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Hispanic link weekly report, March 16, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 16, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Malang The News This Week
U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho(D-Calif.), House Majority Whip, says of First Lady Nancy Reagan in her role in ousting former White House Chief Donald Regan:“l did not think she was that bright, and I have to take that back.”... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Manuel Peha to the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Peha, from San Gabriel, must secure Senate confirmation... Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins announces his intention to appoint former New York City Schools Chancellor Anthony Alvarado to head a panel to study the city’s system of decentralization... Roberto Rivera, director of Chicago Intervention Network, the city’s anti-gang program, announces he will resign after the April 7 mayoral election to become chief legislative aide to the state’s first Hispanic senator,
Miguel Del Valle (D-Chicago)... Claiming that the $606,000 to be distributed by Hands Across America organizers to Ohio organizations ignore the rural poor and encourage welfare dependency, Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, threatens that FLOC will not accept its $25,000 grant FLOC had
applied for $140,000 Television reporter Geraldo Rivera apologizes
to the mayor of San Jose, Calif., for calling East San Jose a ghetto during his recent special on illegal drugs... A day after winning the 800 and 1,500 meter races at a college meet Sylvia Mosqueda, 20, comes in second in the women’s division of the Los Angeles Marathon... New York City Police Officer Edward Paroulek, the son of a Colombian mother and a Czech father, files papers with the state Supreme Court to have the status on his application changed to Hispanic. The reason: the reclassification would allow him to be promoted to sergeant...
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March 16,1987
RNHA Turmoil Threatens ’88 GOP Strategy
A leadership struggle within the Republican National Hispanic Assembly is raising questions over how effective the Republican National Committee’s auxiliary will be in attracting Latino voters in the 1988 presidential election.
Several state chairs are challenging the legality of RNHA elections held Feb. 28 in Nashua, N.H., in which Fernando de Baca was unanimously re-elected chair. Charges concerning the election, certification of voting delegates and the ineffectiveness of RNHA leadership could lead to a split in the organization, or worse, the yanking of its charter by the RNC.
The RNHA adopted its constitution and by-laws in 1975 and was recognized as an official auxiliary of the RNC a year later.
Dr. Tirso del Junco, who headed the RNHA during the 1984 elections in which Ronald Reagan attracted about 40% of the Hispanic vote, views RNHA’s problems as internal but
Second Latino Executed
Eliseo Moreno, convicted of murdering six people during a 50-hour period in October 1983, became the second person Feb. 4 to be executed in the United States this year. The first, also killed in Texas, was Latino as well.
Moreno, 27, instructed lawyers not to undertake any actions to save him.
Moreno was given a lethal injection at 12:13 am. and pronounced dead six minutes later. Texas leads all states with 22 executions since resuming capital punishment in 1982.
Moreno was sentenced to death for the slaying of state Trooper Russell Lyn Boyd, 25, and given 35-* and 45-year sentences for the other five killings.
Prosecutors said the multiple slayings, which occurred over a distance of 160 miles from College Station to north of Houston, were touched off by problems Moreno was having with his estranged wife. Moreno was apparently on his way to kill his wife.
On Jan. 30, Ram6n Hernandez became the first person to be executed in the United States this year.
pointed out that they will negatively affect the assembly’s role in future elections.
Several Republican activists, including Cathi Villalpando, who served as Reagan’s special assistant for Hispanic affairs between 1983-1985, have announced or indicated their intention to challenge de Baca during RNHA’s national convention in Las Vegas on May 8 and 9.
During a Feb. 25 Washington, D.C., RNHA executive committee meeting, the board agreed to reschedule traditional February elections for the May meeting, said Colorado State Chair Bob Martinez. The RNHA has approximately 35 state chapters.
Three days later, de Baca was elected during the Nashua issues meeting. He claims the elections were called for by delegates over his suggestion to recess the convention and hold elections later in the year.
English Measures Falter
Official-English measures in two states met resistance March 5.
The education committee of Nebraska’s unicameral legislature voted down, 5-0, a measure that would have expanded the official status of English in the state’s constitution.
The state's constitution has provided since 1920 that English is the official language of the state, that all state publications should be printed in English, and that English should be used in Nebraska’s public and private schooia The new provision would have strengthened the measure by stating that the state “shall make no law which diminishes or ignores” English and by giving any resident of or person doing business in Nebraska the standing to sue for enforcement of the measure.
In Colorado^ meanwhile, Rep. Barbara Philips (R-Colorado Springs), sponsor of a bill to make English the official language of the state, withdrew it March 5. According to her legislative aide, Sharlene Bailey, she will attempt to collect the 50,000 signatures necessary to get an official-English constitutional amendment referendum on the ballot in 1988. The state’s governor, Roy Romer, had previously threatened to veto the measure.
“The elections were phony," said Connecticut State Chair Hannie Martinez-Santana “We are not going to recognize him as chairman,” said Florida State Chairman Santos Rivero. Rivero’s 2,000- member chapter was decertified by de Baca According to de Baca the Nashua elections were valid since the RNHA Constitution calls for biennual elections in February. He also claimed the Feb. 25 meeting was improperly called and therefore any actions taken were not legally binding.
Eighteen states, including proxy votea par* ticipated in the election, de Baca said. However,
continued on page 2
Child Files Job Pay Suit
A 16-year-old undocumented alien, Manuel Cortez, filed a lawsuit in the Monterey County (Calif.) Superior Court on March 3 against his former employer, charging that he paid him 90 an hour for laboring 10 hours a day, seven days a week for 10 months last year.
Cortez said he had picked cabbage and broccoli for Jos6 Lopez on a farm in Carmel Valley. L6pez allegedly threatened to call immigration officials after learning that Cortez was not satisfied with the working conditions
The suit seeks back pay, $210,000 in punitive damages and other damages resulting from “intentionally inflicted emotional stress,” and violations of California labor codes
According to the California Rural Legal Assistance office in Monterey, which is representing Cortez, Lopez denied alt charges and said that if Cortez did work for him it was only for one month.
Cortez, an orphan, now attends high school, works in a restaurant, lives in an apartment with several roommates and occasionally sends money to his sisters and grandmother in Mexico.
He is eligible to become a legal resident under the new immigration law because he worked 90 days in agriculture, said his attorney Lydia Villarreal.


Asylum Ruling Lauded Cautiously
A spokesman for the Salvadoran Refugee Committee said the organization was pleased with the March 9 U.S. Supreme Court decision to relax legal requirements for obtaining political asylum. He added, however, it would maintain a wary posture until the ruling was set into practice.
Boris Canjura, with the Washington, D.C., office of the committee, told Weekly Report “We encourage the public to write and pressure INS(lmmigration and Naturalization Service) and Congress to follow this ruling,” adding the decision “gives us hope but we are waiting to see what happens.”
In a 6-3 ruling, the court rejected the Reagan administration philosophy that a-sylum applicants must prove a “clear probability” that they would be killed, tortured or persecuted in their countries. The court held that applicants need only show a“ well-founded fear” of persecution.
The court reasoned that the administration’s interpretation was contrary to the wording
of the Refugee Act of 1980 enacted by Congress. Its decision upholds a lower court ruling that the Board of Immigration Appeals reconsider the application fora38-year-old Nicaraguan, Luz Marina Cardoza-Fonseca She entered the United States in 1979 as a visitor. When applying for asylum, she told INS officials she feared for her life because of her brother’s opposition to the Sandinista government
The court noted, however, that the U.S. Attorney General retains the discretion to deny asylum.
A report by the General Accounting Office found that in 1986; 2%of Salvadoran asylum applications were approved compared with 65% of Iranian and 48% of Polish asylum seekers.
Congress is currently considering a bill that would halt all deportations of Central American refugees until GAO conducts a two-year study on whether they are being persecuted.
Federal Job Test Ordered
Within six months, federal agencies will have to use a fair, open and competitive examination to fill entry-level positions, following a ruling Feb. 28 by U.S. District Court Judge Joyce Hens Green.
As of March 10, an Office of Personnel Managemeht spokesperson said the agency is still studying the ruling and no decision on a possible appeal has been reached.
The Professional and Administrative Career Examination, formerly used to fill 118 different white collar posi>tions,was phased out after 1981 when civil rights groups charged it discriminated against minorities.
Image President Annabelle Jaramillo said, “Image is not opposed to an examination process provided it does not discriminate. What we do recommend is that the Office of Personnel Management develop an unassembled type of process where individuals are rated on their education and experience.”
Image, a Hispanic organization dealing with employment concerns, was one of the groups opposed to the PACE.
“One of the problems with the PACE was it assumed a specific education forall entrants. Minorities could not succeed,” she said.
Just before the test was abandoned, figures show that out of 300,000 test-takers, 42% of whites passed but only 13% Hispanics and 5% blacks were eligible for the federal jobs.
Bonilla Running for Mayor
Tony Bonilla, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens between 1981-1983, is running for mayor of Corpus Christi, Texas, he told Weekly Report March 10.
Bonilla, an attorney, said he decided to run because he felt that he could make major contributions locally while getting people involved politically. Elections are on April 4.
N.Y. Commission Criticizes Mayor
The 13-member New York City Commission on Hispanic Concerns criticized Mayor Ed Koch’s March 9 response to a report it issued last December. The report offered recommendations on how to improve economic, employment and educational opportunities for the city’s 1.5 million Hispanics.
In a statement read at a joint news conference with Koch, Commission Chairman Edgardo V&zquez said the commission members “felt that in many cases the mayor had rejected some of the commission’s most important recommendations”
“Equally disappointing were the dozens of recommendations that were not specifically responded to or responded to in vague bureau-cratese,” said Vazquez.
Koch, in a 69-page report, said most of the commission’s 178 recommendationa released Dec 10, had been fully adopted by his administration. It was not clear how many recommendations the mayor would act upon because he offered alternatives for some and said others needed further study.
Two of the recommendations rejected by Koch were: establishing an independent monitoring system for the implementation of the recommendations and setting up acorn-mitteelwith Hispanics on it that would screen nominees to the city’s Board of Education. Presently, there are no Hispanic members on the board.
Latino Jobless Rate Falls
The Hispanic unemployment rate for February dipped to 9.6% from 10.6% the previous month, according to figures released by the U.S. Depart of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics
The number of jobless Hispanics decreased from 893,000 to 813,000.
Brock Agrees to Supply Sanitation Guidelines
U.S Labor Secretary William Brock announced March 9 that he will comply with a federal court order requiring him to issue standards for farm worker field sanitation facilities
A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Feb. 6 that Brock must issue federal standards that would guarantee toilets, drinking and washing waterfor farm workers
The federal government estimates that 500,000 field workers could be affected by the guidelines
Although Brock said that he will comply with the order, he added that the department is petitioning the court for a rehearing of the case. Brock said he feels that the court’s order intruded on executive branch authority.
The department will issue standards perhaps as early as April 21, he added.
The decision is the latest installment in a 14-year-old battle that has been waged by farm worker representatives, the grower's lobby, Congress the courts and the executive branch of the federal government
RNHA Election Contested
continued from page 1
two;statechairsltoldiWeeklylReport|that|only four or five states were actually represented.
“There is going to be a second election in May and there will be two RNHAs,” Martinez-Santana predicted, adding, “The RNC has to do something.”
“If we can’t resolve our problems” said George Herrera, chairman of the New York chapter, “then there’s no way that the RNC can provide recognition, financial support and resources to us - not if there are two bodies claiming to be RNHA.”
Herrera’s New York chapter was also denied voting credentials by the RNHA Herrera said his group was told it had not paid membership dues to the national body. He claimed that he mailed the dues before the Dec. 31 deadline but they were never deposited.
RNC Director of Political Development Bill Mackenturf was an observer at both meetings “At this point we have to weigh our options” he said, adding the committee will attempt to determine if the elections were legal.
“We will continue to try hard to reconcile those two sides. Our commitment is to have a healthy RNHA with one agreed set of leaders” Mackenturf said.
“ If the RNC doesn’t want to step toward and make a decision, if s because they want the Republican Party to lose in 1988,” Rivero charged.
De Baca told Weekly Report that RNHA “can’t afford to spend a lot of time on these intra-party differences We need to focus our attention on the 1988 presidential elections”
“The RNHA is as strong as its leadership. The RNHA has chosen to work apart and separate from the Republican Party,” del Junco observed, adding the Republican Party may have to use another mechanism to reach Hispanics in 1988. - Melinda Machado
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Timothy O’ Leary, guest columnist
Hail the Mexican Irish
As a child I lived under the illusion that the union of my Irish-American father and my Mexican-American mother was the first and only instance of collaboration between the disparate peoples.
That illusion was shattered some years ago when I learned of a little-known historical precedent for such unusual cooperation.
In 1846, an army of the United States, commanded by General Zachary Taylor, was R JHk waging war with Mexico over possession of E Texas Numbered among the Mexican force p were approximately 200 native Irishmen I who for one reason or other shifted to that |
The deserters formed what was known as the San Patricio Battalion, referred to by the ,
Mexicans as La Legidn de Extranjeros (the Foreign Legion).
Whatever enticement fighting for Mexico had forthese peripatetic Irishmen is certainly debatable. Both idealistic and ignoble motives have been attached to their cause. But evidence exists which suggests their seduction was accomplished largely by assuring the i Irish Catholics that it was their religious duty to fight for Mexico I against the largely Protestant United States. And fight they did.
The Irish Mexican battalion saw its first action in the indecisive ! battle of Buena Vista, where it fought as a battery of artillery. Its next engagement was at Churubusco, the scene of the final defeat of the I n Army, where 177 U.S. soldiers died and 879 were wounded.
According to a history of the engagement, “ Most of these casualties j were inflicted by the San Patricio Battalion...”
WHIPPED, DISGRACED AND HANGED By all reports, the I rish fought heroically and bravely. They inflicted [ heavy losses on their former compatriots But it was there at Churubusco that the treasonous Irish guns were quelled. Fifty of their survivors I were ordered hanged. The rest were whipped and disgraced in conformity with the reigning military justice of the period.
Before I learned of these traitorous and, no doubt, romantically inclined Irishmen, St Patrick’s Day had always seemed a somewhat diluted holiday for me. It was an incomplete celebration of but half my motley heritage.
El Cinco da Mayo, the Mexican holiday which celebrates the defeat of the French at Puebla in 1867, failed to appease my longing for a day celebrating my heterogeneous roots, too.
Accounts of the San Patricio Battalion aborted these insecurities, gave me reason to believe my Irish-Mexican heritage was not so [ unusual after all, and convinced me there was a foundation for the [ odd commingling of Hispanic ardor and Irish petulance.
Of further interest to me was the inexplicable fact that the leader of i the San Patricio Battalion, John Riley, was one of those flogged instead of hanged by the norteamericanos
PERPETUATING ROGUISH TRADITION Little had I suspected that by marrying my Mexican mother, my father was simply perpetuating a roguish Irish tradition of harmonious cooperation and friendship with Mexico.
| Today, the spirit of St Patrick’s Day lives anew within me, a Hispanicized version to be sure, but nonetheless one which the totality of my being can celebrate and enjoy.
So, to the glory of St Patrick himself, whose feast we celebrate I today, to the memory of the members of the San Patricio Battalion, to I my parents, Jeremiah and Marfa Teresa O'Leary, who followed their | brave example, and to you, dear reader, I offer this humble Irish benediction:
“Qua al camlno se elava para recibirta; qua est6 siempre el sol encirna de tu hombro, y qua puedas llegar al clelo una bora antes de qua el diablo sepa qua has muerto.”*
(Timothy O Leary is a business reporter with the Washington Times, Washington, D.C.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
FIGHTING FIRE: Los Angeles fire inspectors Steve Vizcaino and Andy Valencia were among 460 city department personnel who took the captain’s exam Jan. 10. They were also among 61 firemen who shelled out $2,300 each to attend a private school-run by Fire Captain Russell Week- to help bone up for such a key promotional exam.
Both received calls from the teacherthe day before the test Week just wanted toireview some,of'thejclassroom exercises, he said. Like how to handle a ruptured water pipe on the fourth floor of a 10-story building where there was a bank on the first floor...
Lo and behold, the first question on the exam was about a ruptured water pipe on the fourth floor of a 10-story building with a bank on the first floor. And so went the exam.
Enraged by what they viewed as an overt act to give them an unfair edge, they - and only they- walked out on the test (Three others complained of similar experiences later.)
Immediately, the two Chicanos were criticized as behaving ’’immature, childish and babyish.”
The Fire Commission found no wrong-doing.
But there’s a hero to the story: A March 6 ruling by the Los Angeles Civil Service Commission ordered the essay portion of the exam thrown out and readministered to the 460 unhappy applicants for captain.
Next time my house is ablaze, I’ll feel a warm, secure glow because men like Vizcaino and Valencia are making certain that their colleagues know which end of the hose the water comes out before they try to rescue me.
DEBATE DEBATE: In early January, Mario Obledo, immediate past president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, wrote Elliot Abrams, Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs, inviting him to debate on U.S. policy toward Nicaragua at the June LULAC convention in Corpus Christi.
Six weeks later he received a negative response from an underling, who offered to discuss the possibility of having another official address the convention.
Mario never takes rejection easily. “Having been a high-ranking government official myself (he was health and welfare chief under California Gov. Jerry Brown for many years),” he fired back March 3, “I know that time is always available for priority items. The Nicaragua question is not just another issue - it is the leading issue.”
Why is it so hard to get some people’s attention?
LANGUAGE THREAT: In recent debate on the failed English-only bill in his state, Colorado Sen. Ray Powers (R-Colorado Springs) offered this warning:
“I believe that probably the Spanish-speaking people are encouraging their culture and that means their Spanish language I’ll be real blunt. I believe that’s a threat to English speaking in our state.”
LISTS: New Mexico’s Grant County is 60% Mexican American. Yet, Dr. Arthur Martinez of Western New Mexico University, in Silver City, advises us that in all of the decades that the county Chamber of Commerce has been honoring its “Citizen of the Year,” not once has it been able to find a Chicano or Chicana worthy of the award.
Suggests Martinez in a letter to the local press: “Ifs as if the Chamber wants to institutionalize the social separation of our major ethnic groups, to nurture a social caste system.”
- Kay BArbaro
Quoting...
TONY BONILLA, mayoral candidate for Corpus Christi, Texas, when asked who he was running against "I’m not running against anyone. They’re running against me"
* May the road rise to meet you, may the sun always be over your shoulder, and may you arrive In heaven an hour before the devil knows you’re dead.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report , March 16,1987


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
PAY EQUITY STUDY: The National Committee on Pay Equity released last month a 180-page study on how race, ethnicity and sex affect pay equity. For a copy of the report send $14.95 (or $4 for a 10-page summary) to: N.C.P.E., 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7304.
LEADERSHIP PROGRAM: The Stanford University Center for Chicano Research will accept applications for its Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program until March 25. The program includes an academic year internship^ a summer leadership course and a possible summer internship in Washington, D.C. The program is open to undergraduates. For applications and more information, write to: HLOP, Stanford Center for Chicano Research, Cypress Hall E-7, Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-3914.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION NEWSLETTER: The Bilingual Special Education Training Program at the University of Texas publishes approximately twice a year a free newsletter on bilingual education. For a copy, send a personal request ta Shernaz Garcia, Bilingual Special Education Newsletter, Dept of Special Education, EDB306, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471-6244.
CHILDREN’S SPANISH-LANGUAGE BOOKS: “Sources of Infor mation on Spanish-Language Juvenile Books?’ is a 10-page booklet by Mary Johnson. To order, send $2.50 ta M.F. Johnson, P.O. Box 110, San Carlos, Calif. 94070 (414) 592-4259.
HOUSING FOB RAC lAiy ETHNIC GROUPS: “Race, Ethnicity and Minority Housing in the United States” is a 224-page book with contributions from housing scholars. The contributors examine why the quality and quantity of housing available to Hispanics, blacks and other minority groups remain below that available to whites. For a copy of the book, edited by Jashid Momeni, send $35 to: Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Box 5007, Westport, Conn. 06881 (203) 226-3571.
CHOOSING A CREDITCARD: The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants has issued a free brochure, “Choosing a Credit Card? These 25 Tips May Save You Money,” that explains, among other things, how to find hidden costs in ‘no-fee’ credit cards. To order, write to: “Choosing a Credit Card,” Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81002.
SER RECEIVES $10 MILLION GRANT
The California Employment and Training Panel (ETP) has granted $10 million to SER-Jobs for Progress Inc., a national Hispanic nonprofit employment and training program, announced Edward Franco, national SER president.
The two-year grant will provide training for California minority and women-owned small businesses. Contracts with these companies are projected to begin in April.
ETP annually disburses approximately $54 million throughout California for employment and training programs
PUERTO RICa TEXAS ACCEPT LITERACY CHALLENGE
Puerto Rico and Texas were two among 13 recipients of a $1.2 million Literacy Challenge grant, announced recently by the Gannett Foundation.
The two-year $2.2 million grant program challenges other programs to come up with a plan that will help unify, coordinate, strengthen and expand adult literacy activities within the recipient’s state.
Puerto Rico and Texas both won $100,000.
STANFORD GAINS HISPANIC FACULTY
Three Hispanic faculty members appointed in 1986 bring to 24 the number of Latinos teaching at Stanford University in California Latinos remain only 1.8% of the 1;315-member faculty. In 1985,21 Hispanics were on the Stanford faculty. The statistics were compiled by the Stanford Faculty Senata
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation, based in Monterey Park, Calif., has promoted attorney Oscar Parra from administrative staff to a newly formed position of administrative assistant to the president. . . Cesar Mario Trimble has been named director of development and research for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities in San Antonio... The new chairperson of the board of directors of Chicanos Por La Causa is attorney Ana Maria Martel... John Trasvina, legislative attorney for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, begins work this week as legal counsel for the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, chaired by Senator Paul Simon (D-lll.).
Calendar
University of Houston, will speak on research on Hispanic college students. Conference workshops will address language testing, preventing high school drop out and high achieving Hispanic students Ivette Del Rio (609) 292-8840
24, Puerto Rico’s new and first all-news television station, will be the featured speaker.
Christopher Crommett (809) 758-5800
COMING SOON
THIS WEEK
GROCERS EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE Palm Springs Calif. March 18-22 “Reaching the Hispanic Consumerfor Bigger Profits" is the theme of the third annual national conference of the Mexican American Grocers Association Foundation
Susana Rend6n (213) 385-7730
HISPANIC EDUCATION FORUM
Olympia, Wash. March 19
The Washington State Commission on Mexican
American Affairs is sponsoring a forum on “Working
Toward a Solid Foundation for Hispanic Education”
H&ctor Gonzalez (206) 753-3159
HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE Princeton, N.J. March 19, 20 “Testing and Evaluation: Barriers to Access and Retention'’ is the theme of the ninth annual conference of the Hispanic Association for Higher Education of New Jersey. Keynote speaker Michael Olivas, a professor of law and education at the 4
MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. March 19-21 The Washington Post is hosting a minority job conference for students and professionals seeking positions in non-editorial areas such as sales, marketing, advertising, accounting and administrative support The conference is being sponsored by the American Newspaper Publishers Association and the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business.
Sandra Moller(800) 544-POST
CHICANO FEDERATION DINNER San Diego, March 20
The Chicano Federation of San Diego County will host its 17th annual awards banquet Jos6 Muhoz (619) 236-1228
JOURNALISM BUSINESS CONFERENCE Santurce, Puerto Rico March 21 “Journalism as a Business; the Business of Joumalisnf is the first National Association of H ispanic Journalists event in Puerto Rico and is sponsored by Region 1. Franklyn Delano-L6pez, President of Channel
March 16,1987
IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY Center for Migration Studies Washington, D.C. March 26, 27 Lydio Tomasi (718) 351-8800
CHICANO POLITICS Western Political Science Association Anaheim, Calif. March 26-28 Benjamin MArquez (801) 581-7031
HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Latino Institute Chicago March 27,28 Adriana Ballen Litvak(312) 663-3603
HISPANIC VIDEO SHOW
T.M. Productions & East Texas Distributors
Dallas March 28, 29
Candelario Gutierrez (800) 331-4502
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE National Association of Bilingual Educators Denver March 29-April 3 Susan Herrera (202) 822-7870
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE
The Board of Trustees of the Latino institute seeks an Executive Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community* based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management of non-profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs; fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. Outstanding verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelor's degree inafield related to the work of the Institute is required; Master's or advanced degree is preferred.
The Latino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in all areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but preference may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city.
Salary $48,000 - $55,000. Apply by March 16,1987 to:
Dr. Josu6 M. Gonzalez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P.O. Box 699005 Chicago, III. 60609-9005
MANAGEMENT INTERN
The City of San Jose, Calif., is accepting applications for the position of Management Intern. Interns assist the City Manager and department heads in organizing, developing and evaluating City services and programs. Interns will be hired on a contractual basis for one year.
Salary is $27,672/year (approximately). Requires complete MA degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or closely related field by 7/1 /87. Resumes will be reviewed and evaluated for personal interviews Resumes must include: honors and extracurricular activities; names and telephone numbers of 3 references (one must be a faculty member); official undergraduate and graduate transcripts; a 3-5 page typewritten paper on why you are seeking this position.
Final filing date: April 10,1987. Send resume to: Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Dept., 801 N. First St., Room 207, San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4202.
The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board.
ENGINEERS
The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4-year engineering degree or EIT certificate. Salary $2,206 -$2,972/mo. + benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before April 6. Se habla espahol.
SCIENCE DEGREES The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam. Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salary $2,011 -$2,837/ma+ benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se .habla espahol.
PRINCE GEORGFS COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408.
Hispanic advertising agency in Chicago looking for an experienced account executive and a copywriter, both must be fluent in Spanish and English. Call (312) 271-2720.
VICE PRESIDENT PUBLIC INFORMATION
This position is responsible for all community public information, public relations and promotional and advertising activities of WETA-TV and FM, and for the national coordination and direction of public information for WETA-produced programs distributed nationwide.
Five years experience in promotion and advertising; demonstrated writing and editing skills; proven track record in managing a staff of at least six employees is highly desirable. Salary is $46,175-$57,720. Contact WETA-TV/FM, Personnel Department, PO Box 2626 87 PI 1 (1), Washington, D.C. 20013 (703) 820-6025.
MARKETING MANAGER Catholic University of America Press
Duties: Plan and implement the marketing program, including developing and managing the marketing budget, preparing sales forecasts and reports, producing catalogs, direct mail pieces and other marketing material and planning the exhibits program. Responsible in addition for customer relations and day-to-day liaison with fulfillment service bureau.
Qualifications: B.A. degree required, preferably in a field of the humanities. Higher degree desirable. Three years of prior experience in book marketing, including experience with direct- mail techniques preferred. Salary up to $23,500 depending upon qualifications.
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS
On April 20, we will publish our 1987 “ media edition.”
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 22-25 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles.
In addition to our regular" Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full pageMOpportunities in the Media” insertforthe edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April
10.
LEGISLATIVE ATTORNEY
National Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Attorney for Washington, D.C., office to perform research of key. national policy issues and monitor bills in Congress affecting Hispanics. The Attorney will monitor the legislative, executive and administrative agencies in Washington, D.C.
Writing assignments include drafting oftesti- 1 mony, issue papers and quarterly status reports.
Required experience in Civil Rights or other public interest law and law degree. Resumes with references to Mario Moreno, 1430 K Street NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C. 20005 by March 20.1987.
EDITOR, NATIONAL DESK
National Public Radio
Candidate edits program materials submitted by reporters and other contributors: initiates plans and produces program materials for broadcast, and fills in for Senior Editor.
At least 3-4 years experience in journalism with demonstrated ability to organize and disseminate information and to coordinate daily news coverage. Salary $33,600 per year.
Interested persons should submit resume to: NPR, Personnel, 2025 M St NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
PROGRAM DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Two positions with KUVO, Denver's bilingual public radio station. One fundraising; one programming. Seek experienced candidates Salary $16,000-$24,000 depending on qualifications. Apply by April 1, contact Florence Hern&ndez-Ramos, KUVO, P.O. Box 11111, Denver, Colo.' 80211. (303) 934-5880.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number,! word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders* varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts& Entertainment
WANTED: HISPANIC ART: Entries are now being accepted for the second national Hispanic art tour, to begin in 1982.
Some 40 to 50 works of art are expected to be chosen for the Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit Tour, which will travel to major art centers, four to six weeks at a time, in cities that will include Denver, Los Angeles and San Antonio.
Art creations in paper, panel or canvas will be accepted for consideration for the juried show through May. Awards totalling more than $15,000 will be shared by the winning artists and a nonprofit Hispanic art institution of the artists? choice.
A color catalog of winning entries will be published as part of the tour.
The tour, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Co., is similar to Mira! The Tradition Continues, the second edition of a touring exhibit sponsored by Canadian Club distiller Hiram Walker Inc.
The 1984 Mira! show, with works by31 Latin American or U.S.- born Hispanic artists, closed to mixed reviews in Denver last week.
Leo Tanguma, a critic for that city’s La Voz, wrote that the exhibit has no “symbols of the Chicano or Puerto Rican struggle, no martyrs, no Oscar Romeros, no memories of the disappeared, no contras,
i—^■BBSgBBBBB*—^
no struggle in Central America! (It) is devoid of controversy, as if none |
existed in our Hispanic world.”
Mira! continues this month in San Francisco, on its way to its j closing engagement in Los Angeles.
Another art exhibit, meanwhile, is being planned by Philadelphia’s Taller Puertorriqueho. Notices are going out this week to artists selected for the show in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware, Maryland and Washington, D.C. Works will be hung at the Arthur Ross Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania this summer.
The Philadelphia exhibit is co-sponsored by the National Conference for Puerto Rican Women.
ONE LINERS: Marta Istomin, artistic director of Washington’s Kennedy Center, was presented March 14 with West Germany’s highest civilian award, the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit Istomin, the widow of legendary Puerto Rican cellist Pablo Casals, was chosen for her work in the field of music... Puerto Rican poet and author Jacobo Morales will read from his book 100x35 March 16 and 17 at New York’s Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre... Five films will screen March 17, Latin American Film Day, as part of the current American Film Institute Festival in Los Angeles. . . The Ballet Folclorico Nacional de Mexico, celebrating its 25th anniversary, performs twice March 22 at the St Paul, Minn., Ordway Music Theatre... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
BAD AD: Xenophobic radio ads continue to slip through stations’ screening.
San Francisco’s KFOG-FM jerked one Feb. 18 after it drew complaints from several listeners
The commercial was written as a testimonial from a “satisfied customer” of Auto Visual Techniques. The customer liked the body shop because its employees didn’t get dirt on the steering wheel and didn’t “tune the radio to Spanish stations."
REVIEW UNIT ASKED: U.S. Rep. Mario Biaggi (D-N.Y.), reporting a 70% increase in complaints submitted to the Federal Communications Commission in 1986 about radio and television programming that stereotypes or ridicules racial and ethnic groups, reintroduced legislation Feb. 24 to establish an ethnic and minority affairs clearinghouse within
the FCC.
The number of complaints rose from 175 in ’85 to 297 in ’86.
It’s the third year he’s introduced such a bill. He sees it as enabling the commission to track repeat offenders better.
NEWSDAY HIRES: New York’s Newsday, which recently hired away Elaine Rivera from The Washington Times, is about to add two more Latinas to its reporting staff: Evelyn Hernandez of The Miami Herald and Laura Castro of The San Diego Union.
Rivera and Hern&ndez are elected officers with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
NEW PUBLICATIONS: Roberto Rodriguez’s Americas2001, a 48-page bilingual magazine, debuts March 20 with, coincidentally, byline pieces by Antonia Hernandez and Toney Anaya, protagonists in the recent Mexican American Legal Defense& Educational Fund board struggle.
For a copy of the premiere edition, send
$1.50 to Americas 2001, P.O. Box 4028, Terminal Annex, Los Angeles, Calif. 90015-2028.
Journalist Ernesto Sosa launches the Spanish-language biweekly tabloid Calendario da la Florida in mid-April in the growing Hispanic community of Orlando. The paper, with an initial 30,000 run, plans to build readership throughout Florida.
NEW AWARD: Nominations for a new award to recognize outstanding efforts in attracting minority students to careers in journalism, sponsored by the Secondary Education Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, are now being accepted.
To nominate a group or person, include the nominees address and a supporting letter. All nominations should be sent by April 1 to: Mary Sparks, Department of Journalism and Broadcasting, Texas Women’s University, Box 23866, Denton, Texas 76204.,
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Erioksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy.
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
MAR 1 7 1987
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Mlguei.Del Valle ( D-Chicago) ... Claiming t hat the $606,000 to be distributed by Hands Across America organizers to Ohio organizations ignore the rural poor and encourage welfare dependency, Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labo r Organizing Committee, threatens that FLOC will not accept its $25,000 grant. FLOC had applied for $140 , 000 .... Television reporter Geraldo Rivera apologizes to the mayor of San Jose , Calif., for calling East San Jose a ghetto during his recent special on illegal drugs . . . A day after winning the 800 and 1 ,500 meter races at a college meet, Sylvia Mosqueda, 20 , comes i n second in the women ' s division of the Los Angeles Marathon . . . New York City Police Officer Edward Paroulek, the son of a Colombian mother and a Czech father, files papers with the state Supreme Court to have the status on his application changed to Hispan i c . The reason : the reclassification would allow him to be U . S . Rep . TonyCoelho(DCalif.), House Majority Whip, says of First Lady Nancy Reagan in her role in ousting former White House Chief Donald Regan: " I did not think she was that bright , and 1 have to take that back. " .. . California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints Manuel Peiia to the Board of Governors of the Cal i fornia Community Colleges. Pei'la, from San Gabriel , must secure Senate confirmation . . . Manhattan . Borough President David Dinkins announces h i s intention to appoin t former New York City Schools Chancellor Anthony Alvarado to head a panel to study the city's system of decentralization . . . Roberto Rivera , director of Chicago Intervention Network, the city's anti-gang program, announces he will resign after the Apr il? mayoral election to become chief legislat i ve aide to the state ' s first Hispanic senator , promoted to sergeant. .. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE ORT RNHA Turm _ oil Threatens '88 GOP Strategy A leadership struggle within the Republican National Hispanic Assembly is raising questions over how effect i ve the Republican National Committee's auxiliary will be in attracting Latino voters in the 1988 presidential election Several state chairs are challenging the legality of RNHA elections held Feb. 28 in Nashua, N.H., in which Fernando de Baca was unanimously re-elected chair . Charges concerning the election, certification of voting delegates and the ineffectiveness of RNHA leadership could lead to a split in the or ganization, or worse , the yanking of its charter by the RNC. The RNHA adopted its constitution and bylaws in 1975 and was recognized as an official auxiliary of the RNC a year later . Dr. Tirso del Junco, who headed the RNHA during the 1984 elections in which Ronald Reagan attracted about 40% of the Hispanic vote, views RNHA's problems as internal but Second Latino Executed Eliseo Moreno, convicted of murdering six people during a so-hour period i n October 1983, became the second person Feb . 4 to be executed in the United States this year . The first, also killed in Texas, was Latino as well . Moreno, 27, instructed la wy ers not to undertake any actions t o save him . Moreno was giv e n a lethal i n jecti on a t 12 :13 am. and p r o no unced dead six minutes later. Texas leads all st ates wi t h 22 e x ecutions si nce r e sum i ng capita l puni shment i n 1 9 82. Moreno w a s sentenc ed to d e ath fo r the s l a y i n g o f st ate Trooper R usse ll Lyn Boyd, 25 , a nd given 35-and 45y ear sentences for th e other f i ve killings . Prosecu t o rs said the m ult ip le s ia ylngs, whi ch occ urred over a dista n ce o f 160 mil e s fr om C ollege Statio n to north o f Houston, w ere t ou c h ed off by pro blems Moreno was h aving w ith his estrang e d wife. Moreno wa s apparentl y on hi s way to ki ll h is wife . On Jan. 30, R am 6n Her nandez became t he first person to be executed in the Uni t ed States thi s year . pointed out that they will negatively affect the assembly's role in future elections . Several Republican activists, including Cathi Villalpando , who served as Reagan's special assistant for Hispanic affairs between 1983, have announced or indicated their intention to challenge de Baca during RNHA's national convention in Las Vegas on MayS and 9 . During a Feb. 25 Washington , D.C. , RNHA executive committee meeting, the board agreed to reschedule traditional February elections for the May meeting , said Colorado State Chair Bob Martinez. The RNHA has approxi mately 35 state chapters . Three days later , de Baca was elected during the Nashua issues meeting . He claims the elections were called for by delegates over his suggestion to recess the convention and hold elections later in the year. English Measures Falter Official-English measures in two states met r esistance March 5 . The education committee of Nebraska ' s unicameral legislature voted down , 5, a measure that would have expanded the official status of English in the state's constitution . The state ' s constitution has provided since 1920 that English is the official language of t he st\lte , that all state publications should be printed i n English , and that English should be used in Nebraska ' s pub l ic and private schoois. The new prov i sion would have stren g thene d th e mea s ure b y s t at in g t hat the s ta te " sh a ll m ake no law w hi c h di m in is hes o r ignore s " Eng lish and by givin g any res id e nt of o r per s on d oing busi ne s s in Nebraska the sta nd ing t o s u e for enforc e m e nt o f the me as ure . In Co l or a do , mean whi l e,l1e p . B arba r a Philips (A-C o lorado S p r in gs) , s pon s o r of a b ill to make Eng lish the official l a ng uage o f t h e state , withdre w it Marc h 5 . Accordi ng t o her legi slat ive aide, S h arlene Bailey, she will a tt empt t o collec t t he 50 ,000 s i g n a t ures n eces s ary t o ge t an o ff icial-Englis h consti t u t ion a l amend men t referendum on t he ballot in 1988. T he state ' s governo r , Roy Romer , had previously th r eatened to veto the measure . "The elections were phony," said Connecticut State Chair Hannie MartinezSantana " We are not going to recognize him as chairman," said Florida State Chairman Santos Rivero . Rivero's 2,000-member chapter was decertified by de Baca According to de Baca, the Nashua elections were valid since the RNHA Constitution calls for biennual elections in February. He also claimed the Feb . 25 meeting was improperly c alled and therefore any actions taken were not legally binding. Eighteen states, including proxy votes, pal" ticipate !i in • he election, de Baca said . However, continued on page 2 Child Files Job Pay Suit A 16-yearold undocumented alien, Manuel Cortez, filed a lawsuit in the Monterey County (Cal if.) Superior Court on March 3 aga i nst his former employer , charging that he paid him 9 an hour for laboring 10 hours a day, seven days a week for 10 months last year . Cortez said he had picked cabbage and broccoli for Jose L6pez on a farm in Carmel Valley . L6pez allegedly threatened to call immigration officials after learning tha t Cortez was not satisfied with the working conditions. The suit seeks back pay, $210,000 in punitive damages and other damages result i ng from " inten ti onally i nfl i c t ed emotional stress," and v iolation s o f California labor codes. A ccord in g to i he Ca l ifo rnia Rur al L egal A s si s tance of f ice in M on t e r ey , wh i c h is represe n ting Co r tez, L o pez deni e d a l l char ges and said that i f Gortez did w o rk for h i m i t wa s only f o r o ne mon t h . C o rtez, an o rphan, no w attends high works in a restaurant, l ives in a n apartmen t w ith sev e ral roommates and occas iona ll y sends money to his sisters and gra nd mother in Mex i c o . H e i s eligible t o become a le gal r esiden t und er' th e new i m m ig ra ti on law bec a use he worked 90 day s in ag ricul t u r e , said his attorney Lyd i a Vill arreal.

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Asylum Ruling Lauded Cautiously A spokesman for the Salvadoran Refugee Committee said the organization was pleased with the March 9 U.S. Supreme Court decision to relax legal requirements for obtaining political asylum. He added, however, it would maintain a wary posture until the ruling was set into practice. Boris Canjura, with the Washington, D.C., office of the committee, told Weekly Report "We encourage the public to write and pressure INS( Immigration and Naturalization Service) and Congress to follow this ruling," adding the decision "gives us hope but we are waiting to see what happens." In a 6 ruling, the court rejected the Reagan administration philosophy that a sylum applicants must prove a "clear proba bility" that they would be killed, tortured or persecuted in their countries. The court held that applicants need only show a "well founded fear" of persecution. The court reasoned that the administration's interpretation was contrary to the wording Federal Job Test Ordered Within six months, federal agencies will have to use a fair, open and competitive examination to fill entry-level positions, follov.r ing a ruling Feb. 28 by U.S. District Court Judge Joyce Hens Green. As of March 10, an Office of Personnel Management spokesperson said the agency is still studying the ruling and no decision on a possible appeal has been reached. The Professional and Administrative Career Examination, former1y used to fill 118 different white collar posi,tions,was phased out after 1981 when civil rights groups charged it discriminated against minorities. Image President Annabelle Jaramillo said, "Image is not opposed to an examination process provided it does not discriminate. What we do recommend is that the Office of Personnel Management develop an unassem bled type of process where individuals are . rated on their education and experience." Image, a Hispanic organization dealing with employment concerns, was one oft he groups opposed to the PACE. "One of the problems with the PACE was it assumed a specific education for all entrants . Minorities could not succeed," she said. Just before the test was abandoned, figures show that out of 300,000 test-takers, 42% of whites passed but only 13% Hispanics and 5% blacks were eligible for the federal jobs. Bonilla Running for Mayor Tony Bonilla, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens between 1981 1983, is running for mayor of Corpus Christi, Texas, he told Weekly Report March 1 0. Bonilla, an attorney, said he decided to run because he felt that he could make major contributions locally while getting people in volved politically . Elections are on Apri14. 2 of the Refugee Act of 1980 enacted by Congress. Its decision upholds a lower court ruling that the Board of Immigration Appeals reconsider the application for a38-yearold Nicaraguan, Luz Marina Cardoza-Fonseca She entered the United States in 1979 as a visitor. When applying for asylum, she told INS officials she feared for her life because of her brother's opposition to the Sandinista government The court noted, however, that the U.S. Attorney General retains the discretion to deny asylum . A report by the General Accouf1ting Office found that in 1986; 2%of Salvadoran asylum applications were approved compared with 65% of Iranian and 48% of Polish asylum seekers. Congress is currently considering a bill that would halt all deportations of Central American refugees until GAO conducts a two-year study on whether they are being persecuted. N.Y. Commission Criticizes Mayor The 13-member New York City Commission on Hispanic Concerns criticized Mayor Ed Koch's March 9 response to a report it issued last December. The report offered recom mendations on how to improve economic, employment and educational opportunities for the city's 1.5 million Hispanics. In a statement read at a joint news conference with Koch, Commission Chairman Edgardo Vaz' quez said the commission members "felt that in many cases the mayor had rejected some of the commission's most important racommendations." "Equally disappointing were the dozens of recommendations that were not specifically responded to or responded to in vague bureau cratese," said Vazquez. Koch, in a 69-page report, said most of the commission's 178 recommendations, released Dec. 10, had been fully adopted by his adminis tration. It was not clear how many recom mendations the mayor would act upon because he offered alternatives for some and said others needed further study. Two of the recommendations rejected by Koch were: establishing an independent monitoring system for the implementation of the recommendations and setting up a com mittee\ with • Hispanics onl it , that would screen nominees to the city's Board ' of Education. Presently, there are no Hispanic members on the board. Latino Jobless Rate Falls The Hispanic unemployment rate for February dipped to9.6% from 10.6% the previous month, according to figures released by the U.S. Depart of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of jobless Hispanics decreased from 893,000 to 81 3,000. Sanitation Guidelines u.S: Labor Secretary William Brock announced March 9 that he will comply with a federal court order requiring him to issue standards for farm worker field sanitation facilities. A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Feb. 6 that Brock must issue federal standards that would gua rantee toilets, drinking and washing water for farm workers. The federal government estimates that 500,000 field workers could be affected by the guidelines. Although Brock said that he will comply with the order, he added that the department is petitioning the court for a rehearing of the case. Brock said he feels that the courfs order intruded on executive branch authority. The department will issue standards, perhaps as early as April 21, he added . The decision is the latest installment in a 14-yearold battle that has been waged by farm worker representatives, the grower's lobby, Congress, the courts and the executive branch of the federal government. RNHA Election Contested continued from page 1 two;statechairsltoldiWeekly\Report\thatlonly four or five states were. actually represented. "There is going to be a second election in May and there will be two RNHAs," Martinez Santana predicted, adding, "The RNC has to do something." "If we can't resolve our problems," said George Herrera, chairman of the New York chapter, "then there's no way that the RNC can provide recognition, financial support and resources to us not if there are two bodies claiming to be RNHA." Herrera's NewYorkchapterwas also denied voting credentials by the RNHA Herrera said his group was told it had not paid membership dues to the national body. He claimed that he mailed the dues before the Dec. 31 deadline but they were never deposited. RNC Director of Political Development Bill Mackenturf was an observer at both meetings. "At this point we have to weigh our options," he said, adding the committee will attempt to determine if the elections were legal. "We will continue to try hard to reconcile those two sides. Our commitment is to have a healthy RNHA with one agreed set of leaders," Mackenturf said. "If the RNC doesn't wantto step toward and make a decision, ifs because they want the Republican Party to lose in 1988," Rivero charged. De Baca told Weekly Report that RNHA "can't afford to spend a lot of time on these intra party differences. We need to focus our attention on the 1988 presidential elections." "The RNHA is as strong as its leadership . The RNHA has chosen to work apart and separate from the Republican Party," del Junco observed, adding the Republican Party may have to use another mechanism to reach Hispanics in 1988. -Melinda Machado . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Timothy 0' Leary, guest columnist Hail the Mexican Irish As a child I lived under the illusion that union of my 1-rish-Amencan father and my Mexicarl-American mother was the first and only instance of collaboration between the disparate peoples. That illusion was shattered some years ago when I learned of a little-known historical precedent for such unusual In 1846, an army of the United States, commanded by General Zachary Taylor, was wag ing war with Mexico over possession of Texas. Numbered among the Mexican force were approximately 200 native Irishmen who for one reason or other shifted to that side. The deserters formed what was known as the San Patricio Battalion, referred to by the Mexicans as La Legi6n de Extranjeros (the Fo reign Legion) . Whatever enticement fighting for Mexico Irishmen is certainly debatable. Both idealistic and ignoble motives have been attached to their cause. But evidence exists which suggests their seduction was accomplished largely by assuring the Irish Catholics that it was their religious duty to fight for Mexico against the largely Protestant United States. And fight they did. I ' The Irish Mexican battalion saw its first action in the indecisive battle of Buena Vista, where It fought as a battery of artillery. Its next engagement was at Churubusco, the scene of the final of the ' I : Mexican Army, where-117 llS. Soldiers died and 879 were wounded. According to a history of the engagement," Most of these casualties ! were inflicted by the San Patricio Battalion ... " I WHIPPED, DISGRACED AND HANGED i I I l l I i ! I By ali reports, the Irish fought heroically and bravely . They inflicted heavy losses on their former compatriots. But it was there at Churubusco that the treasonous Irish guns were quelled. Fifty of their survivors were ordered hanged The rest were whipped and disgraced in conformity with the reigning military justice of the period. Before I learned of these traitorous and, no doubt, romantically inclined Iri s hmen, St Patrick's Day had always seemed a somewhat diluted holiday for me. It was an incomplete celebration of but half my motley heritage. El Cinco de Mayo, the Mexican holiday which celebrates the defeat o f the French at Puebla in 1867, failed to a p pease my longing for a day celebrating my heterogeneous roots, too. Accounts of the San Patricio Battalion aborted these insecurities, gave me reason to believe my I r ish-Mexican heritage was not so unusual after and convinced me there was a foundation for the odd commingling of Hispanic ardor and Irish petu lance. Of further interest to me was the inexplicable fact that the leader of t he San Pa t r i c i o Battalion, John Riley, was one of those flogged instead of hanged by the norteamericanos. PERPETUATING ROGUISH TRADITION Little had I suspected that by marrying my Mexican mother, my father wa s simpl y perpetuating a roguish Irish tradition of harmonious cooperation and friendship w ith Mexico. Today, the spirit of St. Patrick's Day lives anew within me, a H i spanicized version to be sure, but nonetheless one which the totality of my being can celebrate and enjoy. So, to the glory of St Patrick himself, whose feast we celebrate today, to the memory of the members of the San Patricio Battalion, to my parents, Jeremiah and Marla Teresa 0 Leary, who followed their brave example, and to you, dear reader, I offer thi s humble Irish benediction: "Que el camino se eleve para recibirte; que este siempre el sol , encima de tu hombro, y que puedas 1/egar a/ cielo una hora antes de que el diablo sepa que has muerto. " * (Timothy .0 Leary is a business reporter with the Washington Times, Washington, D.C.) • May the road rise i o meet you, may the sun always be over your shouider, and may you arrive in heaven an hour before the devil knows you're dead Sin pelos en Ia lengua FIGHTING FIRE: Los Angeles fire inspectors Steve VIzcaino and Andy Valencia were among 460 city department personnel who took the captain's exam Jan. 10. They were also among 61 . firemen who shelled out $2,300 each to attend a private schoolrun by Fire Captain Russell Week-to help bone up for such a key promotional exam. Both received calls from the teacher the day before the test Week just wanted to! reviewsome1of!thel classroom exercises. :he said Like how to handle a ruptured water pipe on the fourth floor of a 10-story building where there was a bank on the first floor ... Lo and behold, the first question on the exam was about a ruptured water pipe on the fourth floor of a 1 o-stofy building with a bank on the first floor. And so Went the exam . -Enraged by what they viewed as an overt act to give them an unfair edge, they-and only they-walked out on the test (Three others complained of similar experiences later.) Immediately, the two Chicanos were criticized as behaving " immature, childish and babyish . " The Fire Commission found no wrong-doing. But there's a hero to the story: A March 6 ruling by the Los Angeles Civil Service Commission ordered the essay portion of the exam thrown out and readministered to the 460 unhappy applicants for captain . Next time my house is ablaze, I'll feel a warm, secure glow because men like Vizcaino and Valencia are making certain that their colleagues know which end of the hose the water comes out before -they try to rescue me . DEBATE DEBATE: In early January, Mario Obledo, immediate past president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, wrote Elliot Abrams, Assistant Secretary of State for Inter American Affairs, inviting him to debate on U.S. policy toward Nicaragua at the June LULAC convention in Corpus Christi. Six weeks later he received a negative response from an underling, who offered to d i scuss the possibility of having another official address the convent ion. Mario never takes rejection easily. "Having been a high-ranking government official mysel f (he was health and welfare chief under California Gov . Jerry Brown for many years)," he fired back March 3, "I know that time is always available for priority items. The Nicaragua question is not just another issue-it is the leading issue." Why is it so hard to get some people's attention? LANGUAGE THREAT: In recent debate on the failed English only bill in his state, Colorado Sen . . Ray Powers (A-Colorado Springs) offered this warning: " I believe that probably the Spanish-speaking people are en couraging their culture . and that means their Spanish language. I'll be real blunt. I believe thafs a threat to English speaking in our state." LISTS: New Mexico's Grant County is 60% Mexican American . Yet, Dr. Arthur Martinez of Western New Mexico University, in Silver City, advises us that in all of the decades that the county Chamber of Commerce has been honoring its "Citizen of the Year," not once has it been able to find a Chicano or Chicana worthy of the award. Suggests Martinez in a letter to the local press: "lfs as if the Chamber wants to institutionalize the social separation of our najor ethnic groups, to nurture a social caste system." Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • TONY BONILLA, mayoral candidate for Corpus Christi, Texas, when asked who he was running against "I'm not running against anyone. They're running against me." Hi s p a ni c Link Weekly Report March 1 6 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING CONNECTING PAY EQUITY STUDY: The National Committee on Pay Equity released last month a 180page study on how race, ethnicity and sex 1---------------------------" affect pay equity . Foracopyofthe reportsend$14.95 (or$4 fora 1 a page summary) to: N.C.P.E., 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7304. LEADERSHIP PROGRAM: The Stanford University Center for Chicano Research will accept applications for its Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program until March 25. The program includes an academic year internship, a summer leadership course and a possible summer internship in Washington, D.C. The program is open to undergraduates. For applications and more information, write to: HLOP, Stanford Center for Chicano Research, Cypress Hall E-7, Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-3914. BILINGUAL EDUCATION NEWSLETTER: The Bilingual Special Education Training Program at the University of Texas publishes approximately twice a year a free newsletter on bilingual education. For a copy, send a personal request to: Shernaz Garcia, Bilingual Special Education Newsletter, Dept of Special Education, EDB 306, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471. CHILDREN'S SPANISH-LANGUAGE BOOKS: "Sources of Infor mation on Spanish-Language Juvenile Books'' is a 1 Q-page booklet by Mary Johnson. To order, send $2.50 to: M.F. Johnson, P .O. Box 110, San Carlos, Calif. 94070 (414) 592. HOUSING FOR RACIALJETHNIC GROUPS: "Race, Ethnicity and Minority Housing in the United States" is a 224-page book with contributions from housing scholars . The contributors examine why the quality and quantity of housing available to Hispanics, blacks and other minority groups remain below that available to whites. For a copy of the book, edited by Jashid Momeni, send $35 to: Greenwood ' Press, 88 Post Road West, Box 5007, Westport, Conn. 06881 (203) , 226. : CHOOSINGACREDITCARD: The American Institute of Certified . Public Accountants has issued a free brochure , "Choosing a Credit Card? These 25 Tips May Save You Money," that explains, among other things, how to find hidden costs in 'no-fee' credit cards. To order, write to: "Choosing a Credit Card," Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81 002. SER RECEIVES $10 MILLION GRANT The California Employment and Training Panel (ETP) has granted $10 million to SERJobs for Progress Inc., a national Hispanic non profit employment and training program, announced Edward Franco, national SER president. The two-year grant will provide training for California minority and women-owned small businesses. Contracts with these companies are projected to begin in April. ETP annually disburses approximately $54 million throughout California for employment and training programs. PUERTO RICO, TEXAS ACCEPT UTERACY CHALLENGE Puerto Rico and . Texas were two among 13 recipients of a $1.2 million Literacy Challenge grant, announced recently by the Gannett Foundation. The two-year $2.2 million grant program challenges other programs to come up with a plan that will help unify, coordinate, strengthen and expand adult literacy activities within the recipient's state. Puerto Rico and Texas both won $100,000. STANFORD GAINS HISPANIC FACULTY Three Hispanic faculty members appointed in 1986 bring to 24 the number of Latinos teaching at Stanford University in California Latinos remain orily 1 . 8% of the 1;315-member faculty. In 1985,21 Hispanics were on the Stanford faculty. The statistics were cor.lJ:>iled b _ y the Stanford Faculty Senate. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation, . based in Monterey Park, Calif., has promoted attorney OScar Parra from administrative staff to a newly formed position of. administrative assistant to the president. . . Cesar Mario Trimble has been named director of development and research for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities in San Antonio ... The new chairperson of the board of directors of Chicanos Por La causa is attorney Ana Maria Martel ... John Trasvina , legislative attorney for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund , begins work this week as legal counsel for the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on the Constitution, chaired by Senator Paul Simon (D-Ill.). Calendar University of Houstori , -ViiiTi' speak ori ' research on Hispanic college students. Conference workshops will address language testing. preventing high school drop out and high achieving Hispanic students. lvette Del Rio (609) 292-8840 24, Puerto Rico's new and first all-news television station, will be the featured speaker . Christopher Crommett (809 ) 758 COMING SOON THIS WEEK GROCERS EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE Palm Springs. Calif . March 18-22 "Reaching the Hispanic Consumer for Bigger Profit!!" is the theme of the third annual national conference of the Mexican American Grocers Association Foun dation Susana Rend6n (213) 385 HISPANIC EDUCATION FORUM Olympia, Wash. March 19 The Washington State Commission on Mexican American Affairs is sponsoring a forum on "Working Toward a Solid Foundation for Hispanic Education." Hector Gonzalez (206) 753-3159 HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE Princeton, N.J. March 19, 20 "Testing and Evaluation: Barriers to Access and Retention" is the theme of the ninth annual con ference of the Hispanic Association for Higher Education of New Jersey . Keynote speaker Michael Olivas, a professor of law and education at the 4 MINORITY JOURNALISM CONFERENCE Washington , D . C . March 19-21 The Washington Post is hosting a minority job conference for students and professionals seeking positions in no'n-editorial areas suc h as sales, market ing, advertising , accounting and administrative sup port The conference is being sponsored by the American Newspaper Publishers Association and the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business. Sandra Moiler (800) 544-POST CHICANO FEDERATION DINNER San Diego, March 20 The Chicano Federation of San Diego County will host its 17th annual awards banquet. Jose Mul'loz (619) 236-1228 JOURNALISM BUSINESS CONFERENCE Santurce, Puerto Rico March 21 • Journalism as a Business; the Business of Joumalism" is the first National Association of Hispanic Journalists event in Puerto Rico and is sponsored by Region 1. Franklyn Delano-L6pez , President of Channel March 16 , 1987 IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY Center for Migrat i on Studies Washington, D .C. March 26 , 27 Lydio Tomasi (718) 351 CHICANO POLITICS Western Political Sc i ence Association Anaheim, Calif . March 26 Benjamin M8rquez(801) 581 7031 HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE Latino Institute Chicago March 27, 28 Adriana Ballen Litvak (312) 663-3603 HISPANIC VIDEO SHOW T.M. Productions & East Texas Distributors Dallas March 28, 29 Candelario Gutierrez (800) 331 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE National Association of Bilingual Educators Denver March 29-April 3 Susan Herrera (202) 822-7870 Hispanic Link Weekly Repon

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks ancExecutlve Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services io individuals and community based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management o! non -profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs; fundraising ; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. OutstandinQ verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelo(s degree in a field related totheworkofthe Institute is required; Master'soradvanceddegree is preferred. The Latino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S . Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in all areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but prefe . rence may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city. Salary $48,000-$55,000. Apply by March 16, 1987 to: Dr. Josue M . Gonzalez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P .O. Box 699005 Chicago, Ill. 60609-9005 MANAGEMENT INTERN The City of San Jose, Calif., is accepting applications for the position of Management Intern. Interns assist the City Manager and department heads in organizi ng, developing and evaluating City services and programs. In terns willbe hired on a contractual basis for one year. Salary is $27,672/year(approximately). Re quires complete MA degree in Public Ad ministration, Business Administration or closely related field by 7/1/87. Resumes will be reviewed and evaluated for personal interviews. Resumes must include: honors and extracurricular ac tivities; names and telephone numbers of 3 references (one must be a faculty member) ; official underg raduate and graduate transcripts; a 3 5 page typewritten paper on why you are seeking this position. Final filing date: April1 0 , 1987. Send resume to: Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Dept., 801 N . First St. , Room 207, San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4202. The following two positions are with the California Air Resources Board . ENGINEERS VICE PRESIDENT PUBLIC INFORMATION This position is responsible for all community public infonnation, public relations and promotion al and advertising activities of WETA-TV and FM, and fort he national coordination and direction of public information for WET A-produced pro grams distributed nationwide. Five years experience in promotion and ad vertising; demonstrated writing and editing skills; proven track record i n managing a staff of at least six employees is highly desirable. Salary is$46,175-$57,720. Contact: WETA-TV/FM , Personnel Department, PO Box 2626 87 PI 1 (1 ), Washington, D . C . 20013 (703) 820-6025. MARKETING MANAGER Catholic University of America Press Duties: Plan and implement the marketing program, including developing and managing the marketing budget, preparing sales forecasts and reports, producing catalogs, direct mail pieces and other marketing material and planning the exhibits program . Responsible in addition for customer relations and day-to-day liaison with fulfillment service bureau. Qualifications: B.A. degree required, pre ferably in a field of the humanities. Higher degree desirable . Three years of prior experience in book marketing, including experience with direct-mail techniques preferred. Salary up to $23,500 depending upon qualifications. PERSONNEL DIRECTORS On Aprll20, we will publish our 1987 "media edition." This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1 ,500 jour nalists and media who will be attending the April 22-25 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles. In addition to our regular" Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page"Opportunities in the Media" insert forthe edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section. Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April 10. LEGISLATIVE ATTORNEY National Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Attorney for Washington, D.C., office to perform research of key. national policy issues and monitor bills in Congress affecting Hispanics. The Attorney will monitor the legislative , executive and administrative agencies in Washington, D .C. Writing assignments include drafting oftesti mony , issue papers and quarterly status reports. Required experience in Civil Rights or other public interest law and law degree. Resumes with references to Mario Moreno, 1430 K Street NW , Suite 700, Washington, D . C . 20005 by March 20.1987. EDITOR, NATION.AL DESK National Public Radio Candidate edits program materials submitted by reporters and other contributors: initiates plans and produces program materials for broad cast, and fills in for Senior Editor. At least 3 4 years experience in journalism with demonstrated ability to organize and di& seminate information and to coordinate daily news coverage. Salary $33,600 per year. Interested persons should submit resume to: NPR, Personnel, 2025 M St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20036. PROGRAM DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Two positions with KUVO, Denver's bilingual public radio station. One fund raising ; one pro gramming. Seek experienced candidates. Salary $16,000-$24,000 depending on qualifications. Apply by April1, contact Florence Hernandez-. Ramos, KUVO , P .O. Box 11111, Denver, Colo. 80211. (303) 934-5880. The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for its Air Resources Engineer exam. Must have4-yearengineering degree or ElT certificate. Salary: $2,206 -$2,972/mo. +benefits. For more information call (916) 323-4916 before AprilS. Sehabla espaiiol SCIENCE DEGREES The California Air Resources.Board is now accepting applications for its Air Pollution Specialist exam . Must have a 4-year physical or biological science degree. Salary: $2, 011 -$2,837 /mo.+ benefits. . For , .more information. call (916) 323-4916 before March 13. Se . habla espaiiol. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. Hispanic aavertlslng agency in Chicago looking for an experienced account executive and a copywriter. both must be fluent in Spanish and English. Call (312) 271 -2720. Hispani c Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number , 'I word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by ___________ _ Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment no struggle in Central America! (It) is devoid .ofcontroversy, as if none existed in our Hispanic world. " WANTED: HISPANIC ART: Entries are now being accepted for the second national Hispanic art tour, to begin in 1982. Mira! continues this month in San Francisco , on its way to its closing engagement in Los Angeles . Another art exhibit , meanwhile , is being planned by Philadelphia's Taller Puertorriqueiio. Notices are going out this week to artists selected for the show in Pennsylvania , New Jersey , New York, Delaware , Maryland and Washington , D.C. Works will be hung at the Arthur Ross Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania this summer . Some 40 to 50 works of art are expected to be chosen for the Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit Tour, which will travel to major art centers, four to six weeks at a time, in cities that w i ll include Denver , Los Angeles and San Antonio . The Philadelphia exhibit is co-sponsored by the National Conference for Puerto Rican Women. Art creations in paper, panel or canvas will be accepted for consideration for the juried show through May. Awards totalling . more than $15,000 will be shared by the winning artists and a non profit Hispanic art institution of the artists' choice . ONE LINERS: Marta lstomin, artistic director of Washington's Kennedy Center, was presented March 14 with West Germany's highest civilian award , the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit lstomin, the widow of legendary Puerto Rican cellist Pablo Casals, was chosen for her work in the field of music . . . Puerto Rican poet and author Jacobo Morales will read from his book 100 x 35 March 16 and 17 at New York's Puerto Rican Travelling Theatre ... F i ve films will screen March 17, Latin American Film Day, as part of the current American Film Institute Festival in Los Angeles. . . The Ballet Folc/6r i co Nacional de Mexico, celebrating its 25th anniversary, performs twice March 22 at the St Paul , Minn., Ordway Music Theatre... Antonio Mejias Rentas ' A color catalog of winning entries will be published as part of the tour. The tour, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Co. , is similar to Mira! The Tradition Continues, the second edition of a touring exhibit sponsored by Canadian Club distiller Hiram Walker Inc. The 1984 Mira! show, with works by31 Latin American or U . S . born Hispanic artists, closed to mixed reviews in Denver last week. Leo Tanguma , a critic for that c i ty's La Voz, wrote that the exhibit has no "symbol s of the Chicano or Puerto Rican struggle, no martyrs, no Oscar Romeros , no memories of the disappeared, no contras, ------Media Report BAD AD: Xenophobic radio ads continue to slip through stations ' screening. San Francisco's KFOGFM jerked one Feb. 18 after it drew complaints from several listeners. The commercial was written as a testimonial from a "satisfied customer'' of Auto Visual Techniques. The customer liked the body shop because its employees didn't get dirt on the steering wheel and didn ' t "tune the radio to Spanish stations. " REVIEW UNIT ASKED: U.S. Rep . Mario Biaggi (D-N .Y.), reporting a 70% increase in complaints submitted to the Federal Com . munications Commission in 1986 about radio and television programming that stereotypes or ridicules racial and ethn i c groups, reintro duced legislation Feb . 24 to establish an ethnic and minority affairs clearinghouse within HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a nati o nal publi ca ti o n of Hispanic Link News Service Inc . 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 ( 202) 234 or 234 Publ is h er. H ecto r E rick s e n Me n doza Ed i t or. F e l ix Perez R eporting: Charlie Er iokse n , Antoni o Mej i as R e n tas. Melinda Machado, Mike O renstein , J ulio L aboy . No portion o f Hispani c Week l y Report may be reproduced or broadcast in a n y form without advance permission. Annual s ubscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. C ORPOR A TE CLA S S IF IED: Ad rates 7 5 cents per word . Di s pla y ads a r e $35 per column in ch . Ad s placed by T u esday will run in Weekl y R e p orts mail e d Fri d ay of sa m e week. Multiple u s e rates o n r e qu e st. 6 the FCC. The number of complaints rose from 175 in $1.50 to Americas 2001 , P .O. Box 4028, l '85 to 297 in '86. Terminal Annex, Los Angeles , Calif. 90015 lfs the third year he's introduced such a 2028. bill. He sees it as enabling the commission to Journalist Emesto Sosa launches the Spanishtrack repeat offenders better. language biweekly tabloid Calendario de Ia Florida in mid-April in the growing Hispanic NEWSDAY HIRES: New York's Newsday, community of Orlando. The paper. with an which recently hired away Elaine Rivera from initial 3o,ooo run , plans to build readership The washington Times, is about to add two throughout Florida . more Latinas to its reporting staff: Evelyn NEW AWARD: Nominations for a new award Hernandez of The Miami Herald and Laura Castro of The San Diego Union. to recognize outstanding efforts in attracting Rivera and Hernandez are elected officers minority students to careers in journalism, sponsored by the Secondary Education D i vision w i th the National Association of Hispanic of the Association for Education in Journalism Journalists. and Mass Communication, are now being NEW PUBLICATIONS: Roberto Rodriguez's accepted . . Amerlcas2001, a48-page bilingual magazine, To nominate a group or person, include the debuts March 20 with, coincidentally, nominee's address and a supporting letter. All pieces by Antonia Hernandez and Toney nominations should be sent by April 1 to : Anaya, protagonists i n the recent Mexican Mary Sparks, Department of Journal ism and American Legal Defense& Educational Fund Broadcasting, Texas Women ' s UniverSitY. Box board struggle . 23866, Denton, Texas 76204. , For a copy of the premiere edition, send -Charlie Ericksen H i spanic Lin k Weekl y Rep o rt