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Hispanic link weekly report, March 2, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 2, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
House of Representatives Majority Whip Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) distributes a letter to his colleagues on Capitol Hill calling on them to join the “Grate American Sleep Out.” Coelho, actor Martin Sheen, of Spanish and Irish descent, and other celebrities will sleep on heating grates in the nation’s capital the night of March 4, Ash Wednesday, to support the cause of the homeless... The directors of the Southern California Rapid Transit District hire Ernesto Fuentes for the new position of inspector general. Fuentes, 39, is a San Francisco-based legal counsel for the U.S. Urban Mass Transportation Administration. . .The U.S. Mission to the United Nations selects Armando Valladares, a Cuban political prisoner for 22 years, as a spokesman for an international campaign focusing on human rights abuses in Cuba Valladares’ recently published book, “Against All Hope,”
chronicles his time in a Cuban prison.. .The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs elects for 1987 Pilar Le6n as its chair and Carmen Munoz as vice chair. . Clotilde Helen Cabrera, 22, is selected as the first runner-up in the Miss USA pageant. Cabrera is from Tampa, Fla... The Miami City Commission votes unanimously to name its baseball stadium after Cuban baseball legend Bobby Maduro. Maduro, who died at the age of 70 last October in Miami, had served as a special assistant to former baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn. . .The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration names Tony Bernazard, a second baseman with the professional baseball team of the Cleveland Indians, as the recipient of its“Athlete of the Year” award. Bernazard is from Caguas, Puerto Rico.. .Jorge Baca of Pasadena, Texas, wins $1,000 and a trip to Chicago to compete in the national “Best Bagger” semifinals. Baca, 19, neatly sacked a bag of groceries three seconds faster than his closest competitor...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Immigration Confusion Grows
Arguelles Proposed for Calif. Supreme Court
State Appellate Judge John Arguelles was nominated by California Gov. George Deukmejian Feb. 18 to fill one of three vacancies on the state’s Supreme Court
Arguelles, 59, was formerly a legislative lobbyist and served on the City Council of Montebello before being appointed to the Los Angeles Municipal Court by Gov. Edmund Brown in 1963. I n 1969, Gov. Ronald Reagan selected him for a Superior Court post and Deukmejian elevated Arguelles to the Court of Appeal in 1974.
Deukmejian’s appointments give him a majority of five appointees on the seven-member high court. Arguelles was the only Democrat among the nominees. The other two, both state appellate justices, were David Eagleson and Marcus Kaufman.
Deukmejian had been pressured by California Latinos to include a Hispanic among his nominees Arguelles would become the second Latino to have served on the Supreme Court. The other was Cruz Reynoso, who, along with another associate justice and the chief justice, was defeated at the polls in November. Deukmejian opposed Reynoso’s reconfirmation.
The nominations will be reviewed in public hearings March 18 before the state Judicial Appointments Committee.
Aranda Leaves Institute
Mario Aranda, executive director of the Chicago-based Latino Institute for the last seven years, announced Feb. 20 that he was retiring from the institute to seek opportunities in the private sector.
Josue Gonzalez, director of the board of trustees of the Latino Institute, said Aranda’s “guidance, dedication and hard work on behalf of Chicago’s Latinos have been invaluable.”
The board of trustees appointed Peter Martinez, associate director of the institute for the past four years, as acting director. A permanent replacement for Aranda is expected by mid-March.
Employer confusion and employee ignorance of the new immigration law is resulting in firing and attempted extortion of both U.S.-born Hispanic employees and those seeking legalization, according to reporters and community service representatives throughout the country.
A sample of reports gathered by Weekly Report last week shows:
• Employers in Los Angeles are not accepting letters issued by the Catholic Diocese there to undocumented workers as proof of their eligibility for citizenship.
• Employees are being extorted by employers who demand money to supply them with fraudulent documents.
• Employees in a New York factory were being required to work overtime to contribute to a special fund in case the employer is fined for hiring undocumented workers.
Reports are coming in at the rate of 100 to 150 a day to the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund citizen hotline in California, said Linda Wong, associate counsel for the national office.
Chicago incumbents, including four Hispanic aldermen, fared well in that city’s Democratic primary Feb. 24. Latinos total 7% of the 1.5 million registered voters there.
Re-elected to four-year terms were Jesus Garcia (Ward 22), Juan Soliz (Ward 25), Luis Gutierrez (Ward 26) and Miguel Santiago (Ward 31).
In those four inner-city wards, which range from 60% to 78% Hispanic, Mayor Harold Washington received 54% of the vote, slightly higher than the 50% his campaign projected.
The vote in Hispanic wards:
Total % for
Ward Turnout Washington
22 6,883 50.7%
25 8,459 42.6
26 11,576 60.6
31 10,469 56.1
* Note: Vote totals for precincts vary from 88% to 98% of total votes counted.
“It shows the depth of the information gap. The immigration service has been derelict in its duties,” Wong said.
“You can’t do all of this immediately,” INS spokesman Duke Austin countered Wong’s assertion. He added that INS has publicized the law in most U.S. newspapers, sponsored public information forums and issued preliminary regulations.
Beginning in mid-March, the INS plans a nationwide advertising campaign to outline legalization benefits and responsibilities of employers. The agency is considering the possibility of an employer hotline.
“Employers do not know the law,” said Gilbert Carrasco, director of Immigration Services for the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C. Under a “grandfather'’ clause, employers do not need documentation for employees hired before Nov. 6,1986, Carrasco explained.
“The Nov. 6 date only makes the employer immune from sanctions. It does not grant authorization for (undocumented) people to continued on page 2
Washington defeated former mayor Jayne Byrne by a 53% - 47% margin.
In a related election incident, a Cook County ruling reinstated as many as20,000 Hispanics who were purged from voting rolls, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund reported. “It was a complete victory for us,” said MALDEF attorney Dora Arechiga about the decision to allow purged voters to be reinstated at the polling sites.
Gloria Chevere, a34-year-old Puerto Rican backed by Mayor Washington, fell 60,000 votes short, out of nearly a million cast, of winning the city clerk’s position. Incumbent Walter Kozubowski received 494,049 votes.
An estimated 76% of Chicago’s 1.5 million registered voters turned out for the primary. The Board of Elections did not supply Hispanic voter turnout figures.
Until 1983, there were no Hispanics on the 50-member Chicago council.
Hispanics Help Re-elect Washington


Cubans Criticize Gov. Martinez
Rafael Penalver, chairman of the Florida Commission on Hispanic Affairs, told Weekly Report Feb. 24 that Gov. Bob Martinez’s proposal to move the commission to the state commerce department“will not sell in the Hispanic community.
“I hope that the governor will see how prestigious an organization the commission has become and that he will re-evaluate the situation,” said Penalver. “It would be sad to see Hispanics against Hispanics but the governor is losing a lot from his base of support.”
Penalver conceded that the move was in accord with Martinez’s management style, but opposed it full-heartedly. “The fact is that the commission has been reduced in status,” he said.
Martinez announced Feb. 16 that the commission was being moved to the state commerce department as part of a complete overhaul of the governor's staff. Responding
to growing protests and criticisms from Hispanic organizations, including the Cuban American National Foundation and the Spanish American League Against Discrimination, Martinez denied the commission would lose any clout as a result of the move.
A major concern expressed by Hispanic leaders was that the transfer was the first step in the complete abolition of the commission.
“The commerce secretary is an appointed position, giving any future secretary the opportunity not to include the commission’s budget in the department’s budget,” said Penalver.
As a compromise Penalver suggested that Martinez keep the statutes which created the commission, maintaining the commission in the governor's office but housed in commerce. Any changes in the statutes will have to be approved by Florida’s legislative bodies. - Julio Laboy
Immigration Reform Off to Poor Start
continued from page 1 work,” Austin stressed.
Under the law, employers must verify the status of all job applicants hired after Nov.6.
“Employers are beginning to be very cautious of who they are hiring,” said Ricardo Sanchez, publisher of La Voz magazine in Seattle. “There are cases of people being refused work, even if they are citizens, if they do not have the right identification,” he added.
“Many employers are extremely confused and anxious about the new law. Most are fearful and given what they’ve heard, the only protection they believe they can take to not be sanctioned is not hiring,” said Wade Henderson, associate director of the American Civil Liberties Union.
Workers with discrimination complaints have 190 days to file them. Yet the U.S. Justice Department’s new Office of Special Counsel, designed to hear these problems, has not been opened.
“The anti-discrimination provisions themselves offer modest protection for victims but they are only as effective as the administration’s commitment to their enforcement. The administration has turned an active hostility to these provisions,” said Henderson.
No date for the opening of the special center has been set, according to Justice Department spokesman Joe Krozisky. The 1987 budget includes approximately $1.4 million and 30 positions for the center. The office is expected to double in size by 1988.
“Jobs are scarcer and employees are being exploited,” said Univision reporter Jose Gray. As part of a seven-part immigration series for ■"Noticiero” Gray interviewed workers and employers in Los Angeles and San Antonio.
Civil penalties will range from $250 to $2,000 for the first offense per unauthorized
2
worker and go up to $10,000 for the third offense. A pattern of such violations could result in criminal penalties.
No employer citations will be issued before May 31 and no fines will be charged until June 1, 1988.
Under anti-discrimination provisions, employers may not ask employees to post bond or security to offset any penalties or fines resulting from employer sanctions, nor can they discriminate on account of national origin
or citizenship status. , , , ,
- Melinda Machado
Caucus Given High Marks
The eleven full-voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus averaged a 91% score in favor of legislation positively affecting Latinos, according to findings released last week in the Congressional Education Associates’ “Congressional Ledger 1986.”
The book, which rates Congress on black and Hispanic interests, covers the first session of the 99th Congress.
Rep. Manuel Lujan(R-N.M.) scored 30%. The 10 other House Latinos - all Democrats-scored from 90% to 100%. There are no Hispanics or blacks in the Senate.
The scores are based on 20 roll-call votes between Jan. 3 and Dec. 20,1985.
Gordon Alexander, president of the nonpartisan black- and Hispanic-owned Congressional Education Associates firm, which is based in Washington, D.C., said the ledger included votes on such topics as immigration, higher education, the budget, housing and prohibiting aid to Nicaraguan rebels.
Overall, the House voted 61 % in support of legislation that CEA determined was beneficial to Hispanics and blacks. The Senate was 57% supportive.
CEA plans to publish its edition covering Congressional votes in 1986 in late May.
Canada Resets Policy to Inhibit Refugee Flow
The Canadian government imposed rules Feb. 20 to end the practice of allowing automatic entry to refugees from El Salvador, Guatemala and 16 other countries. It did so in response to the growing number of undocumented aliens arriving at its border.
Many of the refugees, known as bus people, are fleeing the crackdown of the new U.S. immigration law.
Those wishing to claim refugee status are now turned back at the border by Canadian immigration officers who arrange for a hearing four to six weeks later.
In the first six weeks of 1987,6,120 persons claiming refugee status have arrived at the Canadian border. That is nearly as many as the total arriving in all of 19$5. More than a third of the recent arrivals are natives of El Salvador and about 1,000 are fleeing Chile.
Canada’s Immigration Minister Benoit Bouchard promised to propose legislation this month that would tighten border control.
LA Racial Incidents Rise
The number of racial incidents in Los Angeles County increased to 58 last year from 13 in 1985 - a 346% increase - while only three such attacks were committed against Latinos, reported a study issued Feb. 20 by the county's Human Relations Commission.
Nearly three-quarters of the incidents were directed against blacks and about a quarter were aimed against Asians. Officials with the commission said the totals were probably severely underreported due to the reluctance of people with questionable immigration status to report crimes.
Most of the incidents involved vandalism, but a number were dangerous A Latino family in Long Beach, for example, had slingshot-fired stones aimed at them and their home.
The number of racial incidents has risen steadily since 1981, when such a breakdown was first provided, except in 1983 when it dipped to 11 from 15 the previous year.
Dade Latinos Grow32%
Dade County, Fla, Hispanics increased their numbers by 187,000 from 1980 to 1985, increasing their proportion of the population from 36% to 43%, according to a study to be released later this month.
The profile, prepared by the county’s Office of Latin Affairs, found that Hispanics increased their representation from 581,000 in 1980 to
768.000 two years ago. Dade County has a total population of 1.77 million.
Among the county’s Latinos, 517,000 were of Cuban extraction, 45,000 Puerto Rican and 25,000 each Colombian and Nicaraguan. Cubans alone accounted for more than
100.000 of the five-year Hispanic population growth.
A spokesperson for the Office of Latin Affairs said the study was the county’s first comprehensive count of the Hispanic population that took into consideration the refugees that arrived during the Mariel boatlift in 1980.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Raul Yzaguirre, guest columnist
The‘Mendacity Bug
There is some kind of “bug” going around in Washington these days. A bug that makes Reagan administration officials say one thing and then do something completely opposite.
This appears to be true, at least, as far as federal education policy for Hispanics is concerned.
Secretary of Education William Bennett became afflicted with the “Mendacitis Bug”
(as in “mendacious,” not truthful) over a year ago when he made his first speech on bilingual education.
At Senate hearings on his proposal to amend Title VII, the Bilingual Education Act, he proclaimed both his commitment to protecting bilingual education from further budget cuts and his concern about limited-English-proficient children.
Since Secretary Bennett took office, however, the department’s record on implementing the act has been abominable.
The act’s governing regulations were issued a year and a half late-and they deviate from both the law and the intent of Congress. The majority of the secretary’s appointees to the National Advisory Council on Bilingual Education advocate eliminating the program. And the Office for Civil Rights has sharply reduced its monitoring on language-related issues.
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS THREATENED
The secretary’s bilingual education proposals are no better. His legislative amendments to Title VII would allow him to fund as many all-English programs as he pleases, at the expense of successful bilingual education programs.
In January, he made another speech on bilingual education. Again he spoke about his commitment to the program Yet he resubmitted to Congress the same Title VII amendments he proposed last year.
The secretary called his 1988 budget a “responsible budget for American education - for our children, their schools, and their futures.” He claimed that it would “enhance educational opportunity for the poor, the disadvantaged, the handicapped and children with limited English-speaking ability.”
It would reduce the federal government’s commitment to education by 25%, and much of this reduction would be at the expense of programs important to the education of Hispanic children. The secretary proposes to eliminate vocational and bilingual vocational education, public library assistance, desegregation assistance, immigrant and refugee education programs, and programs vital to migrant children.
TRIO PROGRAMS WOULD BE CUT
Budget cuts would come from the TRIO programs, such as Upward Bound, which serve disadvantaged high school youth; programs which serve disadvantaged college students; and financial aid for higher education.
Apparently, the secretary’s condition occasionally goes into slight remission. He proposes to increase funding both for Chapter One, the federal government*s compensatory education program, and for the Adult Education Act. At a House hearing on the budget, he remarked that the increase in Chapter One was to account for inflation. (Thus the proposed level funding for the Bilingual Education Act actually represents a budget reduction.)
In the absence of some vaccine for this bug, we can only hope that the secretary of education will listen to his own rhetoric and translate those words into real solutions.
Hispanic children need effective educational services, adequately funded - not kind words accompanied by slashed budgets and crippled programs. The Mendacitis Bug is a serious ailment in the nation’s capital, and Secretary Bennett needs an antidote fast.
Perhaps we’ll find a doctor in the House... or maybe the Senate.
(Raul Yzaguirre is president of the National Council of La Raza.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
REPORTERS ANONYMOUS: In the newspaper.business, it’s accepted that the comparatively low salaries earned by outstanding reporters are balanced by ethereal and ego rewards. Prominent Page 1 bylines are part of the ego compensation.
Thus it was strange to read The Miami Herald’s well-written and well-documented four-part series last month on “The World’s Deadliest Criminals: The Medellin Cartel” and observe not a single byline or credit-line.
The series obviously required numerous trips to Colombia. It took 2 1/2 months to document and write. It mentioned international drug leaders freely and filled in score cards with who got in the way and died: 180 Colombian policeman were killed in 1986. Since late 1984, cartel assassins killed four judges (including a Supreme Court Justice), three high-level security officials and the crusading anti-narcotics editor of Colombia’s second-largest newspaper.,
(The cartel was also believed to have played a major role in the 1985 guerrilla raid on Bogota’s Palace of Justice, in which 11 members of the 24-member high court were killed.)
The Herald series obviously demanded powerful Spanish- language skills and cultural knowledge and sensitivity.
Certain that many of the Herald’s Latino staff members were involved in a story that is bound to win some awards, I called executive editor Heath Meriwether to ask the questions with obvious answers: Who wrote it? Why no bylines?
He courteously declined to tell me who worked on the series. “It was a decision of the people who worked on the story not to use bylines,” he said, adding that if the series pitted the cartel against anybody, the Herald would prefer that it“aim its ire institutionally,” rather than at individuals.
He expressed pride in the fact that seven Colombian newspapers - including two with staff members believed to have been murdered by drug traffickers - are simultaneously reprinting the Herald’s bold expose.
Hopefully, the only suspense remaining is who’s going to pick up the awards that the series is bound to generate.
PRIZE CROP: Meanwhile, the United Nations issued a postage stamp to honor Colombia (U.N. stamps featuring member-countries are printed for collectors and may be used as postage if mailed from the U.N. post office) a couple of months ago.
Someone tampered with it, however. It was printed featuring the country’s flag and a tribute to its main agricultural crops, described on the stamp as “coffee, cocaine and marijuana”
Colombia’s ambassador sent off an energetic protest to Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, who promised an investigation. A U.N. spokesperson gave assurances that none of the stamps had been used on outgoing mail. Colombia announced an investigation of its own.
The last time we checked with the Embassy in Washington, the matter was still “under investigation.”
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
BOB GALLAGHER, Houston high school coach, quoted in the Feb. 16 Los Angeles Times on his coaching 7-foot, 1 -ihch University of Miami basketball star Tito Horford(who at the time was concerned about helping his widowed mother in the Dominican Republic):
“He was a very confused boy. . . He had that Latin mentality -everything goes back to mamacita. Just before he needed to make a decision, he had to call mamacita. And here was a woman in poverty telling a boy with all his potential how to lead his life.. m
ANNA GOMEZ, a patron in Miami’s Parallel Bar, quoted in the Feb. 16 Time magazine on why middle-class whites think AIDS affects only gays and poor mlVlorities:
“ People believe that the higher the cover charges at a bar, the less likely the/re going to run into AIDS.
March 2,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
ASYLUM IN THE UNITED STATES: The US. Committee for Refugees has published a 48-page booklet titled “Despite a Generous Spirit Denying Asylum in the United States.” Included are the steps considered when one applies for asylum and application denial and acceptance rates according to country. For a copy, send $2 to the committee at 815 15th St. NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 667-0782.
NEWS FOR, ON THE UNDOCUMENTED: UNDOC is a 2-6 page newsletter published four to six times yearly. It deals with legislation that affects undocumented aliens and recent research and books geared to this community. Subscription to UNDOC is free - donations are appreciated. To receive, write to: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), P.O. Box 1986, Indianapolis, Ind. 46206(317)353-1491.
HISPANICS IN TUCSON: “Hispanic Visions” is a 28-page report detailing the purchasing power, education, employment and growth patterns of Latinos in that city. Single copies are free; additional copies are $5. To order, write to. Tucson Newspapers,4850 S. Park, Tucson, Ariz. 85714(602)573-4366.
RATING CONGRESS: “CEACongressional Ledger 1986: Rating Congress on Black and Hispanic Interests” is a 122-page booklet that rates congressional members on how they voted on legislation affecting Latinos and blacks in the first session of the 99th Congress. To order (discounts are available for bulk orders^ send $10 to: Congressional Education Associates, 302 E. Capitol St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20013 (202) 547-9000.
NATIONAL HISPANIC ART SHOW: Expresiones Hispanas, a national Hispanic art show to tour the nation this fall, is seeking 40 to 50 works. The show, which will tour cities such as Los Angeles, San Antonio and Denver, is sponsored by the Adolph Coors Co. Prizes totalling $15,000 will be shared equally by the artists and the organizations of their choice. Entry deadline is March 31, and artists must be 21 years of age or older. For information, write to: Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artistic Images, Maureen Leon Acosta, P.O. Box 11434, Denver, Colo. 80211 (303) 433-2661.
PARENTS HELPING CHILDREN LEARN: “Helping Your Child Learn,” a 25-page pamphlet authored by Luis Cano, is a guide written in Spanish and English outlining advice on how Hispanic parents can keep their children in school. For a free copy, write to: Southwestern Bell, P.O. Box 1530, Room 1216, Houston, Texas 77251-1530.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
LATINO HISTORY MUSEUM STUDIED
A feasibility study is presently being conducted by the Economic Research Association on the proposed legislation calling for the establishment of the first museum of Latino history in the United States, to be located in Los Angeles.
The study, under the direction of the California Museum of Science and Industry, is to be completed sometime in April. Then it is expected that Charles Calderon, Democratic state assemblyman, will submit legislation calling for appropriations to finance the full operation.
Proposed name for the facility is the California Museum of Latino History.
STUDY EYES DROPOUT RATE
A three-year study financed by the Ford Foundation will examine Hispanic dropouts in public schools in Milwaukee; Chicago; Dade County, Fla; San Antonio; and Newark, N.J.
The principal investigator of the study is Ricardo Fernandez, an associate professor in the department of education at the University of Wisconsin.
The dropout rate among Hispanic students is up to 80% in some areas, according to statistics provided by the Ford Foundation. Fernandez hopes the study will produce local, school-based strategies to keep Hispanic youths in schools.
MET LIFE TOP LATINO INSURER
A study conducted by Strategy Research Corporation of Miami, found that Metropolitan Life Insurance Company is number one in market share and consumer awareness in the top six Hispanic markets in the United States where the company has a Hispanic marketing program.
Through participating managers and sales representatives supported with Spanish-language promotion materials and advertisements, Met Life has achieved this status.
The study consisted of 1,400 door-to-door interviews with Hispanics in Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Antonio and the San Francisco area
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC CAREER CONFERENCE Ontario, Calif. March 4
The Pomona/East Los Angeles LULAC Education Center is sponsoring the sixth annual Hispanic career conference for professionals and college students in the high tech, business and public sectors. There will be workshops on job search strategies, employment trends, corporate retention and exhibits as well as recruitment booths.
Al Rios (714) 623-0588
MINORITY WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Los Angeles March 6
A minority women’s conference, focusing on employment issues such as job rights, sexual harassment and professional mobility, is being sponsored by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations.
Reva Trevino (213) 974-7626
CHICANO COLLOQUIUM Stanford, Calif. March 6 4
As part of the Chicano Graduate Students Association’s Chicano colloquium, Sheila Shannon will present research on the “Context of English in the Barrio.” Mary Ann Seawell (415) 723-2558
HISPANIC FORUM Houston March 7
A career and educational day for Hispanic students, grades 6-12, is being sponsored by the Houston Hispanic Forum. School districts, universities, colleges and businesses will provide sessions on pursuing educational goals, career planning and role models for students.
Benjamin Avila (713) 521-6151
COMING SOON
HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE National Network of Hispanic Women Date change: the network’s conference has been changed to June 25-27 in Miami.
Alda Levitan (305) 854-3332
JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Institute for Journalism Education Washington, D.C. March 9 Lava Thomas-Hebert (415) 642-8288
March 2,1987
AWARD DINNER
National Puerto Rican Forum
New York March 10
Hector Velasquez (212) 685-2311
DINNER DANCE
League of United Latin American Citizens South Bend, Ind. March 13 lla Plasencia (515) 225-6865
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Statewide Hispanic Women’s Leadership Conference Lansing, Mich. March 14 Andrea Rodriguez (517) 371-3365
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC WORKING WOMEN’S CONFERENCE: “Latinas in the ’80s: Power, Success and Leadership” is the theme of the Latino Institute-sponsored conference in Chicago on March 27, 28. Keynote speaker Patricia Barela Rivera will offer professional and personal power strategies to help Latinas succeed without compromising their cultural values. A report on Chicago’s Latinas in the labor force will be released by the institute, a research, training and advocacy agency, during the event For more information, contact Graciela Kenig (312) 663-3603.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE
The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks an Executive Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community-based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management of non-profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs; fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. Outstanding verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelor’s degree in a field related to the work of the Institute is required; Master’s or advanced degree is preferred.
The Latino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in ail areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but preference may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city.
Salary $48,000 - $55,000. Apply by March 16, 1987 to:
Dr. Josue M. Gonzalez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P.O. Box 699005 Chicago, III. 60609-9005
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Community Based Advocacy, Research and Planning Organization seeks an Executive Director. We seek proven experience in fundraising, program and staff development planning and administration. Relevant graduate degree or equivalent experience required and Spanish/ English bilingual preferred. Competitive salary. Send resume and cover letter by March 1 (no calls) to: Search Committee, Hispanic Office of Planning & Evaluation, Sewall Building, 55 Dimock St., Boston, Mass. 02119.
FOREIGN SERVICE CAREERS
Agency for International Development is looking for candidates with graduate degrees in agriculture, accounting, economics, education, housing/urban planning international relations, population planning, public health, nutrition, procurement/contracting, public or business administration, or closely related disciplines fori its International Development Intern Program. An internship leads to positions planning and managing U.S. foreign economic assistance programs in the developing countries.
U.S citizenship and two or more years’ relevant professional experience are required. Starting salaries are in the $22,000 to $36,000 range, plus standard Foreign Service allowances when stationed overseas.
Send resume or application for Federal Employment (SF-171) as soon as possible to Recruitment Staff, FSP/RSS, HL, Agency for International Development, Washington, D.C. 20523.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, International Clearinghouse on Adolescent Fertility (ICAF). Responsible for development of newsletter in three languages and coordination of seed grants program. Provides technical assistance to adolescent programs.
Qualifications: B.A.; experience in developing country; knowledge of family planning and/or youth work; Spanish fluency; bicultural preferred. Contact: ICAF, Center for Population Options, 1012 14th St. NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20005..
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md.,. government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY Fellowships for 1987-88
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research* and the Social Science Research Council announce three fellowship competitions.
• Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the centers of the I UP or with the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. One year stipend of $22,500. Deadline: March 15,1987.
• Summer Workshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Transportation and living expenses for four-week program. Deadline: April 24, 1987.
• Latino Graduate Student Training Seminar at Stanford University. Transportation and living expenses for two-week summer program. Deadline: March 15,1987.
For more information contact IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, SSB 4.120, Austin, Texas 78712(512)471-1817.
• The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, Hunter College; Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas; Chicano Studies Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles; and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
90-DAY TEMPORARY POSITIONS The Library of Congress
The Library of Congress needs applicants for some temporary positions not to exceed 90 days. These positions are:
• Clerk/Messenger, GS-303-04 ($6.16 per hour)
• Library Technician, GS-1411-3 ($5.49 per hour)
or GS-1411-4 ($6.16 per hour),
or GS-1411- 5 ($6.20 per hour)
• Library Aid, GS-1411-02 ($5.03 per hour)
• Editorial Assistant GS-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour)
• Editorial Clerk/Assistant GS-1087-4 ($6.16 per per hour)
or GS-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour)
Experience Requirements: Experience requirements vary according to the type and level of each position.
Test Requirements: Clerk/Messenger, Library Technician and Library Aid positions do not require typing. Editorial Assistant positions require passing of the Library of Congress Clerical Test unless applicant holds bachelor’s degree.
Call Susan Karnes at (202) 287-5627 for further information.
How to Apply: Submit a Standard Form 171 and a copy of clerical test results as soon as possible to Susan Karnes, Recruitment and Placement Specialist Employment Office, Room LM-107, James Madison Memorial Building, Washington, D.C. 20540.
The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board ENGINEERS
The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4- year engineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary: $2,206 -$2,972/mo. + benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April 6. Se habla espahol.
SCIENCE DEGREES The,CaliforniaAir Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam. Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salary $2,011 /-$2,837/mo.+ benefits.,For.more information, call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se habla espahol
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts& Entertainment
A NIGHT AT THE GRAMMYS: For the first time in three years, three Hispanic performers won Grammys in all three “Latin” music categories at the awards ceremony of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences held Feb. 24.
Jose Feliciano won in the “best Latin pop” category for the Lelolai track from the Te amare album. It was his fourth Grammy- Feliciano had won in the same category in 1983 and twice in 1986 in “pop” performances.
“The future seems bright,” said Feliciano, “because I will also be recording classical music, in English and also in Spanish.” The Puerto Rican singer said he hopes to record his own The Mozartian Influence, a piece for the guitar in seven movements.
San Antonio accordionist Flaco Jimenez won in the category for which his brother Santiago was nominated last year-“best Mexican American performance” - for his album Ay te dejo en San Antonio.
Ruben Blades won in the “best tropical Latin performance” category for his album Escenas. Blades, who had been nominated last year in
the same category, said he is currently collaborating on an English-language album with Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, Bob Dylan and Sting.
For his second year in a row, Blades was an awards presenter at the Grammys ceremony, held in Los Angeles’ Shrine Auditorium.
Past Grammy winner Placido Domingo and past nominee Julia Migenes were also presenters at the ceremony, syndicated to Puerto Rico, Mexico and various Latin American countries. The “Latin” Grammys were announced - as were the majority of the awards- in a non-televised ceremony prior to the awards “show” telecast in the United States by CBS.
Other Latino musicians are in the news this week:
Mexican cellist Carlos Prieto has begun a monthlong recital tour of the United States highlighted by a performance at New York’s Lincoln Center March 13, a Chicago date on the 14th and at the University of California in Los Angeles on the 21 st.
And Sheila E, who is featured on timbales on Prince’s Sign of the Times album, due out March 23, has included the track Salsa Soul in her new album, featuring performances by her father, Pete, her mother, Juanita, and three other performers of the Escovedo family.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HISPANIC MEDIA, USA: The Media Institute,a non-profit research foundation based in Washington, D.C., released a narrative guide to U.S. Hispanic news media on Feb. 27.
Titled “Hispanic Media, USA,” the 225-page soft-cover publication features one-to-two-page profiles of 48 daily and weekly newspapers, television networks and stations, radio stations, wire services and magazines. Nearly all are Spanish-language.
It also has a directory section listing 259 key Hispanic print and broadcast outlets in summary format.
Ana Veciana-Suarez, a reporter with The Miami Herald, was commissioned to write the directory. In her preface, she notes three characteristics shared by U.S. Latino media:
1. They provide Latin American news in much greater detail than do their English-language counterparts.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy.
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2. They cover U.S. Latino communities extensively.
3. They carry editorials that support Hispanic interests such as bilingual education.
University of Southern California journalism professor Felix Gutierrez credits Veciana-Suarez in his foreword as filling “an important void in our knowledge.”
Gutierrez suggests that as Hispanic media in the United States “continue to grow and redefine their role, larger questions will be posed and, hopefully, addressed.”
He singles out five trends or issues described in the publication:
• The need for more coverage of issues relating to the lives of U.S. Latinos;
• The long-range commitment to a Latino audience of the growing number of non-Hispanic owners of Latino media;
• The use of Spanish/English/bilingual formats in media as language use in Latino communities becomes more complex;
• Differences in concepts of advocacy and objectivity between Latino and generahaudience news media; and
• The social responsibility of Latino media to their largely low-income audiences as they operate and grow by selling their audiences as a consumer market to be tapped by advertisers.
The 8 1/2x11-inch directory, supported by funding from the Chevron Corp. and the Adolph Coors Co., sells for $75.
However, The Media Institute President Patrick Maines is making it available to Hispanic organizations and media outlets, as well as to academic institutions, for $25.
Its initial printing is 4,000.
Copies may be obtained from the Publications Department, The Media Institute, 3017 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 298-7512.
PEOPLE: Miguel Gallastedui has been promoted to deputy news director of Radio Marti... Reporter Alfredo Corchado, winner of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ 1986 journalism award, moved from the El Paso Herald-Post to The Wall Street Journal’s Philadelphia bureau...
- Charlie Ericksen

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Making The News This Week chronicles his time in a Cuban prison . . . The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs elects for 1987 Pilar Le6n as its chair and Carmen Muiioz as vice chair ... Ciotilde Helen Cabrera, 22, is selected as the first runner-up in the Miss USA pageant. Cabrera is from Tampa , Fla ... The Miami City Commission votes unanimously to name its baseball stadium after Cuban baseball legend Bobby Maduro. Maduro, who died at the age of 70 last October in Miami, had served as a special assistant to former baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn ... The Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration names Tony Bernazard, a second baseman with the professional baseball team of the Cleveland Indians, as the recipient of its"Athlete of the Year" award . Bernazard is from Caguas, Puerto Rico . . . Jorge Baca of Pasadena, Texas , wins $1,000 and a trip to Chicago to compete in the national "Best Bagger'' semifinals. Baca, 19, neatly sacked a bag of groceries three seconds faster than his closest competitor ... House of Representatives Majority Whip Tony Coelho (DCalif.) distributes a letter to his colleagues on Capitol Hill calling on them to join the"Grate American Sleep Out." Coelho, actor Martin Sheen, of Spanish and Irish descent, and other celebrities will sleep on heating grates in the nation ' s capital the night of March 4, Ash Wednesday, to support the cause of the homeless ... The directors of the Southern California Rapid Transit District hire Ernesto Fuentes for the new position of inspector general. Fuentes, 39, is a San Francisco based legal counsel fort he U . S . Urban Mass Transportation Adminis tration ... The U.S. Mission to the United Nations selects Armando Valladares, a Cuban political prisoner for22 years, as a spokesman for an international campaign focusing on human rights abuses in Cuba. Valladares' recently published book, "Against All Hope," Vol. 5 No.9 HISPANIC LINK WE REPORT March 2, 1987 Arguelles Proposed for Calif. Supreme Court Immigration Confusion Grows State Appellate Judge John Arguelles was nominated by California Gov . George Deukmejian Feb. 18 to fill one of three vacancies on the state's Supreme Court. Arguelles, 59, was formerly a legislative lobbyist and served on the City Council of Montebello before being appointed to the Los Angeles Municipal Court by Gov . Edmund Brown in 1963. In 1969, Gov. Ronald Reagan selected him for a Superior Court post and Deukmejian elevated Arguelles to the Court of Appeal in 1974. Deukmejian's appointments give him a majority of five appointees on the seven member high court. .Arguelles was the only Democrat among the nominees. The other two, both state appellate justices, were David Eagleson and Marcus Kaufman. Deukmejian had been pressured by California Latinos to include a Hispanic among his nominees. Arguelles would become the second Latino to have served on the Supreme Court. The other was Cruz Reynoso, who, along with another associate justice and the chief justice, was defeated at the polls in Novem0er. Deukmejian opposed Reynoso's reconfirmation. The nominations will be reviewed in public hearings March 18 before the state Judicial Appointments Committee. Aranda Leaves Institute Mario Aranda , executive director of the Chicago-based Latino Institute for the last seven years , announced Feb. 20 that he was retiring from the institute to seek oppor tunities in the private sector. Josue Gonzalez, director of the board of trustees of the Latino Institute, said Aranda ' s " guidance, dedication and hard work on behalf of Chicago' s Latinos have been invaluable . " The board of trustees appointed Peter Martinez, associate director of the institute for the past four years, as acting director. A permanent replacement for Aranda is ex pected by mid March. Employer confusion and employee ignorance of the new immigration law is resulting in firing and attempted extortion of both U . S . born Hispanic employees and those seeking legalization, according to reporters and com munity service representatives throughout the country. A sample of reports gathered by Weekly Report last week shows: • Employers in Los Angeles are not accept ing letters issued by the Catholic Diocese there to undocumented workers as proof of their eligibility for citizenship. • Employees. are being extorted by em ployers who demand money to supply them with fraudulent documents. • Employees in a New York factory were being required to work overtime to contribute to a special fund in case the employer is fined for hiring undocumented workers. Reports are coming in at the rate of 100 to 150 a day to the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund citizen hotline in California, said Linda Wong, associate counsel for the national office. "It shows the depth of the information gap. The immigration service has been derelict in its duties," Wong said. " You can't do all of this immediately," INS spokesman Duke Austin countered Wongs assertion . He added that INS has publicized the law in most U.S. newspapers, sponsored public information forums and issued pre liminary regulations. Beginning in mid-March, the INS plans a nationwide advertising campaign to outline legalization benefits and responsibilities of employers. The agency is considering the possibility of an employer hotline. "Employers do not know the law," said Gilbert Carrasco , director of Immigration Ser vices for the U .S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C. Under a "grandfather" clause, employers do not need documentation for employees hired before Nov . 6, 1986, Carrasco explained. " The Nov. 6 date only makes the employer immune from sanctions. It does not grant authorization for (undocumented) people to continued on page 2 Hispanics Help Re-elect Washington Chicago incumbents, including four His panic aldermen, fared well in that city's De mocratic primary Feb. 24. Latinos total?% of the 1 . 5 million registered voters there. Re-elected to four-year terms were Jesus Garcia (Ward 22), Juan Soliz (Ward 25), Luis Gutierrez (Ward 26) and Miguel Santiago (Ward 31) . In those four inner-city wards, which range from 60% to 78% Hispanic, Mayor Harold Washington received 54% of the vote, slightly higher than the 50% his campaign projected. The vote in Hispanic wards: *Ward 22 25 26 31 Total Turnout 6 ,883 8,459 11 ,576 10,469 % .for Washington 50.7% 42. 6 60. 6 56. 1 • N o t e : Vote toia t s f o r prec in c t s vary from 88 % t o 98 % of t o t a l v o te s c o unted . Washington defeated former mayor Jayne Byrne by a 53%-47% margin . In a related election incident, a Cook County ruling reinstated as many as20,000 Hispanics who were purged from voting rolls, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund reported. "It was a complete victory for us," said MALDEF attorney Dora Arechiga about the decision to allow purged voters to be reinstated at the polling sites. Gloria Chevere, a 34-yearold Puerto Rican backed by Mayor Washington, fell 60,000 votes short, out of nearly a million cast, of winning the city clerk's position. Incumbent Walter Kozubowski received 494,049 votes. An estimated 76% of Chicago' s 1.5 million registered voters turned out for the primary. The Board of _ Elections did not supply Hispanic turnout figures. Until1983, there were no Hispanics on the 50-member Chicago council.

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Cubans Criticize Gov. Martinez Rafael Penalver, chairman of the Florida Commission on Hispanic Affairs, told Weekly Report Feb . 24 that Gov . Bob Martinez' s proposal to move the commission to the state commerce department"will not sell in the Hispanic community. " I hope that the governor will see how prestigious an organization the commission has become and that he will re-evaluate the situation," said Penalver. "It would be sad to see Hispanics against Hispanics but the governor is losing a lot from his base of support. " Penalver conceded that the move was in accord with Martinez' s management style, but opposed it full-heartedly. "The fact is that the commission has been reduced in status," he said. Martinez announced Feb . 16 that the commission was being moved to the state commerce department as part of a complete overhaul of the governor's staff. Responding to growing protests and criticisms from Hispanic organizations, including the Cuban American National Foundation and the Spanish American League Against Discri mination, Martinez denied the commission would lose any clout as a result of the move. A major concern expressed by Hispanic leaders was that the transfer was the first step in the complete abolition of the com mission . " The commerce secretary is an appointed position, giving any future secretary the opportunity not to include the commission's budget in the department' s budget, " said Penalver. As a compromise Penalver suggested that Martinez keep the statutes which created the commission, maintaining the commission in the governor's office but housed in com merce. Any changes in the statutes will have to be approved by Florida's legislative bodies. -Julio Laboy Immigration Reform Off to Poor Start contlnued from page 1 work," Austin stressed. Under the law , employers must verify the status of all job applicants hired after Nov. 6 . "Employers are beginning to be very cautious of who they are hiring," said Ricardo Sanchez , publisher of La Voz magazine in Seattle. "There are cases of people being refused work, even if they are citizens, if they do not have the right identification," he added. "Many employers are extremely confused and anxious about the new law. Most are fearful and given what they've heard, the only protection they believe they can take to not be sanctioned is not hiring," said Wade Henderson, associate director of the American Civil Liberties Union. Workers with discrimination complaints have 190 days to file them. Yet the U.S . Justice Department' s new Office of Special Counsel, designed to hear these problems, has not been opened. "The anti-discrimination provisions them selves offer modest protection for victims but they are only as effective as the administration ' s commitment to their enforcement. The ad ministration has turned an active hostility to these provisions," said Henderson. No date for the opening of the special center has been set, according to Justice Department spokesman Joe Krozisky. The 1987 buc'get includes approximately $1.4 million and 30 positions for the center. The office is expected to double in size by 1988. "Jobs are scarcer and employees are being exploited," said Univision reporter Jose Gray. As part of a seven-part immigration series for "Noticiero," Gray interviewed workers and employers in Los Angeles and San Antonio. Civil penalties will range from $250 to $2,000 for the first offense per unauthorized 2 worker and go up to $10,000 for the third offense. A pattern of such violations could result in criminal penalties. No employer citations will be issued before May 31 and no fines will be charged until June 1 , 1988. Under anti-discrimination provisions, em ployers may not ask employees to post bond or security to offset any penalties or fines resulting from employer sanctions, nor can they discriminate on account of national origin or citizenship status. Melinda Machado Caucus Given High Marks The eleven full-voting members of the Con gressional Hispanic Caucus averaged a 91% score in favor of legislation positively affecting Latinos, according to findings released last week in the Congressional Education As sociates' "Congressional Ledger 1986. " The book, which rates Congress on black and Hispanic interests, covers the first session of the 99th Congress. Rep. Manuel Lujan (R-N.M . ) scored 30%. The 10 other House Latinos all Democrats -scored from 90% to 1 00%. There a re no Hispanics or blacks in the Senate. The scores are based on 20 roll-call votes between Jan. 3 and Dec . 20, 1 985. Gordon Alexander, president of the non partisan blackand Hispanic-owned Congres sional Education Associates firm, which is based in Washington, D .C., said the ledger included votes on such topics as immigration, higher education, the budget, housing and prohibiting aid to Nicaraguan rebels. Overall, the House voted 61% in support of legislation that CEA determined was beneficial to Hispanics and blacks. The Senate was 57% supportive. CEA plans to publish its .edition covering Congressional votes in 1986 in late May. Canada Resets Policy to Inhibit Refugee Flow The Canadian government imposed rules Feb . 20 to end the practice of allowing auto matic entry to refugees from El Salvador, Guatemala and 16 other countries. It did so in response to the growing number of un documented aliens arriving at its border. Many of the refugees, known as bus people , are fleeing the crackdown of the new U . S. immigration law. Those wishing to claim refugee status are now turned back at the border by Canadian immigration officers who arrange for a hea r ing four to six weeks later. In the first six weeks of 1987, 6 ,120 persons claiming refugee status have arrived at the Canadian border. That is nearly as many as the total arriving in all of 1985. More than a third of the recent arrivals are natives of El Salvado r and about 1,000 are fleeing Chile. Canada's Immigration Minister Benoit Bouchard promised to propose legislation this month that would tighten border control. LA. Racial Incidents Rise The number of racial incidents in Los Angeles County increased to 58 last year from 13 in 1985 -a 346% increase-while only three such attacks were committed aga inst Latinos, reported a study issued Feb. 20 by the county's Human Relations Commission. Nearly three-quarters of the incidents were directed against blacks and about a quarter were aimed against As i ans. Officials with the commission said the totals were probably severely underreported due to the reluctance of people with questionable immigration status to report crimes. Most of the incidents involved vandalism , but a number were dangerous. A Latino family in Long Beach , for example, had slingshot fired stones aimed at them and their home . The number of racial incidents has risen steadily since 1981, when such a breakdown was first provided, except in 1983 when it dipped to 11 from 15 the previous year. Dade Latinos Grow 32/o Dade County , Fla. Hispanics increased their numbers by 187,000 from 1980 to 1985, increasing their proportiqn of the population from 36% to 43% , according to a study to be released later this month . The profile, prepared by the county's Office of Latin Affairs, found that Hispanics increased their representation from 581 ,000 in 1980 to 768,000 two years ago. Dade County has a total population of 1.77 million. Among the county's Latinos, 517,000 were of Cuban extraction, 45,000 Puerto Rican and 25,000 each Colombian and Nicaraguan . Cubans alone accounted for more than 100,000 of the five-year Hispanic population growth. A spokesperson for the Office of Latin Affairs said the study was the county's first comprehensive count of the Hispanic popu lation that took into consideration the refugees that arrived during the Marie I boat lift in 1980. Hispani c Link Weekly Rep ort

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Raul Yzaguirre, guest columnist The 'Mendacitis' Bug There is some kind of "bug" going around in Washington these days . A bug that makes Reagan administration officials say one thing. and then do something completely opposite. This appears to be true, at least, as far as federal education policy for Hispanics is concerned. Secretary of Education William Bennett became afflicted with the" Mendacitis Bug " (as in " mendacious," not truthful) over a year ago when he made his first speech on bilingual education. At Senate hearings on his proposal to amend Title VII, the Bilingual Education Act , he proclaimed both his commitment to pro tecting bilingual education from further budget cuts and his concern about limited-English profic ie nt children. Since Secretary Bennett took office, however, the departmenfs record on implementing the act h?S been abominable. The acfs governing regulations were issued a year and a half late and they deviate from both the law and the intent of Congress. The majorit y of the secretary's appointees to the National Advisory Council on Bilingual Educat i on advocate eliminating the program. And the Office for Civil Rights has sharply reduced its monitoring on language-related issues. BILINGUAL PROGRAMS THREATENED The secretary's bilingual education proposals are no better. His legislative amendments to T itle VII would allow him to fund as many programs as he pleases, at the expense of successful bilingual education programs. In January, he made another speech on bilingual education. Again he spoke about his commitment to the program Yet he resubmitted to Congress the same Title VII amendments he proposed last year. The secretary called his 1988 budget a "responsible budget for American education -for our children, their schools, an d their fu tures." He claimed that it would"enhance educational opportunity for the poor, the disadvantaged, the handicapped and children with limited English-speaking ability." It would reduce the federal governmenfs commitment to education by 25%, and much of this reduction would be at the expense of programs important to the education of Hispanic children. The secretary proposes to eliminate vocational and bilingual vocational education, public library assistance, desegregation assistance , im migra nt and refugee education programs, and programs vital to migrant children. TRIO PROGRAMS WOULD BE CUT Budget cuts would come from the TRIO programs , such as Upward Bound , which serve disadvantaged high school youth; programs which serve disadvantaged college students; and financial aid for higher education. Apparently, the secretary's condition occasionally goes into slight remission. He proposes to increase funding both for Chapter One, the federal governmenfs compensatory education program , and for the Adult Education Act. At a House hearing on the budget, he remarked that the increase in Chapter One was to account for inflation. (Thus the proposed level funding for the Bilingual Education Act actually represents a budget reduction. ) In the absence of some vaccine for this bug, we can only hope that the secretary of education will listen to his own rhetoric and translate those words into real solutions. Hispanic children need effective educational services, adequately funded -not kind words accompanied by slashed budgets and crippled programs. The Mendacitis Bug is a serious ailment in the nation's capital, and Secretary Bennett needs an antidote fast. Perhaps we'll find a doctor in the House ... or maybe the Senate. (Raul Yzaguirre is president of the National Council of La Raza) Sin pelos en Ia lengua REPORTERS ANONYMOUS: In the newspaper. business, ifs accepted that the comparatively low salaries earned by outstanding reporters are balanced by ethereal and ego rewards. Prominent Page 1 bylines are part of the ego compensation. Thus it was strange to read The Miami Herald's well-written and well-documented four-part series last month on "The World' s Deadliest Criminals: The Medellin Cartel" and observe not a single byline or credit-line. The series obviously required numerous trips to Colombia. It took 2 1/2 months to document and write. It mentioned international drug leaders freely and filled in scorecards with who got in the way and died: 180 Colombi an policeman were killed in 1986. Since late 1984, cartel assassins killed four judges (including a Supreme Court Justice), three high-level security officials and the crusading anti-narcotics editor of Colombia's second-largest newspaper., (The cartel was also believed to have played a major role in the 1985 guerrilla raid on Bogota' s Palace of Justice, in which 11 members of the 24-member high court were killed . ) The Herald series obviously demanded powerful Spanish-language skills and cultural knowledge and sensitivity. Certain that many of the Herald's Latino staff members were involved in a story that is bound to win some awards, I called executive editor Heath Meriwether to ask the questions with obvious answers: Who wrote it? Why no bylines? He courteously declined to tell me whowOf"ked on the series. "It was a decision of the people who worked on the story not to use bylines, " he said, adding that if the series pitted the cartel against anybody, the Herald would prefer that it" aim its ire institutionally," rather than at i"ndividuals. He expressed pride in the fact that seven Colombian newspapers -including two with staff members believed to have been murdered by drug traffickers-are simultaneously reprinting the Herald's bold expose. Hopefully, the only suspense remain i ng is who' s going to pick up the awards that the series is bound to generate. PRIZE CROP : Meanwhile , the United Nations issued a postage stamp to honor Colombia (U.N . stamps featuring member-countries are printed for collectors and may be used as postage if mailed from the U.N. post office) a couple of months ago. Someone tampered with it, however. It was printed featuring the country's flag and a tribute to its main agricultural crops, described on the st .amp as " coffee, cocaine and marijuana" Colombia 's ambassador sent off an energetic protest to Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, who promised an investigation. A U.N. spokesperson gave assurances that none of the stamps had been used on outgoing mail. Colombia announced an inves tigation of its own. The last time we checked with the Embassy in Washington, the matter was still "under investigation. " Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • BOB GALLAGHER , Houston high school coach, quoted in the Feb . 16 Los Angeles Times on his coaching 7-foot, 1-irich University of Miami basketball starTito Horford(who at the time was concerned about helping his widowed mother in the Dominican Republic) : "He was a very confused boy. . . He had that Latin mentalityeverything goes back to mamacita. Just before he needed to make a decision, he had to call mamacita. And here was a woman in poverty"' telling a boy with all his potential how to lead his life ... " ANNA GOMEZ, a patron in Miami' s Parallel Bar , quoted in the Feb. 16 Time magazine on why middle-class whites think AIDS affects only gays and poor ml'r,orities : " People believe that the higher the cover charges at a bar, the less likely theyre going to run into AIDS." Hi spa ni c Link Weekly Report March 2 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING ASYLUM IN THE UNITED STATES: The U . S . Committee for Refugees has published a 48-page booklet titled "Despite a Generous Spirit: Denying Asylum in the United States." Included are the steps considered when one applies for asylum and application denial and acceptance rates according to country. For a copy, send $2 to the committee at: 815 15th St. NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 667-0782. NEWS FOR, ON THE UNDOCUMENTED: UN DOC is a 2-6 page newsletter published four to six times yearly . It deals with legislation that affects undocumented aliens and recent research and books geared to this community. Subscription to UNDOC is free-donations are appreciated. To receive, write to: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), P . O . Box 1986, Indianapolis, Ind. 46206 (317) 353-1491. HISPANICS IN TUCSON: "Hispanic Visions" is a28-page report detailing the purchasing power, education, employment and growth patterns of Latinos in that city: Single copies are free; additional copies are $5. To order, write to. Tucson Newspapers,4850 s. Park , Tucson, Ariz. 85714 (602) 573-4366. RATING CONGRESS: "CEACongressional Ledger1986: Rating Congress on Black and Hispanic Interests" is a 122-page booklet that rates congressional members on how they vo 'ted on legislation affecting Latinos and blacks in the first session of the 99th Congress. To order( discounts are available for bulk orders) send $1 0 to: Congressional Education Associates, 302 E. Capitol St. NE , Washington, D.C. 20013 (202) 547-9000. NATIONAL HISPANIC ART SHOW: Expresiones Hispanas, a national Hispanic art show to tour the nation this fall, is seeking 40 to 50 works. The show, which will tour cities such as Los Angeles, San Antonio and Denver, is sponsored by the Adolph Coors Co. Prizes totalling $15,000 will be shared equally by the artists and the organizations of their choice. Entry deadline is March 31, and artists must be 21 years of age or older . For information, write to: Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artistic Images , Maureen Leon Acosta, P .O. Box 11434, Denver, Colo. 80211 (303) 433-2661. PARENTS HELPING CHILDREN LEARN: "Helping Your Child Learn, " a 25-page pamphlet authored by Luis Cano, is a guide written in Spanish and English outlining advice on how Hispanic parents can keep their children in school. For a free copy, write to: Southwestern Bell, P . O . Box 1530, Room 1216, Houston, Texas 77251-1530. CONNECTING (Late news on what' s occumng within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) LATINO HISTORY MUSEUM STUDIED A feasibility study is presently being conducted by the Economic Research Association on the proposed legislation calling for the establishment of the first museum of Latino history in the United States, to be located in Los Angeles. The study, under the direction of the California Museum of Science and Industry, is to be completed sometime in April. Then it is expected that Charles Calderon, Democratic state assemblyman, will submit leg i slation calling for appropriations to finance the full operation. Proposed name for the facility is the California Museum of Latino History. STUDY EYES DROPOUT RATE A three-year study financed by the Ford Foundation will examine Hispanic dropouts in public schools in Milwaukee; Chicago; Dade County, Fla ; San Antonio; and Newark, N . J . The principal investigator of the study is Ricardo Fernandez, an associate professor in the department of education at the University of Wisconsin . The dropout rate among Hispanic students is up to 80% in some areas, according to statistics provided by the Ford Foundation. Fer nandez hopes the study will produce local, school-based strategies to keep Hispanic youths in schools. MET LIFE TOP LATINO INSURER A study conducted by Strategy Research Corporation of Miami, found that Metropolitan Life Insurance Company is number one in market share and consumer awareness in the top six Hispanic markets in the United States where the company has a Hispanic marketing program. Through participating managers and sales representatives sup ported with Spanish-language promotion materials and advertisements, Met Life has achieved this status . The study consisted of 1,400 door t
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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks an Executive Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management of non-profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs; fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. Outstanding verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelor's degree in a field related to the work of the Institute is required ; Master's or advanced degree is preferred. The L atino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training , information and advocacy in all areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but preference may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city. Salary $48,000-$55,000. Apply by March 16, 1987 to: Dr. Josue M. Gonzalez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P . O . Box 699005 Chicago, Ill. 60609-9005 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Community Based Advocacy, Research and Planning Organization seeks an Executive Director. We seek proven experience in fund raising , program and staff development planning, and administration. Relevant graduate degree or equivalent experience required and Spanish/ English bilingual preferred. Competitive salary. Send resume and cover letter by March 1 (no calls) to: Search Committee, Hispanic Office of Planning & Evaluation, Sewall Building, 55 Dimock St. , Boston , Mass. 02119. FOREIGN SERVICE CAREERS Agency for International Development is looking for candidates with graduate degrees in agriculture, accounting, economics, education, housinq/urban planning, international population planning, public health, nutrition, procurement/contracting, public or business_ administration, or closely related disciplines fori its International Development Intern Program . An internship leads to positions planning and managing U.S. foreign economic assistance programs in the developing countries. '' U.S. citizenship and two or more years' relevant professional experience are required. Starting salaries are in the $22,000 to $36,000 range , plus standard Foreign Service allowances when stationed overseas. Send resume or application for Federal Employment (SF-171) as soon as possible toRe cruitment Staff , FSP/RSS, HL, Agency for Inter national Development Washington, D.C. 20523. LATINO PUBLIC POLICY Fellowships for 1987-88 The Inter-University Program for Latino Research* and the Social Science Research Council announce three fellowship compe titions. • Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the centers of the IUP or with the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. One year stipend of $22,500. Deadline: March 15, 1987. • Summer Workshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigal\ Ann Arbor. Transportation and living expenses for four-week program. Deadline : April 24, 1987. e Latino Graduate Student Training Seminar at Stanford University. Transpor tation and living expenses for two-week summer program. Deadline: March 15, 1987. For more information contact IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, versity of Texas at Austin, SSB 4 . 1 20, Austin, Texas 78712 (512)4711817. *The IUP is operated jointly by the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, Hunter College; Center for Mexican American Studies, versity of Texas; Chicano Studies Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles; and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research . AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 90-DAYTEMPORARY POSITIONS The Library of Congress The Library of Congress needs applicants for some temporary positions not to exceed 90 days. These positions are: • Clerk/ Messenger, G&303-04 ($6.16 per. hour) e Library Technician, G&1411-3 ($5.49 per hour) or GS-1411-4 ($6. 16 per hour), or GS-14115 ($6.20 per hour) • Library Aid , GS-1411-02 ($5.0 3 per hour) • Editorial Assistant, GS-1 087-5 ($6.90 per hour) e Editorial Clerk/ Assistant G& 1 087-4 ($6 . 16 pe! per hour) or G&t 087-5 ($6.90 per hour) Experience Requirements: Experience re qui rements vary according to the type and level of each position. Test Requirements: Clerk/Messenger, Library Technician and Library Aid positions do not require typing. Editorial Assistant positions re quire passing of the Library of Congress Clerical Test unless applicant holds bach'tllor's degree. Call Susan Kames at (202) 287-5627 for further information. . How to Apply: Submit a Standard Form 171 and a copy of clerical test results as soon as possible to Susan Kames, Recruitment and Placement Specialist Employment Office , Room LM-1 07, James Madison Memorial Building, Washington, D.C. 20540. The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board. ENGINEERS The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4-yearengineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary: $2,206 $2 , 972/mo. +benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April6. Se habla espana/. SCIENCE DEGREES The ,California Air is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam. Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salary: . 1 . .-$2,837 /mo. + benefits. . For . more information. call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se habla espana! An Equal Opportunity Employer DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino exec b tivesarid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of His panic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washingt9n, o.c; 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 6r(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, International Clearinghouse on Adolescent Fertility(ICAF). Responsible for development of newsletter in three languages and coordination of seed grants program. Provides technical assistance to adolescent programs. Qualifications: B.A.; experience in developing country; knowledge of f amily planning and/or youth work; Spanish fluency; bicultural preferred. Contact: ICAF , Center for Population Options, 1012 14th St. NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D . C . 20005. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., . govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (3'0 1) 952-3408. Hi s p a ni c Link W eekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered bY.----------75 cents per word (city, state & zip Title --------------code count as 2 words; telephone Area Code & Phone-------number. 1 wordl.Multiple use rates Advertiser Name ________ _ on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Bill To------------Address ----------City, State & Zip ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment the same category, said he is currently collaborating on an English language album with Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, Bob Dylan and Sting. A NIGHT AT THE GRAMMYS: For the first time in three years, three Hispanic performers won Grammys in all three "Latin" music categories at the awards ceremony of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences held Feb. 24. For his second year in a row, Blades was an awards presenter at the Grammys ceremony, held in Los Angeles' Shrine Auditorium. Past Grammy winner Placido Domingo and past nominee Julia Migenes were also presenters at the ceremony, syndicated to Puerto Rico Mexico and various Latin American countries. The "Latin" were announced-as were the majority of the awards-in a non-televised ceremony prior to the awards " show' ' telecast in the United States by CBS. Jose Feliciano won in the "best Latin pop" catepory for the Lelolai track from the Te amare album. It was his fourth GrammyFeliciano had won in the same category in 1983 and twice in 1986 in "pop" performances. Other Latino musicians are in the news this week: "The future seems bright," said Feliciano, "because I will also be recording classical music, in English and also in Spanish." The Puerto Rican singer said he hopes to record his own The Mozartian Influence, a piece for the guitar in seven movements. Mex ican c ellist Carlos Prieto has begun a monthlong recital tour of the United States highlighted by a performance at New York's Lincoln Center March 13, a Chicago date on the 14th and at the University of California in Los Angeles on the 21st. San Antonio accordionist Flaco Jimenez won in the category for which his brother Santiago was nominated last year"best Mex ican American performance" -for his album Ay te deja en San Antonio. And Sheila E, who is featured on timbales on Prince ' s Sign of the Times album, due out March 23, has included the track Salsa Soul in her new album, featuring performances by her father, Pete , her mother, Juanita, and three other performers of the Escovedo family. Ruben Blades won in the " best tropical Latin performance " category for his album Escenas . Blades, who had been nominated last year in -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report HISPANIC MEDIA, USA: The Media In stitute,a non-profit research foundation based in Washington , D . C., r eleased a narrative guide to U . S. Hispanic news media on Feb . 27. Titled " Hispanic Media , USA," the 225-page soft-cover publication features one-to-two page profiles of 48 daily and weekly news papers , television networks and stations , radio stations, wire services and magazines . Nearly all are Spanishlanguage. It also has a directory section listing 259 key Hispanic print and broadcast outlets in summary format. Ana VecianaSuarez, a reporter with The Miami Herald, was commissioned to write the directory. In her preface, she notes three characteristics shared by U.S. Latino media : 1 . They provide Latin American news in much greater detail than do their English language counterparts. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Edi tor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Charlie Eri c ksen . Antonio Mejias-Rentas, M elinda Ma c hado. M i k e Ore nstei n . Jul io L aboy. No portion of Hispani c Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. T rial subscription (13 Issues) $26. 6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word . Display ads are $35 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesda y will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same we ek. Multi ple use rates on request . 2 . They cover U . S. Latino communities ex tensively. 3 . They carry editorials that support Hispanic interests such as bilingual education. University of Southern California journalism professor Feli x Gutierrez c redits Veciana Suarez in his foreword as filling " an important void in our knowledge." Gutierrez suggests that as Hispanic media in the United States "continue to grow and redefine their role , larger questions will be posed and, hopefully, addressed." He singles out five trends or issues described in the publication: e The need for more coverage of issues relating to the lives of U.S . Latinos; e The long-range commitment to a Latino audience of the growing number of nonHispanic owners of Latino media ; e The use of Spanish/English/ bilingual formats in media as language use in Latino communities becomes more complex; e Differences in concepts of advocacy and objectivity between Latino and news media; and • The social responsibility of Latino media to their largely low-income audiences as they operate and grow by selling their audiences as a consumer market to be tapped by adver tisers. The81/2 x 1 Hnch directory, supported by funding from the Chevron Corp . and the Adolph Coors Co., sells for $75. However, The Media Institute President Patrick Maines is making it available to His panic organizations and media outlets, as well as to academic institutions, for $25. Its initial printing is 4,000. Copies may be obtained from the Publications Department, The Media Institute, 3017 M St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20007 (202) 298 7512. PEOPLE: Miguel Gallastedui has been promoted to deputy news director of Radio Marti ... Reporter Alfredo Corchado, winner of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists' 1986 journalism award, moved from the El Paso Herald-Post to The Wall Street Journal's Philadelphia bureau ... Charlie Ericksen ATTENTION! DUETO NEW IMMIG-RATION L.AW/ C.eRTAJN EMPLOYEES ARE:. RfCVUIREPTO Th-KE curs A WbK EXTRA 10 OFfSET IJES. Empl oy e r Hi spanic L i n k W eek l y Report