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Hispanic link weekly report, March 9, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 9, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
House Majority Whip Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) agrees with other Democratic House leaders that Congress will have to abandon the deficit ceiling set by the Gramm-Rudman budget-balancing law... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints David Romero as chairman of the new state Task Force on California-Mexico Relations... Deukmejian also names Ivonne Ramos-Richardson to the state Agricultural Relations Board Ramos-Richardson replaces Jorge Carillo... Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin is appointed to the advisory council of the Heritage Foundation’s Arthur Spitzer Institute for Hemispheric Development, a think tank focusing on U.S. policy toward Latin America and the Caribbean.. . California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown selects fellow Assemblyman PeteChacbnas
chairman of the Assembly Elections, Reapportionment and Constitutional Amendments Committee... U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Western Region Commissioner Harold Ezell announces the appointment of 19-year INS veteran Carlos T6llez as director of a new office that will investigate charges of job discrimination against immigrants in that region... The board of directors of the Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission selects Liz Flores as its executive director. Flores, 29, was a planner with the agency... Trial begins for J.R. Hagan in Tucson, Ariz. He is charged with illegally carrying firearms while reportedly detaining a group of undocumented aliens at gunpoint... Janie Martinez becomes one of 10 women to successfully give birth while undergoing dialysis treatment. The Lubbock, Texas, resident delivered a healthy boy, whom she named Joshua. . . Maria Vel&squez, from Fremont, Calif., gives birth to quadruplet boys...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
MALDEF Board Settles Dispute
LA. Foes Agree on Assembly Candidate
Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of U.S. Rep. Edward R. Roybal (D-Calif.),told Weekly Report March 2 that she will run for the seat vacated by former state Assemblywoman Gloria Molina She said she has the support of Los Angeles City Council members Molina and Richard Alatorre and state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles).
Alatorre and Torres had both opposed Molina’s candidacy in the Feb. 3 special election for the council seat. Alatorre and Molina have backed opposing candidates in elections involving Los Angeles-area Hispanics and were expected to support different candidates in this race.
Allard’s emergence as a consensus candidate is a hoped-for “bridge” between the factions, Alatorre told reporters in Los Angeles.
A consensus candidate could also avoid a costly election like the one in which Molina just defeated school board member Larry Gonzalez for her Council seat. Each spent close to a quarter of a million dollars.
“As soon as the governor declares the election date, I will determine when I will officially announce my candidacy,” Allard said.
Under California law, the governor must set an election date within 14 days of the Assembly seat vacancy. Molina was sworn into city office Feb. 28.
Among the issues prompting the 45-year-old Allard to make her first run for office is the discord surrounding the possibility of a prison being built in East Los Angeles.
“The East Los Angeles prison issue, which is something the community and Gloria have been fighting, is something I feel very strongly about. I feel I can contribute and make sure that it is defeated in Sacramento,” she said.
Polls Show Pena Strength
Denver Mayor Federico Pena appears to be on his way to becoming the first candidate in 20 years in that city to win the mayoral election without a runoff, recent polls indicate.
Pena, who officially announced his candidacy for a second four-year term Feb. 12, was shown to be ahead of his nearest competitor by at least 30 points
The board of directors of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund voted, 18-14, Feb. 28 to reinstate Antonia Hernandez as the organization’s general counsel and president after a sometimes acrimonious 8 1/2-hour meeting.
Despite what was widely reported as being a disruptive and contentious effort to unseat Hernandez, Hispanic leaders around the country and within the 20-year-old organization generally agree that the episode will not cause irreparable harm to MALDEFs effectiveness as a civil rights defender.
“I do believe there has been some damage to MALDEFs credibility in the community, and we are going to do our darndest to go out
The National Consortium of Hispanic Organizations, an umbrella group of 30 Latino advocacy organizations, met with a White House official Feb. 25 in an attempt to increase Hispanic input into the Reagan ad-
INS Wants $175 Fee
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service proposed Feb. 27 to the Reagan administration that it approve a fee of $175 for individuals and $400 for families applying for legalization under federal immigration law.
Hispanic advocacy and community organizations had sharply criticized INS when it announced Jan. 20 that it was considering setting the fee at between $150 and $250.
Congressman Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, called the fees“ unreasonably high and completely contrary to the spirit and intent of Congress.”
According to organizations monitoring the situation, individuals applying for legalization could easily end up paying more than $300 when medical examinations, document copying costs and fees charged by agencies authorized by I NS to offer assistance are taken into account.
there and re-establish that credibility,” Hernandez told Weekly Report She added, however, that the board decision “reaffirms MALDEFs stature.”
In addition to reinstating Hernandez as bead, the board also decided to extend her contract until April 1988. Her current agreement with the organization expires next month.
Eric Serna, the MALDEF board of directors chairman, pointed out that during the turmoil the organization “continued with litigation, continued with the MALDEF mission and did so in a professional and unbiased way.”
Serna, also chairman of the New Mexico state Corporation Commission, spearheaded continued on page 2
ministration.
Jane Delgado, president of the consortium, and several other Hispanic organization leaders and representatives presented a four-point agenda to Rudy Beserra, associate director of the White House Office of Public Liaison.
The four itenjs were: addressing the English-Only movement; appointing more Hispanics to senior level positions within the administration; establishing a better working relationship between Hispanic advocacy groups and Republicans, more specifically the Republican National Hispanic Assembly; and conducting a forum with Cabinet heads and White House officials to present Hispanic viewpoints on issues of interest to Latinos.
“Having that kind of meeting on a regular basis is crucial to the Hispanic community,” said Delgado. She stressed that the most important national issue facing Hispanics is the campaign being waged at the state and national level to make English the official language.
Among consortium member-organizations represented at the meeting were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, National Council of La Raza, National Council of Puerto Rican Women, InterAmerican College for Physicians and Surgeons, the Cuban National Planning Council and El Con-greso Nacional de Asuntos Colegiales.
Hispanics Seek White House Access


L.A. Forms Task Force to Halt Alien ‘ Rip-offs’
Legalization Delay Requested
A resolution to push back by at least four months the May 5 legalization application acceptance date under the new immigration law was passed by the organization of Hispanic Elected Local Officials during the National League of Cities’ conference in Washington, D.C., March 1.
HELO is one of four constituency groups within the NLC whose purpose is to further the chances of minorities to become NLC board members and be involved in the policy process.
“By May 5th, we are not going to be in a good position to help people. There is the question of money and confusion,” said HELO President Maria Antonietta Berriozabal, a San Antonio City Councilwoman.
HELO is proposing that the May start-up date for implementation of the Immigration
Reform and Control Act be delayed at least 120 days to allow private and public community groups time to prepare for the large number of undocumented workers expected to apply for citizenship.
The resolution, authored by Phoenix, Ariz, City Councilwoman Mary Rose Wilcox, will be presented to members of Congress by the 40 HELO members supporting the resolution. HELO was precluded from presenting the resolution to NLC because it was passed after the N LCs Board of Directors meeting, said an NLC staff member.
Because of obligations which may be placed on local government by the immigration law, the resolution calls for clear and flexible regulations concerning amnesty procedures and asks Congress for adequate funding at the state and local level.
EEOC Clarifies Immigration Policy
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission adopted unanimously a policy statement Feb. 26 that said it will enforce the Civil Rights Act against employers who “overreact” to the new immigration law by firing or refusing to hire individuals who sound or look“foreign.”
The act does create an Office of Special Counsel under the U.S. Justice Department that would handle complaints of discrimination The office, however, only covers employers who have between three and 15 employees. EEOC Commissioner Fred Alvarez said, “Anybody who has more than 15 employees-and there are a lot of those- and who overreacts
Texas Weighs English Bill
A resolution proposing a constitutional amendment to make English the official language of Texas was introduced in the Texas House March 2, Texas Independence Day, by Rep. Pete Patterson (D-Brookston).
“English-only is dead one-half hour after it was introduced,” said state Rep. Al Luna(D-Houston), chairman of the Mexican American Legislative Caucus.
The caucus has secured signatures from 61 representatives committing themselves to vote against the proposal.
Sen. Carlos Truan (D-Corpus Christi) said he has seen no support for the bill in the Senate.
Proficiency Bill Proffered
A companion English Proficiency bill to one submitted to the U.S. House of Representatives by Rep. Matthew (Marty) Martinez Jan. 8 was introduced in the Senate March 3 by Sens. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) and John McCain(R-Ariz.)
The act, endorsed by several Hispanic organizations, asks for $50 million per year for three years to establish English literacy programs for adults of limited-English proficiency.
2
to the law will be under our jurisdiction.” The Justice Department has yet to open its Office of Special counsel. Rick Swartz, president of the National Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Forum, said that employees who feel they have been discriminated against should send a letter now to the Justice Department to fall within the 180-day filing deadline created under the act.
continued from page 1
the campaign to oust Herndmdez and replace her with former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya. At a Jan. 17 meeting of the executive committee in Dallas, Serna announced that Anaya was joining MALDEF as the new head. Cited as the two reasons for firing Hernandez were a letter she sent to the Federal Communications Commission on behalf of the court-approved sale of nine Spanish-language stations to Hallmark Cards Inc. and her approval of a class-action settlement in a lawsuit against a major Texas grocery chain.
Hernandez immediately challenged the firing as illegal, stating that only the full34-member board could dismiss her. On Feb. 17, aTexas state district court ruled that the meeting to resolve the issue would be held in Los Angeles.
Board member Al Zapanta stormed out of the Los Angeles meeting following the vote and tendered his resignation. Serna refused to accept it.
The full board meets again in Los Angeles April 25 and 26. On the agenda will be recommendations to replace 14 members retiring at the end of their 4-year terms. The board could also choose to expand itself to 40 members. Conceivably, the new board could abrogate any agreement reached by the current board.
“We left the meeting with an understanding of how important it is to preserve MALDEF and for it to continue as the effective advocacy
A multiagency task force will work vigorously in Los Angeles to prevent the exploitation of hundreds of thousands of undocumented workers expected to seek legalization under the new immigration law, the Los Angeles city attorney announced Feb. 25.
Complaints of “rip-offs,” such as excessively high notary public charges and costly fees from immigration consultants, prompted Deputy City Attorney Susan Frauens to request the task force, which she now heads.
“Whenever there is the opportunity to make money, you’ll find con artists not far behind. And this will be a very lucrative field in the next few months,” she said.
Between 400,000 to 1 million people are expected to seek legalization in Los Angeles, according to City Attorney James Hahn.
Members of the Immigration and Amnesty Task Force include representatives from the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office, the Los Angeles County Department of Consumer Affairs, the Los Angeles Bar Association, the California State Bar Association, the California Attorney General’s Office, the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the California Secretary of State’s office.
The task force will allow various agencies to coordinate investigations and prevent duplication, Frauens said. Members will be looking for false advertising, persons practicing law without a license, unfair business practices and the charging of high fees.
arm of the Hispanic community,” said Serna. “The fight is behind us. We will go forward as a united organization."
U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said, “I thought there was much to-do about this issue,” adding, “I never see big exposes on the NAACP, Urban League or B’Nai B’Rith having a problem. These are problems that all organizations go through and I don’t think it will hurt them.”
Phil Montez, western regional director of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, attributed what happened at MALDEF to “personalities.” “Any of the anti-MALDEF remarks that have been made will not erode the highly respected reputation that it has earned over the years.” Congressman Matthew Martinez agreed that the confrontation between Serna and Hernandez will not have a long-lasting effect on the ability of MALDEF to represent the interests of Hispanics'. He added, however, that the board should have fired Hernandez for her letter concerning the television stations Hernandez was instructed by the MALDEF executive board to withdraw the letter.
MALDEF began in Texas in 1967. It now has 60 staff members, offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., and San Antonio. It is operating on a budget this year of $2.8 million.
Hernandez has headed MALDEF since July 1985. - Felix Perez
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
MALDEF’s Leaders Look to Future


Margarita Mondrus Engle, guest columnist
The Traditional Latina
A friend told me he is looking for a Latina wife. He wants a wife who will stay home, have many children and be ‘“just a housewife.” He thinks a Latina would fit these requirements j perfectly.
I started thinking about the women in my family.
My great-grandmother was a matriarch. She ruled an enormous family in Cuba and helped j manage a farm she bought with gold coins j she had accumulated one at a time over many years.
No one in her family would have taken any important step without her advice and consent She was consulted on all decisions involving farm, family and finances. Her 12 children respected her, and needed her, throughout her long life.
She lived well into her 90s without ever losing any of her influence or strength.
My grandmother, who turned 86 this month, was also a traditional housewife. She was, however, courageous enough to be the first woman in her small town to seek a divorce, at a time when Cuban I Catholics simply did not get divorced. To this day she remains the j most devout Catholic I know, despite her excommunication.
PROMISED AN ETERNAL LIGHT
When my sister had polio, my grandmother promised her favorite saint an eternal light in exchange for my sisters survival. The light has been with her more than 30 years. It came with her when she left Cuba She was more than 70 years old when she left as a refugee. She had the courage to leave, knowing that she would never see her i homeland again.
I know few young women, Anglo or Hispanic, with the kind of faith, courage and perseverance my grandmother has shown.
My mother left Cuba long before the revolution, at the age of 17. She left her country and family to travel thousands of miles to marry a foreigner, my father. She arrived in Los Angeles without understanding a word of English. She quickly adapted to an alien and often hostile city. Many years as a traditional housewife did not prevent her from developing into a woman of remarkable strength.
A few years ago, I spent six weeks as a volunteer in a social-service project in a village in southern Mexico. I was supposed to help build a school, but the building materials never arrived.
I wanted to do something useful, so I found a woman who needed j help in her corn and bean fields. I had been working in vegetable j plots at an agricultural school in California, and I thought I was ) accustomed to manual labor. I was soon disillusioned.
HOED 12 HOURS WITHOUT REST
My friend hoed weeds for 12 hours without a rest. She ate her lunch of cold tortillas while working. This tiny woman moved so fast that I found myself gasping for breath after half an hour. Her older children helped, and the baby was carried on her back
Her husband had gone to the United States to find work, and like so many of the husbands in her village, had never returned. He had found a new life and a new family somewhere in California.
Instead of selling off her land, this woman continued to farm by herself. In good years, she sometimes had enough money to rent a | mule or even oxen to pull a plow through her fields. In bad years, she told me, she had to pull it herself.
So when my friend tells me he wants to marry a traditional Latina j woman, I have to assume he is looking for certain qualities.
If he finds his Latina wife, will he find a subservient, weak-willed woman who cooks and cleans and has a baby every year?
Or will he find a woman distinguished by courage, strength and ! perseverance?
(Margarita Mondrus Engle, of Vista, Calif., is an agronomist and a writer who has taught at the high school and college levels.)
Reprinted from Hispanic Link News Service
Sin pelos en la lengua
CALIFORNIA CONVALESCENCE: Florida Gov’ Bob Martinez has confirmed his speaking appearance at the National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles April 25, NAHJ President Manuel Galvdn tells us.
Following his skirmishes with Florida’s cubano leadership after he kicked the state’s Commission on Hispanic Affairs out of his office last month, Martinez maybe relieved to know that California - with five times more Latinos than his own sunshine state- has no such counterpart.
Jorge Mas Canosa, chairman of the powerful Cuban American National Foundation, sent the new governor a letter Feb. 19 advising him that the foundation unanimously supported the commission’s strong resolution accusing Martinez of taking an ill-advised and inconsistent action.
“It is ironic that Florida’s first Hispanic governor in over a century would be the one to propose” such an action, it noted.
PAYDAY: When MALDEFs executive board tried to fire its president, Antonio Hernandez, it offered Toney Anaya, her proposed replacement, nearly $30,000 more than her present $62,000 annual salary.
Probing for more details on the narrow 18-14 vote by the group’s full board of directors to retain her, Hernandez was asked by an irreverent Hispanic Link reporter “Did you get a raise?”
“No,” she said, controlling her laughter. “But I’m going to ask for one.”
CATCH VEINTIDOS: Antonio Rodriguez, director of the Los Angeles Center for Law and Justice, describes the dilemma facing legalization candidates in a March 2 Los Angeles Times op/ed piece:
“Unemployed men and women, many of whom qualify for the legalization program, are being denied jobs because they have no work authorization. However, they cannot obtain work authorization unless they first apply for temporary residence beginning this May 5. But in order to qualify for temporary residence, they must prove a history of stable employment and show proof of current employment.
“The INS could easily solve the plight of these people, but the agency callously has refused to agree to issue them temporary work permits. Yet at the same time the INS has announced plans to disqualify applicants who have received unemployment-insurance benefits at any time.
“The devil could not have thought of a better plan to eliminate poor Latino applicants for legalization.”
THIS WEEK’S LIST: Submitted by Jos6 Rolg of Arlington, Va, is a list of the Festival Committee (14 persons) and Honorary Advisory Board (64 persons) for the National Independence Day Festival and Parade, to be held in Washington, D.C., July 4.
The event will draw bands and floats from nearly every state to celebrate our nation’s “heritage of freedom, pluralism and tolerance,” its coordinators promise.
Advisory board members range from Sen. John Glenn(D-Ohio) and U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese to boxers, actors and churchmen. Yet on the entire continental United States, the committee was unable to find a single qualified Latino or Latina.
But we will be represented, admits Roig wryly. “Where there are parades, there are horses. Where there are horses, clean-up crews are sure to follow. Yes, we will be invited to show up- after everyone else has gone.” Kay B£rbaro
Quoting...
LIONEL SOSA, president of Sosa & Associates ad agency in San Antonio, quoted in Insight magazine March 9:
“Courting the minority market share is like asking a wallflower to dance. Nobody asks her. So, when somebody finally notices her and asks, she’ll always say yes and she’ll never forget ydu.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 9,1987
3


COLLECTING
ARTS MAGAZINE: Order Performing Arts Manual (see Arts and Entertainment) by sending $18 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (Stock No. 030-001-00115-6).
PUERTO RICAN CHILDBEARING PATTERNS: “Childbearing Patterns Among Puerto Rican Hispanics in New York and Puerto Rico” outlines the patterns for the two groups between 1978 and 1982. Contained in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Jan. 30,
1987, by the Centers for Disease Control, the article can be obtained by sending $1 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
STATE, METRO AREA FACTS: The Census Bureau has published its periodic book on facts such as population, housing, health and vital statistics, income and education on. all 50 states and major metropolitan areas. The 726-page “1986 State and Metropolitan Area Data Book” can be obtained by sending a $28 prepaid order to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
MARKETING TO HISPANICS: Bilingual Hispanics whose primary language is Spanish are more likely to experience difficulty processing large amounts of consumer information, according to a study by Richard Feinberg, an associate professor of consumer sciences and retailing. For a copy of the 20-page study, send $2 to: Dr. R. Feinberg, Department of Consumer Sciences and Retailing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. 47907 (317) 494-8301.
HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES: The Northeast LULAC Regional News includes in its eight-page March 1987 issue two pages on scholarships and educational programs aimed at Hispanic and other minority students. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Andres Tobar, P.O. Box 44082, Washington,, D.C. 20026.
LITERACY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATORS: The National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education has published the proceedings of a symposium pn methods for teaching limited*English-proficient students, involving their parents and literacy. For a copy, send $1 for postage and handling to: NCBE, 11501 Georgia Ave., Wheaton, Md. 20902.
CONNECTING
(Late news on what’s occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
USHCC SCHEDULES WORKSHOPS Three business workshops are being staged by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce this month.
Sites, dates and subjects are: Cleveland, March 20, financial and bonding services and marketing; Seattle, March 27, marketing and business planning; and Kansas City, Mo., March 31, program to be decided later.
Workshops are open to the general public. For more information contact Carmelo Cuellar at the USHCC business department (816) 531-6363.
CONSORTIUM TO STUDY POVERTY The Inter-University Program for Latino Research, a national research consortium at Stanford University, has received an award of $250,000 from the Ford Foundation to study the long-term effects of growing poverty among Hispanics linked to major changes in the U.S. economy.
These economic changes are eliminating sources of adequate wages for Hispanics, suggests a preliminary study by Latino scholars at Stanford, UCLA and Hunter College in New York.
According to the U.S. Census, the average Hispanic family income dropped from 71% to 66% of that of whites between 1972 and 1982.
LABOR DEPT. RECRUITS STUDENTS Seven students from the University of Puerto Rico at Bayamdn are participating in a Cooperative Education Program at the U.S. Labor Department in Washington, D.C.
The program offers the students an opportunity to gain experience and to earn wages for tuition and other college expenses.
Elia Kerr, the department’s Hispanic Employment Program manager, said the young adults are working as computer analysts* accountants and program analysts for about six months before returning to Puerto Rico to continue their studies.
The students, who began working on Jan. 20, are: Lore Konig, Victor Lopez, Susan Muir, Francisco Ortiz, Carlos Rodriguez, Enrique Santos and Yolanda Tirado.
“The program has been in operation for years,” said Kerr, “but this is the first time this many Hispanics have been recruited at once.”
Calendar
THIS WEEK
JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. March 9-11 “Racial Diversity - The Media: A Blueprint for Action” is the topic of a national conference sponsored by the Institute for Journalism Education to assess the numerous efforts aimed at increasing minority representation at all levels of the media industry. Lava Thomas-Hebert (415) 642-8288
AWARD DINNER New York March 10
The National Puerto Rican Forum’s second annual award dinner will honor the McDonald’s Corporation for its support of affirmative action.
Hector Velasquez (212) 685-2311
LULAC NATIONAL MEETING
South Bend, Ind. March 12-14
The League of United Latin American Citizens is
holding its national executive board of directors
meeting and is hosting a dinner-dance on March 13.
4
Ismael Santiago (219) 874-7945
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Lansing, Mich. March 14
Alicia Valladolid Cuarbn will be the keynote speaker at the second annual statewide Hispanic Women’s Leadership Conference. Cuardn is a commissioner on the Colorado Supreme Court Nominating Commission and a communications consultant, author and educator.
Andrea Rodriguez (517) 371-3365
COMING SOON
GROCERS EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE Mexican American Grocers Association Foundation Palm Springs, Calif. March 18-22 Susana Rendon (213) 385-7730
MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE
American Newspaper Publishers Association Washington, D.C. March 19-21 Sandra Moller(800) 544-POST
HISPANIC EDUCATION FORUM
Washington State Commission on Mexican American
Affairs
Olympia, Wash. March 19 H6ctor Gonzalez (206) 753-3159
CHICANO FEDERATION DINNER Chicano Federation of San Diego County San Diego March 20 Jose Munoz (619) 236-1228
JOURNALISM BUSINESS CONFERENCE National Association of Hispanic Journalists Santurce, Puerto Rico March 21 Christopher Crommett (809) 758-5800
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC ASSOCIATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION, NEW JERSEY: “Testing and Evaluation: Barriers to Access and Retention” is the theme of the association’s ninth annual conference March 19 and 20 at Princeton University. Keynote speaker Michael Olivas, a professor of law and education at the University of Houston, will speak on “Research on Hispanic College Students: Lessons from Scholarship.” Conference workshops will address language testing, preventing high school drop out, high achieving Hispanic students and a proposed college sophomore test. For more information, contact Ivette Del Rio (609) 292-8840.
March 9, 1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE
The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks an Executive Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community-based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management of non-profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs; fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. Outstanding verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelor's degree in afield related to the work of the Institute is required; Master's or advanced degree is preferred.
The Latino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in all areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but preference may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city.
Salary $48,000 - $55,000. Apply by March 16, 1987 to:
Dr. Josu6 M. Gonzalez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P.O. Box 699005 Chicago, III. 60609-9005
LEGISLATIVE ATTORNEY
National Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Attorney for Washington, D.C., office to perform research of key national policy issues and monitor bills in Congress affecting Hispanics. The Attorney will monitor the legislative, executive and administrative agencies in Washington, D.C.
Writing assignments include drafting of testimony, issue papers and quarterly status reports.
Required experience in Civil Rights or other public interest law and law degree. Resumes with references to Mario Moreno, 1430 K Street NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C. 20005 by March 20, 1987.
FOREIGN SERVICE CAREERS
Agency for International Development is looking for candidates with graduate degrees in agriculture, accounting, economics, education, housing/urban planning international relations^ population planning, public health, nutrition, procurement/contracting, public or business administration, or closely related disciplines for its International Development Intern Program. An internship leads to positions planning and managing U.S. foreign economic assistance programs in the developing countries.
U.S citizenship and two or more years’ relevant professional experience are required. Starting salaries are in the $22,000 to $36,000 range, plus standard Foreign Service allowances when stationed overseas.
Send resume or application for Federal Employment (SF-171) as soon as possible to Recruitment Staff, FSP/RSS, HL, Agency for International Development, Washington, D.C. 20523.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, International Clearinghouse on Adolescent Fertility (ICAF). Responsible for development of newsletter in three languages and coordination of seed grants program. Provides technical assistance to adolescent programs.
Qualifications: BA; experience in developing country; knowledge of family planning and/or youth work; Spanish fluency; bicultural preferred. Contact: ICAF, Center for Population Options, 1012 14th St. NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20005.
MANAGEMENT INTERN
The City of San Jose, Calif., is accepting applications for the position of Management Intern. Interns assist the City Manager and department heads in organizing, developing and evaluating City services and programs. I n-terns will be hired on a contractual basis for one year.
Salary is $27,672/year(approximately). Requires complete MA degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or closely related field by 7/1 /87. Resumes will be reviewed and evaluated for personal interviews Resumes must include: honors and extracurricular activities; names and telephone numbers of 3 references (one must be a faculty member); official undergraduate and graduate transcripts; a 3-5 page typewritten paper on why you are seeking this position.
Final filing date: April 10,1987. Send resume to: Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Dept, 801 N. First St., Room 207, San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4202.
Hispanic advertising agency in Chicago looking for an experienced account executive and a copywriter; both must be fluent in Spanish and English. Call (312) 271-2720.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md.,. government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
90-DAY TEMPORARY POSITIONS The Library of Congress
The Library of Congress needs applicants for some temporary positions not to exceed 90 days. These positions are:
# Clerk/Messenger, GS-303-04 ($6.16 per hour)
# Library Technician, GS-1411-3 ($5.49 per hour)
or GS-1411-4 ($6.16 per hour),
or GS-1411- 5 ($6.20 per hour)
# Library Aid, GS-1411-02 ($5.03 per hour)
# Editorial Assistant, GS-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour)
# Editorial Clerty Assistant, GS-1087-4 ($6.16 per per hour)
or GS-1087-5 ($6.90 per hour)
Experience Requirements: Experience requirements vary according to the type and level of each position.
Test Requirements: Clerk/Messenger, Library Technician and Library Aid positions do not require typing. Editorial Assistant positions require passing of the Library of Congress Clerical Test unless applicant holds bachelor's degree.
Call Susan Karnes at (202) 287-5627 for further information.
How to Apply: Submit a Standard Form 171 and a copy of clerical test results as soon as possible to Susan Karnes, Recruitment and Placement Specialist Employment Office, Room LM-107, James Madison Memorial Building, Washington, D.C. 20540.
The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board.
ENGINEERS
The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4-year engineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary: $2,206 -$2,972/mo. + benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April 6. Se habla espahol.
SCIENCE DEGREES The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam. Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salary $2,011 -$2,837/mo.+ benefits. For.more information call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se .habla espahol
DEAR EXECUTIVE OFFICER OR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR:
On April 20, we will publish our 1987 media edition.
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 22-25 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles.
In addition to our regular“Marketplace” section, Weekly Report will carry a full page “Opportunities in the Media” insert for the edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
Our rates remain the same: 75 cents per word or $35 a column inch for a display ad; for those people seeking positions, the cost is 50 cents per word.
Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April 10.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
LEGAL LOBOS ON TOUR: Denying speculation by Madricf s press that they are “wetbacks,” Los Lobos began their first-ever European tour last month in Spain.
“We’re not wetbacks,” bassist Conrad Lorenzo said categorically during a press conference in Madrid Feb. 26, according to an Associated Press story circulated here.
All members of the group, continued the story, were born in the United States except guitarist Cesar Rosas, whose Mexican parents migrated legally when he was six years old.
Just two days prior to the Madrid incident, Paul Simon had thanked Los Lobos and singer Linda Ronstadt for being among “American artists” who helped him “take his album (Graceland) to the American people.” Simon made the statement while accepting the Grammy Award for Graceland, named “album of the year"’ at the award ceremony telecast Feb. 24.
Los Lobos performed to capacity audiences at Madrid’s Club Astoria, and continued on to a Paris engagement. The tour continues this month, taking the Los Angeles-based band to Denmark, Sweden,
Norway and Great Britain.
Back home, the band’s By the Light of the Moon album continues climbing the pop charts. Los Lobos* remake of Ritchie Valens’ La Bamba is due to coincide with this summer’s release of Luis Valdez’s film, with the same title, for Columbia Pictures.
PAZ ON POETRY: Mexican poet Octavio Paz will be among the writers discussing the work of U.S. poets for an upcoming public television series.
Paz will be seen in Voices and Visions, a 13-part series and course for college credit. There are no Latinos among the 13 poets covered in the series, which is expected to air on the Public Broadcasting Service in January 1988.
ONE LINERS: A Group Show by Nancy Shunn, Lillian Morelo, Rene Santos and Bill Wurtz opens March 10 at New York’s Intar Gallery. . . La Mujer, a photo exhibit documenting the history of Mexican women in Central California, continues at the Madera (Calif.) County Public Library through March 21... And With Villa in Mexico on Location is the title of an article by Aurelio de los Reyes featured in the first issue of Performing Arts Manual, a new magazine from the Library of Congress...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Court Ruling Aids Latinos
The U.S. Supreme Court decision Feb. 25 to uphold a promotion system based on a racial quota is a defeat for the Reagan administration’s opposition to affirmative action policies, a legislative lawyer for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund said.
MALDEF Washington attorney John Trasvina commented that the Reagan administration has consistently maintained discrimination remedies should apply only to individuals, not classes.
The court, voting 5-4, found constitutional a plan that required the promotion of one black for every white promoted in the Alabama State Police force. The plan remains effective until 25% of upper-rank officers are black.
The ruling marked the first time the Supreme Court has said judges could require employers to use numerical quotas in promotion. Last year, the court ruled similarly with regard to hiring.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 * N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hfcctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejlas-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
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Media Report
CELEBRITY GRATE: Contrived media events have to be spectacular to attract strong coverage in Washington, D.C. The overnight March 3-4 “Grate American Sleep-Out” - in which three California Hispanics were prominent- apparently qualified.
There were enough television lights glaring around many of the capital’s sidewalk grates - where several actors and congressmen were tucked into sleeping bags- to raise the temperature well above the evening’s official 35-degree low.
The event was organized by Community for Creative Non-Violence leader Mitch Snyder, with a boost from Hollywood’s Martin Sheen, who played the renown homeless advocate in a television movie.
Also sleeping with the city’s dispossessed to bring attention to Congress’s $500 million homeless aid package were Reps. Esteban Torres, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, and Tony Coelho, who serves
as House Majority Whip.
The CCNV issued a statement saying that no homeless people would be displaced from their regular sleeping spots by the event but one man was heard to shout to a friend near a popular grate behind the Library of Congress: “Stay away from there, buddy. That’s the celebrity grate tonight.”
PUERTO RICO CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists will hold its first activity in Puerto Rico March 21. NAHJ Region 1 director Chris Crommett news director at WKAQ-AM there, has put together at one-day conference on “Journalism as a Business; the Business of Journalism.” It will be staged at Sacred Heart University in Santurce.
WASHINGTON CONFERENCE: A three-day conference on “Racial Diversity - The Media: A Blueprint for Action” runs March 9-11 at the Westin Hotel in Washington, D.C. Washington Post publisher Donald Graham and U.S. Rep. William Gray III (D-Pa.) are featured speakers. The conference is coordinated by The Institute for Journalism Education.
- Charlie Ericksen
SLEEP-OUT: Sharing a heating grate one block from the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., are (from left) Reps. Tony Coelho, George Miller and Esteban Torres. (See Media Report.)
i
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
photo by Hector Ericksen-Mendoza


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Making The News This Week chairman of the Assembly Elections, Reap -portionment and Constitutional Amendments Committee ... U.S. Immigration and Naturali zation Western Region Commissioner Harold Ezell announces the appointment of 19-year INS veteran Carlos Tellez as director of a new office that will investigate charges of job discrimination against immigrants in that region . . . The board of directors of the Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission selects Liz Flores as its executive director. Flores, 29, was a planner with the agency . . . Trial begins for J.R. Hagan in Tucson, Ariz . He is charged with illegally carrying firearms while reportedly detaining a group of undocumented House Majority Whip Tony Coelho (D-Calif . ) agrees with other Democratic House leaders that Congress will have to abandon the deficit ceiling set by the Gramm-Rudman budget-balancing law ... California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints David Romero as chairman of the new state Task Force on California-Mexico Relations. .. Deukmejian also names lvonne Ramos-Richardson to the state Agricultural Relations Board Ramos-Richardson replaces Jorge Carillo ... Former U .S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin is appointed to the advisory council of the Heritage Foundation's Arthur Spitzer Institute for Hemispheric Development, a think tank focusing on U.S . policy toward Latin America and the Caribbean. . . California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown selects fellow Assemblyman Pete Chacon as aliens at gunpoint. .. Janie Martinez becomes one of 10 women to successfully give birth while undergoing dialysis treatment. The Lubbock, Texas, resident delivered a healthy boy, whom she named Joshua. . . Maria Velasquez, from Fremont, Calif., gives birth to quadruplet boys ... HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY R PORT March 9, 1987 LA. Foes Agree on Assembly Candidate Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of U.S. Rep. Edward R. Roybal ([}Calif.), told Weekly Report March 2 that she will run for the seat vacated by former state Assemblywoman Gloria Molina She said she has the support of Los Angeles City Council members Molina and Richard Alatorre and state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) . Alatorre and Torres had both opposed Molina's candidacy in the Feb. 3 special election for the council seat. Alatorre and Molina have backed opposing candidates in elections in volving Los Angeles-area Hispanics and were expected to support different candidates in this race. Allard's emergence as a consensus can didate is a hoped-for "bridge" between the factions, Alatorre told reporters in Los Angeles . A consensus candidate could also avoid a costly election like the one in which Molina just defeated school board member Larry Gonzalez for her Council seat. Each spent close to a quarter of a million dollars. "As soon as the governor declares the election date, I will determine when I will officially announce my candidacy," Allard said. Under California law, the governor must set an election date within 14 days of the Assembly seat vacancy . Molina was sworn into city office ! Feb. 28. Among the issues prompting the 45-yearold Allard to make her first run for office is the ' discord surrounding the possibility of a prison being built in East Los Angeles. ' "The East Los Angeles prison issue, which is something the community and Gloria have been fighting, is something I feel very strongly about. I feel I can contribute and make sure that it is defeated in Sacramento," she said . Polls Show Peiia Strength Denver Mayor Federico Peiia appears to be on his way to becoming the first candidate in 20 years in that city to win the mayoral election without a runoff, recent polls indicate . Peiia, who officially announced his candidacy for a second four-year term Feb. 12, was shown to b e ahead of his nearest competitor b y at lea st 30 points. MALDEF Board Settles Dispute The board of directors of the Mexican Ame rican Legal Defense and Educational Fund voted, 18-14, Feb. 28 to reinstate Antonia Hernandez as the organization's general courl' sel and president after a sometimes acrimonious 8 1 /2-hour meeting. Despite what was widely reported as being a disruptive and contentious effort to unseat Hernandez, Hispanic leaders around the country and within the 20-year-old organization gen erally agree that the episode will not cause irreparable harm to MALDEPs effectiveness as a civil rights defender. "I do believe there has been some damage to MALDEPs credibility in the community, and we are going to do our darndest to go out there and re-es t ablish that credibility," Her . nandez told Weekly Report She added, however, that the board decision" reaffirms MALDEPs stature. " In addition to reinstating Hernandez as ('lead, the board also decided to extend her contract until April1988. Her current agree ment with the organization expires next month. Eric Serna, the MALDEF board of directors chairman , pointed out that during the turmoil . the organization "continued with litigation, continued with the MALDEF mission and did so in a professional and unbiased way. " Serna, also chairman of the New Mexico state Corporation Commission, spearheaded continued on page 2 Hispanics Seek White House Access The National Consortium of Hispanic Or ganizations, an umbrella group of 30 Latino advocacy organizations, met with a White House official Feb . 25 in an attempt to increase Hispanic input into the Reagan adINS Wants $175 Fee The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service proposed Feb. 27 to the Reagan administration that it approve a fee of $175 fori ndividuals and $400 for families applying for legalization under federal immigration law . Hispanic advocacy and community or ganizations had sharply criticized INS when it announced Jan . 20 that it was considering setting the fee at between $150 and $250. Congressman Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, called the fees" unreasonably high and completely contrary to the spirit and intent of Congress." According to organizations monitoring the situation, individuals applying for legali zation could easily end up paying more than $300 when medical e xaminations, do cument copying costs and fees charged by agencies authorized by INS to offer assistance a r e taken into account. ministration . Jane Delgado, president of the consortium, and several other Hispanic organization leaders and representatives presented a four-point agenda to Rudy -Beserra , associate director of the White House Office of Public Liaison. The fo!.lr iter were: addressing the EnglishOnly movement; appointing more Hispanics to senior level positions within the adminis tration; establishing a better working relation ship between Hispanic advocacy groups and Republicans, more specifically the Republican National Hispanic Assembly; and conducting a forum with Cabinet heads and White House officials to present Hispanic viewpoints on issues of interest to Latinos. "Having that kind of meeting on a regular basis is crucial to the Hispanic community," said Delgado. She stressed that the most important national issue facing Hispanics is the campaign being waged at the state and national level to make English the official language. Among consortium member-organizations i represented at the meeting were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund , National Council of La Raza , National Council of Puerto Rican Women, lnterAmerican College for Phys i c i a ns and Sur9eons, the Cuban National Planning Council a nd El Con greso Na c ion a l d e A suntos Coleg i a les.

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Legalization Delay Requested A resolution to push back by at least four months the May 5 legalization application acceptance date under the new immigration law was passed by the organization of Hispanic Elected Local Officials during the National League of Cities' conference in Washington, D.C., March 1 . HELO is one of four constituency groups within the NLC whose purpose is to further the chances of minorities to become NLC board members and be involved in the policy process. "By May 5th, we are not going to be in a good position to help people. There is the question of money and confusion," said HELO President MariaAntonietta Berri6zabal, a San Antonio City Councilwoman. HELO is proposing that the May start-up date for implementation of the Immigration Reform and Control Act be delayed at least 120 days to allow private and public com munity groups time to prepare for the large number of undocumented workers expected to apply for citizenship. The resolution, authored by Phoenix, Ariz., City Councilwoman Mary Rose Wilcox, will be presented to members of Congress by the 40 HELO members supporting the re solution. HELO was precluded from presenting the resolution to N LC because it was passed after the NLC's Board of Directors meeting, said an NLC staff member. Because of obligations which may be placed on local government by the im migration law, the resolution calls for clear and flexible regulations concerning amnesty procedures and asks Congress for adequate funding at the state and local level. EEOC Clarifies Immigration Policy The Equal Employment Opportunity Com mission adopted unanimously a policy statement Feb. 26 that said it will enforce the Civil Rights Act against employers who "overreacf' to the new immigration law by firing or refusing to hire individuals who sound or look "foreign." to the law will be under our jurisdiction." The Justice Department has yet to open its Office of Special counsel. Rick Swartz, president of the National Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Forum, said that employees who feel they have been discriminated against should send a letter now to the Justice Depart ment to fall within the 180-dayfiling deadline created under the act. L.A. Forms Task Force to Halt Alien' Rip-offs' A multiagency task force will work vigorously in Los Angeles to prevent the exploitation of hundreds of thousands of undocumented workers expected to seek legalization under the new immigration law , the Los Angeles city attorney announced Feb. 25. Complaints of "rip-offs," such as excessively high notary public charges and costly fees from immigration consultants, prompted Deputy City Attorney Susan Frau ens to request the task force, which she now heads. "Whenever there is the opportunity to make money, you'll find con artists not far behind. And this will be a very lucrative field in the next few months," she said. Between 400,000 to 1 million people are expected to seek legalization in Los Angeles, according to City Attorney James Hahn. Members of the Immigration and Amnesty Task Force include representatives from the Los Angeles City Attorney's Office, the Los Angeles County Department of Consumer Affairs, the Los Angeles Bar Association, the California State Bar Association, the California Attorney General' s Office, the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the California Secretary of State's office. The task force will allow various agencies to coordinate investigations and prevent duplication, Frauens said . Members will be looking for false advertising, persons practicing law without a license, unfair business practices and the charging of high fees. The act does create an Office of Special Counsel under the U .S. Justice Department that would handle complaints of discrimination. The office, however, only covers employers who have between three and 15 employees. EEOC Commissioner Fred Alvarez said, "Any body who has more than 15 employees-and there are a lot of those-and who overreacts MALDEF's Leaders Lookto Future Texas Weighs English Bill A resolution proposing a constitutional amendment to make English the official lan guage of Texas was introduced in the Texas House March 2, Texas Independence Day, by Rep . Pete Patterson (D-Brookston). "English-only is dead one-half hour after it was introduced," said state Rep . AI Luna (D Houston), chairman of the Mexican American Legislative Caucus. The caucus has secured signatures from 61 representatives committing themselves to vote against the proposal. Sen. Carlos Truan (D-Corpus Christi) said he has seen no support for the bill in the Sfnate. Proficiency Bill Proffered A companion English Proficiency bill to one submitted to the U . S . House of Representatives by Rep . Matthew (Marty) Martinez Jan. 8 was introduced in the Senate March 3 by Sens. Jeff Bingaman (D-N . M . ) and John McCain (R Ariz.) The act , endorsed by several Hispanic or ganizations, asks for $50 million per year for three years to establish English literacy pro grams for adults of limited-English proficiency. 2 continued from page 1 the campaign to oust Hernandez and replace her with former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya. At a Jan. 17 meeting of the executive .committee in Dallas, Serna announced that Anaya was joining MALDEF as the new head. Cited as the two reasons for firing Hernandez were a letter she sent to the Federal Com munications Commission on behalf of the court-approved sale of nine Spanish-language stations to Hallmark Cards Inc. and her approval of a class-action settlement in a lawsuit against a major Texas grocery chain. Hernandez immediately challenged the firing as illegal, stating that only the full34-member board could dismiss her . On Feb . 17, a Texas state district court ruled that the meeting to resolve the issue would be held in Los Angeles . Board member AI Zapanta st.:>rmed out of the Los Angeles meeting following the vote and tendered his resignation. Serna refused to accept it. The full board meets again in Los Angeles April 25 and 26. On the agenda will be re commendations to replace 14 members retiring at the end of their 4-year terms. The board could also choose to expand itself to 40 members. Conceivably, the new board could . abrogate any agreement reached by the current board . " We left the meeting with an understanding of how important it is to preserve MALDEF and for it to continue as the effective advocacy arm of the Hispanic community," said Serna. "The fight is behind us. We will go forward as a united organization." U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif . ) , chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said, "I thought there was much to-do about this issue," adding, "I never see big exposes on the NAACP, Urban League or B'Nai B'Rith having a problem. These are problems that all organizations go through and I don't think it will hurt them." Phil Montez, western regional director of the U . S . Civil Rights Commission, attributed what happened at MALDEF to " personalities." "Any of the anti-MALDEF remarks that have been made will not erode the highly respected reputation that it has earned over the years." Congressman Matthew Martinez agreed that the confrontation between Serna and Hernandez will not have a long-lasting effect on the ability of MALDEF to represent the interests of Hispanics . He added, however, that the board should have fired Hernandez for her letter concerning the television stations. Hernandez was instructed by the MALDEF executive board to withdraw the letter. MALDEF began in Texas in 1967. It now has 60 staff members, offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Washington, D.C. , and San Antonio. It is operating on a budget this year of $2. 8 million. , Hernandez has headed MALDEF since July 1985. -Felix Perez Hispani c Link Weekly Report

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Margarita Mondrus Engle, The Traditional Latina A friend told me he is looking for a Latina wife. He wants a wife who will stay home, have many children and be '"just a housewi fe." He thinks a Latina would fit these requirements perfectly. I started thinking about the women in my family . My g r eat-grandmothe r was a matriarch. She ruled an enormous family in Cuba and helped manage a farm she bought with gold coins she had accumulated one at a time over many years . No one in her family would have taken any important step without her advice and consent She was consulted on all decisions i nvolving farm , f amily and finances . Her 12 children r espected her, and needed her, throughout her long life . S h e lived well into her 90s without ever losing any of he r influence or st rength. My grandmother, who turned 86 th i s month , was also a traditional housewife. She was, however, courageous enough to be the first w oma n i n her small town to seek a d i vorce , at a time when Cuban C a t hol ics si m ply did not get divorced. To this d a y she remains th e most d evou t Ca t h ol ic I know , despite h e r e xcommunication. PROMISED AN ETERNA L LIGHT When my sister had pol i o , my grandmother promised he r f avo r it e sain t an etern al li g h t in exc h a nge for my sist er's s urv iv al. The ligh t has been wit h h e r m o re than 3 0 years. It c a m e with her w h e n s he le ft Cuba She w as mor e than 70 years old w h e n sh e l eft as a ref u gee . S h e ha d the cou r age t o leave, knowin g that sh e wo uld nev e r see her h o m el an d a gai n . I know few y ou ng women , Anglo o r His pa nic, wit h the k ind o f fai th , courage and p e rseverance my gran dm o th er has shown . My mo t her le ft Cu ba lon g bef o re the r e v ol u tion , at t h e age o f 1 7 . She left h e r c o u nt ry a n d fa m i l y t o t rave l t ho usand s of miles t o m arry a f o reigner, m y f at h e r . Sh e a rriv e d in L o s Ang eles withou t understan di ng a wor d of Englis h . Sh e quickl y adapt e d to an ali e n a n d o ft en hostile city. Man y years as a tra ditional housewife did not prev e n t her from developing into a woman of remarkable strength . A f e w ye a rs ago , I spent si x wee ks as a volun t e e r in a social-service project in a v i llag e i n southern M exico. I was supposed to help build a school , bu t the building materials neve r ar r ived . I wanted to do something useful, so I found a woman who needed help in her corn and bean fields. I had been working in vegetable plots at an agricultural school in California, and I t hought I was a ccustomed to manual labor . I was s oon disillusioned . HOED 12 HOURS WITHOUT REST M y fri e nd hoed weeds for 12 hours without a rest. She ate her lunch of cold tortillas while working . This tiny woman moved so fast t hat I found myself gasping for breath after half an hour. Her old e r childr en helped, and the baby was carried on her back He r husband had gone to the United States to find work, and like so many of the husbands in her village , had never returned . He had found a new life and a new family somewhere in California. Instead of selling off her land, this woman continued to farm by herse l f . In good yea r s , she sometimes had enough money to rent a mule or even oxen to pull a plow through her fields . In bad years, she t old me , she had to pull it herself. So when my friend tells me he wants to marry a traditional Latina woman , I have to assume he is looking for certain qualities. I f he finds his Latina wife, will he find a subservient , weak-willed w o man who cooks and cleans and has a baby every year? Or will he find a woman distinguished by courage, strength and pe r severance? ( Margarita Mondrus Engle , of Vista, Calil, is an agronomist and a writer who has taught at the high school and college levels.) Reprinted from Hispanic Link News Service Sin pe"los en Ia lengua CALIFORNiA CONVALESCENCE: Florida Gov. Bob Martinez has confirmed his speaking appearance at the National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles April 25, NAHJ President -Manuel Galvan tells us . Following his skirmishes with Florida's cubano leadership after he kicked the state's Commiss i on on Hispanic Affairs out of his office last month, Martinez may be relieved to know that California -with f i ve times more Latinos than his own sunshine state-has no such counterpart. Jorge Mas Canosa, chairman of the powerful Cuban American National Foundation, sent the new governor a letter Feb. 19 advising h i m that the foundation unanimously supported the commission ' s strong resolution accusing Martinez of taking an i ll advised and inconsistent action . . " It is i ronic that Florida ' s first Hispanic governor in over a century would be the one to propose " such an acti on, it noted. PAYDAY: When MALDEPs executive board tried to fire its president, Antonio Hernandez, it offered Toney Anaya, her proposed replacement, nearly $30,000 more than her present $62 ,000 annual salary. Probing for more details on the narrow 1814 vote by the group's full board of directors to reta i n her, Hernandez was asked by an irreverent Hispanic Link reporter. " Did you get a raise?" " No," she said , controlling he r laughter. " But I ' m going to ask for one. " CATCH VEINTIDOS: Antonio Rodriguez, di rector of the Los A n g el e s Cen ter for L a w a n d J u s tice, desc r i b es t he d i l e mma facing l ega l izati on candi d a t e s in a M a rc h 2 Lo s Angeles Times op/ed piece: " U nem ploy e d m e n an d women, m a ny of wh o m q u al if y for the l egali za t ion progra m , are being deni ed jobs b ecau s e they have no wo r k autho riza tion. Ho w e v er, they can n o t obt a i n wo r k au t ho r i z ation u n less th ey firs t apply fo r te mp o r a ry residence beg i nn i ng this May 5. B u t in order t o qualify for t em p ora ry residence , they mus t prove a history of stable employment and show proof of current employ ment. " The INS could easily solve the plight of these people, but the agency callously has refused to agree to issue them temporary work permits . Yet at the same time the INS has announced plans to disqualify applicants who have received unemployment-insurance benefits at any time . " The devil could not have thought of a better plan to eliminate poor Latino applicants for legalization. " THIS WEEK'S LIST: Submitted by Jose Roig of Arlington , Va, is a list of the Festival Committee (14 persons) and Honorary Advisory Board (64 persons) for the National Independence Day Festival and Parade , to be held in Washington, D .C., July 4 . The event will-draw bands and floats from nearly every state to celebrate our nation ' s " heritage of freedom , pluralism and tolerance, " its coordinators promis _ e . Advisory board members range from Sen . John Glenn(D-Ohio) and U.S . Attorney General Edwin Meese to boxers, actors and churchmen. Yet on the entire continental United States, the committee was unable to find a single qualified Latino or Latina. But we will be represented, admits Roig wryly . "Where there are parades , there are horses . Where there are horses , clean-up crews are sure to follow. Yes , we will be invited to show up-after everyone else has gone. " Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • LIONEL SOSA, president of Sosa & Associates ad agency in San Antonio , quoted in Insight magazine March 9 : "Courting the minority market share is like asking a to dance . Nobody asks her. So , when somebody finally notices her and asks, she' ll always say yes and she ' ll never forget you . " H i s p a ni c L i n k W eek l y R e p o rt March 9 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING ARTS MAGAZINE: Order Performing Arts Manual (see Arts and 1------C __ O_N __ N_E __ C __ T_I_N __ G __ Entertainment) by sending $18 to: Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (Stock No . 030-00 1-00 11 5-6). PUERTO RICAN CHILDBEARING PATTERNS: " Childbearing Patterns Among Puerto Rican Hispanics in New York and Puerto Rico" outlines the patterns for the two groups between 1978 and 1982. Contained in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Jan. 30, 1987, by the Centers for Disease Control, the article can be obtained by sending $1 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. STATE, METRO AREA FACTS: The Census Bureau has published its periodic book on facts such as population, housing, health and ' vital statistics, income and education on. all 50 states and major metropolitan areas. The 726-page "1986 State and Metropolitan Area Data Book" can be obtained by sending a $28 prepaid order to: Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. MARKETING TO HISPANICS: Bilingual Hispanics whose primary language is Spanish are more likely to experience difficulty processing large amounts of consumer information, according to a study by Richard Feinberg, an associate professor of consumer sciences and retailing. For a copy of the 20-page study, send $2 to: Dr. R. Feinberg, Department of Consumer Sciences and Retailing, Purdue University, West Lafayette , Ind. 47907 (317) 494-8301. HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES: The Northeast LULAC Regional News includes in its eight-page March 1987 issue two pages on scholarships and educational programs aimed at Hispanic and other minority students. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Andres Tobar, P . O . Box 44082, Washington, , D.C . 20026. LITERACY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATORS: The National Clearing house for Bilingual Education has published the proceedings of a symposiumpn methods for teaching limited-English-proficient students, involving their parents and literacy . For a copy, send $1 for postage and handling to: NCBE, 11501 Georgia Ave., Wheaton, Md . 20902. (Late news on what's occumng within the U .S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) USHCC SCHEDULES WORKSHOPS Three business workshops are being staged by the U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce this month. Sites, dates and subjects are: Cleveland, March 20, financial and bonding services and marketing; Seattle, March 27, marketing and business planning; and Kansas City, Mo., March 31, program to be decided later. Workshops are open to the general public. For more information contact Carmelo Cuellar at the USHCC business department (816) 531-6363. CONSORTIUM TO STUDY POVERTY The Inter-University Program for Latino Research, a national re search consortium at Stanford University, has received an award of $250,000 from the Ford Foundation to study the long-term effects of growing poverty among Hispanics linked to major changes in the U.S. economy. These economic changes are eliminating sources of adequate wages for Hispanics, suggests a preliminary study by Latino scholars at Stanford, UCLA and Hunter College in New York. According to the U .S. Census, the average Hispanic family income dropped from 71% to 66% of that of whites between 1972 and 1982. LABOR DEPT. RECRUITS STUDENTS Seven students from the University of Puerto Rico at Bayam6n are participating in a Cooperative Education Program at the U.S. Labor Department in Washington, D.C. The program offers the students an opportunity to gain experience and to earn wages for tuition and other college expenses. Elia Kerr, the departmenfs Hispanic Employment Program manager, . said the young adults are working as computer analysts, accountants and program analysts for about six months before returning to Puerto Rico to continue their studies. The students , who began working on Jan. 20, are : Lore Konig, Victor Lopez, Susan Muir, Francisco Ortiz, Carlos Rodriguez, Enrique Santos and Yolanda Tirado. "The program has been in operation for years," said Kerr, "but this is the first time this many Hispanics have been recruited at once. " Calendar lsmael Santiago (219) 874-7945 WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Lansing, Mich. March Olympia, Wash . March 19 Hector Gonzalez (206) 753-3159 CHICANO FEDERATION DINNER Chicano Federation of San Diego County San Diego March 20 THIS WEEK JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. March 9-11 " Racial Diversity The Media : A Blueprint for Action" is the topic of a national conference sponsored by the Institute for Journalism Education to assess the numerous efforts aimed at increasing minority representation at all levels of the media industry . Lava Thomas-Heber! (415) 642-8288 AWARD DINNER New York March 1 0 The National Puerto Rican Forum's second annual award dinner will honor the McDonald's Corporation for its support of affirmative action . Hector Velasquez (212) 685-2311 LULAC NATIONAL MEETING South Bend, Ind . March 12-14 The League of United Latin American Citizens is holding its national executive board of directors meeting and is hosting a dinner-dance on March 13. 4 Alicia Valladolid Cuar6n will be the keynote speaker at the second annual statewide Hispanic Women's Leadership Conference . Cuar6n is a commissioner on the Colorado Supreme Court Nominating Com mission and a communications consultant, author and educator. Andrea Rodriguez (517) 371-3365 COMING SOON GROCERS EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE Mexican American Grocers Association Foundation Palm Springs, Calif. March 18-22 Susana Rendon (213) 385-7730 MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE American Newspaper Publishers Association Washington , D.C. March 19-21 Sandra Moller(800) 544-POST HISPANIC EDUCATION FORUM Washington State Commission on Mexican American Affairs March 9, 1987 Jose Munoz (619) 236-1228 JOURNALISM BUSINESS CONFERENCE National Association of Hispanic Journalists Santurce , Puerto Rico March 21 Christopher Grommet! (809) 758-5800 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC ASSOCIATION OF HIGHER EDu CATION, NEW JERSEY: "Testing and Evaluation: Barriers to Access and Retention" is the theme of the association's ninth annual conference March 19 and 20 at Princeton University. Keynote speaker Michael Olivas, a professor of law and education at the University of Houston, will speak on " Research on Hispanic College Students: Lessons from Scholar ship." Conference workshops will address language testing, preventing high school drop out, high achiev ing Hispanic students and a college sophomore test. For more information, contact lvette Del Rio (609) 292-8840. Hispan i c Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks an Executive Director' to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management at non-profit organizations; in the design and of services and programs; fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. Outstanding verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelor's degree in a field related to the work of the Institute is required; Master's or advanced degree is preferred. The Latino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in all areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but preference may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city. Salary $48,000-$55,000. Apply by March 16, 1987 to: Dr. Josue M. Gonzalez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P.O. Box 699005 Chicago, Ill. 60609-9005 LEGISLATIVE ATTORNEY National Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Attorney for Washington, D.C., office to perform research of key national policy issues and monitor bills in Congress affecting Hispanics. The Attorney will monitor the legislative, executive and administrative agencies in Washington, D.C. Writing assignments include drafting of testi mony , issue papers and quarterly status reports. Required experience in Civil Rights or other public interest law and law degree. Resumes with references to Mario Moreno, 1430 K Street NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C. 20005 by March 20, 1987. FOREIGN SERVICE CAREERS Agency for International Development is looking for candidates with graduate degrees in agriculture , accounting, economics, educatiO[), housing/urban planning, international relations, population planning, public health, nutrition; procurement/contracting, public or business administration, or closely related disciplines for its International Development Intern Program. An internship leads to positions planning and managing U.S. foreign economic assistance programs in the developing countries. U.S. citizenship and two or more years' relevant professional experience are required. Starting salaries are in the $22,000 to $36,000 range, plus standard Foreign Service allowances when stationed overseas. MANAGEMENT INTERN The City of San Jose, Calif., is accepting applications for the position of Management Intern. Interns assist the City Manager and department heads in organizing, developing and evaluating City services and programs. In terns will be hired on a contractual basis for one year. Salary is $27,672/year(approximately). Requires complete MA degree in Public Ad ministration, Business Administration or closely related field by 7/1/87. Resumes will be reviewed and evaluated for personal interviews. Resumes must include: honors and extracurricular ac tivities; names and telephone numbers of 3 references (one must be a faculty member); official undergraduate and graduate transcripts; a 3-5 page typewritten paper on why you are seeking this position. Final filing date: April1 0, 1987. Send resume to: Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Dept., 801 N. First St., Room 207, San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4202. Hispanic advertising agency in Chicago looking for an experienced account executive and a copywriter, both must be fluent in Spanish and English. Call (312) 271-2720. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md.,. govern. ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 90-DA Y TEMPORARY POSITIONS The Library of Congress The Library of Congress needs applicants for some temporary positions not to exceed 90 days. These positions are: e Clerk/ Messenger, G&-303-04 ($6.16 per hour) e Library Technician, G&-1411-3 ($5.49 per hour) or GS-1411-4 ($6.16 per hour), or G&-14115 ($6.20 per hour) • Library Aid, GS-1411-02 ($5 .03 per hour) • Editorial Assistant, G&-1 087-5 ($6.90 per hour) . • Editorial Clerk/ G& 1 OB7 -4 ($6.16 per per hour) -or G&-1 087-5 ($6.90 per hour) Sxperience Requirements: Experience requirements vary according to the type and level of each position. Test Requirements: Clerk/Messenger, Library Technician and Library Aid positions do not require typing. Editorial Assistant positions re quire passing of the Library of Congress Clerical Test unless applicant holds bachelor's degree. Call Susan Kames at (202) 287-5627 for further information. How to Apply: Submit a Standard Form 171 and a copy of clerical test results as soon as possible to Susan Kames, Recruitment and Placement Employment Office, Room LM-107, James Madison Memorial Building, Washington, D.C. 20540. The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board. ENGINEERS The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam . Must have4-yearengineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary: $2,206 $2,972/mo. +benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April6. Se habla espanol SCIENCE DEGREES The California Air Resources.Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution . Specialist exam. Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree . Salary: $2,011 -$2,837 /mo.+ benefits. For more information call (91 6) 323-4916 before March 13. Se .habla espana/. Send resume or application for Federal Em ployment (SF-171) as soon as possible toRecruitment Staff, FSP/RSS, H L, Agency for Inter national Washington, D.C. 20523. DEAR EXECUTIVE OFFICER OR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: An Equal Opportunity Employer PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, International Clearinghouse on Adolescent Fertility(ICAF). Responsible for development of newsletter in three languages and coordination of seed grants program. Provides technical assistance to ado lescent programs. Qualifications; B.A.; experience in Jeveloping country; knowledge of family planning and/or youth work; Spanish fluency; bicultural preferred. Contact: ICAF , Center for Population Options: 1012 14th St. NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report On April 20, we will publish our 1987 media edition. This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1 ,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1 ,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 22-25 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles. In addition to our regular" Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page "Opportunities in the Media" insert for the edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section. Our rates remain the same: 75 cents per word or $35 a column inch for a display ad; for those people seeking positions, the cost is 50 cents per word. Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, Apri/10.

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.;, Arts & Entertainment Norway and Great Britain. Back home, the band's By the Light of the Moon album continues climbing the pop charts. Los Lobos remake of Ritchie Valens' La Bamba is due to coincide with this summer's release of Luis Valdez's film, with the same title, for Columbia Pictures. LEGAL LOBOS ON TOUR: Denying speculation by Madrid's press that they are "wet backs," Los Lobos began their first-ever European tour -last month in Spain. PAZ ON POETRY: Mexican poet Octavio Paz will be among the writers discussing the work of U .S. poets for an upcoming public television series. "We're not wetbacks," bassist Conrad Lorenzo said categorically during a press conference in Madrid Feb . 26, according to an Associated Press story circulated here. Paz will be seen in Voices and Visions, a 13-part series and course for college credit. There are no Latinos among the 13 poets covered in the series, which is expected to air on the Public Broadcasting Service in January 1988. All members of the group, continued the story, were born in the United States except guitarist Cesar Rosas, whose Mexican parents migrated legally when he was six years old. Just two days prior to the Madrid incident, Paul Simon had thanked Los Lobos and singer Linda Ronstadt for being among "American artists" who helped him "take his album (Grace/and) to the American people." Simon made the statement while accepting the Grammy Award for Grace/and, named "album of the year'' at the award ceremony telecast Feb. 24. Los Lobos performed to capacity audiences at Madrid's Club Astoria, and continued on to a Paris engagement. The tour continues this month, taking the Los Angeles-based band to Denmark, Sweden, ONE LINERS: A Group Show by Nancy Shunn, Lillian Morelo, Rene Santos and Bill Wurtz opens March 10 at New York's lntar Gallery. . . La Mujer, a photo exhibit documenting the history of Mexican women in Central California, continues at the Madera(Calif. ) County Public Library through March 21 ... And With Villa in Mexico on Location is the title of an article by Aurelio de los Reyes featured in the first issue of Performing Arts Manual, a new magazine from the Library of Congress ... Court Ruling Aids Latinos The U . S. Supreme Court decision Feb. 25 to uphold a promotion system based on a racial quota is a defeat for the Reagan ad ministration's opposition to affirmative action policies, a legislative lawyer for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund said . MALDEF Washington attorney John Trasvina commented that the Reagan administration has consistently maintained discrimination remedies should apply only to individuals, not classes. The court, voting 5-4, found constitutional a plan that required the promotion of one black for every white promoted in the Alabama State Police force . The plan remains effective until 25% of upperrank officers are black. The ruling marked the first time the Supreme Court has said judges could require employers to use numerical quotas in promotion. Last year, the court ruled similarly with regard to hiring. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-G737 Publisher. Hector ErickserrMendoza Ed i tor. Felix Perez Reportin\j: Charl ie Ericksen . Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Meli nda Machado. Mike Orenstein. Julio Laboy. No portion of H is panic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast i n any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. 6 COR POR ATE CLASSIF IED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. D i splay ads are S35 per column in ch . Ads placed by Tuesda y wi ll run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. Media Report CELEBRITY GRATE: Contrived media events have to be spectacular to attract strong coverage in Washington, D.C . The overnight March 3-4 "Grate American Sleep-Ouf'in which three California Hispanics were pro minentapparently qualified. There were enough television lights glaring around many of the capital's sidewalk grates -where several actors and congressmen were tucked into sleeping bags-to raise the temperature well above the evening' s official 35-degree low. The event was organized by Community for Creative Non-Violence leader Mitch Snyder, with a boost from Hollywood' s Martin Sheen, who played the renown homeless advocate in a television movie . Also sleeping with the city's dispossessed to bring attention to Congress' s $500 million homeless aid package were Reps. Esteban Torres, chairman of the Congressional His panic Caucus, and Tony Coelho, who serves -Antonio Mejias-Rentas as House Majority Whip. The CCNV issued a statement saying that no homeless people would be displaced from their regular sleeping spots by the event, but one man was heard to shout to a friend near a popular grate behind the Library of Congress: "Stay away from there, buddy. Thafs the celebrity grate tonight." PUERTO RICO CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists will hold its first activity in Puerto Rico March 21. NAHJ Region 1 director Chris Crommett, news director at WKAQ-AM there, has put toge the r at one-day conference on " Journalism as a Business; the Business of Journalism. " It will be staged at Sacred Heart University in Santurce. WASHINGTON CONFERENCE: A three day conference on " Racial Diversity-The Media: A Blueprint for Action" runs March 9 -11 at the Westin Hotel in Washington, D.C. Washington Post publisher Donald Graham and U.S . Rep . William Gray Ill (D-Pa . ) are featured speakers . The conference is coordi nated by The Institute for Journalism Edu-cation. Charlie Ericksen SLEEP-OUT: Sharing a h ea ting grate one block from the U . S. Capitol Building in Washinqton, D.C., are (from l eft) Reps. Ton y Coelho, George Miller and Esteban Torres . (See Media Report.) Hi span1c Li nk Weekl y Report