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Hispanic link weekly report, March 23, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 23, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
The bill to cut off further assistance to the Nicaraguan contras until earlier aid is accounted for, passed 230-to-196 by the U.S. House of Representatives March 11, wins support of nine Hispanic congressmen. The only two opposing it are Rep. Solom6n Ortiz (D-Texas) and Manuel Lujdn (R-N.M.)... U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzdlez replies to a booklet by the director of the Office of Management and Budget defending the Reagan administration’s budget: “It would have been a public service if you had saved the ink and paper.”... Joyce Valdez, a prominent Los Angeles political fund-raiser, signs on with Vice President George Bush in his quest to secure the Republican presidential nomination. . . California Gov. George Deukmejian
appoints Francisco Marquez as director of the state Office of California-Mexico Affairs... Edward|fitfu]ieer44^ears old and a 20-year veteran of the California Highw^M#6lVfc«Smesthe new chief of the agency’s Southern Division. G6mez is the first Latino to obtain that rank... Luis Sanjurjo, literar)^|$ngcgs^00|fi U.S. writers and playwrights, including Tennessee Williams, aies of a heart attack at the age of 45. Sanjurjo was a native of San Juan, Puerto Rico... La f fit Pincay becomes the first jockey in the 50-year history of the Arcadia, Calif., Santa Anita racetrack to win seven races in one day... Wide receiver Mervyn Fernandez, the Canadian Football League’s Most Valuable Player for 1985, sings a four-year $1.8 million contract -reportedly the largest contract given to a wide receiver - with the Los Angeles Raiders...
Hispanic Yellow Pages Sprouting with the’80s
Spanish* language yellow pages have become big business for the ’80s, attracting both existing telephone companies and new publishing entrepreneurs, a Weekly Report survey showa
The Bell operating companies now publish
N.Y. Borough Post
The Bronx delegation of the City Council of New York will hold its first hearing March 24 to discuss.the selection of a new Bronx borough president. Two Hispanics are considered front-runnera
If a Latino is selected for the post, it will be the second time in the city’s history. Herman Badillo was the first in 1964.
The Bronx is approximately 35% Latino.
The candidate who is selected will automatically become a member of the city’s Board of Estimatea The board, composed of the mayor, comptroller, city council president
Spanish-language directories alongside their English-language ones in markets such as New York, Los Angeles and Miami. Small-business persons are also finding a niche with similar ventures in several statea Pag in as am aril las- yellow pages- began in
Eyed by Latinos
and the five borough presidents, controls city finances jointly with the city council.
Assemblyman Jose Serrano and Councilman Fernando Ferrer, the top contenders, are seeking the position. The former president resigned recently in the face of a pending indictment for allegedly accepting bribea The delegation will select a replacement by April 1 from a pool of six candidates - three Hispanics and three blacks - to serve until January. In a special primary election in September, voters will elect a president to serve the rest of the term, which ends in 1989.
three large markets, Chicago, Miami and Houston, in 1980. They were introduced in New York in 1983, in suburban New Jersey, Los Angeles and San Jose, Calif., in 1985, and in Washington, D.C., in 1986.
Current distribution ranges from 50,000 in Washington, D.C., to 400,000 in Miami and New York. The books vary in pages from under 100 to 400.
By and large, Spanish-language yellow pages look like any other yellow-page directories, except that the advertising, listings and indices are in Spanish - or, in the case of the San Francisco Bay Area yellow pages, bilingual.
With a growing number of Spanish-speakers in the nation, the books fill a need both for advertisers and consumers, points out Darlene Drapkin, second-language marketing director for Direct Language Publishing in San Francisco, which distributes directories in five Northern California counties - Santa Clara,
continued on page 2
NATIONAL SAMPLING OF SPANISH ‘YELLOW PAGE’ DIRECTORIES
AREA CHICAGO HOUSTON MIAMI N. J.* N. Y. SAN FRAN** SO. CAUF *** WASH. D.C.
COMPANY Cinco Estrellas International Inc. Houston Spanish Yellow Pages Bell South Advertising and Publishing NYNEX NYNEX Direct Language Publishing Pacific Bell Directory 495 -The Hispanic Yellow Pages
ADDRESS 4724 W. Lawrence Chicago, III. 60630 3800 Buffalo Speedway Houston, Texas 77098 250 Alhambra Cir. Room 304, Coral Gables, Fla. 33134 855 Valley Road Clifton, N.J.07013 711 Third Ave. New York, N.Y. 10577 346 9th St. San Francisco, Calif. 94103 5830 E. Whittier Blvd. Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 5622 Columbia Pike Falls Church, Va. 22401
PHONE (312) 725-4959 (713) 840-9898 (305) 529-3476 (201) 777-8100 (212) 972-8000 (415) 626-4111 (213) 726-4304 (703) 820-4842
DELIVERY April April January Sept. 8 June 6 April Staggered March/April
AD D’LINE Jan. 31 Feb. 28 Oct. 5 June 11 March 9 Dec. 31 Varies Early February
CIRC. 200,000 150,000 402,000 120,000 400,000 Varies; Santa Clara 125,000 Average 157800 50,000
PAGES 304 80 130 208 395 220 (Santa Clara) Average 322 160
BASIC LIST. $75 $120 Free Free Free $140 Free Free
FULL PAGE $10,000 $5,000 $5,544 $5,184 (often discounted) $13,440 (often discounted) $8,855 (Santa Clara) $3,000 1/2 page $675
BEGAN 1980 1980 1980 1985 1983 1985 1985 1986
* - Mainly Hudson County.
** - Five directories: Santa Clara, Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo, Contra Costa counties.
*** - Five directories: Los Angeles, East Los Angeles, San Gabriel Valley, Orange County, San Diego. _ Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart


GAO Report Faults Bennett Policy
The U.S. General Accounting Office issued a report March 11 sharply criticizing U.S. Education Sf^^tafV sWiilfefi$ Bennett’s position on bilingual education. The report charged that Bennett1 s philosophy was not reflective of research in the area
Seven of the ten language and bilingual education experts used for the report, "Bilingual Education: A New Look at the Research Evidence,” felt that the Department of Education was incorrect in its belief that research indicated that there was promise in teaching methods that did not use native-language instruction.
Joseph Beard, national administrator for the National Association for Bilingual Education, said the organization was extremely pleased with the report, adding, “We don’t have to be on the defensive now. This comes from the highest accounting office in the land.”
Chester Finn, the Education Departments
assistant secretary for Educational Research and Improvement, called the GAO report “a bundle of contradictions and inconsistencies that defy the canons of scholarship.”
The experts, more than half of whom the department cites in support of its programs, found that Bennetts philosophy was unsubstantiated in other areas:
• the belief that transitional bilingual education, in which some non-language courses are taught initially in the students native language, is not effective;
• the position that poor performance and high dropout rates of Latinos are connected to the transitional instruction method^
• the opinion that research is so ambiguous that students should be taught using several methods.
In 1985, the act served 186,000 students out of an estimated 1.2 to 1.7 million 5-to-17-year-old children who lived in “language-minority households.”
INS Issues Legalization Regulations
Undocumented workers seeking legalization under the immigration law will have to pay a $185 basic application fee under rules issued March 16 by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Family fees will be capped at $420.
“The fee is reasonable and fair. The $185 charge is the same fee as paid by a legal immigrant,” INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said.
Applicants must have resided in the United States since before Jan. 1,1982. Those who cannot pay the fee are not “qualified” to apply for amnesty, Nelson said.
Hispanic organizations such as the National Council of La Raza and the Mexican American
Farm Workers Assail Law
A coalition of Hispanic farm workers proposed launching a protest against the new immigration law during a Washington, D.C, meeting March 13-15.
Charging that legalization for undocumented workers in the United States prior to Jan. 1, 1982, is a “farce,” the Coalicion Nacional de Trabajadores Agricolas will begin protesting the law May 5, the first day legalization applications will be accepted.
Coordinator Carlos Marentes with the Union de Trabajadores Agricolas Fronterizos in El Paso, Texas, said the coalition, composed of 16 farm worker organizations from throughout the country, will demonstrate at sites where the U.S. I mmigration and Naturalization Service will be accepting applications.
The coalition believes few people will qualify for amnesty and fears many applying for legal status will be deported.
Protest actions will concentrate on major cities on the East Coast, California, Florida, New Mexico and Texas, he said. The group will meet in Austin, Texas, in April to finalize protest plans.
2
Legal Defense and Educational Fund have said the fees are too high. MALDEF plans to lobby Congress to change the regulations.
“The INS should consider the total cost to the individual and not just the INS cost for processing,” said Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), adding that fulfilling medical and other requirements for legalization could cost individuals $1,000.
The new rules include the following additional provisions:
• Legalization fees are $50 for children under 18.
• Male applicants between the ages of 18 and 26 must register under the Military Selective Service Act.
• Six-month work permits will be issued while applications are being reviewed. If accepted, applicants will be granted 18-month temporary resident status.
• After living in the United States for 18 months under that status, applicants will be eligible for permanent residency.
The rules, published in the Federal Register March 19, are subject to30-day publiccomment Final regulations are expected to be issued in May.
18-Month Strike Settled
A settlement was reached March 11 in a bitter 18-month strike by 1,000 workers, mostly Latinas, against the nation’s largest frozen food plant in Watsonville, Calif.
Workers voted, 543-21, to return to work under a new three-year contract.
The walkout had become a rallying point for minority activists after the former owner lowered the base pay of workers to $4.75 an hour from $6.66 and slashed medical, pension and other benefits. The new pact provides for a base-wage pay of $5.85 an hour.
Bill to Improve^ Extend Bilingual Ed. Offered
Legislation was expected to be introduced late last week by Congressman Augustus Hawkins (D-Calif.) to strengthen and extend the bilingual education act for five more years.
The legislation, co-sponsored by Dale Kilbee (D-Mich.), Matthew Martinez(D-Calif.) and Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), authorizes a first-year increase of $70 million, boosting the total ] Title VII funding to $246 million.
“It greatly strengthens the bilingual education act and responds to the growing needs of limited-English-proficiency children,” said Jim Lyons, legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education.
A spokesperson at Hawkins’ office said that the act encourages state responsibility and assures parental participation in addition to increasing the funding. “We think the Senate will be supportive," said the spokesperson.
Yellow Pages Flourishing
continued from page 1
Alameda, San Francisco San Mateo and Contra Costa DLP, with $3 million in annual ad revenues, claims that 70% ot its advertisers are non-Hispanic.
“If sa good way for non-Hispanic businesses to reach the growing Hispanic market” she says.
Hector Barreto, national president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, sees them of special value to Hispanic businesses “Hispanic business is growing faster than the economy as a whole,” he says “Spanish-language directories definitely can add to that growth.”
Francisco Vega, publisher of “ Directory495 -The Hispanic Yellow Pages” based in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Falls Church, Va, offers one reason fortheir success: “The one thing I noticed - traditional Spanish-language publications had small circulations and high prices for their ads.”
Vega, with some background in publishing, launched his venture two years ago.
A problem faced by most publishers particularly in cities where the Latino population is spread out, is distribution.
The Cinco Estrellas publishing firm in Chicago “reads mailboxes” according to J.L. Jorden, head of the investment group which runs it. “A lot of Hispanic people don’t have telephones so when we go into a Spanish neighborhood, we actually read mailboxes If there are ten families in a building, we give them ten books”
Jorden had worked for the international publishing giant R.R. Donnelley in Mexico for two years before returning to Chicago and deciding to produce a directory. In seven years his paginas amarillas have grown from 200 to300 pages and circulation has doubled from 100,000 to 200,000.
A basic one-line listing in most of the directories is free. Bold-face type has a small cost. Full-page ads can run into five figures in some cities - Mike Orenstein
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Julio Laboy Jr., guest columnist
‘Homelessly Human’
It was a great media event - actors and congressmen sleeping in the streets of the nation’s capital. They emerged from the warmth of their studio stages and House chamber to drum up support for legislation to aid the nation’s homeless.
Reporters and cameramen took turns interviewing and filming such celebrities as Community for Creative Non-Violence leader Mitch Snyder, Congressmen Joe Kennedy, Esteban Torres, Tony Coelho and Mickey Leland, and actor Martin Sheen as they squatted on the city’s steam grates.
With a handful of homeless men and women as his silent chorus, Sheen was the evening’s star. Clad in old sneakers and faded jeans, he was wrapped in a bright orange blanket and a constant circle of journalists, protecting him from the frequent cold gusts of wind on a 35-degree March night On the periphery of the spotlight stood a slight young man with black high-top shoes, gray jeans and a black fluffy jacket. A scruffy beard clung to his olive-skin.
Although his eyebrows were raised sullenly, tears welled in his eyes. His voice cracked. “Martin! Martin! Can I speak to you?”
The cameras were supposed to be recording the plight of the homeless, but not a single flash or shaft of light was directed toward the sobbing figure. A tall reporter brushed impatiently past him. “This is our living,” he scolded. “Stand back.”
“My name is Robert Morillo,” the young man was hollering. “I have a national anthem for the homeless.”
“What drug are you on?” a cameraman said as he brushed by. Now the young man was shouting. “No one wants to hear what’s true about the homeless.” Tears streamed down his face. “Why not talk to me? I know the truth.” He moved closer to Sheen. Occasionally, he would reach out and try to pat the actor on the shoulder. Repeatedly, a muscular man who appeared to be Sheen’s bodyguard stepped in front of him, pushing him away.
“I have a song, Martin- a song forthe homeless. Please let me sing it to you.”
Now he had Sheen’s attention. The actor cracked a smile and advanced toward the shivering figure. He extended his hand.
“My name is Robert Morillo,” the young man repeated, finding his composure. “I have a song. ‘Homelessly Human.’ ”
He rambled on for a minute or two and then he began to sing.
"... They live and die in the streets. They sleep in the gutter. They rarely eat meat or bread spread with butter.. "
It was a rap tune. When Morillo finished, Sheen talked softly with him for a few minutes. The lights went off and the press left.
PRODUCT OF NEW YORK’S STREETS Morillo was alone again when I approached him. “Where are you from?” I asked.
“I’m a product of the New York streets,” he said. “I heard what was happening so I scratched up enough cash for the Greyhound bus. I came down to say something.”
We talked for about 20 minutes. He told me he was 22, that he had dropped out of Aviation High School in Queens, tried the service, but that didn’t work, and found himself in the streets. His parents were from the Dominican Republic - Santo Domingo.
His dream, he said, was to start the Morillo Foundation for the Homeless. He had a lawyer helping him draw up the papers. He gave me the man’s phone number, in case I wanted to check it out.
(The next day, I did. And the next day, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a $500 million homeless aid package.)
I left Roberto Morillo and his dream about a half hour after midnight to return to my apartment and my warm bed. As I walked away, I glanced over my shoulder once.
Robert Morillo had found a spot on Sheen’s grate. He was fluffing a pillow and tucking it gently under the actor’s head.
(Julio Laboy is a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
CULTURAL CONFUSION: Irish America magazine names C6sar Chdvez as an honorary member of its “Top 100 Irish Americans" this month... A Chicano executed in Texas orders steak for his last meal. An Anglo who went a year and a half before him ordered a flour tortilla and a glass of water.
YESTERDAY*S SPORTS REPORTER: In putting opponents of his 1988 budget on notice not to mess with it, President Reagan warned in a recent weekly radio address:
“If the big spenders want to fight on the budget, they’d better strap on their helmets and shoulder pads. I’m determined to go out there and win for the American people and, yes, one for the Gipper.”
TOMORROW’S SPORTS REPORTER: So long as we’re pretending this is football season, let me quote a line of coverage in La Oferta, a San Jose, Calif., bilingual weekly, on a college game there:
"The Spartans executed a perfect on-side kick and the Spartan defense was on the ball like cheese on enchiladas”
The sports pages will never be the same if the nation’s daily newspapers ever get serious about letting us work for them.
AS OTHERS SEE US: Newsweek of Feb. 23 offered the following from Wellesley College Prof. Marshall Goldman, commenting on trustee Henrietta Holsman, who had told a college audience that Hispanic workers at her Los Angeles firm were lazy and that it was hard to keep the blacks from going “back to the street’ to deal drugs:
“She is just the kind of person Wellesley is usually proud of. She is young, imaginative, a successful entrepreneur, and she was sharing her experiences with other women.”
OFFICIAL STATE HAIR COLOR: Reacting to the Florida English drive to make English that state’s official language through constitutional amendment, Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen suggests a campaign to make blond the official state hair color.
Proposes Hiaasen in a recent column:
“Whereas Florida is a state renowned for its year-round sunshine;
“and whereas prolonged exposure to Florida sunshine is known to bleach and brighten the most dispirited of human hair;
“and whereas almost no redheads or brunettes get to do sexy beach scenes on Miami Vice;
“and whereas it would be greatly beneficial to the promotion of tourism and a healthy state image if all Floridians were to have lustrous blond hair;
“it is hereby decided that it will be law. Also, watch the roots, please.”
LISTS: California Gov. George Deukmejian recently appointed nine members to the new state Task Force to Promote Self-Esteem. Not one was Hispanic.
That has to be the ultimate put-down*
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
PEDRO GUERRERO, million-dollar Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder who overslept four hours and missed the team bus to an exhibition game in Florida:
“If I had to work in a factory, they probably would’ve fired me by now.”
TONY COELHO, House majority whip, commenting on President Reagan’s defense of Secretaries Shultz and Weinberger in the Iran-contra scandal:
“I’m glad the see-no-evil, hear-no-evi! twins have been embraced by their speak-no-evil president I wish Reagan would spend as much time solving the budget crisis as he does throwing kisses to his Cabinet secretaries”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 23,1987
3


COLLECTING
FEDERAL IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS: Draft copies of rules outlining the new immigration law and of an employer-facts brochure were published in the Federal Register March 19. A copy of the register is available at most public libraries or can be ordered by sending $1.50 and the publication date to: Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Charge card orders will be accepted at (202) 783-3238.
The materials are subject to a 30-day public comment period before final publication. Comments should be addressed to: Office of Investigations, Immigration and Naturalization Service, 425 I St. N W, Washington, D.C. 20536.
DECIPHERING BILINGUAL ED RESEARCH: “Bilingual Education: A New Look at Research,” is a free 77-page report by the General Accounting Office which finds that the position taken by the U.S. Education Department on bilingual education is not consistent with the research. For a copy of the report (six or more copies are $2 each), write to: U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. (Make checks payable to the Superintendent of Documents.)
NATIONAL: “Directory of Agencies Which Assist Persons in Immigration Proceedings” is the second edition of the listing of voluntary, non-profit agencies that offer counseling, referral and legal assistance to undocumented aliens. For a copy, send $5 (free for non-profit agencies) to: National Centerfor Immigrants’ Rights, 1636 W. Eighth St., Suite 215, Los Angeles, Calif. 90017 (213) 487-2531.
WASHINGTON, MD., VA.: “Guia Latina de Comercio ’86" is the 134-page third edition of this Spanish-language directory. It includes Hispanic and non-Hispanic businesses. For a free copy, write to: Guia Latina de Comercio, 6718 Edsall Road, Springfield, Va. 22151 (713) 642-0824.
NATIONAL; The U.S. HispanicChamberofCommercewillpublish a nationwide listing of 4,200 Hispanic-owned businesses this April. For a copy of the “National Hispanic Business Directory," send $25 to Roy Nunez, USHCC,4900 Main, Kansas City, Mo. 64112(816)531-6363.
ROCKY MOUNTAI NS: The Latin American Research and Service Agencies publishes the “Directory of Services for the Hispanic Communities,” a listing .of organizations and agencies providing services to Hispanics. For a copy, send $6 to LARASA, 303 W. Colfax, Suite 950, Denver, Colo. 64112 (303) 623-1465.
NATIONAL: The “Hispanic Yearbook," or Anuario Hispano, is a bilingual publication listing Hispanic organizations, media, Latin American embassies and other information. It also includes a small “yellow pages” covering Washington, D.C. (Another is planned for New York.) For a copy, send $1 to cover postage and handling to T.I.Y.M. Publishing Co., 8340 Greenboro Drive,#1001, McLean, Va. 22102 (202) 362-3033.
ROSTER OF OFFICIALS: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released its “1986 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials.” The 115-page book Iists3,202 of them. For a copy, send $30 plus $2.40 for postage and handling to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
MEDIA DIRECTORY: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is offering its 93-page “Hispanics in the Media, 1986 - A National Directory" for$50. It includes3,000 names, addresses and affiliations. Send check to: NAHJ, National Press Building, #634. Washington, D.C. 20045.
CONNECTING
TRAINING TO AID HISPANIC ELDERLY
The National Hispanic Council on Aging will select 12 graduate students to participate in its Gerontology Training Program, titled “Increasing the Pool of Hispanics in Gerontology." The application deadline is April 1.
Students will be chosen from Pan American University (Edinburg, Texas), New Mexico (Las Vegas) Highlands University, University of Puerto Rico, and Wichita (Kan.) State University.
Interested students should contact Juan Paz at (202) 265-1288.
AMOCO FUNDS BOY SCOUT RECRUITING
The Amoco Foundation March 10 granted the first $50,000 of a $150,000 three-year pledge to the Programa Alcance a la Comunidad Hispana del Concilio del Area de Chicago de los Boy Scouts of America
The program was started last year to familiarize the Hispanic community with the Boy Scouts of America It aims to increase Hispanic participation from its current 2% to its 12% representation in the Chicago population.
The 1987 goal is to increase the number of Hispanic Boy Scouts in Chicago to 1,200.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY Washington, D.C. March 26, 27 The Center for Migration Studies’ national legal conference will discuss aspects of the 1986 immigration bill. Panel discussions will include temporary guest workers, legal aspects of the sanctuary movement, detention issues and Supreme Court involvement.
Lydio Tomasi (718) 351-8800
CHICANO POLITICS Anaheim, Calif. March 26-28 Mexican-American professors will read papers and discuss both Chicanos in electoral politics and in urban politics during a meeting of the Western Political Science Association.
Benjamin Marquez (801) 581-7031.
CHILD ABUSE WORKSHOP Bakersfield, Calif. March 27 Eight California experts will address the topic of 4
“Cultural Differences: Their Impact on Child Abuse and Other Social Service Programs” during a one-day workshop sponsored by the Kern Child Abuse Prevention Council.
Norma Peal (805) 327-4711
HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Chicago March 27, 28
“Latinas in the'80s: Power, Success and Leadership’ is the theme of the Hispanic working women’s conference sponsored by the Latino Institute. Adriana Ballen Litvak (312) 663-3603
HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Chicago March 27, 28
“Adelante Mujer Hispana” is the theme of a conference addressing the needs of Hispanic women in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Jamie Sepulveda-Bailey, Gov. George Deukmejian’s liaison to the Latino community, will be the keynote speaker. Carlotta Curti (209) 431-1343
HISPANIC VIDEO SHOW Dallas March 28, 29
Manufacturers and distributors of hardware and software will be displaying their goods at the first annual Hispanic video show organized by T.M. Productions® East Texas Distributors.
March 23,1987
Candelario Gutierrez (800) 331-4502
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE Denver March 29-April 3
The National Association for Bilingual Education’s annual conference will be “Bilingual Education: It’s Working for All of Us.” The six-day conference will feature 140 sessions, school visits and intensive sessions on areas from teaching writing to ESL students to understanding language and culture of immigrant children from Central America.
Susan Herrera (202) 822-7870
COMING SOON
IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS DINNER
National Center for Immigrants’ Rights
Los Angeles April 3
Peter Schey (213) 388-8693
BILINGUAL EDUCATION PANEL National School Boards Association San Francisco April 4-7 Phil Smith (703) 838-6743
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION CONFERENCE American Association for Affirmative Action Chicago April 8-11 Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE
The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks an Executive Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community* based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management of non-profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs; fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy. Outstanding verbal and written skills are essential. Fluency in Spanish and English is mandatory. Bachelor’s degree in a field related to the work of the Institute is required; Masters or advanced degree is preferred.
The Latino Institute is among the most prestigious and influential Hispanic agencies in the region. It seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in all areas. Service area is limited to Chicago. Candidates from other localities are welcome but preference may be given to those with first-hand knowledge of and experience in that city.
Salary $48,000 - $55,000. Apply to:
Dr. Josue M. Gonz&lez, Chair Executive Director, Selection Committee P.O. Box 699005 Chicago, III. 60609-9005
ASSISTANT TO
DIRECTOR OF SUPPORT SERVICES
The Administrative Director of LaGuardia Community College seeks an individual to assist the Director in supervision of the Support Services area which includes print shop, mail room, cleaning, receiving, security, IDs and motor-pool. Assist in budget preparation and control, problem solving and report writing and managing computerized records. Flexible hours.
BA degree, 2 years experience in service organization, excellent writing skills and computer knowledge or aptitude is required.
Rank and salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Excellent fringe benefits.
Send cover letter and resume by April 3 to: Director of Support Services LaGuardia Community College/CUNY 31-10 Thomson Ave.
Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EOE/AA EMPLOYER
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
California Teachers Association
A letter will constitute a formal application and should be accompanied by a resume that includes academic background, work experience and other personal experience or achievements. The names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references who may be contacted must accompany the application. Interested individuals should apply to: Judie Lowman, President West Orange County United Teachers, 8511 Heil Ave., Westminster, Calif. 92683-7888.
VICE PRESIDENT PUBLIC INFORMATION
This position is responsible for all community public information, public relations and promotional and advertising activities of WETA-TV and FM, and for the national coordination and direction of public information for WETA-produced programs distributed nationwide.
Five years experience in promotion and advertising; demonstrated writing and editing skills; proven track record in managing a staff of at least six employees is highly desirable. Salary is $46,175 - $57,720. Contact: WETA-TV/FM, Personnel Department, PO Box 2626 87 PI 1(1), Washington, D.C. 20013 (703) 820-6025.
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS
On April 20, we will publish our 1987 “ media edition.”
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 22-25 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles.
In addition to our regular** Marketplace” section. Weekly Report will carry a full page“Opportunities in the Media” insert forthe edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April
10.
CHIEF, HISPANIC DIVISION
GS-16 $63,135 - $70,800
The Chief is responsible for the overall administration of the Hispanic division, which provides reference service relating to the countries of Latin American and the Iberian Peninsula, and other regions influenced by Hispanic culture.
One year of specialized research or library experience in Hispanic studies is required. Qualifying specialized experience must demonstrate scholarly achievement in a major sub-field of Hispanic studies sufficient to demonstrate ability to plan, organize, direct and manage a division responsible for providing the national and international community with reference and bibliographic services in the field of Hispanic studies, development of collections forthe study of Hispanic history and culture, and effective liaison with the scholarly and library world at home, abroad and with professionat associates concerned with the pursuit of Hispanic studies.
Fluency in Spanish or Portuguese sufficient to read, speak, and translate with facility, and ability to read one additional modem foreign language other than English is also required.
To apply contact The Library of Congress, Employment Office, James Madison Memorial Bldg., LM 107, 101 Independence Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20540, (202) 287-JOBS.
PROGRAM DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Two positions with KUVO, Denver’s bilingual public radio station. One fundraising; one programming. Seek experienced candidates Salary $16,000-$24,000 depending on qualifications Apply by April 1, contact Florence Hern£ndez-Ramos, KUVO, P.O. Box 11111, Denver, Colo. 80211. (303) 934-5880.
PERSONNEL OFFICER
Stanford University Libraries
Full responsibilities directing Personnel Office, working in library system with staff of 390. Includes employee relations staff planning, compensation & staff development Qualifications required are understanding of employment conditions in an academic institution, a strong commitment to affirmative action, ability to develop & implement administrative policies, skill in handling employee relations issues, supervisory experience & suitable formal education (a graduate library degree or library experience is desirable but not required). Rank of Senior Librarian/Administrative Service Manager III. Initial salary between $36,000 & $53,300-depending on qualifications Send letter (cite #300-HL), resume, supporting documentation & list of professional references by May 8, 1987, to: Director of Libraries Stanford University. Stanford, Calif. 94305-6004. EEO/AAE.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
FILM FARE: Two Academy Award entries from Spanish-speaking countries will screen on this week’s closing day of the American Film Institute’s Fest-Los Angeles.
Mexico’s The Realm of Fortune, directed by Arturo Ripstein, and Spain’s Half of Heaven, by Manuel Gutierrez Aragon, will open the screening program on March 26. Both films were official entries for “ best foreign film” nominations in this year's Oscar race; no Spanish-language films are nominated for the awards to be handed out March 30.
The two-week Fest-Los Angeles, a resurrected version of the city’s late Filmex, held various Hispanic programs. March 17 was dubbed Latin American Film Day, with screenings of films from Venezuela, Brazil, Costa Rica and Colombia.
Among them was A Time to Die, Jorge All Triana’s film with a screenplay by Gabriel Garcia Marquez that was Colombia’s official Oscar entry.
A special series of screenings at the city’s Plaza de la Raza March 18-20 included works by U.S. Hispanic filmmakers. Carlos Ortiz’s Machito: A Latin Jazz Legacy and Enrique Oliver’s Photo-Album were among them.
An Argentine film that screened on opening day, March 12, was released commercially the day after in New York, Dallas and Los Angeles. Eliseo Subielo’s Man Looking Southeast was enormously successful at the Toronto Film Festival last October, where it was picked up for U.S. distribution by Filmdallas Pictures.
Hombre mirando al sudeste, the Spanish version of Subielo’s film, also screened successfully at festivals in San Sebastian, Spain, Havana, Chicago and Miami, and it is finally set to open in Argentina next month.
Films and Latin America have been in the news recently.
Shooting in Cuernavaca, Mexico, of La rebelion de los colgados, based on the novel by Mexican-German writer B. Traven, has reportedly been helped by an effort of the government of Morelos to turn that Mexican state into the new “Mexican Hollywood.”
Producer Deborah Blum says that filming Columbia Pictures’ adventure picture Vibrations in Ecuador, with stars Cindy Lauper, Peter Falk and Jeff Goldblum, will help promote tourism for that South American country.
But Mexican filmmaker Ismael Rodriguez said in a Notimex story that audiences for Mexican movies in U.S. houses have thinned down because of last year’s passage of the Simpson-Rodino immigration bill. Undocumented movie-goers fear apprehension.
- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
MORE DIRECTORIES: With U.S. Hispanic population increases and the growth of Latino professional, benevolent and political organizations, directories of all sorts are becoming popular as promotional and money-generating tools, as well as community resources.
One such product is the “Directory of Services for the Hispanic Communities,” compiled by the Latin American Research and Service Agencies- LARASA- of Denver and published by Mountain Bell.
For sale for $6, it lists government and nonprofit agencies- Hispanic and otherwise - which provide services to the Latino community in six Rocky Mountain states: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.
Another successful publication serving the Greater Washington, D.C., area is Anuario
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy.
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Hispano-The Hispanic Yearbook, published by the T.I.Y.M. Publishing Co. of McLean, Va. The ’87 edition is bilingual, 308 pages and free.
It provides statistics on the Hispanic population in the United States, plus short essays and information on everything from U.S. Hispanic congressmen and census data to immigration regulations, scholarships and media lists.
It also has a 125-page“yellow pages? directory for the Greater Washington area. A similar
Information on obtaining copies of the directories mentioned in “ Media Report” is provided in “Collecting” on Page 4.
yearbook is being planned for New York.
Next month the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce expects to come out with ^“National Hispanic Business Directory,” listing 4,200 Hispanic-owhed businesses in detail. It will also list national and regional Small
Business Administration and Minority Business Development Agency offices and the purchasing agents of certain corporations. It sells for $25.
Among recent professional publications is the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ “1986 National Directory of Hispanics in the Media” Supported by grants from CBS (to conduct a national census) and Philip Morris USA (to print 5,000 copies), it offers a categorized list of about 3,000 Hispanics in print and broadcast media. The cost is $50.
Another which came out this month is the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ 1986 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials. In 115 pages, it provides titles, addresses, telephones and other information on 3,200 U.S. Hispanic political leaders.
The roster was supported by grants from AT&T, Bear Stearns and The Stroh Brewery Company. Ifs free to NALEO members on request, $30 to others. - Mike Orenstein

6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week appoints Francisco Marquez as director of the state Office of California-Mexico Affairs ... old and a 20year veteran of the California Highw mes the new chief of the agency's Southern Division. Gomez is the first Latino to obtain that rank .. Luis Sanjurjo, literaf.4AftnQ<:3s49fJJI U . S . writers and playwrights, including Tennessee Williams, aies of a heart attack at the age of45. Sanjurjo was a native of San Juan, Puerto Rico ... Laffit Pin cay becomes the first jockey in the 50-year history of the Arcadia, Calif., Santa Anita racetrack to win seven races in one day ... Wide receiver Mervyn Fernandez, the Canadian Football League's Most Valuable Player for 1985, sings a four-year $1.8 million contract reportedly the largest contract given to a wide receiver -with the Los Angeles Raiders ... The bill to cut off further assistance to the Nicaraguan contras until earlier aid is accounted for, passed 230-to-196 by the U.S. House of Representatives March 11, wins support of nine Hispanic congressmen. The only two opposing it are Rep . Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas) and Manuel Lujan (R-N.M . ) . . . U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez replies to a booklet by the director of the Office of Management and Budget defending the Reagan administration's budget: " It would have been a put;>lic service if you had saved the ink and paper. " ... Joyce Valdez, a prominent Los Angeles political fund-raiser, signs on with Vice President George Bush in his quest to secure the Republican presidential nomination. . . California Gov. George Deukmejian HISPANIC LINK WEE LY REP March 23, 1987 Hispanic Yellow Pages s prouting with the'80s Spanish-language yellow pages have become big business for the '80s, attracting both existing telephone companies and new publish ing entrepreneurs, a Weekly Report survey shows. The Bell operating companies now publish Spanish-language directories alongside their English-language ones in markets such as New York, Los Angeles and Miami. Small business persons are also finding a niche with similar ventures in several states. Paginas amarillasyellow pages-began in three large markets, Chicago, Miami and Hous ton, in 1980. They were introduced in New York in 1983, in suburban New Jersey, Los Angeles and San Jose, Calif., in 1985, and in Washington, D . C . , in 1986. N.Y. Borough Post Eyed by Latinos Current distribution ranges from 50,000 in Washington, D.C. , to 400,000 in Miami and New York The books vary in pages from under 1 00 to 400. The Bronx delegation of the City Council of New York will hold its first hearing March 24 to discuss. the selection of a new Bronx borough president. Two Hispanics are con sidered front-runners. If a Latino is selected for the post, it will be the second time in the city's history . Herman Badillo was the first in 1964. The Bronx is approximately 35% Latino. The candidate who is selected will auto matically become a member of the city's Board of Estimates . The board, composed of the mayor, comptroller, city council president, and the five borough presidents, controls city finances jointly with the city council. Assemblyman Jose Serrano and Councilman Fernando Ferrer, the top contenders, are seeking the position. The former president resigned recently in the face of a pending for allegedly accepting bribes. The delegation will select a replacement by April1 from a pool of six candidates-three Hispanics and three blacks -to serve until January. In a special primary election in Sep tember, voters will elect a president to serve the rest of the term, which ends in 1989. By and large , Spanish-language yellow pages look like any other yellow-page directories, except that the advertising, listings and indices are in Spanish-or, in the case of the San Francisco Bay Area yellow pages, bilingual. With a growing number of Spanish-speakers in the nation, the books fill a need both for advertisers and consumers, points out Darlene Drapkin, second-language marketing director for Direct Language Publishing in -San Fran cisco, which distributes directories in five Northern California counties-Santa Clara, continued on page 2 NATIONAL SAMPLING OF SPANISH 'YELLOW PAGE' DIRECTORIES AREA CHICAGO HOUSTON MIAMI N.J.* N.Y. SAN FRAN.** SO. CAUF.*** WASH. D.C. COMPANY Cinco Estrellas Houston Spanish Bell South NYNEX NYNEX Direct Language Pacific Bell Directory 495International Inc . Yellow Pages Advertising Publishing The Hispanic and Publishing Yellow Pages ADDRESS 4 724 W. Lawrence 3800 Buffalo 250 Alhambra Cir . 855 Valle y Road 711 Third Ave. 346 9th St. 5830 E . Whittier 5622 Columbia Pike Chicago , Ill . 60630 Speedway Room 304, Coral Clifton, N . J. 07013 New York, N.Y. San Francis co, Blvd . Los Angeles, Falls Church , Va. Houston , Texas Gables , Fla . 33134 10577 Calif . 94103 Calif . 90022 22401 77098 PHONE (31 2) 725-4959 (713) 840-9898 (305) 529-3476 (201) 777-8100 (212) 972-8000 (415) 626-4111 (213) 726-4304 (703) 820-4842 DELIVERY April April January Sept. 8 June 6 April Staggered March/ April AD D'LINE Jan. 31 Feb. 28 Oct. 5 June 11 March 9 Dec. 31 Varies Early February CIRC. 200,000 150,000 402,000 120,000 400,000 Varies ; Santa Average 157,800 50,000 Clara 125,000 PAGES 304 80 130 208 395 220 (Santa Clara) Average 322 160 BASICUST. $75 $120 Free Free Free $140 Free Free FULL PAGE $10,000 1>5,000 $5,544 $5,184 (often $13,440 (often $8,855 $3,000 $675 discounted) discounted) (Santa Clara) 1/2 page BEGAN 1980 ,gao 1980 1985 1983 1985 1985 1986 • Mainly Hudson County. •• Five directories: Santa Clara, Alameda, San Fran c isco , San Mateo, Contra Costa counties. ... Five director i es: Los Angeles, East L os Angeles, San Gabriel Valley , Orange County, San Diego . -Hispanic link Weekly Report chart

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GAO Re . port Faults Bennett Policy The U.S. General Accounting Office issued assistant secretary for Educational Research a report March 11 sharply criticizing U.S. and Improvement, called the GAO report"a Edu_c_ ation $yJJll . . Bennetfs bundle of contradictions and inconsistencies pos1t1on on b1hngual educat1on. The report that defy the canons of scholarship . " charged that Bennetfs philosophy was not The experts, more than half of whom the reflective of research in the area department cites in support of its programs, Seven of the ten language and biiingual found that Bennetfs philosophy was un education experts used for the report, "Bisubstantiated in . other areas: lingual Education: A New Look at the Re• the belief that transitional bilingual search Evidence," felt that the Department education, in which some non-language of Education was incorrect in its belief that courses are taught initially in the studenfs research indicated that there was promise native language, is not effective; in teaching methods that did not use native• the position that poor performance language instruction. and high dropout rates of Latinos are con-Joseph Beard, national administrator for nected to the transitional instruction method; the National Association for Bilingual Edtr • the opinion that research is so ambiguous cation, said the organization was extremely that students should be taught using several pleased with the report, adding, "We don't methods. have to be on the defensive now. This In 1985, the act served 186,000 students comes from the highest accounting office out of an estimated 1.2 to 1.7 million 5-to in the land." 17-year-old children who lived in "languageChester Finn, the Education Departmenfs minority households." INS Issues Legalization Regulations Undocumented workers seeking legalization under the immigration law will have to pay a $185 basic application fee under rules issued March 16 by the U.S. Immigration and Natural ization Service. Family fees will be capped at $420. "The fee is reasonable and fair. The $185 charge is the same fee as paid by a legal immigrant," INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said. Applicants must have resided in the United States since before Jan. 1, 1982. Those who cannot pay the fee are not" qualified" to apply for amnesty, Nelson said . Hispanic organizations such as the National Council of La Raza and the Mexican American Farm Workers Assail Law A coalition of Hispanic farm workers pro posed launching a protest against the new immigration law during a Washington, D.C., meeting March 13-15. Charging that legalization for undocumented workers in the United States prior to Jan. 1, 1982, is a "farce," the Coalici6n Nacional de Trabajadores Agricolas will begin protesting the law May 5, the first day legalization ap plications will be accepted. Coordinator Carlos Marenteswith the Union de Trabajadores Agricolas Fronterizos in El Paso, Texas, said the coalition, composed of 16 farm worker organizations from throughout the country, will demonstrate at sites where the U .S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will be accepting applications . The coalition believes few people will qualify for amnesty and fears many applying for legal status will be deported . Protest actions will concentrate on major cities on the East Coast , California, Florida, New Mexico and Texas , he said . The group will meet in Austin , Texas , in April to finalize protest plans . 2 Legal Defense and Educational Fund have said the fees are too high. MALDEF plans to lobby Congress to change the regulations. "The INS should consider the total cost to the individual and not just the INS cost for processing," said Rep . Esteban Torres (D Calif.), adding that fulfilling medical and other requirements for legalization could cost indi viduals $1,000. The new rules include the following additional provisions : • Legalization fees are $50 for children under 18. • Male applicants between the ages of 18 and 26 must register under the Military Se lective Service Act. • Six-month work permits will be issued while applications are being reviewed . If accepted , applicants will be granted 18-month temporary resident status. • After living in the United States for 18 months under that status, applicants will be eligible for permanent residency. The rules, published in the Federal Register March 19, are subject to3Q-day public comment Final regulations are expected to be issued in May. 18-Month Strike Settled A settlement was reached March 11 in a bitter 18-month strike by 1,000 workers, mostly Latinas, against the nation ' s largest frozen food plant in Watsonville , Calif. Workers voted, 543-21 , to return to work under a new three-year contract. The walkout had become a rallying point for minority activists after the former owne r lowere d the base pay of workers to $4.75 an hour from $6.66 and slashed medical, pe nsion and other benef its. The new pact provides for a base -w age pay of $5.85 an hour. Bill to Improve, Extend Bilingual Ed. Offered Legislation was expected to be introduced late last week by Congressman Augustus Hawkins (D-Calif.) to strengthen and extend the bilingual education act for five more years. The legislation, co-sponsored by Dale Kilbee (D-Mich.), Matthew Martinez(D-Calif.) and Bill Richardson (D-N .M.), authorizes a first-year increase of $70 million, boosting the total Title VII funding to $246 million. "It greatly strengthens the bilingual education act and responds to the growing needs of limited-English-proficiency children," said Jim Lyons , legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education. A spokesperson at Hawkins' office said that the act encourages state responsibility and assures parental participation in addition to increasing the funding. "We think the Senate will be supportive," said the spokesperson. Yellow Pages Flourishing continued from page 1 Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo and Contra Costa DLP, with $3 million in annual ad revenues , claims that 70% ot its advertisers are non-Hispanic. "If sa goodway for non-Hispanic businesses to reach the growing Hispanic market," she says . Hector Barreto, national president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, sees them of special value to Hispanic businesses. "His panic business is growing faster than the economy as a whole," he_. says. "Spanish language directories definitely can add to that growth." Francisco Vega, publisher of" Directory 495-The Hispanic Yellow Pages," based in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Falls Church, Va, offers one reason for their success: "The one thing I noticedtraditional Spanish-language publications had small circulations and high prices for their ads." Vega, with some background in publishing, launched his venture two years ago. A problem faced by most publishers, parti cularly in cities where the Latino population is spread out, is distribution. The Cinco Estrellas publishing firm in Chicago "reads mailboxes," according to J.L. Jorden, head of the investment group which runs it. "A lot of Hispanic people don't have tele phones so when we go into a Spanish neighbor hood, we actually read mailboxes . If there are ten families in a building, we give them ten books." Jorden had worked for the international publishing giant R.R. Donnelley in Mexico for two years before returning to Chicago and deciding to produce a directory . In seven years , his pagina s amaril/as have grown from 200 to300 pages and circulation has doubled from 1 00,000 to 200,000. A basic one-line listing in most of the direcb ries is free. Bold face type has a small cost. Full-page ads can run into five figures in some cities . -Mike Orenstein Hi spanic Link Weekly R eport

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Julio Laboy Jr., guest columnist 'Homelessly Human' It was a great media event actors and congressmen sleeping in the streets of the nation's capital. They emerged from the warmth of their studio stages and House chamber to drum up support for legislation to aid the nation's homeless. Reporters and cameramen took turns interviewing and filming such celebrities as Community for Creative Non-Violence leader Mitch Snyder , Congressmen Joe Kennedy , Esteban Torres, Tony Coelho and Mickey Leland, and actor Martin Sheen as they squatted on the city's steam grates . With a handful of homeless men and women as his silent chorus, Sheen was the evening's star . Clad in old sneakers and faded jeans, he was wrapped in a bright orange blanket and a constant circle of journalists, protecting him from the frequent cold gusts of wind on a 35-degree March night. On the periphery of the spotlight stood a slight young man with black high-top shoes, gray jeans and a black fluffy jacket. A scruffy beard clung to his olive skin. Although his eyebrows were raised sullenly, tears welled in his eyes . His voice cracked . "Martin! Martin! Can I speak to you? " The cameras were supposed to be recording the plight of the homeless, but not a single flash or shaft of light was directed toward the sobbing figure. A tall reporter brushed impatiently past him . "This is our living, " he scolded. "Stand back. " " My name is Robert Morillo," the young man was hollering. "I have a national anthem for the homeless." " What drug are you on?" a cameraman said as he brushed by. Now the young man was shouting. "No one wants to hear whafs true about the homeless." Tears streamed down his face. "Why not talk to me? I know the truth." He moved closer to Sheen. Occasionally, he would reach out and try to pat the actor on the shoulder. Repeatedly, a muscular man who appeared to be Sheen's bodyguard stepped in front of him, pushing him away. " I have a song, Martin-a song for the homeless. Please let me sing it to you . " Now he had Sheen's attention. The actor cracked a smile and advanced toward the shivering figure. He extended his hand . "My name is Robert Morillo," the young man repeated, finding his composure. "I have a song. 'Homelessly Human.'" He rambled on for a minute or two and then he began to sing. " ... They live and die in the streets. They sleep in the gutter. They rarely eat meat or bread spread with butter. .. " It was a rap tune. When Morillo finished, Sheen talked softly with him for a few minutes . The lights went off and the press left. PRODUCT OF NEW YORK'S STREETS Morillo was alone again when I approached him . "Where are you from?" I asked. "I'm a product of the New York streets," he said. "I heard what was happening so I scratched up enough cash for the Greyhound bus . I came down to say something. " We talked for about 20 minutes . He told me t:e was 22, that he had dropped out of Aviation High School in Queens, tried the service , but that didn ' t work, and found himself in the streets. His parents were from the Dominican RepublicSanto Domingo . His dream, he said, was to start the Morillo Foundation for the Homeless. He had a lawyer helping him draw up the papers. He gave me the man's phone number, in case I wanted to check it out. (The next day, I did. And the next day, the U.S. House of Repre sentatives passed a $500 million homeless aid package.) I left Roberto Morillo and his dream about a half hour after midnight to return to my apartment and my warm bed. As I walked away, I glanced over my shoulder once. Robert Morillo had found a spot on Sheen's grate. He was fluffing a pillow and tucking it gently under the actor's head . (Julio Laboy is a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service . ) Sin pelos en Ia lengua CULTURAL CONFUSION: Irish America magazine names Cesar Chavez as an honorary member of its "Top 100 Irish Americans" this month ... A Chicano executed in Texas orders steak for his last meal . An Anglo who went a year and a half before him ordered a flour tortilla and a glass of water. YESTERDAY'S SPORTS REPORTER: In putting opponents of his 1988 budget on notice not to mess with it, President Reagan warned in a recent weekly radio address : "If the big spenders want to fight on the budget, they'd better strap on their helmets and shoulder pads . I'm determined to go out there and win for the American people and, yes, one for the Gipper." TOMORROW'S SPORTS REPORTER: So long as we're pre tending this is football season , let me quote a line of coverage in La Oferta, a San Jose , Calif., bilingual weekly, on a college game there: "The Spartans executed a perfect on-side kick and the Spartan defense was on the ball like cheese on enchiladas." The sports pages will never be the same if the nation's daily newspapers ever get serious about letting us work for them. AS OTHERS SEE US: Newsweek of Feb. 23 offered the following from Wellesley College Prof. Marshall Goldman, com menting on trustee Henrietta Holsman, who had told a college audience that Hispanic workers at her Los Angeles firm were lazy and that it was hard to keep the blacks from going "back to the streef' to deal drugs: "She is just the kind of person Wellesley is usually proud of. She is young , imaginative, a successful entrepreneur, and she was sharing her experiences with other women." OFFICIAL STATE HAIR COLOR: Reacting to the Florida English drive to make English that state's official language through constitutional amendment, Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen suggests a campaign to make blond the official state hair color. Proposes Hiaasen in a recent column: " Whereas Florida is a state renowned for its year-round sunshine; "and whereas prolonged exposure to Florida sunshine is known to bleach and brighten the most dispirited of human hair, "and whereas almost no redheads or brunettes get to do sexy beach scenes on Miami Vice; " and whereas it would be greatly beneficial to the promotion of tourism and a healthy state image if all Floridians were to have lustrous blond hair; "it is hereby decided that it will be law. Also, watch the roots, please.'' LISTS: California Gov . George Deukmejian recently aP.pointed nine members to the new state Task Force to Promote Self Esteem. Not one was Hispanic. That has to be the ultimate put-down . Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • PEDRO GUERRERO, million-dollar Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder who overslept four hours and missed the team bus to an exhibition game in Florida: "If I had to work in a factory, they probably would've fired me by now." TONY COELHO, House majority whip, commenting on President Reagan's defense of Secretaries Shultz and Weinberger in the Iran contra scandal: "I'm glad the see-no-evil , hear-no-evil twins have been embraced by their speak-no-evil president. I wish Reagan would spend as much time solving the budget crisis as he does throwing kisses to his Cabinet secretaries" Hispan ic Link W ee kly Report March 23 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING FEDERAL IMIY!IGRATIQ!II REGULATIONS: Draft copies of rules outlining the new immigration law and of an employer-facts brochure were published in the Federal Register March 19. A copy of the register is available at most public libraries or can be ordered by sending $1.50 and the publication date to: Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington , D.C. 20402. Charge card orders will be accepted at (202) 783. The materials are subject to a 30-day public comment period before final publication. Comments should be addressed to : Office of Investigations, Immigration and Naturalization Service, 425 I St. N W, Washington, D .C. 20536. DECIPHERING BILINGUAL ED RESEARCH: "Bilingual Education : A New Look at Research," is a free 77-page report by the General Accounting Office which finds that the position taken by the U.S . Education Department on bilingual education is not consistent with the research. For a copy of the report (six or more copies are $2 each), write to: U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 601 5, Gaithers burg, Md. 20877. (Make checks payable to the Superintendent of Documents; ) NATIONAL: "LNectory of Agencies Which Assist Persons in lm migration Proceedings" is the second edition of the listing of voluntary , nonprofit agencies that offer counseling, referral and legal assistance to undocumented aliens. For a copy, send $5 (free for non-prof i t agencies) to: National Center for Immigrants' Rights, 1636 W. Eighth St., Suite 215, Los Angeles , Calif. 90017 (213) 487-2531. WASHINGTON, MD., VA.: "Guia Latina de Comercio '86" is the 134-page third edition of this Spanish-language directory . It includes Hispanic and non-Hispanic businesses. For a free copy, write to : Guia Latina de Comercio, 6718 Edsall Road, Springfield , Va. 22151 (713) 642-0824. NATIONAL: The U.S. HispanicChamberofCommercewillpublish a nationwide listing of4,200 Hispanic-owned businesses this April. For a copy of the " National Hispanic Business Directory, " send $25 to Roy Nunez, USHCC , 4900 Main, Kansas City, Mo. 64112 (816) 531-6363. ROCKY MOUNTAINS: The Latin American Research and Service Agencies publ i shes the "Directory of Services for the Hispanic Communities," a listing .of organizations and agencies providing services to Hispanics . For a copy, send $6 to LA RASA, 303 W. Colfax, Suite 950, Denver, Colo . 64112 (303) 623-1465. NATIONAL: The "Hispanic Yearbook," or Anuario Hispano, is a bilingual publication listing Hispanic organizations, media, Latin American embassies and other information. It also includes a small "yellow pages" covering Washington, D . C . (Another is planned for New York.) For a copy, send $1 to cover postage and handling to T . I.Y .M. Publishing Co. , 8340 Greenboro Drive,#1001, Mclean, Va. 221 02 (202) 362-3033. ROSTER OF OFFICIALS: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released its "1986 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials . " The 115-page book lists 3,202 of them. For a copy, send $30 plus $2.40 for postage and handling to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. MEDIA DIRECTORY: The National Association of Hispanic Jour nalists is offering its 93-page "Hispanics in the Media, 1986 -A National Directory" for $50. It includes 3,000 names , addresses and affiliations. Send check to: NAHJ, National Press Building, #634. Washington, D.C. 20045. CONNECTING TRAINING TO AID HISPANIC ELDERLY The National Hispanic Council on Aging will select 12 graduate students to participate in its Gerontology Training Program, titled "Increasing the Pool of Hispanics in Gerontology. " The application deadline is April 1 . Students will be chosen from Pan American University(Edinburg, Texas), New Mexico (Las Vegas) Highlands University, University of Puerto Rico, and Wichita (Kan.) State University . Interested students should contact Juan Paz at (202) 265. AMOCO FUNDS BOY SCOUT RECRUITING The Amoco Foundation March 10 granted the first $50,000 of a $150,000 three-year pledge to the Programa Alcance a Ia Comunidad Hispana del Concilio del Area de Chicago de los Boy Scouts of America. The program was started last year to familiarize the Hispanic community with the Boy Scouts of America It aims to increase Hispanic participation from its current 2% to its 12% representation in the Chicago population. The 1987 goal is to increase the number of Hispanic Boy Scouts in Chicago to 1 ,200. Calendar "Cultural Differences: Their Impact on Child Abuse and Other Social Service Programs " during a one day workshop sponsored by the Kern Child Abuse Prevention Council. Candelario Gutierrez (800) 331-4502 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE Denver March 29-April 3 THIS WEEK IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY Washington, D.C. March 26 , 27 The Center for Migration Studies' national legal conference will discuss aspects of the 1986 im mig r ation bill . Panel discussions will include tempo rary guest workers, legal aspects of the sanctuary movement, detention issues and Supreme Court involvement. Lydio Tomasi (718) 351-8800 CHICANO POLITIC!:i Anaheim, Calif . March 26-28 M ex ican-American professors will read papers and dis c uss both Chicanos in electoral politics and in u r b a n politics during a meeting of the Western Political Sc ience Association. Benjamin Marquez (80 1) 581 7031 . CHILD ABUSE WORKSHOP Bakersfield , Calif. March 27 Eight California experts will address the topic of 4 Norma Peal (805) 327-4711 HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE Chicago March 27 , 28 "Latinas in the '80s: Power , Success and Leadership' ' is the theme of the Hispanic working women ' s conference sponsored by the Latino Institute. Adriana Ball en Litvak (312) 663-3603 HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE Chicago March 27 , 28 "Adelante Mujer Hispana " is the theme of a con terence addressing the needs of Hispanic women in California ' s San Joaquin Valley . Jamie Sepulveda Bailey, Gov. George Deukmejian ' s liaison to the Latino community, will be the keynote speaker. Carlotta Curti (209) 431 -1343 HISPANIC VIDEO SHOW Dallas March 28, 29 Manufacturers and distributors of hardware and software will be displaying their goods at the first annual Hispanic video show organized by T .M. Pro ductions & East Texas Distributors. March 23, 1987 The National Association for Bilingual Education ' s annual conference will be "Bilingual Education : lfs Working for All of Us." The six -day conference will feature 140 sessions, school visits and intensive sessions on areas from teaching writing to ESL students to understanding language and culture of immigrant children from Central America . Susan Herrera (202) 822-7870 COMING SOON IMMIGRANTS' RIGHTS DINNER Nat i onal Center tor Immigrants' Rights Los Angeles April 3 Peter Schey (213) 388-8693 BILINGUAL EDUCATION PANEL National S c hool Boards Association San Francisco April4-7 Phil Smith (703) 838-6743 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION CONFERENCE American Association for Affirmative Action Chicago April 8-11 Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512 Hispani c Link Weekly Rep o rt

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I 4 ! l I I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LATINO INSTITUTE CHIEF, HISPANIC DIVISION GS-16 $63,135-$70,800 The Chief is responsible for the overall ad ministration of the Hispanic division, which provides reference service relating to the coun tries of Latin American and the Iberian Peninsula; and other regions influenced by Hispanic culture . The Board of Trustees of the Latino Institute seeks an Executive Director to head an important Hispanic organization providing multiple services to individuals and community based organizations in Chicago. Candidates must be highly experienced in management oJ non -profit organizations; in the design and development of services and programs : fundraising; personnel management and minority-group advocacy . Outstanding verbal and written skills
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Arts & Entertainment An A rgentine film that screened on opening day, March 12, was released commercially the day after in New York, Dallas and Los Angeles. Eliseo Subielo' s Man Looking Southeast was enormously successful at the Toronto Film Festival l ast October, where it was picked up for U .S. distribution by Filmdallas Pictures. FILM FARE: Two Academy Award entri es from Spanish-speaking countrie s will screen on this week's closing day of the American Film Institute's Fest Los Angeles. Mex ico ' s The Realm of Fortune , directed by Arturo Ripstein, and Sp a in ' s Half of Heaven , by Manuel Gutierrez Aragon , will open the s creening p rogram on Marc h 26. B oth films were official entries for "best foreign film" nominations in this year's Oscar race ; no Spanish language films a r e nominated for the awards to be handed out March 3 0 . Hombre mirando a/ sudeste, the Spanish version of Subielo' s film , also screened successfully at festivals in San Sebastian, Spain , Havana , Chicago and Miami , and it is finally set to open in Argentina next month. The two-wee k Fest-Los Angeles, a resurrected version of the city's late Filmex, held v ar ious Hispanic programs. March 17 was dubbed L a tin American Film Day, with screenings of films from Venezuela , Brazil , Costa Rica an d Colombia. Films and Latin America have been in the news recently. Shooting in Cuernavaca, Mexico, of La rebeli6n de los colgados, based on the novel by Mexican-German writer B . Traven , has reportedly been helped by an effort of the government of Morelos to turn that Mexican state into the new "Mexican Hollywood. " Producer Deborah Blum says that filming Columbia Pictures' adventure picture Vibrations in Ecuador, with stars Cindy Lauper, Peter Falk and Jeff Goldblum, will help promote tourism for that South American country. Among them w a s A Time to Die , Jorge Ali Triana ' s film with a screenplay by Gabriel Garcia Marquez that was Colombia' s offi c ial Oscar entry. A special series of s creenings at the city's Pla z a de Ia Raza Marc h 1820 included works by U.S . Hispanic filmma k ers. Carlos Ortiz ' s Machito: A Latin Jazz Legacy and Enrique Oliver's Photo-A/bum were among them. But Mex ican filmmaker lsmael Rodriguez said in a Notimex story that audiences for Mexican movies in U.S. houses have thinned down because of last year's passage of the SimpsonRodino immigration bill. Undocumented movie-goers fear apprehension. Media Report MORE DIRECTORIES: With U.S . Hispanic population increases and the growth of Latino professional, benevolent and political organizations, directories of all sorts are becoming popular as promotional and money-generating tools, as well as community resources . One such product is the" Directory of Services for the Hispanic Communities," compiled by the Latin American Research a nd Service Agencies-LA RASAof Denver and published by Mountain Bell. For sale for $6, it lists government and nonprofit agencies-Hispanic and otherwise wh ich provide services to the Latino com munity in six Rocky Mountain states: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho , New Mexico, Utah and Wyom i ng . Another successful publicati on serving the Greater Washington, D .C., area is Anuario HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a na t io n a l p ubl ication of Hispanic Link News Service I n c. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publis her. Hector Eri ckse n M e ndoza E ditor. F elix P erez Rep orting: Charl i e E r i c k se n , Ant o ni o Mejias Rentas. Meli n d a M a c h a do. M i ke Orenst ein, Juli o L a b oy . N o p ortion of Hispanic Weekly R e p o r t may be r e produced or b roadcast i n any f orm without advance permiss i on. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CO RPORATE C L ASS IFIE D : A d r a t es 75 ce nt s pe r word . D is pl ay a d s are $35 per colu m n i nc h . A ds placed by T uesday wi ll run in Weekl y R e p orts mai led F riday o f sa me w ee k . M u l t i p l e use rat es o n req ue st. 6 Hispano-The Hispanic Yearbook, published by the T . I.Y.M. Publishing Co. of Mclean, Va . The '87 edition i s bilingual , 308 pages and free . It provides statistics on the Hispanic popu lat ion in the United States, plus short essays and information on eve r ything from U . S . H ispanic congressmen and census data to im migration regulations , scholarships and media lists . It also has a 125-page " yellow pages" directory for the Greater Washington area . A similar Information on obtaining copies of the directories mentioned in" Media Report" is provided in "Collecting" on Page 4. yearbook is being planned for New York. Next month the U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce expects to come out with its " Na t i onal Hispanic Business Directory, " list i ng 4,200 Hispanic-owned businesses in detail. It will also list national and regional Small -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Business Administration and Minority Business Development Agency offices and the purchas ing agents of certain corporations. It sells for $25. Among recent professional publications is the National Association of Hispanic Journalists' "1986 National D i rectory of Hispanics in the Media" Supported by grants from CBS (to conduct a nat i onal census) and Philip Morris USA (to print 5 ,000 copies) , it offers a categorized list of about 3,000 Hispanics in print and broadcast media. The cost is $50. Another which came out thi s month is the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials ' 1986 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials. In 115 pages, it prov i des titles, addresses, telephones and other informati . on on 3,200 U.S. Hispanic political leaders. The roster was supported by grants from AT&T , Bear Stearns and The Stroh Brewery Company. It's free to NALEO members on request , $30 to others. -Mike Orenstein