 350 in November to 1,300 in January. This month, applications are averaging 100 a day compared with about 50 a month a year ago.
“We have a more liberal (refugee) policy than the United States,” said William Lundy, chief consult at the Canadian Embassy in Washington.
Under the new federal immigration law, which provides legalization for aliens who have lived here continuously since before Jan. 1,1982, there are no provisions providing legal status to refugees.
a dropout researcher with the National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, a branch of the National Education Association. “You have to be sure you are comparing apples with apples and that is difficult to do because everyone uses his or her own definition.”
In addition to the lack of standardization among measurement techniques, experts point to the reluctance of districts to collect dropout data for fear they are falling short in their responsibility to educate.
“Many of your districts are suffering from the same malady - overrepresentation of minorities among the dropouts, which puts them in a bad light,” said Sarah Melendez, associate director of the American Council on Education’s Office of Minority Concerns.
After years of pressure from Hispanic advocacy organizations, the New York City Board of Education announced Feb. 4 that it would start collecting dropout statistics according to ethnic and racial group. Aspira, an organization devoted to improving the education of Hispanics, conducted a study four years ago which put the city’s Hispanic dropout rate at 80%. A study issued late last year by the African American Institute of the State Uni-continued on page 2
Con Artists Target Aliens
Undocumented aliens are becoming»the target of “con artists” who are taking advantage of those seeking to become citizens under the new federal immigration law, according to California Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles).
During a Feb. 9 press conference in Sacramento, Torres urged passage of state legislation which would increase penalties for people charging undocumented aliens for “special favors” from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Introduced last month, the Torres bill would require the posting of signs with client’s rights in immigration consultant offices in English and the predominant language spoken in the area. A toll-free number to assist with complaints would be established.


Ad Campaign Against Japanese Products Unveiled
An advertising campaign this April to publicize a boycott on Japanese products is being planned by the American G1 Forum and other Hispanic organizations.
G.l. Forum National Chairman Eduardo Bernaldez revealed the plans to Weekly Report Feb. 16. He said a committee is being formed with representatives of the League of United Latin American Citizens and Image to coordinate boycott efforts begun in December. Bernaldez estimated $36,000 will be spent on the campaign.
Hispanic organizations were outraged after Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone said the large number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans in the United States were lowering this country s educational levels Newspaper ads, fliers and bumper stickers concerning the boycott will appear in California, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma,
Texas Utah and Washington and in cities such as Chicago, Detroit and the District of Columbia, Bernaldez said.
“We want parity,” he added.
LULAC began boycotting Japanese products Dec. 12, three monthsafter Nakasone’s remark and after negotiations with Japanese officials stalemated.
“Our interest is to see that Japanese manufacturers, who benefit from Hispanic consumers be sensitized,” said Joe Trevino, executive director of National LULAC.
“We have asked local members to evaluate products in their community as to boycott efforts and methods” he added.
LULAC is asking Japanese companies to sponsor scholarships employment and training •programs for Hispanics.
Image, an employment services organization, is conducting a selective boycott against
Sony. Annabelle Jaramillo, Image’s national president, said Sony was selected because it is one of the largest and more influential Japanese firms.
“If the Japanese have the same perception of Hispanics as Nakasone, does this mean they won’t select Hispanics to work in their plants,” she said, adding, “This is an affirmative action issue.”
Image is setting up a monitoring system to see if: its boycott is effective.
All three organizations are calling for cultural exchange programs and say they have ongoing dialogues with the Japanese Embassy in Washington, D.C.
Earlierthis month, the Rev. Jesse Jackson urged Japanese companies in the U.S. to hire and use more black, Latino and women employees, suppliers, distributors and other firms. - Melinda Machado
Faulty Dropout Data Hurts Hispanics
Court Affirms LA. as MALDEF Voting Site
A Texas state district court ruled Feb. 17, without comment, that the meeting to decide whether Antonia Herndndez will remain president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will be held in Los Angeles, not San Antonio.
The 34-member board of directors will meet Feb. 28 to determine whether Hernandez will be retained. The 15- member executive committee last month voted to replace Hernandez with former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya, an action challenged as illegal.
Judge Rose Spectoi's ruling resolves a standoff between supporters of Hernandez, who wanted the meeting in Los Angeles, and those of Anaya, who preferred San Antonio.
The board had split, 14-14, when polled on the meeting site. Each side challenged one of those votes in court Four additional votes were either late or lacked signatures
Fla. Commission Moved
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez announced Feb. 5 that the state Commission on Hispanic Affairs has been moved from the governor’s office to the state Commerce Department.
The action was part of an economic overhaul which eliminated33 jobs from the385-member governor’s staff.
Ralph Penalver, Hispanic commission chairman, said that he was assured by Martinez that the governor was in no way targeting the Hispanic Commission. The commission’s budget, once as high as $180,000, is set at $25,000 for this year. “I hope that we are able to come out of this in a situation that will allow us to function,” said Penalver. He added that the governor promised to meet with the commission at least four times a year.
The governor also eliminated or moved advocacy units for women, the disabled, American Indian and community affairs.
continued from page 1
versity system said that 62% of the state’s Hispanics eventually dropped out of school.
The city’s Board of Education recently released its 1985-86 dropout statistics, which claimed that the rate among all students had dropped from 35% to 31%.
Magallan, from the Claremont, Calif.-based Rivera Center, recommended that state legislatures take the initiative in seeing to it that local school districts keep standardized data on Hispanics.
The California state Board of Education last year began requiring that the state’s 1,040 districts keep data on Hispanics according to a consistent definition. Jim Avila, a program analyst with the Board of Education’s High Risk Youth Liaison Division, said the state requires information on attrition rates
INS to Consider ‘Wall9
Concrete barricades or other barriers may be constructed along the flat terrain between Tijuana and San Diego County, an Immigration and Naturalization Service official; said Feb! 11.
Harold Ezell, INS western regional coordinator, said he is concerned about aliens driving across this isolated area They accounted for one-third of the 1.7 million undocumented workers arrested along the border last year.
The proposal, which also includes plans to reinforce a fence stretching from the Pacific Ocean eastward, will be submitted to INS headquarters this month.
“It’s ludicrous. A solution won’t be found in a Berlin wall,” said Herman Baca, chairman of the Committee on Chicano Rights in San Diego.
Ezell said he hopes to have the fence reinforced and barriers constructed by this fall.
for racial/ethnic groups rather than dropout statistics.
“Attrition rates follow students throughout their academic careers and do not give just a one-year reading, as dropout rates do,” he said. Dropout rates do not track students who claim to have transferred, he added The Hispanic high school attrition rate for California seniors in the 1985-86 school year was 45%, said Avila That compared with 30% overall.
Although there is no accepted national definition of how to measure the dropout rate, the federal government does collect, every 10 years, such data on Hispanics. Magalldn said the data was a useful reference point but incomplete because of sampling errors.
“Until we adequately address the dropout problem, our students will continue to suffer in terms of educational attainment and under1 education," added Magallan.
- Felix Perez
Alvarado Candidacy Nixed
A school board in the West Side of Manhattan, New York, said Feb 12 that Anthony Alvarado, former New York City Schools Chancellor, was rejected as a candidate for superintendent of the local school district.
While Alvarado was initially considered to be the front-runner for the $83,000-a-year job, the members voted against him because of the notoriety surrounding his resignation as chancellor, said a member.
Alvarado, who now heads an adult literacy and education program run by several unions, resigned in 1984. He did so after it was uncovered that he accepted more than $80,000 in loans from subordinates, had thousands of dollars in outstanding parking tickets and used employees to run personal errands
Board member Carmen Alvarez disagreed with the rejection, saying “he had a great deal to offer.”
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Maggie Rivas, guest columnist
Pinching the Gorditas
At a book party recently, a group of bilingual Hispanics was browsing through a cookbook. One of them zeroed in on a recipe for gorditas - a small, chubby version of the tortilla.
“Oh, gorditas - I love them,” she told the author effusively. “My grandmother used to make them when I was a little kid. She’d make them tiny and very fat. And after they were cooked, she would pinch them on top and spread butter on them.
“Tell me,” she asked solemnly, “do you pinch your gorditas on the top?”
- To which the author, with a mischievous gleam in his eyes and a meaningful pinching gesture, replied:
“No madam. I pinch my gorditas on the bottom.”
It took the members of our group several minutes to stop laughing and regain our composure. (Yes, I was the one who innocently asked him if he pinched his gorditas on the top.)
The humor of the moment came from the man’s use of a double-entendre that crossed linguistic lines.
Such moments occur far more often than we can remember. I do recall the year my mother sold herSinger sewing machine. As the two men hauled it out of our house, one of my sisters, about 14 years old at the time, waved sadly at the departing machine and cried out shrilly, “Bye bye, cantadora.” Bye bye, singer.
TELLING GRANDMA A JOKE
We thought it was hilarious. Recalling it, I still think it’s funny. But maybe that has more to do with my own sense of humor.
Those who live with cross-language jokes know well that you can also die by them. A play on words in one language may mean absolutely nothing in another.
First- or second-generation U.S. Hispanics should remember the experience of trying to tell their grandmother (who, of course, spoke no English) a joke they heard in school. It would go something like this:
"We I a (for abuela - grandmother) cPor que el niho enterro a su madre debajo de los escalones?” Why did the boy bury his mother under the stairs?
Wela would shrug indifferently.
“jPorque queria tener una madrastra- er, stepmotherl” (Because he wanted to have a stepmother.)
"Get it, Wela?”
Wela did not.
If s the same kind of difficulty in translating that my sister Lupe encountered when she tried to explain to a Peruvian acquaintance that my sinus condition had laid me low.
FOILED BY THE DICTIONARY
Lupe looked up "sinus” in our Spanish-English dictionary and found “senos” as the Spanish translation.
"Esta mala de los senos” Lupe told her.
“cDiscuIpe? cDe que?” was the woman’s incredulous reply.
"De los senos,” Lupe answered, by now getting confused by the woman’s alarmed reaction. “Tiene una fiebre y no puede respirar. Ha estado dormida todo el dia” She has a fever and can’t breathe. She’s been sleeping all day.
Days later, when Lupe and I discussed this, we took the time to look up “senos ” The first translation, in English, is “breasts.”
(Maggie Rivas is a writer with the business section of The Dallas Morning News.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
DISTORTED LENS: California’s much-quoted political pundit Joe Scott, who publishes a newsletter out of Sacramento, was about as wrong as you can get in his prognostication on the Gloria Molina-Larry Gonzalez race for Los Angeles City Council this month.
He predicted that the Latino “machismo” factor would force Molina into a run-off. She beat Gonzalez with 57% of the vote to his 26%.
Scott had forecast “A Latino man versus a Latino woman is going to be a bloodbath. The machismo factor in the Latino community is a very heavy matter.”
Yes, people pay for such sage commentary.
VOTE THE UGLY TICKET: Washington Post correspondent Jay Mathews, who has a history of squirting ink in our collective eye, enlightened Post readers by describing the same race as one for an “ugly” little district which twists through “crime-ridden neighborhoods full of recent immigrants, both legal and illegal, who could not vote even if they wanted to...”
SHORT MEMORY: Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez heaped praise on himself in a Feb. 12 column he personally by-lined for The Miami Herald, pointing out that in his first year in office, “almost every (campaign) promise has been fulfilled.”
High on his list of “accomplishments:” a reduction in the city’s crime rate.
Three weeks before he penned those immortal words, a thief stole his 1986 Buick Park Avenue, along with his mayor’s badge, .380 Beretta automatic pistol and police radio.
SCOOP OF THE SEASON: Ben Fernandez, the Latino community’s answer to Harold Stassen, has announced that he’ll again be seeking the ’89 Republican nomination for president
Will a fine Spanish surname help the California banker, what with promised growth in Latino voter registration?
Last time around, running in the Republican primary in Puerto Rico against a field of Anglo-Saxon surnames, he attracted about 1% of the vote. If just the island’s Fernandezes had voted for him, he’d have done better than that.
QUID PRO QUOMO: In the other camp, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo cancelled a Feb. 15 appearance at an Albany dinner sponsored by the New York Black and Puerto Rican Legislative Caucus to depart a day early for New Orleans, where he was scheduled to give another "non-political” speech.
His reason: predicted thunderstorms might have delayed his flight the following day. Caucus chair Roger Green (D-Brooklyn) suggested that the governor’s decision “sends a message... that he has other political priorities.”
By avoiding one potential thunderstorm, he assured the arrival of a bigger one later on.
CHILLY SEAT BELT BUCKLES: In Dallas, Braniff airlines created a TV ad to promote their new leather seats. Fly "sentado en cuero,” suggested their Spanish-language commercial.
That could mean sitting on leather, or hide. Or - as Miami ad folks howled when the ad ran there - it could mean sitting naked. They suggested that the ad should read, "sentado en asientos(seats) de cuero”
Countered Braniffs marketing VP Diego Garrido: “If you have some sick minds out there in Miami, that*s their problem.”
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
WALLY GEORGE, popular Los Angeles talk show host announcing that he is forming a committee to weigh his candidacy for mayor in ’88, explained:
“Los Angeles was once known as the City of Angels. It is now known as a haven for illegal aliens and street people... It’s time to clean up the city and get them out of here.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Feb. 23,1987
3


COLLECTING
Hispanic theater companies mentioned in Arts and Entertainment, and other companies that perform works geared to Latinos, can be contacted for season brochures and other information:
Cast Theatre, 804 El Centro Avenue, Hollywood, Calif. 90038 (213) 462-0265.
Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, 421 N. Ave. 19, Los Angeles, Calif. 90031 (213) 225-4044.
Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 South Spring St, Los Angeles, Calif. 90013 (213)627-6500.
Lorraine Hansberry Theater/Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, 953 De Haro St., San Francisco, Calif. 94107 (415) 474-8800.
Teatro Meta/0\6 Globe Theatre, P.O. Box2171, San Diego, Calif. 92112 (619) 231-1941.
South Coast Repertory, 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa, Calif. 92628 (714) 957-2602.
Repertorio Espahol, 138 East 27th St., New York, N.Y. 10016 (212) 889-2850.
Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre, 304 W. 47th St., New York, N.Y. 10036 (212) 354-1293.
Intar, 420 W. 42nd St., New York, N.Y. 10036 (212) 695-6134.
Gala Hispanic Theatre, 1625 Park Road NW, Washington, D.Q. 20010 (202) 234-1714.
Teatro de Bellas Artes, 2173 S.W. 8th Street Miami, Fla 33135 (305) 325-0515.
Teatro Miami, 8546 S.W.40th Street, Miami, Fla 33155(305)559-4688.
Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, 1300 Guadalupe St, San Antonio, Texas 78207 (512) 271-3151.
MEXICAN AMERICANS AND ALCOHOL: The Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center has compiled three articles on issues related to alcohol treatment, prevention, patterns, practices and specific programs. “Mexican Americans and Alcohol Related Issues,” Special Report #4, can be obtained by sending $5 to: SSMHRC, Special Reports, A352 Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 (213) 825-8886,
CONNECTING
(Late news on what’s occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
The Ford Foundation has given $914,800 in grants to Hispanic organizations, its February newsletter reported.
Two Washington, D.C.-based organizations, the National Association of Latino Appointed and Elected Officials Education Fund and the National Council of La Raza, received $160,000 and $400,000, respectively, in grants and supplements.
The Hispanic Policy Development Project, in New York City, was granted $250,000 over two years for research and analysis of policies affecting U.S. Hispanics, mainly concentrating on youth.
In San Diego, the University of California received a $54,800 supplement for a study of Hispanic women in the U.S. garment and electronic industries.
Finally, a program at Temple University in Philadelphia, for elderly Southeast Asian refugees and Hispanic migrants, was allocated $50,000.
FBI SEEKING SPANISH SPEAKERS
The FBI launched a recruitment drive in Miami this month, which will last for several weeks, geared to hiring Spanish-speaking agents and guaranteeing the option to work in the Miami office.
\ The bureau said its drug-smuggling investigations there have /created a critical need for Spanish-speaking agents.
Currently, 4% of the bureau’s 9,069 agents are Hispanic.
CHECKLIST FOR COLLEGE OFFERED
With funding in part from the Southern California Gas Company, the University of Southern California’s Office of Hispanic Programs has prepared a booklet to aid junior high and high school students prepare for college.
It includes a year-by-year checklist starting in the eighth grade.
For a free copy of “ Preparing for College: A Manual for H igh School Students,” send your name, address and current grade level to Samuel Mark, LAS Office of Hispanic Programs, USC,727 W.27th St, Los Angeles, Calif. 90007. (213)743-0977,
NEW FORD GRANTS ANNOUNCED
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MIGRANT CHILD EDUCATION Philadelphia Feb. 23-26
The 17th Eastern Stream Conference on the education of migrant children will offer 95 workshops for administrators, instructional personnel, supportive staff and parents. Hispanic culture, teaching critical thinking, dropout prevention and health programs are among topics to be addressed.
Manuel Recio (717) 783-6466
ETHNIC/MINORITY STUDIES San Diego Feb. 25-28
Writers and scholars will address “Ethnicity: Propaganda, Persuasion and Political Economy” during the National Association for Ethnic Studies’15th annual conference. A special session, “Growing Up Chicano,” will feature Lupe Cardenas and Justo Alarcon of Arizona State University and Jose L. Varaela-Ibarra of San Diego State University. Charles C. Irby (714) 625-8070
WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Los Angeles Feb. 27
The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation is 4
sponsoring the 11 th annual National Hispanic Women’s Conference, which will emphasize employment and career dynamics. Los Angeles City Council-woman Gloria Molina will present the 1987 Women of the Year awards to four Latinas.
Maritza Mendizabal (818) 703-2010
YOUTH SYMPOSIUM Hutchinson, Kan. Feb. 27
The Kansas Advisory Committee on H ispanic Affairs is sponsoring a Hispanic Youth Symposium to encourage high school students to graduate and continue planning for their future.
Ed Berger (316) 665-3552
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL HISPANIC ASSEMBLY Nashua, N. H. Feb. 27, 28
The Republican Hispanic National Assembly will hold its annual elections. Vice President George Bush is expected to address the delegates, alternates and others attending the session.
Ed Galvez (202) 662-1355
HISPANIC EDUCATION Lubbock, Texas March 1,2 Texas Tech University’s College of Education is sponsoring the second annual Texas Symposium on Hispanic Educational Issues. Possible methods for reducing the high Hispanic dropout rate will be discussed along with other issues on education from kindergarten through graduate and professional
Feb. 23, 1987
schools.
Herman Garcia (806) 742-2313
FIRST NOTICE
JOURNALISM JOBCONFERENCE: The American Newspaper Publishers Association and its Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business are sponsoring “Jump In,” a conference emphasizing non-editorial careers in newspapers. During the event, hosted by The Washington Post in Washington, D.C., on March 19-21, representatives from mid-Atlantic newspapers and newspaper suppliers will interview minority studentsand professionals seeking internships and positions on the business side of the newspaper industry. Registration deadline is Feb. 23 or as soon as possible thereafter. Contact Barbara Brown at 1-800-544-POST for more information.
COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE: Nominations for participants - scholars, professionals, students- to an Invitational Conference on Minorities and Communications are being accepted through Feb. 27. The conference will be held in Washington, D.C., on June 18-20 and is sponsored by the University of Texas’ College of Communication and the Howard University s School of Communications. Nominations should be submitted to Dr. Mary Carter-Williams, Coordinator, Continuing Education and Community Service Programs* School of Communications, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059 (202) 636-7491.
Hispanic Link Week'y Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK PROVOST
VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Empire State College, a national leader in non-traditional higher education, invites nominations and applications for the position of Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Founded in 1971 as part of the State University of New York, ESC has eight major centers located across New York State serving 6,000 students enrolled in associate, baccalaureate and master's programs ESC provides opportunities to adults for individualized instruction and degree programs which are grounded in the belief that an educational system must begin with the goals, needs and interests of students The Van Arsdale School serves working men and women from organized labor. ESC, now in its 15th year, has 600 full- and part-time faculty and staff.
The Provost reports directly to the President, sharing overall responsibility for Collegewide leadership, administration and management in all areas of external and internal College activity. Responsibilities include: serving as Acting President in his absence; coordination and integration of the planning, program and budget process; monitoring and assessing the quality of the institution’s progress
The Vice President for Academic Affairs, as chief academic officer, is responsible for the academic program. Responsibilities include: ensuring high standards of academic quality; development and new program initiatives; academic policies and procedures; employment and development of faculty. The Office of Academic Affairs also includes Continuing Education and Public Service, Assessment, Admissions, and Records.
These two positions are currently held by a single incumbent Candidates should have significant college-level teaching experience, advanced-level administrative and program-development experience, and an earned doctorate.
The Search Committee will begin consideration of applications after March 15,1987. Please send letter of application and resume to: Presidents Office, Search Committee - Room 203, Empire State College, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866.
- Full position descriptions are available on request.
- Starting date is Summer 1987.
ESC is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer.
SOCIAL WORK
Assistant Coordinator-toll free for major national health foundation in suburban Maryland. Master's in Social Work, RN or related field, with knowledge of service delivery systems. Minimum 3 years experience in information & referral or patient education, or equivalent combination of education & experience. Excellent written & oral communication skills. Ability to speak Spanish required. Send resume and salary requirements to Mrs. Ormsby, Epilepsy Foundation of America, 4351 Garden City Drive, Landover, Md. 20785 by February 28,1987. No phone calls. EOE
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
90-DAY TEMPORARY POSITIONS The Library of Congress
The Library of Congress needs applicants for some temporary positions not to exceed 90 days. These positions are:
• Clerk/Messenger, GS-303-04 ($6.16 per hour)
• Library Technician, GS-1411-3 ($5.49 per hour)
or GS-1411 -4 ($6.16 per hour),
or GS-1411- 5 ($6.20 per hour)
• Library Aid, GS-1411-02 ($5.03 per hour)
• Editorial Assistant, GS-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour)
• Editorial Clerk/Assistant GS-1087-4($6.16 per per hour)
or GS-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour)
• Experience Requirements: Experience requirements vary according to the type and level of each position.
Test Requirements: Clerk/Messenger, Library Technician and Library Aid positions do not require typing. Editorial Assistant positions require passing of the Library of Congress Clerical Test unless the applicant holds a bachelor’s degree.
Call Susan Karnes at (202) 287-5627 for further information.
How to Apply: Submit a Standard Form 171 and a copy of clerical test results as soon as possible to Susan Karnes, Recruitment and Placement Specialist, Employment Office, Room LM-107, James Madison Memorial Building, Washington, D.C. 20540.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md.,. government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board.
ENGINEERS
The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4-year engineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary: $2,206 -$2,972/mo. + benefits For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April 6. Se habla espahoL
SCIENCE DEGREES ThejCalifomiaAiriResources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam. Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salaiy $2,011 -$2,837/010.+ benefits Forfmore information call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se habla espahol.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Community Based Advocacy, Research and Planning Organization seeks an Executive Director. We seek proven experience in fundraising, program and staff development, planning, and administration. Relevant graduate degree or equivalent experience required and Spanish/ English bilingual preferred. Competitive salary. Send resume and cover letter by March 1 (no cails) to: Search Committee, Hispanic Office of Planning & Evaluation, Sewall Building, 55 Dimock St, Boston, Mass 02119.
WRITING POSITION Princeton, N.J. Writer to prepare Latin American teaching materials Native fluency and excellent grammar required. Teaching, editing or publishing experience helpful. Contact M rsOKeeffe, 1-800-257-9449 ext 257.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Media Specialist for national professional membership association, responsible for researching, writing and placing news stories, preparing promotional materials and obtaining media coverage. BA degree in journalism or communications preferred. Selfstarter with 5 years experience required. Excellent verbal and writing skills a must Working knowledge of social or mental health issues helpful. Starting salary to $26,000 plus excellent benefits. Resume to: Employment specialist, National Association of Social Workers, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910 EOE
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis Call (301) 251-2252.
Ordered by__________
Title_______________
Area Code & Phone. Advertiser Name_____
Bill To 1__________
Address ___ City, State & Zip___
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR; No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
TRAVELLING FOR THEATER: This month United States residents are seeing the best of the world’s H ispanic theater in cities across the nation. (See “Collecting” for theater company addresses and phone numbers.)
In Los Angeles, Manuel Puig’s stage version of his own novel, Kiss of the Spider Woman, continues through March 15 at the Cast Theatre. The Argentine writer says he likes his play better than the movie; the production has Enrique Sandino and Javier Grajeda in the Raul Julie and William Hurt parts.
Opening last week was Villa!, a one-man show with Julio Medina in the title role, with actor Hector Elizondo (who will be seen this spring starring in Down and Out in Beverly Hills) directing.
Ending Feb. 22 was La victims, an English-language premiere of a play toured by the Santa Barbara, Calif., group El Teatro de la Esperanza as part of the eighth Los Angeles Theatre Center Festival.
At San Francisco’s Lorraine Hansberry Theater, the West Coast premiere of Maria Irene Fornes’ musical Sarita also wound up Feb. 22. In April, the South Coast Repertory of Costa Mesa, Calif., opens Arthur Giron’s Charley Bacon and His Family.
One of California’s most successful Hispanic stage productions, Luis Valdez’s Corridos, is being staged for public television in San Francisco. Created in the ’60s by the San Juan Bautista-based Teatro Campesino, Corridos will be seen as a prime-time special this
fall with Linda Ronstadt and San Francisco ballet artist Evelyn Cisneros joining members of the original cast
On the East Coast New York’s Repertorio Espahol continues a wide repertory through May: titles include the Puerto Rican folk musical Puerto Rico: Encanto y Cancion, third-year performances of Gloria Gonzalez’s comedy Cafe con Leche, and Spanish classics such as Lope de Vega’s Fuente Ovejuna and Tirso de Molina’s El burlador de Sevilla
The Puerto Rican Travelling Theater’s season began with the English-language opening of Rene Aloma’s A Little Something To Ease the Pain, which ran through Feb. 22. It was directed by Mario Ernesto Sanchez, who premiered it in Spanish last year in Miami.
Another New York option: the Intar Theatre, which stages Milcha Sanchez-Scott’s Roosters in March.
In the nation’s capital, Gala Hispanic Theatre presents The Fanlights, one of the best known plays by Puerto Rico’s Rene Marques. Washington’s company will stage the play in Spanish and English through March 8.
In Miami, you can catch a performance of Alberto Gonzalez’ Ydice el del tabacon que en Cuba no falta nada, a satire that has Armando Roblan playing Fidel Castro, at the Miami Theater, or of the hit Midnight Follies, a transvestite revue thaf s been playing over a year at Teatro de Bellas Artes.
In San Antonio, the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center will open Silvana Wood’s Amor de hija, March 12-29, directed by the Tucson-based playwright _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TEXAS ACTION: Latino journalists in Texas spent a busy February, with about 80 of them from throughout the state and beyond participating in a two-day conference in El Paso on immigration issues and a dozen members of the San Antonio Association of Hispanic Journalists electing their 1987 officers.
The San Antonio group, which incorporated in November, elected Dino Chiecchi, a reporter with the Express-News there, as its president Feb. 7. He set a goal of signing up 30 members by June. The association staged a reception last month for the board of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Its ’87 program emphasis will be on developing motivational and educational projects for junior
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘KT Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Labby.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 percolumn inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request
high and high school students.
The Feb. 13-14 El Paso meeting featured former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya as a speaker and attracted Latino journalists from as faraway as St. Paul, Minn., according to its coordinator, Roy Ortega. Ortega, a reporter/ anchor with El Paso’s ABC affiliate, KVIA-TV, is president of the El Paso Association of Hispanic Journalists.
LOS ANGELES SIMULCAST: A five-part series on the new immigration law will be simulcast beginning Feb. 23 in Los Angeles by KCBS-TV and - in Spanish - on radio station KALI-AM. It’s a first for daily news broadcasting there.
Penny Griego, a reporter on the Channel 2-produced series, recorded the matching radio soundtrack.
MARCH CHANGES: Univision’s late evening national newscasts, inaugurated Jan.
19 as 60- minute programs, will be trimmed to half an hour and moved from 11 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. (EST) effective March 9.
The change was made to accommodate viewers who need to get up early for work, said SIN network spokesperson Maite Sara-legui. Moving into a 11 -till-midnight slot willl be a mini series from Argentina, El Vidente (The Seer)-
Galavision, the nation’s premiere Spanish-language entertainment service, will extend its programming day to 24 hours effective March 1, programming director Juanin Reid announced.
ELSEWHERE: Among state winners of the 1986 National Sportscasters and Sports-writers Association awards- to be presented April 7 - is John Hernandez, of KTUU in Anchorage, Alaska . .
- Charlie Ericksen
N EWS ,NS WESTERN REGION COMMISSIONER HAROLD EZELL WILL RECORD PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS ITEM ENCOURAGING ALIENS TO REGISTER FOR AMNESTY.
Cmon, WET BUDDIES, this is AMIGO HAROLD, your tour guide to AMNESTYLAND!
I wuz only kiddiri when I said Fd catch you and clean you and fry you.
Hey, amigos, when I called you dangerous invaders, that was just a joke. Arid my line about you overthrowing our beautiful culture - well - Hello! Hello! ANYBODY OUT THERE?

6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week be ordained as an Episcopalian deacon. heritage ... The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California announces Lucretia Bermudez, along with two other plaintiffs, reached a seftlement with the city of San Francisco for injuries suffered at the hands of city police during protests at the 1984 Democratic National Convention . The three plaintiffs split approxi mately $100,000 . . . The Santa Ana , Calif. , chapter of LULAC honors Carole Vargas, Teresa Saldivar, Olga ' Niebla, Judy Campos and Lydia Ledesma as Hispanic Women of the Yearfortheirinvolvement Florida Gov. Bob Martinez writes to the White House suggesting two possible replacements for U.S. Attorney Robert Merkle. Martinez has been seeking the ouster of the controversial Merkle since he publicly accused Martinez of accepting bribes while he was mayor of Tampa. . . California Gov . George Deukmejian reappoints John Acosta to the California Commission on Aging . Acosta is a member of the Santa Ana City Council. . . Joseph Fernandez, deputy superintendent of Florida's Dade County Public Schools, is named by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators to a task force that will devise ways to persuade students to stay in schools in 12 cities across the nation . . . The Rev . Vernella Alford Brown, 59, becomes the first Hispanic in the state of Connecticut to in cultural and civic organizations ... Ernesto Freyre, a Cuban exile instrumental in the negotiated release of 1 ,113 prisoners captured during the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion , is buried. freyre, 76, died of heart failure . . . Mercedes Fajardo, a longtime San Francisco entrepreneur and feminist leader among her fellow Nicaraguan women , dies at the age of 94 a suffering a long illness. . . Vol. 5 No.8 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REP Chicago Hispanics Split ' Dropout Research Dearth Decried On Washington, Byrne Chicago's Hispanic voters, 7% of the elec torate , are expected to split their choice between Mayor Harold Washington and former Mayor Jane Byrne in the Feb . 24 Democratic primary, according to several polls and political strategists. "lfs a very close race, as far as Hispanics are concerned, between Byrne and Washington," said Peter Martinez, associate director of the Latino Institute in Chicago. Also, for the first time in history, Latinos are expected to fill four aldermanic seats for full four-year terms. U nti 11983 , there were no Hispanics on the 50 member Chicago Council. That year , 31st Ward Alderman Miguel Santiago became the first. A special election held as a result of court-ordered redistricting in 1986 placed three more Hispanics on the Council and their seats are now up for re-election . Of the 1.56 million registered voters in Chicago, Hispan i cs are more than 100,000 of the electorate. In efforts to attract this vote , both Byrne and Washington have campaigned heavily on Spanish language media and in the four inner-city Hispanic wards . Ward Hispanic % 22 78. 1% 25 73D 26 642 31 59 . 5 This year, Hispanic registration in these four wards dropped by 3, 195, according to Chicago Board of Election figures . However, the 7% registration figure remains the same as in 1983. . In these wards, Aldermen Jesus Garcia (22nd Ward) and Luis Gutierrez (26th Ward) support the mayor and Juan Soliz (25th Ward) and Santiago are backing Byrne . Washington has placed city clerk candidate Gloria Chevere , 34, a Puerto Rican , on his ticket. Carmen M . Lopez is running for that position in the Republican primary . "Hispanics are a substantial block of votes which candidates have no choice but to go for . So what it means is that the agenda of the Hispanic community is taken seriously by both candidates," Martinez said . The failure of states and school districts to collect data on Hispanic dropouts and the differing definitions among those that, do retard efforts to measure and rectify the problem , according to educational experts and researchers. This could hurt programs of such Hispanic groups as the League of United Latin American Citizens and Asp ira, which are presently focus ing on initiatives to keep Latino students in If they cannot get an accurate measure on the ' problem, ifs difficult to formulate strategies to help solve it, Hispanic experts agree. "The lack of dependable dropout statistics on Hispanics means that the problems that should be addressedcurriculum modification, expectations, inadequate funding and revised teaching materials are not, " said Rafael Magallan, executive director of the Tomas Rivera Center, a policy analysis research institute aimed at Hispanics. Recent studies peg the national Hispanic dropout rate at anywhere from 19% to 50%. " Anyone can take numbers and make them say whatever they want," said Carole Bialek Refugees Head to Canada A substantial number of undocumented aliens, ineligible for legal. status under the new U . S . immigration law , are migrating to Canada, Canadian officials reported recently . Most of the refugees are from El Salvador and Guatemala. They are often called "bus people" because of their means of travel usually by bus from New York City. The number of refugee applications at the Lacolle , Quebec, border station rose from 350 in November to 1 ,300 in January. This month, applications are averaging 100 a day compared with about 50 a month a year ago. "We have a more liberal (refugee) policy than the United States, " said William Lundy, chief consult at the Canadian Embassy in Washington. Under the new federal immigration law, which provides legalization for aliens who have lived here continuously since before Jan . 1 , 1982, there are no provisions providing legal status to refugees . a dropout researcher with the National Foun dation for the Improvement of Education, a branch of the National Education Association . " You have to be sure you are comparing apples with apples and that is difficult to do because everyone uses his or her ow. n defi nition . " In addition to the lack of standardization among measurement techniques, experts point to the reluctance of districts to collect dropout data for fear they are falling short in their responsibility to educate. "Many of your districts are suffering from the same malady -overrepresentation of minorities among the dropouts, which puts them in a bad light," said Sarah Melendez, associa t e director of the American Council on Education's Office of Minority Concerns. After years of pressure from Hispanic ad vocacy organizations, the New York City Board of Education announced Feb. 4 that it would start collecting dropout statistics according to ethnic and racial group. Aspira , an organi zation devoted to improving the education of Hispanics, conducted a study four years ago which put the city's Hispanic dropout rate at 80%. A study issued late last year by the African American Institute of the State Unicontinued on page 2 , . Artists Target Aliens Undocumented aliens are becoming. .the target of "con artists" who are taking ad vantage of those seeking to become citizens 'under the new federal immigration law, according to California Sen. Art Torres (D Los Angeles) . During a Feb . 9 press conference in Sacra mento, Torres urged passage of state legis lation which would increase penalties for people charging undocumented aliens for " special favors'' from the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service . Introduced last month, the Torres bill would require the posting of signs with clienfs rights in immigration consultant offices in ' English and the predominant language spoken in the area . A toll-free number to assist with complaints would be established .

PAGE 2

Ad Campaign Against Japanese Products Unveiled An advertising campaign this April to publi cize a boycott on Japanese products is being planned by the American G.L Forum and other Hispanic organizations. G.l. Forum National Chairman Eduardo Bernaldez revealed the plans to Weekly Report Feb. 16. He said a committee is being formed with representatives of the League of United Latin American Citizens and Image to coordinate boycott efforts begun in December. Bernaldez estimated $36,000 will be spent on the campaign. His panic organizations were outraged after Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone said the large number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans in the United States were lowering this country's educational levels. Newspaper ads, fliers and bumper stickers concerning the boycott will appear in Cali fornia, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, . Court Affirms LA. as MALDEF Voting Site A Texas state district court ruled Feb. 17, without comment, that the meeting to decide whether Antonia Hernandez will remain pre sident and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will be held in Los Angeles, not San Antonio. The 34-member board of directors will meet Feb. 28 to detet mine whether Hernandez will be retained. The 15-member executive com mittee last month voted to replace Hernandez with former New Mexico Gov . Toney Anaya, an action challenged as illegal. Judge Rose Spector's ruling resolves a standoff between supporters of Hernandez, who wanted the meeting in Los Angeles, and those of Anaya, who preferred San Antonio. The board had split, 14-14, when polled on the meeting site. Each side challenged one of those votes in court. Four additional votes were either late or lacked signatures. Fla. Commission Moved Florida Gov . Bob Martinez announced Feb. 5 that the state Commission on Hispanic Affairs has been moved from the governor's office to the state Commerce Department. The action was part of an economic overhaul which eliminated33 jobsfromthe385-member governor's staff . Ralph Penalver, Hispanic commission chair man, said that he was assured by Martinez that the governor was in no way targeting the Hispanic Commission. The commission ' s budget, once as high as $180,000, is set at $25,000 for this year. "I hope that we are able to come out of this in a situation that will allow us to function," said Penalver. He added , that the governor promised to meet with the : commission at least four times a year. The governor also eliminated or moved advocacy units for women, the disabled, American Indian and community affairs. 2 Texas, Utah and Washington and in cities such as Chicago, Detroit and the District of Columbia, Bernaldez said . "We want parity," he added. LULAC began boycotting Japanese pro ducts Dec. 12, three months after Nakasone's remark and after negotiations with Japanese officials stalemated. "Our interest is to see that Japanese manlt' facturers, who benefit from Hispanic con sumers, be sensitized," said Joe Trevino, executive director of National LULAC. "We have asked local members to evaluate products in their community as to boycott efforts and methods," he added. LULAC is asking Japanese companies to si:>onscir scholarships, employment and training . programs for Hispanics. Image, an employment services organization , is conducting a selective boycott against Sony. Annabelle Jaramillo, Image's national president, said Sony was selected because it is one of the largest and more influential Japanese firms. "If the Japanese have the same perception of Hispanics as Nakasone, does this mean they won't select Hispanics to work in their plants," she said, adding, "This is an affirmative action issue." Image is setting up a monitoring system to see if ! its , boycott . is effective. . All three organiZations are calling for cul tural exchange programs and say they have ongoing dialogues with the Japanese Em bassy Washington, D.C. Earlier this month, the Rev . Jesse Jackson urged Japanese companies in the U.S. to hire and use more black, Latino and women employees, suppliers, distributors and other firms. -Melinda Machado Faulty Dropout Data Hurts Hispanics continued from page 1 versity system said that 62% of the state's Hispanics eve ntually dropped out of school. The city's Board of Education recently released its 1985-86 dropout statistics, which claimed that the rate among all students had dropped from 35% to 31 %. Magallan, from the Calif . -based Rivera Center, recommended that state legis latures initiative in seeing to it that local school districts keep standardized data on Hispanics . The California state Board of Education last year began requiring that the state ' s 1 ,040 districts keep data on Hispanics accord ing to a consistent definition . Jim Avila, a program analyst with the Board of Education's High Risk Youth Liaison Division, said the state requires information on attrition rates for racial/ethnic groups rather than dropout statistics . "Attrition rates follow students throughout their academic careers and do not give just a one-year reading, as dropout rates do," he said. Dropout rates do not track students who claim to have transferred, he added The Hispanic high school attrition rate for California seniors in the 1985-86 school yearwas45%, said Avila That compared with 30% overall. Although there is no accepted national definition of how to measure the dropout rate, the federal government does collect, every 10 years, such data on Hispanics. Magallan said the data was a useful reference point but incomplete because of sampling errors. "Until we adequately address the dropout problem, our students will continue to suffer . in terms of educational attainment and under education," added Magallan. INS to Consider 'Wall' Concrete barricades or other barriers may be constructed along the flat terrain between Tijuana and San Diego County, an Immigration and Naturalization Service official : said Feb. 11. Harold Ezell, INS western regional coordi nator, said he is concerned about aliens driving across this isolated area They acxx:iu_nt ed for oriEl-third of the 1.7 million undoclt' mented workers arrested along the border last year. The proposal, which also includes plans to reinforce a fence stretching from the Pacific Ocean eastward, will be submitted to INS headquarters this month . "lfs ludicrous. A solution won't be found in a Berlin wall," said Herman Baca, chairman of the Committee on Chicano Rights in San Diego. Ezell said he hopes to have the fence reinforced and barriers constructed by this fall. -:-Felix Perez Alvarado Candidacy Nixed A school board in the West Side of Manhat,tan, New York, said Feb. 12 that Anthony Alvarado, former New York City Schools Chancellor, was rejected as a candidate for superintendent of the local school district. While Alvarado was initially considered to be the front-runner for the $83,000-a-year job , the members voted against him because of the notoriety surrounding his resignation as chancellor, said a member. Alvarado, who now heads an adult literacy and education program run by several unions, resigned in 1984. He did so after it was uncovered that he accepted more than $80,000 in loans from subordinates, had thousands of dollars in outstanding parking tickets and used employees to run personal errands. Board member Carmen Alvarez disagreed with the rejection , saying "he had a great deal to offer." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Maggie Rivas, guest columnist Pinching the Gorditas At a book party recently, a group of bilingual Hispanics was browsing through a cookbook One of them zeroed in on a recipe for gorditas-a small, chubby version of the tortilla "Oh, gorditasI love them," she told the author effusively. "My grandmother used to make them when I was a little kid . She'd make them tiny and very fat. And after they were cooked, she would pinch them on top and spread butter on them. "Tell me," she asked solemnly, "do you pinch your gorditas on the top?" -To which the author, with a mischie vous gleam in his eyes and a meaningful pinching gesture, replied: "No madam . I pinch my gorditas on the bottom. " It took the members of our group several minutes to stop laughing and regain our composure. (Yes, I was the one who innocently asked him if he pinched his gorditas on the top. ) The humor of the moment came from the man's use of a double-entendre that crossed linguistic lines. Such moments occur far more often than we can remember. I do recall the year my mother sold her Singer sewing machine. As the two men hauled it out of our house, one of my sisters, about 14 years old at the time, waved sadly at the departing machine and cried out shrilly, " Bye bye , cantadora. " Bye bye , singer. TELLING GRANDMA A JOKE We thought it was hilarious. Recalling it , I still think it's funny. But maybe that has more to do with my own sense of humor. Those who live with cross-language jokes know well that you can also die by them. A play on words in one language may mean absolutely nothing in another. First-or second-generation U . S . Hispanics should remember the experience of trying to tell their grandmother (who , of course, spoke no English) a joke they heard in school. It would go something like this: "We/a (for abuela-grandmother) c, Por que el nino enterr6 a su madre debajo de los escalones?" Why did the boy bury his mother under the stairs? We/a would shrug indifferently. "iPorque queria tener una madrastra-er, stepmother." (Because he wanted to have a stepmother. ) "Get it , We/a?'' We/a did not. lfs the same kind of difficulty in translating that my sister Lupe encountered when she tried to explain to a Peruvian acquaintance that my sinus condition had laid me low . FOILED BY THE DICTIONARY Lupe looked up "sinus" in our Spanish-English dictionary and found" senos" as the Spanish translation. " Est a mala de los senos," Lupe told her. "c,Disculpe? iDe que? " was the woman's incredulous reply. " De los senos, " Lupe answered, by now getting confused by the woman' s alarmed reaction. "Tiene una fiebre y no puede respirar. Ha estado dormida todo el dia " She has a fever and can ' t breathe. She's been sleeping all day. Days la ter, when Lupe and I discussed this, we took the time to look up "senos." The first translation, in English, is "breasts." ( Maggie Rivas is a writer with the business section of The Dallas M orning News.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua DISTORTED LENS; California' s much-quoted political pundit Joe Scott, who publishes a newsletter out of Sacramento, was about as . wrong as you can get in his prognostication on the Gloria Molina-Larry Gonzalez race for Los Angeles City Council this month. He predicted that the Latino "machismo" factor would force Molina into a run-off . She beat Gonzalez with 57% of the vote to his 26%. Scott had forecast: " A Latino man versus a Latino woman is going to be a bloodbath. The machismo factor in the Latino community is a very heavy matter." Yes , people pay for such sage commentary. VOTE THE UGLY TICKET: Washington Post correspondent Jay Mathews, who has a history of squirting ink in our collective eye, enlightened Post readers by describing the same race as one for an "ugly" little district which twists through "crime-ridden neighborhoods full of recent immigrants, both legal and illegal, who could not vote even if they wanted to ... " SHORT MEMORY: Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez heaped praise on himself in a Feb . 12 column he personally by-lined for The Miami Herald, pointing out that in his first year in office, "almost every (campaign) promise has been fulfilled." High on his list of" accomplishments:" a reduction in the city's crime rate. Three weeks before he penned those immortal words, a thief stole his 1986 Buick Park Avenue, along with his mayor's badge, .380 Beretta automatic pistol and police radio. SCOOP OF THE SEASON: Ben Fernandez, the Latino com munity's answer to Harold Stassen, has announced that he' ll again be seeking the '8'3 Republican nomination for president. Will a fine Spanish surname help the California banker, what with promised growth in Latino voter registration? Last time around, running in the Republican primary in Pue rto Rico against a field of Anglo-Sa xon surnames, he attracted about 1 % of the vote . If just the island ' s Fernandezes had voted for him , he ' d have done better than that. QUID PRO QUOMO: In the other camp, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo cancelled a Feb. 15 appearance at an Albany dinner sponsored by the New York Black and Puerto Rican Legislative Caucus to depart a day early for New Orleans, where he was scheduled to give another "non-political" speech. His reason: predicted thunderstorms might have his flight the following day. Caucus chair Roger Green (D-Brooklyn) suggested that the governor's decision "sends a message ... that he has other political priorities. " By avoiding one potential thunderstorm, he assured the arrival of a bigger one later on. CHILLY SEAT BELT BUCKLES: In Dallas, Braniff airlines created a TV ad to promote their new leather seats. Fly "sentado en cuero," suggested their Spanish-language commercial. That could mean sitting on leather, or hide. Oras Miami ad folks howled when the ad ran there it could mean sitting naked. They suggested that the ad should read , "sentad. o en asientos (seats) de cuero." Countered Braniffs marketing VP Diego Garrido: " If you have some sick minds out there in Miami, thafs their problem." Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • WALLY GEORGE, popular Los Angeles talk show host. announcing that he is forming a committee to weigh his candidacy for mayor in '88, explained: " Los Angeles was once known as the City of Angels. It is n "ow known as a haven for illegal aliens and s treet people ... It ' s time to clean up the city and get them out of here." Hi s panic Link Weekly Report Feb. 2 3, 1987 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING Hispanic theater companies mentioned in Arts and Entertainment, and other companies that perform works geared to Latinos, can be contacted for season brochures and other information: Cast Theatre, 804 El Centro Avenue, Hollywood, Calif. 90038 (213) 462-0265. Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, 421 N . Ave. 19, Los Angeles, Calif. 90031 (213) 225-4044. Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 South Spring St, Los Angeles, Calif . 90013 (213) 627-6500. Lorraine Hansberry Theater/Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, 953 De Haro St., San Francisco, Calif. 94107 (415) 4 7 4-8800. Teatro Meta/Old GIQ!>e Theatre, P.O . Box 2171, San Diego, Calif . 92112 (619) 231-1941. South Coast Repertory, 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa, Calif . 92628 (714) 957-2602. Repertorio Espaiiol, 138 East 27th St., New York, N.Y. 10016 (212) 889-2850. Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre, 304 W. 47th St., New York, N.Y. 1 0036 (21 2) 354-1293. lntar, 420 W. 42nd St., New York, N.Y. 10036 (212) 695-6134. Gala Hispanic Theatre, 1625 Park Road Nyv, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 234-1714. . Teatro de Bellas Artes, 2173 S.W. 8th Street, Miami, Fla. 33135 (305) 325-0515. Teatro Miami, 8546 S.W.40th Street, Miami, Fla. 33155(305) 559-4688. Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, 1300 Guadalupe St., San Antonio, Texas 78207 (512) 271-3151. MEXICAN AMERICANSANDALCOHOL: The Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center has compiled three articles on issues related to alcohol treatment, prevention, patterns, practices and specific programs. "Mexican Americans and Alcohol Related Issues," Special Report #4, can be obtained by sending $5 to: SSMHRC, Special Reports, A352 Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif . 90024 (213) 825-8886, CONNECTING (Late news on what's occumng within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) NEW FORD GRANTS ANNOUNCED The Ford Foundation has given $914,800 in grants to Hispanic organizations, its February newsletter reported. Two Washington, D.C.-based organizations, the National As sociation of Latino Appointed and t::lected Officials Education Fund and the National Council of La Raza, received $160,000 and $400,000, respectively, in grants and supplements. The Hispanic Policy Development Project, in New York City, was granted $250,000 over two years for research and analysis of policies affecting U.S. Hispanics, mainly concentrating on youth. In San Diego, the University of California receiveq a $54,800 supplement for a study of Hispanic women in the U.S. garment and electronic industries. Finally, a program at Temple University in Philadelphia, for elderly Southeast Asian refugees and Hispanic migrants, was allocated $50,000. FBI SEEKING SPANISH SPEAKERS The FBI launched a recruitment drive in Miami this month, which will last for several weeks, geared to hiring Spanish-speaking agents and guaranteeing the option to work in the Miami office. ) The bureau said its drug-smuggling investigations there have . created a critical need for Spanish-speaking agents. Currently, 4% of the bureau's 9,069 agents are Hispanic. CHECKLIST FOR COLLEGE OFFERED With funding in part from the Southern California Gas Company, the University of Southern California's Office of Hispanic Programs has prepared a booklet to aid junior high and high school students prepare for college. It includes a yearby-year checklist starting in the eighth grade. For a free copy of"Preparing for College: A Manual for High School Students," send your name, address and CL•rrent grade level to Samuel Mark, LAS Office of Hispanic Programs , USC, 727 W. 27th St. , Los Angeles, Calif. 90007. (213) 7 43-0977. Calendar sponsoring the 11th annual National Hispanic Wo men ' s Conference , which will emphasize employment and career dynamics. Los Angeles City woman Gloria Molina will present the 1987 Women of the Year awards to four Latinas. schools. Herman Garcia (806) 7 42-23 1 3 FIRST NOTICE JOURNALISM JOB CONFERENCE: The Amer ican Newspaper Publishers and its Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business are sponsoring "Jump ln." a conference emphasizing norreditorial careers in newspapers. Duri ng the event , ho s ted by The Washington Post in Washington, D.C., on March 19-21. representatives from midAtlantic newspapers and newspaper suppliers will interview minority students and professionals seeking internships and positions on the business side of the newspaper industry. Registration deadline is Feb . 23 or as soon as possible thereafter. Contact Barbara Brown at 1-800-544POST for more infor mation . THIS WEEK MIGRANT CHILD EDUCATION Philadelphia Feb. 23-26 The 17th Eastern Stream Conference on the edu cation of migrant children will offer 95 workshops for administrators , instructional personnel , supportive staff and parents. Hispanic culture, teaching critical thinking, dropout prevention and health programs are among topics to be addressed. Manuel Recio (717) 783-6466 ETHNIC/MINORITY STUDIES San Diego Feb. 25-28 Writers and scholars will address "Ethnicity: Pro paqanda, Persuasion and Political Economy " during the National Association for Ethnic Studies' 15th annual conference. A special session, "Growing Up Chicano, " will feature Lupe Cardenas and Justo Alarcon of Arizona State University and Jose L. Varaela-lbarra of San Diego State University. Charles C. lrby (714) 625'8070 WOMEN' S CONFERENCE Los Angeles Feb. 27 The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation is 4 Maritza Mendizabal (818) 703-2010 YOUTH SYMPOSIUM Hutchinson, Kan. Feb. 27 The Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs is sponsoring a Hispanic Youth Symposium to encourage high school students to graduate and continue planning for their future. Ed Berger (316) 665-3552 REPUBLICAN NATIONAL HISPANIC ASSEMBLY Nashua, N.H. Feb. 27, 28 The Republican Hispanic National Assembly will hold its annual elections. Vice President George Bush is expected to address the delegates. alternates and others attending the session. Ed Galvez (202) 662-1355 HISPANIC EDUCATION Lubbock, Texas March 1. 2 Texas Tech University's College of Education is sponsoring the second annual Te xa s Symposium on Hispanic Educational Issues. Possible methods for reducing the high Hispanic dropout rate will be discussed along with other issues on education from kindergarten through graduate and professional Feb. 23 • . 1987 COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE: Nomi nations for participantsscholars, professionals, students-to an Invitational Conference on Minorities and Communications are being accepted through Feb. 27. The conference will be held in Washington, D .C., on June 18-20 and is sponsored by the University of Texas ' College of Communication and the Howard University's School of Communications . Nominations should be submitted to Dr. Mary Carter-Williams, Coordinator, Continuing Education and Community Service Programs. School of Communications. Howard University, Washington, D .C. 20059 (202) 636-7491. Hisp a ni c Link Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS SOCIAL WORK Assistant Coordinator-toll free for major national health foundation in suburban Maryland. Master's in Social Work, RN or related field, with knowledge of service delivery systems. Minimum 3 years experience in information & referral or patient education, or equivalent combination of education & experience. Excellent written & oral com munication skills. Ability to speak Spanish re quired. Send resume and salary requirements to Mrs. Ormsby, Epilepsy Foundation of America, 4351 Garden City Drive, Landover, Md. 20785 by February 28, 1987. No phone calls . EOE. AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 90-DAY TEMPORARY POSITIONS The Library of Congress The Library of Congress needs applicants for some temporary positions not to exceed 90 days. These positions are: • Clerk/Messenger, G&-303-04 ($6.16 per hour) • Library Technician, G&-1411-3 ($5.49 per hour) or G&-1411-4 ($6.16 per hour), _or G&1411-5 ($6.20 per hour) • Library Aid, GS-1411-02 ($5.03 per hour) • Editorial Assistant, G&1 087-5 ($6.90 per hour) • Editorial Clerk/ Assistant, G&1 087-4 ($6.16 per per hour) or G&-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour) Experience Requirements: Experience re quirements vary according to the type and level of each position. Test Requirements: Clerk/Messenger, Library Technician and Library Aid pos1t1ons do not require typing. Editorial Assistant positions re quire passing of the Library of Congress Clerical Test unless the applicant holds a bachelor's degree. Call Susan Kames at (202) 287-5627 for further information. How to Apply: Submit a Standard Form 171 and a copy of clerical test results as soon as possible to Susan Kames, Recruitment and Placement Specialist, Employment Office, Room LM-107, James Madison Memorial Building, Washington, D.C. 20540. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md.,. goverrt ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board ENGINEERS The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications-for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4-yearengineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary: $2,206 $2,972/mo. +benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April6. Se habla espanol. SCIENCE DEGREES The : California , Air iResources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam . Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salary: $2,011 benefits. For : more information call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se habla espana/. Hi spa ni c Link Weekly Report EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK PROVOST VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Empire State College, a national leader in non-traditional higher invites nominations and applications for the position of Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs . Founded in 1971 as part of the State University of New York, ESC has eight major centers located across New York State serving 6,000 students enrolled in associate, baccalaureate and master's programs. ESC provides opportunities to adults for individualized instruction and degree programs which are grounded in the belief that an educational system must begin with the goals, needs and interests of students. The VanArsdale School serves working men and women from organized labor. ESC, now in its 15th year, has 600 fulland part-time faculty and staff. The Provost reports directly to the President, sharing overall responsibility for College wide leadership, administration and management in all areas of external and internal College activity . Responsibilities include: serving as Acting President in his absence; coordination and integration of the planning, program and budget process; monitoring and assessing the quality of the institution's progress . . The Vice President for Academic Affairs, as chief academic officer, is responsible for the academic program. Responsibilities include: ensuring high standards of academic quality; development and new program initiatives; academic policies and procedures; .employment and development of faculty. The Office of Academic Affairs also includes Continuing Education and Public Service, Assessment, Admissions , and Records. These two positions are currently held by a single incumbent Candidates should have significant college-level teaching experience, advanced-level administrative and program development ex-perience, and an earned doctorate. The Search Committee will begin consideration of applications after March 15, 1987. Please send letter of applicat i on and resume to: Presidenfs Office, Search Committee-Room 203, Empire State College, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. Full position descriptions are available on request. Starting date is Summer 1987. ESC is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employ!(. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Community Based Advocacy, Research and Planning Organization seeks an Executive Director. We seek proven experience in fund raising, program and staff development, planning, and administration. Relevant graduate degree or equivalent experience required and Spanish/ English bilingual preferred Competitive salary. Send resume and cover letter by March 1 (no calls) to: Search Com mitiee, Hispanic
PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment fall with Linda Ronstadt and San Francisco ballet artist Evelyn Cisneros joining members of the original cast. TRAVELLING FOR THEATER: This month United States residents are. seeing the best of the world's Hispanic theater in cities across the nation. (See "Collecting" for theater company addresses and phone numbers.) On the East Coast , New York's Repertorio Espana/ continues a wide repertory through May: titles include the Puerto Rican folk musical Puerto Rico: Encanto y Canci6n, third-year performances of Gloria Gonzalez's comedy Cafe con Leche, and Spanish classics such as Lope de Vega's Fuente Ovejuna and Tirso de Molina's El bur/ador de Sevilla In Los Angeles, Manuel Puig ' s stage version of his own novel, Kiss of the Spider Woman, continues through March 15 at the Cast Theatre. The Argentine writer says he likes his play better than the movie; the production has Enrique Sandi no and Javier Grajeda in the Raul Juli a and William Hurt parts. The Puerto Rican Travelling Theater's season began with the Englishlanguage opening of Rene Aloma ' s A Little Something To Ease the Pain, which ran through Feb . 22. It was directed by Mario Ernesto Sanchez , who premiered it in Spanish last year in Miami. Opening last week was Villa!, a one-man show with Julio Medina in the title role, with actor Hector Elizondo(who will be seen this spring starring in Down and Out in Beverly Hills) direct ing . Another New York option: the lntar Theatre , which stages Milcha Sanchez -Scotfs Roosters in March . In the nation's capital, Gala Hispanic Theatre presents The Fanlights, one of the best known pl a ys by Puerto Rico ' s Hene Marques. Wash ington' s company will stage the play in Spanish and English through March 8 . Endi n g Feb. 22 was L a victima, an English-language premiere o f a play toured by the S a nta Barbara , Calif., group El Teatro de Ia Esperanza as part of the eighth Los Angeles Theatre Center Festival. At San Franciscds Lorraine Hansberry Theater, the West Coast premiere of Maria Irene Fornes ' musical Sarita also wound up Feb . 22. In April , the South Coast Repertory of Costa Mesa, Calif . , ope ns Arthur Giron ' s Charley Bacon and His Family. I n Miami, you can catch a performance of Alberto Gonzalez • ' ' Y dice el del tabac6n que en Cuba no falta nada, a satire that has Armando Roblan playing Fidel Castro , at the Miami Theater, or of the hit Midnight Follies , a transvestite revue thafs been playing over a year at Teatro de Bellas Artes. One of California' s most successful Hispanic stage productions, Luis Valdez ' s Corridos, is being staged for public television in San Francisco. Created in the '60s by the San Juan Bautista-based Teatro Campesino, Corridos will be seen as a prime-time special this In San Antonio, the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center will open Silvana Wood ' s Amor de hija, March 12-29, directed by the Tucson based playwright. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report TEXAS AC T ION: Latino journalists in Texas spent a busy February, with about 80 of them from throughout the state and beyond parti cipating in a two-day conference in El Paso on immigration issues and a dozen members of the San Antonio Association of Hispanic Journalists electing their 1987 officers. The San Antonio group, which incorporated in November , elected Dino Chiecchi, a reporter w i th the Express-News there , as its president Feb. 7 . He set a goal of signing up30 members by June. The association staged a reception last month for the board of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Its '87 program emphasis will be on developing motivational and educational projects for junior HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE PORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service I n c. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or 234-o737 6 Publisher. EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Pe r ez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Ant onio Mej l a&-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mik e Orenstein, Julio Laboy . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 lsauea) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rate s are 75 cents p e r word . Display ads are $35 percolumn inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request . high and high school s tudents. The Feb . 13-14 E l Paso meeting featured former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya as a speaker and attracted Latino journalists from as far away as St. Paul, Minn. , according to its coordinator, Roy Ortega. Ortega, a reporter/ anchor with El Paso's ABC affiliate , KVI A TV, is president of the El Paso Association of Hispanic Journalists. LOS ANGELES SIMULCAST: A five-part series on the new immigration law will be simulcast beginning Feb. 23 in Los Angeles by KCBS.TV and-in Spanish-on radio station KALl-AM. lfs a first for daily news broadcasting there. Penny Griego, a reporter on the Channel2produced series, recorded the matching radio soundtrack. MARCH CHANGES: Univision's late evening national newscasts, inaugurated Jan. 19 as60-minute programs, will be trimmed to half an hour and moved from 11 p.m. to 1 0 :30 p .m. (ESD effective March 9 . The change was made to accommodate v iewers who need to get up early for work, said SIN network spokesperson Maite Sara legui. Moving into a 11-till-midnight slot will I be a miniseries from Argentina, El Vidente (The Seer). Galavision, the nation ' s premiere Spanish language entertainment service , will extend its programming day to 24 hours effective March 1, programming director Juanin Reid announced. ELSEWHERE: Among state winners of the 1986 National Sportscasters and Sports writers Association awards-to be presented April 7 is John Hernandez, of KTUU in Anchorage , Alaska ... Charlie Ericksen NEWS ITEM INS WESTERN REGION COMMISSIONER HAROLD WILL RECORD PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS ENCOURAGING ALIENS TO REGISTER FOR AMNESTY. C'mon, WET BUDDIES, this is AMIGO HAROLD, your tour guide to AMNESTYLAND! I wuz only kiddin ' when I said r d catch you and clean you and fry you . Hey, amigos , when I called you dangerous invaders , that was just a joke. An'd my line about you overthrowing our beautiful culture well Hello! Hello! ANYBODY OUT THERE? Hispani c Link Weekl y Report