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Hispanic link weekly report, April 6, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 6, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News Week
Vice President George Bush chooses Bexar County (Texas) District Judge Roy Barrera as his vice chairman for his presidential nomination campaign in Texas. Last November Barrera lost a close race for the state’s attorney general post... California Gov. George Deukmejian picks Chon Gutierrez, formerly deputy director of the State Department of Finance, to head the state’s $2.1 billion prison construction program... The Small Business Administration singles out Orlindo Baldonado from Tennessee and Vilma Colon of Puerto Rico as two of the nation’s exemplary small-business persons. Baldonado is president of a defense contracting firm in Oak Ridge and Col6n owns an advertising agency in Hato Rey... Pedro Cuatrecasas splits with
another scientist a prestigious $100,000 Wolf Prize science award for his research in biomedical technology^ tlhiMGfoicano Student Affairs Office of Yale University selects Stanford University anthropology professor Jos6Cuellar as the recipient gfrthe 1^8^00^Hector P. Garcia Award for his contributions to Cmcano research... Enrique Rivera, director of the Washington, D.C., Latin American Youth Center since 1978 and coordinator of the Coalition for a Latino Community Agenda, is named by D.C. Mayor Marion Barry to the city’s Parole Board... The remains of Air National Guard weapons officer Capt. Ramon Ortiz, 39, are airlifted from the wreckage of his fighter jet on a remote mountain northeast of Banning, Calif. Ortiz died along with the son of entertainer Dean Martin, Capt. Dean Paul Martin. The accident occurred on a routine practice bombing mission...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPQRT
Federal Hiring: 65,000 Hispanics ‘Missing9
Hispanics are still grossly underrepresented in the federal government work force and government affirmative action efforts have failed to keep up with Hispanic growth in the civilian labor force, an analysis of 1984 and 1985 data shows.
There are 180 federal agencies that can be targeted for having statistically significant underrepresentation of Hispanic men and women, according to a U.S. Office of Personnel Management report on 1984 employment.
The report also revealed that of the 180 federal agencies only eight reached 4% His-
panic representation in their work force. There were 27 agencies with less than 1 % Hispanic representation.
In 1985 the federal government employed 2.7 million workers, 132,741 of whom were Hispanic.
If the federal government hired Hispanics at a level equal to their percentage in the civilian labor force that year, an additional 65,000 federal jobs would have been occupied by Hispanics
In 1977 Hispanics represented 4.6% of the labor force and 3.3% of federal employees- a
gap of 1.3%.
In 1985 Hispanics represented 7.4% of the labor force and 5.0% of federal employees- a gap of 2.4%.
“It is quite obvious that the representation of Hispanics in the federal work force has proceeded at a snail’s pace,’’ Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos told Weekly Report. “The Hispanic representation has hardly increased in the 20 years that the anti-discrimination laws have been in existence.
“Given the negligible increase in represen-
Undocumented Workers Reinstated
A Houston Federal District Court issued an injunction March 31 ordering the Pasadena, Texas, school district to reinstate four undocumented Latina employees who had been fired for using false Social Security numbers.
Federal District Judge Gabriel McDonald handed down the injunction in response to a class-action lawsuit filed March 24.
Isaias Torres, the attorney for the plaintiffs, charged that the women’s firings would damage their chances for qualifying for legalization under the newfederal immigration law because without jobs they would be considered public
charges. He said all four women had lived in the United States since before Jan. 1,1982, the stipulated cutoff date.
The women, who were all working as custodial workers before being fired last month, were reinstated by the court with back pay.
Torres told Weekly Report that this was the first federal case which enforced the anti-discrimination provision of the immigration law.
“This sends a clear message to other employers thinking of firing individuals who may qualify for legalization,” said Torres.
tation and the substantial increase in the Hispanic civilian labor force, it would take a century to achieve parity at the rate we are going.”
Comparisons between Hispanic civilian labor force (CLF) rates and H ispanics in the federal labor force (FLF) show (by percent):
’77 79 '80 ’81 '83 '85
CLF 4.6 5.0 5.3 6.0 6.4 7.4
FLF 3.3 3.9 4.1 4.5 4.6 5.0
“We had been moving on a forward track before the Reagan administration came in. Now it looks as if the numbers are coming to a standstill,” said Annabelle Jaramillo, president
continued on page 2
EMPLOYMENT IN SELECTED FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES - 1985
Q.
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V5j> s. > -0. C; % \\
Female 2.54% » 1.60% 1.1% 0.8% 1.5% 1.7% 15% 4.4% 2.3% 2.7%
HISPANICS
Male 3.90 3.35 2.6 1.4 3.8 1.8 2.4 5.2 1.3 2.6
BLACKS Female 4.84 8.99 4.3 11.3 5.8 31.1 6.8 29.6 19.6 19.2
Male 4.94 856 3.7 5.7 7.2 9.7 3.4 16.7 55 8.4
Female 34.08 25.24 26.8 28.0 24.7 23.0 25.1 25.3 38.6 27.8
WHITES
Male 47.48 48.34 58.8 51.2 52.7 30.6 57.8 17.2 25.3 36.8
TOTAL* 115,461 *Numbers in thousands 2,680 93.9 29.3 929.1 4.4 15.7 3.0 122.9 11.4
Note: Column one percentages are based on 1980 Censusdata used by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Updated census data used bythe U.S. Office of Personnel Management shows the Hispanic CLF to be 7.4%.
o\ % C%c %% c% > <5A o. o. Of
2.1% 1.7% 1.0% 0.8% 3.3%
5.7 2.6 2.4 2.5 2.7
10.8 15.9 11.5 4.5 14.6
6.3 6.9 5.8 5.4 5.5
23.3 24.8 25.9 15.3 34.4
50.1 64.3 51.4 68.7 37.2
61.1 17.2 12.7 59.2 121.9
- Hispanic Link Weekly chart


Affirmative Action Ruling Praised
The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision expanding the scope of affirmative action was hailed by a national Hispanic civil rights organization as an opportunity for businesses to increase their numbers of female, Latino and other minority employees without the fear of reverse discrimination lawsuits.
Attorney Mario Moreno, who heads the Washington office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said the March 25 ruling “lets employers know that reasonably crafted, voluntary affirmative action plans will pass constitutional muster.”
The Supreme Court, in a 6-3 vote, held that employers may favor women and minorities over better-qualified men and whites in hiring and promotions. The decision marked the first time the court has ruled employers may use racial-, ethnic- or sex-based affirma-tive action plans without proof of past discrimination. The court reasoned that plans may be used simply to bring work force make-up closer to that of the local population or labor market
The case, Johnson vs. Transportation Agency, involved a reverse discrimination lawsuit filed by a white male in Santa Clara County, Calif., who charged that he was passed over for a promotion in favor of a woman who scored slightly lower on an oral examination.
Moreno said the ruling frees the business community from the “specter” of reverse discrimination lawsuits by white males, while at the same time pre-empting charges of discrimination from minorities and women.
Responding to press reports that the Justice Department had all but dropped its opposition to affirmative action in light of the recent decision, Deborah Burstion-Wade, a department spokeswoman, said “We’ve not changed our principles.”
Attorney General Edwin Meese and Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds have been spearheading a campaign to scratch an executive order mandating federal contractors to set hiring goals for minorities and women.
Federal Hispanic Hiring at Standstill
continued from page 1
of National Image.
National Image, established in 1972, is a Hispanic volunteer organization that works with Congress, the Office of Personnel Management and state and local governmental agencies and programs to promote Latino employment and advancement.
RNC Shuts RNHA Office
The Republican National Hispanic Assembly office in Washington was closed by the Republican National Committee March 26 after a March 18 letter which detailed the committee’s withdrawal of monetary and institutional support for the auxiliary body.
Several sources confirmed that the RNHA owes the RNC about $60,000 for off ice rental costs, telephone, mailing and other support service expenses.
Reaction to the letter written by RNC Chair Frank Fahrenkopf has varied from a call for recognition of the national board elected Feb. 28 to the formation of a committee of state chairmen to conduct another election meeting in Las Vegas May 8 and 9.
Maria Garcia, who is vice chair for the Northeast region, maintains the Nashua, N.H., elections in which Fernando d e Baca was reelected chair were legal. She told Weekly Report the GOP body should recognize the national board. De Baca remained unavailable for comment
“We received a number of letters from RNHA state chairmen stating they believed that a Feb. 25 executive board resolution made it clear that no elections were to be held in New Hampshire,” RNC Political Director Bill Mclnturff said. “They asked us not to recognize the elections in New Hampshire.”
The RNC is still considering sending observers to the May meeting.
2
The Hispanic Employment Program, which operates under OPM, was established in 1970 and has representatives in nearly every federal agency. It sets up recruitment drives and outreach programs and helps set hiring guidelines.
One of the largest federal employers, the U.S. Postal Service - with nearly 3/4 of a million employees - had 5.5% Hispanics in 1985, up from 2.2% a decade earlier. Yet if it was at parity with the Hispanic CLF in 1985, more than 13,000 additional Hispanics would have been in its work force.
Among large federal departments, the Commerce Department and the Department of Transportation had the lowest percentage of Hispanics. Commerce, with 645 Hispanics in a workforce of 29,385, had 2.2%. Transportation, with 1,976 H ispanics in a work force of 59,221, had 3.3%.
The two departments that do meet or go beyond the Hispanic CLF are the Justice Department at 7.8% and EEOC at 9.6%.
The Justice Department's 7.7% Hispanic work force may be linked to the fact that about 30% of those in its Border Patrol branch are Hispanic. According to Verne Jervis, an Immigration and Naturalization Service spokesman, Spanish is a requirement for those seeking positions with the service.
- Julio Laboy
Md. Stops Language Bill
The Judiciary Committee of the Maryland StateHouse of (Representatives voted March 19 to kill a bill that would have made English the official language in the state and its public schools.
The defeat brings to six the number of states that have stopped official-English legislative efforts this year.
III. Students File Suit, Ask for In-State Fees
An injunction hearing is expected this week concerning a class-action suit filed March 25 by three Hispanic teen-agers against several Illinois colleges and universities to stop the institutions from barring or charging out-of-state tuition rates to students awaiting permanent residency status.
A motion requesting a new judge was filed March 30 in Cook County Circuit Court by one of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund attorneys handling the case.
“My students are on the verge of dropping out and I want to make sure they stay in school,” said MALDEF staff attorney Arturo Jauregui, adding he will try to ensure a temporary arrangement for the students while the case is pending. ' i
Plaintiffs in the case, representing several* hundred alien residents of Illinois, are Refugio Alarcdn, 19, a freshman at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Guillermo Alvarado, 17, a high school senior accepted by UIC, and Elizabeth Govea, 18, who was denied admission to Northeastern University on grounds she is not a permanent resident
The suit Alarcdn, et al. vs. the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Industrial University, et al, alleges the state is violating the plaintiffs? rights to equal protection under the law.
MALDEF has filed a complaint for a preliminary injunction, enjoining the defendants from basing university tuition classifications solely on the plaintiffs’ immigration status, and seeking a declaration that such classification is unconstitutional.
All the plaintiffs are long-time residents of Illinois, have attended high schools in the state and have paid state and federal taxes, the suit says.
Bernaldez Quits Post
Ed Bernaldez, American Gl Forum national chairman since 1984, resigned March 28 during a board of directors meeting in Houston. National Vice Chairman Edward Landrdn, a Hutchinson, Kan., firefighter, now heads the Hispanic civil rights and veteran’s advocacy group.
An official with the forum’s Veteran’s Outreach Program in El Paso, Texas, Bernaldez told Weekly Report March 31 that he could not comment on his resignation but that he expected to have a statement ready early this week.
Landron was elected vice chair last year and is the first Puerto Rican to hold a national office with the organization. He will remain chairman until the group conducts its annual election at its 39th annual convention in San Jose, Calif., in August.
Following debate March 27 overfunding priorities and accountability, the board voted to suspend Bernaldez for two months, according to others who attended the meeting,
The forum was founded in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 1 S)48 by Dr. H6ctor P. Garcia and has chapters in 34 states.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist
‘Cruz’ Control
Ron got home to find his roommate fast asleep, so he thought, until he tried to wake him up. Juan de la Cruz Cuellar had passed away as a result of an epileptic seizure.
Ron called Juan’s sister Mary. Soon the word spread amongst the small family and the few friends Juan had.
Juan’s death was a surprise and yet it wasn’t, it was sad and it was almost good news. Juan had finally gotten the best of life. When he awakened dead and in his new found peace, he probably laughed at life.
The obituary in California’s San Jose Mercury News was so minimal it was misleading:
“Juan C. Cuellar, 53, gardener, graveside services at..
Juan was more than a gardener. He was a landscape artist.
He grew up in reformatory schools and spent most of his adult life behind bars.
At the age of 21 he was arrested with heroin and sentenced to 20 years at San Quentin. His adult convictions were all for
But he never felt sorry for himself, never seemed angry or bitter. He soothed people with his gentleness, humor and the book knowledge he had acquired during a lifetime in prison. Juan became good friends with Chicano writers and poets in San Jose.
LOOKED LIKE DON QUIXOTE
Most of the time Juan was a recluse at home. Shades drawn, he seemed to prefer the security that dark prisons had given him. “All I need,” he once wrote, “is a good book, some paper and a pencil.”
Occasionally, he would write 14-page letters on yellow legal paper with an incredibly sophisticated vocabulary, yet sincere and creative. Or he would call me and in a whispering voice tell me of his consultations with Kierkegaard or his mind blowing up with relevant thoughts.
Despite his transgressions, Juan de la Cruz Cuellar had high ideals and ambitions. He seemed by nature quixotic. With his white goatee and sad, emaciated countenance, he even looked like Don Quixote.
In his last prison stretch at Soledad, he welcomed the newly arrived prisoners by briefing them on the written and unwritten laws of prisons. His inmate friends called him “Cruz Control.”
In his last days as a free man, he spent his time teaching English and Spanish to Vietnamese and Latino immigrants. And he had one dream:
‘JOSE, PRAY FOR ME’
“I intend to establish a chain of one-room school houses. It’s been done before... One Sister Katherine Mary Drexel in 1912 opened a chain of one-room elementary schools along the Mississippi Delta to supplement the inadequate facilities for blacks. She later built high schools and junior colleges, culminating in 1915 by the opening of Xavier University in New Orleans. Her major work was in the West with Indians. She continued it until the age of 97. . . I dream of emulating such works, Jose. Pray for me.”
But his dream came to a halt at 53.
He knew how ill he was. In a journal that lay by his deathbed, Juan wrote, “I’m sicker than ten dogs, and not just ten ordinary dogs, like the government keeps for studies. If I were like those dogs, I’d be well...”
On a slope at Oak Hill Cemetery, 20 family members and friends, including two of his children, weathered the cold wind and rain that whipped across the canopy to bid Juan a last farewell. On his casket lay a wreath of chrysanthemums. Two poets dedicated a poem to him.
And his roommate Ron, a young goateed Chicano ex-convict, paced from Juan’s grave to the open grey sky, grunting heavily to keep from crying. As Ron clutched his knitted cap in his hand, his crew cut exposed a dented and scarred skull where police had beat him. Through his teary eyes Ron blinked up at the sky, unbelieving and angry.
(Jose Antonio Burciaga is an artist/writer from Stanford, Calif.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
UNWANTED? Poor New Mexico. First a Washington bureaucrat told it that it wasn’t eligible for a federal program because it was a foreign country.
Now, when officials ordered two flags from a private firm, they received two Mexican flags.
Inquired the office manager “Have we been sold?”
NOT WANTED EITHER? Latino students at Bonner Elementary School in Tyler, Texas, were told by their teacher last month: “Raise your hands if you’re illegal.”
The teacher explained that she just wanted to know which students should fill out applications for social security numbers.
Margaret Gonzalez, a district director with the League of United Latin American Citizens, saw it rather as a return “to earlier times in our history when‘No Dogs or Mexicans’ were allowed into restaurants.”
With her encouragement, LULAC’s board endorsed a national campaign to repeal employer sanctions provisions of the new immigration law at its annual meeting in South Bend, Ind., last month.
CREATING YOUR OWN STEREOTYPES: New York’s daily Noticias del Mundo, in an editorial urging the Republican National Committee to reconsider its action of cutting off the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, created a fresh stereotype for us to live up to.
“It would appear that(RNC chair) Frank Fahrenkopf is not at all attuned to Hispanic culture. To expect pure harmony within the ranks of a Hispanic political organization is akin to expecting a total absence of sibling rivalry in a family of a dozen children.”
Internecine combat never quite struck me as something unique to Hispanic political organizations.
OBITUARY: Estos Tiempos> the Chicano publication at California’s Stanford University, carries the following obituario this month:
“Since the Chicano movement of the late sixties, many of the gains we made have been virtually wiped out. Affirmative action, bilingual education, bilingual ballots and many other rights we took for granted are now endangered species.
“Yet, when the closing of YEMCO was announced, I didn’t really believe it Not until I saw the full-page ad ‘Going Out of Business? ”...
“YEMCO (was) one of the most popular department stores amongst la raza. Better known as GEMCO by the white majority, YEMCO had alwaysJ3een a favorite shopping place of Chicanos. It was a couple of nachos above Quey-mar, better known as K-Mart...
“Any Chicano could become a card-carrying YEMCO member for the princely sum of one dollar - for a lifetime membership. A card brought status to any new immigrant family. When familia visited from the old country, YEMCO was the place to spend those hard-earned pesos.
“ Perhaps that was part of the reason for YEMCO's demise. With the devaluation of the peso and with the new immigration law, YEMCO must have been doomed.” - Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
HENRY CISNEROS, quoted in an Austin American-Statesman series on the popular San Antonio mayor, shortly before his expected re-election to a fourth term April 4:
“I really haven't made any decision about any office after that or continuation in politics for certain. We have no plan, no office, no timetable, no deadline."
H. ROSS PEROT, Dallas billionaire, speaking at a re-election fundraiser for San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros last month:
“He stands as one of the finest leaders in our nation... Could he be governor? Absolutely. Could he be president? Absolutely."
HERMAN SILLAS, activist Los Angeles lawyer, commenting to Weekly Report on President Reagan’s inevitable memoirs:
“I don't think they’re going to oe very long. He forgets."
April 6, 1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
IMMIGRATION LAW VIDEOTAPE: The University of California has produced a videotape - with the same material in English and Spanish- explaining the new federal immigration law to undocumented aliens and employers. For a copy of the tape, which is in VHS format, send $20 to: I RCA Video, Extension Visual Media, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. (A copy may be borrowed for a $7 postage and handling fee.)
MAN A SCHOLARSHIPS: The Mexican American Women’s National Association is taking applications for its Raquel Marquez Frankel Scholarship. Up to $1,000 will be awarded to one or more Hispanas in postsecondary institutions who seek to aid the Hispanic community. The deadline is June 1. For more information or applications, write to: MANA, Scholarship Committee, 1201 16th St NW, #420, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-3440.
IMMIGRATION ANDTHE LABOR MARKET: “Illegal Immigration and the Colonization of the American Labor Market” is a study paper by the Center for Immigration Studies on how the availability of undocumented workers is affecting U.S. investment employment and business competition. For a copy of the paper, send $6.95 to: CIS, 1424 16th St NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C. 20036.
WOMEN IN THE ECONOMY: “Women in the American Economy” is a 45-page report detailing the economic status of women according to race, ethnicity and age. For a copy of the report (Series P-23, No. 146), send $2.75 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENT RETENTION: “Improving Minority Retention in Higher Education: A Search for Effective Institutional Practices” is a report by the Educational Testing Service on strategies used at four predominantly white educational institutions to curb the high minority dropout rate. For a free copy, write to: Research Publications, Mail Stop05-R, Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton, N.J. 08541.
LATINOS IN CHICAGO’S MAYORAL PRIMARY: The Midwest Voter Registration Education Project has released a 28-page study titled“The 1987 Chicago Mayoral Primary: The Hispanic Vote.” Fora copy, send $2.50 for shipping and handling to: MVREP, 50 W. Broad St., Suite 622, Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 464-1116.
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
READER’S DIGEST AWARDS $375,000
The Hispanic Policy Development Project was one of four organizations to receive grants from the Reader’s Digest Foundation last month to improve educational opportunities for minorities. The grants totalled $375,000.
HPDP was awarded a one-year grant of $150,000 for the Reader’s Digest Parent/School Partnership Campaign which works at improving Hispanic education. The campaign encourages parental involvement in younger children’s schools and in the learning process in communities nationwide.
LIBRARIANS VOLUNTEER TIME
The Chicano Periodical Index, a 650-page reference book with more than 120,000 citations, was recently published. The one-of-a-kind specialized index was made possible through the volunteer efforts of 25 librarians from throughout the Southwestern United States.
Published by the Chicano Studies Library Publications Unit at the University of California at Berkeley, the cloth-bound book includes complete indexing of 32 periodicals on Mexican Americans as well as the selective indexing of 500 other magazines and journals.
Cost $90 ($83.50 for libraries) plus $2.50 for postage and handling.
To order, write to the Chicano Studies Library, 3404 Dwinelle Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 94720.
SMITHSONIAN SETS LATINO PROGRAM
The advisory council for the development and direction of a new program in Hispanic American History at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., met recently and established themes for the program.
The program, which is administered by the museum’s Department of Public Programs, will be coordinated by Pauline Nunez-Morales. It will begin this fall.
The program is made possible by a planning grant from the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Program and will generally cover the social and political history of Hispanics in the United States.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE Salt Lake City April 8-10
The National Association for Chicano Studies is sponsoring a conference on academic disciplines and community concerns.
Eduardo Elias (801) 581-7561
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION CONFERENCE Chicago April 8-11
‘ Affirming the Rights, Securing the Opportunities” is the theme of the 13th annual conference sponsored by the American Association for Affirmative Action. Annabelle Jaramillo, president of National Image, will conduct a session on “Rediscovering Hispanic America.”
Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512
WOMEN’S SUCCESS AWARD BANQUET Los Angeles April 8
The Hispanic Women’s Council will recognize three outstanding Latinas in the community: Tichi Wil-kerson Kassel, publisher and editor in chief of the
“Hollywood Reporter,” as 1987 Woman of the Year, Dolly Rivera for Community Service and Linda Jean Escajeda as Woman of Promise.
Genoveva Arellano (213) 629-4974
ERNESTO GALARZA SYMPOSIUM Los Angeles April 9
“The Life and Legacy of Ernesto Galarza: 1905-1984,” will be discussed by former Colorado State Sen. Polly Baca-Barragan and Carlos Munoz, professor of political science at the University of California at Berkeley. The program honors Galarza’s work as a Chicano author, diplomat and social activist. Frances Hill (213) 259-2677
ADELANTE MUJER HISPANA El Paso, Texas April 11
“ Preparing for Choice and Action” is the focus of the fifth annual conference sponsored by the El Paso Community Conference. Estella Casas, evening news anchor at KDBC-TV, will be the keynote speaker. Sylvia Sitters (915) 775-6063
HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE San Antonio April 11
Project Excellence and the University of Texas at San Antonio are sponsoring “Hispanics in Higher Education: Our Key to the Future, Our Ticket to Success.” Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz will be
the keynote speaker.
Elaine Coronado (512) 366-2008
HISPANIC COLLEGIATE CONFERENCE Macomb, ill. April 11-12
The Latin American Student Organization will sponsor a Hispanic collegiate leadership conference. Midwest Voter Registration Education Project Executive Director Juan Andrade will be the keynote speaker.
Juan Rodriguez (309) 298-3388
COMING SOON
LITERACY CONFERENCE SER-Jobs for Progress Inc.
San Antonio April 15-17 Allison Parker (214) 631-3999
EMPLOYERS AND IMMIGRATION Institute for Regional Studies of the Californias San Diego April 16 Charlotte Fajardo (619) 265-6190
CORRECTION: The SER-Jobs for Progress National Convention, listed in the Dec. 29,1986, issue of Weekly Report, will be held in conjunction with the organization’s literacy conference on April 15-17.
4
April 6, 1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS
On April 20, we will publish our 1987 “media edition.”
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 22-25 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles In addition to our regular* Marketplace^ section Weekly Report will carry a full page "Opportunities in the Media" insert for the edition If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April 10.
Coronado Four-County Broadcasting Inc.
Hispanic-owned media company in California seeks individual for radio sales Applicant must have excellent bilingual communication skills be highly motivated and result-oriented. For more information, contact Malu Hernandez, (714) 981-8893.
VICE PRESIDENT PUBLIC INFORMATION
This position is responsible for all community public information, public relations and promotional and advertising activities of WETA-TV and FM, and for the national coordination and direction of public information for WETA-produced programs distributed nationwide.
Five years experience in promotion and advertising demonstrated writing and editing skills proven track record in managing a staff of at least six employees is highly desirable. Salary is $46,175-$57,720. Contact WETA-TV/FM, Personnel Department PO Box 2$26 87 PI 1 (1), Washington, D.C. 20013 (703) 820-6025.
EDITOR, NATIONAL DESK
National Public Radio
Candidate edits program materials submitted by reporters and other contributors: initiates plans and produces program materials for broadcast, and fills in for Senior Editor.
At least 3-4 years experience in journalism with demonstrated ability to organize and disseminate information and to coordinate daily news coverage. Salary $33,600 per year.
Interested persons should submit resume to: NPR, Personnel, 2025 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ASSESSMENT SUNY/Empire State College at Buffalo^ N.Y.
Innovative college emphasizing individual degree programs seeks Assistant Dean to begin 8/87 to provide leadership for evaluation of prior learning process; review of all degree programs & portfolios; training expert evaluators; counseling students regarding college policies & assessment & program planning.
Administrative skills, demonstrated interest in alternative programs & adult students, significant teaching or related academic experience, master's required; doctorate preferred.
Letter& resume by4/24/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director Personnel/AA, SUNY/ESC, Room 54, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866.
An AA/EOE
mL
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE the city university of new york
ANTICIPATED VACANCIES
ACCOUNTING: Teach Intro. & Adv. Accounting Courses. Ph.D. or Master's + CPA req. VAC. #320.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION: Coordinator/Placement Specialist Place students in internship and general positions with employers. Mia req. for Asst. Prof, rank: Master's in approp. field + 30 grad, credits & 8 yrs. approp. exp VAC. #321.
DATA PROCESSING: Fluency in operating systems: VM/SP.OS/MVT, Teleprocessing, Data Base, Data Structures; IBM Mainframe & IBM PCs. MA/MS req. +30 grad, credits pref.; 2 yrs. industrial tech, exp.; knowl. of 2 or more high level languages. VAC. #322. MATHEMATICS: College Lab Technician. (2) a) Coordinator of Math Apple Computer Labi MA in Computers in Education or Ed.M. in Instructional Technology pref.; 4 yrs. ed. & related technical exp. using Apple microcomputers as instructional tool; knowl. of math thru calculus req. VAC. #323. b) Coordinator of Math tutoring & testing. BA & knowl. of math thru calculus pref.; 4 yrs. ed. & related technical exp. using microcomputers as instructional tool + demonstrated ability to run tutoring & testing program.VAC. #324.
MODERN LANGUAGES: College Lab Technician. Supervise& maintain Mod. Lang. Lab. BA pref.;4 yrs. ed. & related tech, exp req. + proficiency in English & Spanish. Knowl. of French & Italian desir. VAC. #325.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Teacher of Health Education. Rank: Asst Prof. Ph.D. and teaching exp. req. VAC. #326.
COLLEGE LAB TECHNICIAN: Responsible & dependable technician to assist faculty in P.E & Dance. B.S. pref.; 4 yrs. ed. & related tech, exp req. VAC. #327.
SEARCH EXTENDED
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: Teach Money & Banking. Ph.D. pref. VAC. #299a. DEVELOPMENT SKILLS: (2) Teachers of ESL. Ph.D. pref. + 5 yrs. teach, adults pref. VAC. #301 a. (2) Teachers of Reading. Ph.D. pref. + 5 yrs. teach, adults pref. VAC. #302a. ENGLISH: (3-4) Teachers of Development Writing & Composition. Ph.D. pref. VAC. #303a. MATHEMATICS:(2) Teachers exp. with microcomputers, math lab& grants desir. Ph.D. or Math Ed.D. Pref. VAC. #305a.
SECRETARIAL SCIENCE: Teach Courses in Office Automation. Master's/Bus. Ed. VAC. #306a.
SCIENCE: College LabTechnician. Maint.& repair scientific instruments& microcomputers; network microcomputer& minicomputers; prep, of labs. B.S. in Elec. Eng. or Elec. Tech. Pref. + 4 yrs. ed. & tech. exp. & knowl. of electronics. VAC. #31 Oa.
All ranks and salaries dependent upon qualifications. Refer to a specific BMCC vacancy# above and send resume with cover letter by 5/4/87 to:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel-Room H Borough of Manhattan Community Coliege/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts& Entertainment
OSCAR WHO?: While the last of the season’s “major*’ entertainment awards ceremonies had nothing in store for U.S. Latinos, Hispanic artists throughout the world were honored last month in ceremonies of their own.
Spain’s own Academy of Motion Picture Arts&Sciences handed out its first ever awards - the Goya- at a ceremony presided over by the King Juan Carlos and the Queen Sofia in Madrid March 18.
Fifteen Goyas were handed out. The evening’s big winner was Argentine director Fern£n Gomez, who won “best director" and “best script’ for his film El viaje a ninguna parte. G6mez also won a “best actor" Goya for his role in Mambru se fue a la guerra
The Spanish film El amor brujo, currently in release here, won two Goyas - one for “best cinematography” going to Teo Escamilla, and another for“costut*ie design” given to Gerardo Vera
The Goyas, created by sculptor Miguel Berroca, are bronze busts of famed Spanish painter Francisco de Goya y Lucientes.
In New York, the Asociacion de Cronistas de Espectaculos gave
out its annual ACE awards March 22,
The group of New York-based entertainment journalists gave its highest award - the Premio de Distincidn y Merito- to Cuban salsa singer Celia CrUz. Non-competitive awards were also voted to Ptecido Domingo, Marla Elena Velasco (a.k.a. la india Maria) and dancer Pilar Rioja.
ACE handed out scores of awards in film, television, radio, theater and nightclub categories.
Across the nation and on the same night the Texas Talent Musicians’ Association held its Tejano Music Awards at the San Antonio Convention Center Arena Edward James Olmos and Ana Alicia were co- hosts of the event where Little Joe y La Familia headlined.
Tejano Music Awards were presented in 11 categories. “Song of the Year" went to the Houston-based band La Mafia for Si tu supieras(If You Knew). “Male entertainer of the year*’ was won by Little Joe Hernandez of La Familia, and Patsy Torres walked away with the “female entertainer of the year” award.
There were no Latino winners - or nominees- at the 59th annual Oscar ceremony held March 30 in Los Angeles. The Oscar show traditionally closes the entertainment industry’s “awards” season.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
RUNNING WITH MANUEL: Chicago Tribune reporter Manuel Galvan is unopposed on the National Association of Hispanic Journalists ballot in his quest for a second term as NAHJ president So are New York Times reporter Jesus Rangel in his effort to follow Julio Moran, Los Angeles Times reporter, as first vice president and New York Newsday reporter Evelyn Hernandez in her candidacy to succeed Maria Elena Salinas, news anchor at Los Angeles’ Spanish-language KM EX-TV, as second v.p.
Under NAHJ bylaws, additional nominations, accompanied by signed petitions, may be presented from the floor at the National Hispanic Media Conference April 22-25.
Races already competitive are for financial officer New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez vs. San Diego Union reporter Steve Padilla; secretary: Arizona Daily Star editorial writer Elaine Ayala vs. Elisa Alfonso, freelance journalist from Chicago; and at-large delegates
(3 to be elected): Mario Villafuerte, photographer, Austin American-Statesman, Texas; Ivan Roman, reporter, San Juan Star, Puerto Rico; Pat r i s i a G onzal es, reporter, Philadelphia Inquirer, and Phil Garcia, reporter, Pasha Publications, Washington, D.C.
PICKING ON GERALDO? Cover story in the April issue of Vista magazine: “Why Is Everyone Picking on Geraldo Rivera?”
In it former 20/20 colleague Tom Jarriel describes him as a man who had “a very strong cadre of producers and staff who absolutely adored him. With a good executive producer, Rivera is excellent. With a bad executive producer, he can be off the wall.” Rivera’s self-assessment:
“The mainstream guys, the Peter Jennings types- if s like we’re on different planets. They perceive their roles to be above the fray, coolly reflecting on it. I see my role as being down in the street fighting it out. I have a much more passionate approach.
“They’re super cool and I’m super hot.”
TALKING TO TONEY: In the premiere issue of the latest Latino magazine Americas 2001,
former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya explains to author Martha Guerrero why he declared his state a sanctuary for Central American refugees:
“I did it to draw attention, because the only way that someone from Central America could meet requirements (for political asylum) would be to escape their country, come to the U.S., get caught, get deported, get assassinated, come back in spirit and say, ‘I told you so.’ ”
SOCIAL LITERATURE: Some 20 Chicano writers and critics will participate in a national conference on “Chicano Literary Criticism in a Social Context’ at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., May 28-30.
Its sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research.
All sessions are free and open to the public.
A complete program and information on meals, lodging and advance registration may be obtained by contacting the Stanford Center for Chicano Research, Cypress Hall, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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I ) j , ! I r Ma_king The News This Week Vice President George Bush chooses Bexar Courity(Texas) District Judge Roy Barrera as his vice chairman for his presidential nomination campaign in Texas. Last November Barrera lost a close race for the state's attorney general post. .. California Gov. George Deukmejian picks Chon Gutierrez, formerly deputy director of the State Department of Finance, to head the state's $2.1 billion prison construction program ... The Small Business Administration singles out Orlinda Baldonado from Tennessee and Vilma Col6n of Puerto Rico as two of the nation's exemplary small-business persons. Baldonado is president of a defense contracting firm in Oak Ridge and Colon owns an advertising agency in Hato Rey ... Pedro Cuatrecasas splits with another scientist a prestigious $100,000 Wo!JP fize. award for his research in biomedical technology . . Student Affairs Office of Yale University selects Stanford University anthropology professor Jose Cuellar as the recipienk efdhe Hector P . Garcia Award for his contributions to research ... Enrique Rivera, director of the Washington, D.C., Latin American Youth Center since 1978 and coordinator of the Coalition for a Latino Community Agenda, is named by D. C . Mayor Marion Barry to the. city's Parole Board . . . The remains of Air National Guard weapons officer Capt. Ramon Ortiz, 39, are airlifted from the wreckage of his fighter jet on a remote mountain northeast of Banning, Calif. Ortiz. died along with the son of entertainer Dean Martin, Capt. Dean Paul Martin. The accident . occurred on a routine practice bombinq ... HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE April 6, 1987 in the federal government work force and were 27 agencies with less than 1% Hispanic In 1985 Hispanics repr,esented 7.4% of the government affirmative action efforts have representation. labor force and 5 . 0 % of federal employeesa failed to keep up with Hispanic growth in the In 1985 the federal government employed gap of 2 .4%. civil i an labor force, an analysis of 1984 and 2 . 7 million workers, 132,741 of whom were "It is quite obvious that the representation 1985 data shows. Hispanic. of Hispanics in the federal work force has There are 180 federal agencies that can be If the federal government hired Hispanics proceeded at a snail's pace, " Equal Employtargeted for having statistically significant at a level equal to their percentage in the meritOpportunityCommissionerTonyGallegos underrepresentation of Hispanic men and civilian labor force that year, an additional told Weekly Report. "The Hispanic represen-women, according to a U.S. Office of Personnel 65,000 federal jobs would have been occupied tat ion has hardly increased in the 20 years Management report on 1984 employment. by Hispanics. that the anti-discrimination laws have been in The report also revealed that of the 180 In 1977 Hispanics represented 4.6 % of the existence. federal agencies only eight reached 4 % His-labor force and 3 .3% of federal employeesa "Given the negligible increase in represen Undocumented Workers Reinstated A Houston Federal District Court issued an injunction March 31 ordering the Pasadena, Texas , school district to reinstate four un documented Latina employees who had been fired for using false Social Security numbers. Federal District Judge Gabriel McDonald handed down the injunction in response to a class-action lawsuit filed March 24. Isaias Torres, the attorney for the plaintiffs, charged that the women's firings would damage their chances for qualifying for legalization under the new federal immigration law because without jobs they would be considered public charges. He said all four women had lived in the United States since before Jan. 1, 1982, the stipulated cutoff date. The women, who were all working ascus todial workers before being fired last month, were reinstated by the court with back pay. Torres told Weekly Report that this was the first federal case which enforced the anti discrimination provision of the immigration law. " This sends a clear message to other employers thinking of firing individuals who may qualify for legalization, " said Torres. tation and the substantial increase in the Hispanic civil-ian labor force, it would take a century to achieve parity at the rate we are going." Comparisons between Hispanic civilian labor force (CLF) rates and Hispanics in the federal labor force (FLF) show (by percent): '77 '79 '80 '81 . '83 '85 CLF 4 . 6 5.0 5.3 6.0 6.4 7.4 FLF 3.3 3.9 4 . 1 4 . 5 4 . 6 5 . 0 "We had been moving on a forward track before the Reagan administration came in. Now it looks as if the numbers are coming to a standstill, " said Annabelle Jaramillo, president con tinued on page 2 EMPLOYMENT IN SELECTED FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES -1985 HISPANICS BLACKS WHITES TOTAL* Female 2 .54% 1.60% 1 . 1 o/o 0 .8% Mal e 3 .90 3.35 2 . 6 1.4 Female 4 .84 8.99 Male 4.94 8.56 4 . 3 11. 3 3.7 5 . 7 3 . 8 1 . 8 5 . 8 31. 1 7.2 9 . 7 1.5% 2.4 6 . 8 3.4 5 . 2 29. 6 16. 7 Female 34.08 25.24 26.8 28.0 24. 7 23. 0 25. 1 25. 3 Male 47.48 48.34 58.8 51.2 52. 7 30. 6 57.8 17.2 1.3 19. 6 5 . 5 38.6 25.3 115,461 2,680 93.9 29. 3 929.1 4.4 15.7 3.0 122. 9 * Numbel'$ in th ousands Note: Column one percentages are based on 1980 C _ensusdata used by the Equal Empl oy ment Opportunity Commissio n . UpdatedcensusdatausedbytheU. S . Off iceofPersonnel M a nagemen t show s the Hispanic CLF to be 7.4%. 2 . 6 19. 2 8.4 27. 8 36.8 11.4 2.1% 5 . 7 10. 8 6 . 3 23.3 50.1 61.1 1.7 % 1 .0% 0 . 8 % 3.3 % 2.6 2.4 2 . 5 2.7 15. 9 11. 5 4 . 5 14. 6 6.9 5 . 8 5.4 5.5 24.8 25. 9 15. 3 34.4 64. 3 51.4 68. 7 37.2 17.2 12J 59.2 121.9 Hispan1 c Weekly chart

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Affirmative Action Ruling Praised The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision expanding the scope of affirmative action was hailed by a national Hispanic civil rights organization as an opportunity for businesses to increase their numbers of female, Latino and other minority employees without the fear of reverse discrimination lawsuits. Attorney Mario Moreno, who heads the Washington office of the Mexican American legal Defense and Educational Fund, said the March 25 ruling "lets employers know that reasonably crafted, voluntary affirmative action plans will pass constitutional muster . " The Supreme Court, in a 6-3 vote, held that employers may favor women and mi norities over better-qualified men and whites in hiring and promotions. The decision marked the first time the court has ruled employers may use racial-, or sex-based affirm& . tive action plans without proof of past dis crimination. The court reasoned that plans may be used simply to bring work force make-up closer to that ofthe local population or labor market. The case, Johnson vs. Transportation Agency, involved a reverse discrimination lawsuit filed by a white male in Santa Clara County, Calif., who charged that he was passed over for a promotion in favor of a woman who scored slightly lower on an oral examination. Moreno said the ruling frees the business community from the "specter" of reverse discrimination lawsuits by white males, while at the same time pre-empting charges of discrimination from minorities and women. Responding to press reports that the Justice Department had all but dropped its opposition to affirmative action in light of the recent decision, Deborah Burstion-Wade, a department spokeswoman, said "We've not changed our principles." Attorney General Edwin Meese and As sistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds have been spearheading a cam paign to scratch an executive order mandat ing federal contractors to set hiring goals for minorities and women. Federal Hispanic Hiring at'Standstill continued from page 1 of National Image. National Image, established in 1972, is a Hispanic volunteer organization that works with Congress, the Office of Personnel Man agement and state and local governmental agencies and programs to promote Latino employment and advancement. RNC Shuts RNHA Office The Republican National Hispanic Assembly office in Washington was closed by the Republican National Committee March 26 after a March 18 letter which detailed the committee's withdrawal of monetary and institutional sup port for the auxiliary body. Several sources confirmed that the RNHA owes the RNC about $60,000 for office rental costs, telephone, mailing and other support service expenses. Reaction to the letter written by RNC Chair Frank Fahrenkopf has varied from a call for recognition of the national board elected Feb. 28 to the formation of a committee of state chairmen to conduct another election meeting in Las Vegas May 8 and 9. Maria Garcia, who is vice chair for the Northeast region, maintains the Nashua, N.H., elections in which Fernando :de Baca was reelected chair were legal. She told Weekly Report the GOP body should recognize the national board. De Baca remained unavailable for comment. "We received a number of letters from RNHA state chairmen stating they believed that a Feb. 25 executive board resolution made it clear that no elections were to be held in New Hampshire:• RNC Political Director Bill Mcinturff said. "They asked us not to recognize the elections in New Hampshire." The RNC is still considering sending ob servers to the May meeting. 2 The Hispanic Employment Program, which operates under OPM, was established in 1970 and has representatives in nearly every federal agency. It sets up recruitment drives and outreach programs and helps set hiring guidelines. One of the largest federal employers, the U.S. Postal Service with nearly 3/4 of a million employeeshad 5.5% Hispanics in 1985, up from 2.2% a decade earlier. Yet if it was at parity with the Hispanic CLF in 1985, more than 13,000 additional Hispanics would have been in its work force . Among large federal departments, the Com merce Department and the Department of Transportation had the lowest percentage of Hispanics. Commerce, with 645 Hispanics in a workforce of 29,385, had 2 .2%. Transpor tation, with 1,976 Hispanics in a work force of 59,221, had 3.3% . The two departments that do meet or go beyond the Hispanic CLF are the Justice Department at 7.8% and EEOC at 9.6%. The Justice Department's 7.7% Hispanic work force may be linked to the fact that about 30% of those in its Border Patrol branch are Hispanic. According to Verne Jervis, an Immigration and Naturalization Service spokes man, Spanish is a requirement for those seeking positions with the service. Julio Laboy. Md. Stops Language Bill The Judiciary Committee of the Maryland StateHouse ofiRepresentatives voted March 19 to kill a bill that would have made English the official language in the state and its public schools. The defeat brings to six the number of states that have stopped official-English legislative efforts this year. Ill. Students File Suit, Ask for In-State Fees An injunction hearing is expected this week concerning a class-action suit filed March 25 ' l by three Hispanic teen-agers against several Illinois colleges and universities to stop the institutions from barring or charging out-of state tuition rates to students awaiting per manent residency status. A motion requesting a new judge was filed March 30 in Cook County Circuit Court by one of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund attorneys handling the case. 1 "My students are on the verge of dropping out and I want to make sure they stay in school," said MALDEF staff attorney Arturo Jauregui, adding he will try to ensure a tem porary arrangement for the students while the case is pending. ... Plaintiffs in the case, representing severa! : .t. hundred alien residents of Illinois, are Refugio Alarcon, 19, a freshman at lhe University of Illinois at Chicago, Guillermo Alvarado, 17, a high school senior accepted by UIC, and Elizabeth Govea, 18, who was denied admission to Northeastern University on grounds she is not a permanent resident. The suit, Alarcon, et al. vs. the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Industrial University, et al, alleges the state is violating the plaintiffs' rights to equal protection under the law. MALDEF has filed a complaint for a pre liminary injunction, enjoining the defendants from basing university tuition classifications solely on the plaintiffs' immigration status , and seeking a declaration that such classifi cation is unconstitutional . All the plaintiffs are long-time residents of Illinois, have attended high schools in the state and have paid state and federal taxes, the suit says. Bernaldez Quits Ed Bernaldez, American Gl Forum national chairman since 1984, resigned March 28 during a board of directors meeting in Houston National Vice Chairman Edward landron, a Hutchinson, Kan., firefighter, now heads the Hispanic civil rights and veteran's ad vocacy group. An official with the forum's Veteran's Out reach Program in El Paso, Texas, Bernaldez told Weekly Report March 31 that he could not comment on his resignation but that he expected to have a statement ready early this week. land ron was elected vice chair last year and is the first Puerto Rican to hold a national office with the organization. He will remain chairman until the group con ducts its annual election at its 39th annual convention in San Jose, Calif., in August. Following debate March 27 over funding priorities and accountability, the board voted to suspend Bernaldez for two months, cording to others who attended the meeting. The forum was founded in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 1948 by Dr. Hector P. Garcia and has chapters in 34 states. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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i I ! I I I l f I Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist 'Cruz' Control Ron got home to find his roommate fast asleep, so he thought, until he tried to wake him up . Juan de Ia Cruz Cuellar had passed away as a result of an epileptic seizure. Ron called Juan' s sister Mary. Soon the word spread amongst the small family and the few friends Juan had. Juan' s death was a surprise and yet it wasn 't; it was sad and it was almost good news. Juan had finally gotten the best of life . When he awakened dead and in his new found peace, he laughed at life. The obituary in California' s San Jose Mercury News was so minimal it was mis leading: " Juan C. Cuell ar, 53, gardener, qraveside services at . . ," Juan was more than a 9ardener. He was a landscape arti st. He grew up in reformatory s chools and spent most of his adult life behind bars. At the age of 21 h e was arrested with heroin and sentenced to 20 years at San Quentin. His adult convictions were all for rugs . But he never felt sorry for himself, never seemed angry or bitter. He soothed people with his gentleness, humor and the book knowledge he had acquired during a lifetime in prison . Juan became good friends w i th Chicano writers and poets in San Jose. LOOKED LIKE DON QUIXOTE Most of the time Juan was a recluse at home. Shades drawn , he seemed to prefer the security that dark prisons had given him. "Alii need," he on c e wrote, " is a good book, some paper and a pencil. " Occasionally, he would write 14-page letters on yellow legal paper with an incredibly sophisticated vocabulary, yet sincere and creative. Or he would call me and in a whi s pering voi c e tell me of his consultations with Kierkegaard or his m ind blowing up with relevant thoughts. Despite his transgressions, Juan de I a Cruz Cuellar had high ideals and ambitions. He seemed by nature quix otic. With his white goatee and sad , emaciated countenanc e , he e ven looked l i k e Don Qui xote. In his last prison stretch at Soledad, he welcomed the newly arri v ed prisoners by briefing them on the written and unwritten laws of prisons. His inmate friends called him "Cruz Control. " In hi s last days as a f re e m a n , he spe nt his tim e teaching English a nd Spa nish to Vietnamese and Latino immigrants. And he had one dream : 'JOSE, PRAY FOR ME' "I i nt e nd to establish a c hain of one-room school houses. lfs been done before ... One Sister Katherine Mary Dre x el in 1912 opened a c hain of one-room elementary schools along th e Mississippi Delta to s uppl ement the inadequate facilities for blacks. She later built high s ch o o ls a nd junior colleges, culmina ting in 1915 by th e opening of Xav i e r University i n Ne w Orlea ns . Her major work wa s in the West w ith Indians. She continued it until the age of 97. . . I dream of e m u la t ing su c h works, Jose. Pray for me. " Bu t h is dream c am e t o a halt at 53. H e k new how ill he w as . In a journal that lay b y his deathbed, Juan wro te," I'm sicker th a n t e n dog s , and not just ten ordinary dogs, like th e g ov e rnment keeps for s tudies. If I were like those dogs, I ' d be well . . :" O n a s l o pe at Oak H i ll Cemetery, 20 family members and friends, including two of his c hildren , weathere d the cold wind and rain that whippe d ac ro ss the cano py to bid Juan a l a st farewell. On his casket l a y a wrea th o f chrysanthemums. Two poets dedicated a poem to him . And his roommate Ron , a young goateed Chicano e x-c onvict , paced f rom Juan' s grave to th e open grey sky, grunting heavi l y to keep from c rying. As Ron clutched his knitted cap in his hand, his c rew cut ex p ose d a dented and s carred skull where police had beat him. Through his teary eyes Ron blinked up at the sky, unbelieving and angry. Antonio Burc iag a is an artist/writer from Stanford, Calif.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua UNWANTED? Poor New Mexico. First a Washington bureaucrat told it that it wasn' t eligible for a federal program because it was a foreign country. Now, when officials ordered two flags from a private firm, they received two Mexican flags . Inquired the office manager. "Have we been sold? " NOT WANTED EITHER? Latino students at Bonner Elementary School in Tyler, Texas , were told by their teacher last month: " Raise your hands if you ' re tllegal." The teacher explained that she just wanted to know which students should fill out applications for social secunty numbers. Margaret Gonzalez, a district director with the League of United Latin American Citizens, saw it rather as a return "to earlier times in our history when' No Dogs or Mexicans' were allowed into rest au rants . " With her encouragement, LULAC' s board endorsed a national campaign to repeal employer sanctions provisions of the new immigration law at its annual meeting. in South Bend, Ind . , last month. CREATING YOUR OWN STEREOTYPES: New York's daily Noticias del Mundo, in an editorial urging the Republican National Committee to reconsider its action of cutting off the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, created a fresh stereotype for us to live up to. "It would appearthat(RNC chair; Frank Fahrenkopf is not at all attuned to Hispanic culture. To expect pure harmony within the ranks of a Hispanic political organization is akin to expecting a total absence of sibling rivalry in a fam ily of a dozen children." Internecine combat never quite struck me as something unique to Hispanic political organizations. OBITUARY: Estos Tiempos, tne Chicano publication at California's Stanford University, carries the following obituario this month: "Since the Chicano movement of the late sixties, many of the gains we made have been virtually wiped out. Affirmative action, bilingual education, bilingual ballots and many other rights we took for granted are now endangered species. " Yet, when the closing of YEMCO was announced, I didn't really believe it Not until I saw the act ' Going Out ofBusiness' " . . . " YEMCO (was) one of the most popular department stores amongst Ia raza Better known as GEMCO by the white majority, YEMCO had always _.been a favori te shopping place of Chicanos. It was a couple of nachos above Quey-mar, better known asK-Mart . . ." "Any Chicano could i;)ecome a card-carrying YEMCO member for the princely sum o( one dollar-for a lifetime membership. A card brought status to any new immigrant family. When familia visited from the old country, YEMCO was the place to spend those hard-earned pesos. "Perhaps that was part of the reason for YEMCO ' s demise. With the devaluation of the peso and with the new immigration law , YEMCO must have been doomed. " -Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • HENRY CISNEROS, quoted in an Austin American-Statesman s e ries on the popular San Antonio mayor, shortly before his expected r e-election to a fourth term April 4 : " I really haven ' t made any decision about any office after that or continuation in politics for certain. We have no plan , no office, no timetable , no deadline." H. ROSS PEROT, Dallas bill ionaire, speaking at a re-election fundraiser f o r San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros last month: "He stands as one of the finest leaders in our n a t ion. .. Could he be governor? Ab s olutely. Could he be president? Absolutely." HERMAN SILLAS, a c tivist Los Angeles law yer, commenting to Weekly Report on President Rea g an ' s in e vitabl e memoirs : " I don ' t think they 're g oi n g t o oe very l o ng. H e f o r gets. Hi spa n ic L ink Weekly R e p ort April 6 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING IMMIGRATION LAW VIDEOTAPE: The University of California has produced a videotape-with the same material in English and Spanish-explaining the new federal immigration law to undocumented aliens and employers. For a copy of the tape, which is in VHS format, send $20 to: IRCA Video, Extension Visual Media, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. (A copy may be borrowed for a $7 postage and handling fee.) MANA SCHOLARSHIPS: The Mexican American Women's National Association is taking applications for its Raquel Marquez Frankel Scholarship. Up to$1 ,000 w il l be awarded to one or more Hispanas in postsecondary institutions who seek to aid the Hispanic community. The deadline is June 1. For more information or applications, write to: MANA, Scholarship Committee, 1201 16th St NW, #420, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-3440. IMMIGRATION AND THE LABOR MARKET: "Illegal Immigration and the Colonization of the American Labor Market'' is a study paper by the Center for Immigration Studies on how the availability of undocumented workers is affecting U.S . investment, employment and business competition. For a copy of the paper, send $6.95 to: CIS, 1424 16th St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, D . C . 20036. WOMEN IN THE ECONOMY: "Women in the American Economy" is a 45-page report detailing the economic status of women according to race, ethnicity and age. For a copy of the report (Series P-23, No. 146), send $2.75 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENT RETENTION: "Improving Minority Retention in Higher Education : A Search for Effective Institutional Practices" is a report by the Educational Testing Service on strategies used at four predominantly white educational institutions to curb the high minority dropout rate. For a free copy , write to: Research Publications, Mail Stop05-R, Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton, N.J. 08541. LATINOS IN CHICAGO'S MAYORAL PRIMARY: The Midwest Voter Registration Education Project has released a 28-page study titled "The 1 987 Chicago Mayoral Primary: The Hispanic Vote . " For a copy, send $2.50 for shipping and handling to: MVREP, 50 W . Broad St., Suite 622, Columbus, Ohio (614) 464-1116. CONNECTING (Late news on what' s occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it.) READER'S DIGEST AWARDS $375,000 The Hispanic Policy Development Project was one of four organi zations to receive grants from the Reader's Digest Foundation last month to improve educational opportunities for minorities. The grants totalled $375,000. HPDP was awarded a one-year grant of$150,000 for the Reader's Digest ParenVSchool Partnership Campaign which works at improving Hispanic education. The campaign encourages parental involvement in younger children's schools and in the learning process in com munities nationwide. LIBRARIANS VOLUNTEER TIME The Chicano Periodical Index, a 650-page reference book with more than 120,000 citations, was recently published. The one-of-a kind specialized index was made possible through the volunteer efforts of 25 librarians from throughout the Southwestern United States . Published by the Chicano Studies Library Publications Unit at the University of California at Berkeley, the cloth-bound book includes complete indexing of 32 periodicals on Mexican Americans as well as the selective indexing of 500 other magazines and journals. Cost $90 ($83.50 for libraries) plus $2.50 for postage and handling . To order, write to the Chicano Studies Library, 3404 Dwinelle Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Calif . 94720. SMITHSONIAN SETS LATINO PROGRAM The advisory council for the development and direction of a new program in Hispanic American History at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History in Washington, D .C., met recently and established themes for the program . The program , which is administered by the museum's Department of Public Programs, will be coordinated by Pauline NunezMorales. It will begin this fall. The program is made possible by a planning grant from the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Program and will generally cover the social and political history of Hispanics in the United States. Calendar "Hollywood Reporter, " as 1987 Woman of the Year , Dolly Rivera for Community Service and Linda Jean Escajeda as Woman of Promise. the keynote speaker. Elaine Coronado (51 2) 366-2008 HISPANIC COLLEGIATE CONFERENCE Macomb, IlL April 11-12 THIS WEEK CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE Salt Lake City April 8-10 The National Association for Chicano Studies is sponsoring a conference on academic di sciplines and community concerns. Eduardo Elias(801) 58h"561 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION CONFERENCE Chicaqo April 8-11 • Affirming the Rights, Sec u ring the Opportunities" is the theme of th e 13th annual conference sponsored by the American Associat i on for Affirmative Action. Annabelle JaramillO , president of National lmaqe, will conduct a session on "Rediscoverinq Hispanic America." Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512 WOMEN'S SUCCESS AWARD BANQUET Los Angeles April 8 The Hispanic Women' s Council will recognize three outstanding Latinas in the community: Tich i Wil kerson Kassel, publisher and editor in chief of the 4 G . enoveva Arellano (213) 629-497 4 ERNESTO GALARZA SYMPOSIUM Los Angeles April 9 "The Life and Legacy of Ernesto Galarza : 19051984," will be discussed by former Colorado State Sen. Polly Baca-B ar ragan a nd Carlos Munoz, professor of political science at th e University of California at Berkeley. The program honors Galarza's work as a Chicano author, diplomat and social activist. Frances Hill (213) 259-2677 ADELANTE MUJER HISPANA El Paso , Texas April 11 " Prep a ring for Choice and Action" is the focus of th e fifth annual conference sponsored by the El Paso Community Conference . Estella Casas , evenin9 news anchor at KDBC-TV, will be the keynote spea ker. Sylvia Sitters (915) 775-6063 HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE San Antonio April 11 Project Excellence and the University of Te xas at San Antonio are sponsoring "Hispanics in Higher Education: Our Key to the Future, Our Ticket to Success. " Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz will be April6, 1987 The Latin American Student Organization will spon sor a Hispanic collegiate leadership conference. Midwest Voter Registration Education Project E xe cutive Director Juan Andrade will be the keynote speaker. Juan Rodriguez (309) 298-3388 COMING SOON UTERACYCONFERENCE S ER-J obs for P rogress Inc. San Antonio April 15-17 Allison Parker (214) 631 -3999 EMPLOYERS AND IMMIGRATION Institute for Regional Studies o f the Californias San D iego April 1 6 Charlotte Fajardo (619) 265-6190 CORRECTION: The SER-Jobs for Progress Na tional Convention, listed in the Dec. 29, 1986, issue of Weekly Report, will be held in conjunction with the or 9 anization's literacy conference on April 15-17 . Hispa nic Link Weekly Re port

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL DIRECTORS OnApril20, we will publishour1987 "medle edition." Th i s special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,000 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1 ,500 jour nalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 22 National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles. In addition to our regular " Marketplace" section Weekly Report will carry a full page"Opportunities in the Media" insert for the edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section. Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April 10. Coronado Four-County Broadcasting Inc. Hispanic-owned media company in Californ i a seeks individua l for radio sales. Applicant must have excellent bilingual communication skills, be highly motivated and result-oriented For more information , contact Malu Hernandez, (714) 981. VICE PRESIDENT PUBLIC INFORMATION This position is responsible for all community public information, public relations and promotion al and advertising activities of WETATV and FM, and for the national coordination and direction of public information for WET A-produced pro grams distributed nationwide . Five years experience in promotion and vert i sing; demonstrated writing and editing skills; proven track record in man aging a staff of at least s i x employees i s highly desirable. Salary is$46,175-$57,720. Contact WETATV/FM, Personnel PO Box 2t)26 87 PI 1 (1 ) , Washington , D . C . 20013 (703) 820. EDITOR, NATIONAL DESK Nat i onal Public Radio Candidate edits program materials submitted by reporters and other contributors: initiates plans and produces program materials for broad cast, and fills in for Senior Editor. At least 3 4 years experience in journalism with demonstrated ability to organize and di& sem i nate informat i on and to coordinate daily news coverage. Salary $33,600 per year. Interested persons should submit resume to: NPR , Personnel , 2025 M St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20036. ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ASSESSMENT SUNY/Empire State College at Buffalo, N .Y. Innovative college emphasizing individual degree programs seeks Assistant.Dean to begin8 / 8 7 to provide leadership for. evaluation of prior learning process; review of all degree programs & portfoli os; training expert evalu a tors ; counseling students regarding college policies & assessment & program planning . Administrative skills, demonstrated interest in alternative programs& adult students, signi ficant teaching or related academic experience , master's required ; doctorate preferred . Letter& resume by4/24/87 to: JanetZim mer , Director PersonneV AA, SUNY/ESC, Room 54, 1 Union Ave . , Saratoga Springs , N .Y. 12866. An ANEOE Hi s p a n ic Lin k Weekly Rep o rt BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE T H E CITY 1 :11:1\'ER S J T Y Of :-.iEW YORK ANTICIPATED VACANCIES ACCOUNTING: Teach lntro. & Adv . Accounting Courses. Ph . D . or Master's +CPA req. VAC. #320. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION: Coordinator/Placement Specialist. Place students in intern ship and general positions with employers. Min . req . for Asst. Prof. rank: Master's in approp. field + 30 grad. credits & 8 yrs . approp . exp . VAC. #321. DATA PROCESSING: Fluency in operating systems : VM/SP, OS/MVT, Teleprocessing , Data Base , Data Structures; IBM Mainframe& IBM PC's. MNMS req . +30 grad . credits pre!. ; 2 yrs. industrial tech. exp . ; knowl . of 2 or more high level languages . VAC. #322. MATHEMATICS: College Lab Technician. (2) a) Coordinator of Math Apple Computer Lab. MA in Computers in Education or Ed . M . in Instructional Technology pref.; 4 yrs. ed. & related technical exp. using Apple microcomputers as instructional tool; knowl ef math thru calculus req . VAC. #323. b) Coordinator of Math tutoring& testing . BA& knowl. of math thru calculus pref . ; 4 yrs . ed . & related technical exp . using micro'Computers as instructional tool+ demonstrated ability to run tutoring & testing program . VAC . #324. MODERN LANGUAGES: College Lab Technician . Supervise& maintain Mod. Lang . Lab. BA pref.;4 yrs. ed. & related tech . exp req. +proficiency in English & Spanish . Knowl of French & Italian desir . VAC . #325. PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Teacher of Health Education . Rank: Asst Prof. Ph . D . and teaching exp . req . VAC. #326. COLLEGE LAB TECHNICIAN: Responsible& dependable technician to assist faculty in P . E . & Dance . B . S . pref. ; 4 yrs . ed . & related tech . exp. req. VAC. #327. SEARCH EXTENDED BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: Teach Money & Banking . Ph. D . pref. VAC . #299a. DEVELOPMENT SKILLS: (2) Teachers of ESL. Ph.D. pref . + 5 yrs . teach . adults pre!. VAC. #301 a . (2) Tea c hers of Reading . Ph. D . pref . + 5 yrs . teach . adults pref . VAC. #302a. ENGLISH: (3) Teachers of Development Writing & Composition. Ph. D . pref . VAC. #303a. MATHEMATICS:(2) Teachers exp . with microcomputers , math lab & grants desir. Ph . D . or Math Ed. D . Pref . VAC . #305a. . SECRETARIAL SCIENCE: Teach Courses in Office Automation . MasterS/Bus. Ed . VAC. #306a. SCIENCE: College Lab Technician . Main!.& repair scientific instrumen t s& microcomputers; network microcomputer& minicomputers ; prep . of labs. B . S . in Elec . Eng. or Elec . Tech . Pre!.+ 4 yrs . ed. & tech. exp . & knowl. of electronics . VAC. #310a. All ranks and salaries dependent upon qualifications . Refer to a specific BMCC vacancy# above and send resume with cover letter by 5/4/87 to: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel-Room H Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street , New York, N . Y . 10007 An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 or phone(202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone ) by 5 p ,m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by ___________ _ Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip, _________ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _

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Arts & Entertainment out its annual ACE awards March 22, . . The group of New York-based entertainment journalists gave 1ts highest award-the Premio de Distinci6n y Merito-to Cuban salsa singer Celia Cruz. Non-competitive awards were also voted to Placido Domingo, Maria Elena Velasco (a . k . a . Ia india Maria) and dancer Pilar Rioja. OSCAR WHO?: While the last of the season's "major" entertainment awards ceremonies had nothing in store for U . S . Latinos, Hispanic artists throughout the world were honored last month in ceremonies of their own. Spain's owri Academy of Motion Picture Arts& Sciences handed out its first ever awards-the Goy a-at a ceremony presided over by the King Juan Carlos and the Queen Sofia in Madrid March 18. ACE handed out scores of awards in film, television, radio, theater and nightclub categories. Fifteen Goyas were handed out. The evening' s big winner was Argentine director Fernan Gomez, who won "best director" and "best scripf' for his film E l viaje a ninguna parte. Gomez also won a "best actor" Goya for hi s role in Mambru se fue a Ia guerra Across the nation and on the same night , the Texas Talent Musicians' Association held its Tejano Music Awards at the San Antonio Convention Center Arena. Edward James Olmos and Ana Alicia were co-hosts of the event where Little Joe y La Familia headlined. Tejano Music Awards were presented in 11 categories. "Song of the Year" went to the Houston-based band La Mafia for Si tu supieras (If You Knew). "Male entertainer of the year" was won by Little Joe Hernandez of La Familia, and Patsy Torres walked away with the "female entertainer of the year" award. The Spanish fil m E l amor brujo, currently in release here, won two Goyas-one for " bes t cinematography'' going to Teo Escamilla, and another for " c ostuc .1e design" given to Gerardo Vera . The Goy as, created by sculptor Miguel Berroca, are bronze busts of famed .Spanish painter Francisco de Goya y Lucientes. In New York, the Asociacion de Cronistas de Espectaculos gave There were no Latino winners-or nominees-at the 59th annual Oscar ceremony held March 30 in Los Angeles. The Oscar show traditionally closes the entertainment industry's "awards" season. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report . RUNNING WITH MANUEL: Chicago Tribune reporter Manuel Galvan is unopposed on the National Association of Hispanic Journalists ballot in his quest for a second term as NAHJ president. So are New York Times reporter Jesus Rangel in his effort to follow Julio Moran , los Angeles Times reporter, as first vic e pre sident, and New York Newsd a y reporter Evelyn Hernandez in her candidacy to suc c eed Maria Elena Salinas , news anchor at L o s Angeles' Spanish-language KMEXTV, as second v . p . Under NAHJ bylaws, additional nominations, accompanied by signed p etitions, may be presented from the floor at the National Hispanic Media Conference April 22-25. Races already competitive are for financial officer. New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez vs . San Diego Union reporter Steve Padilla ; secretary: Arizona Daily Star editorial writer Elaine Ayala vs. Elisa Alfonso, freelance jm .. rnalist from Chicago; and at-large delegates 6 HISPA-NIC liNK WEEKLY REPORT a nat1onal publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 2340280 or 234 Publishec Hec t o r Ericksen-Mendoza Editoc Feli x Pe r ez Reporti ng : Char lie Eric ksen , Antonio Mej ias Rentas. Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein , Jul1o Laboy. N o portion o f H i spani c Weekly Rep ort m a y b e reproduced or broadcas t i n any for m without advan ce permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rate s 7 5 cents pe r word. D•splay ads a r e $35 per column i nch. A d s p laced by Tue sday w ill run i n Wee k ly Report s maile d Friday of sam e we e e .. Multiple use rat es o n requ es t . (3 to be elected) : Mario Villafuerte , photo grapher, Austin American-Statesman, Texas ; Ivan Roman , reporter, San Juan Star, Puerto Rico;Patrisia Gonzales, reporter,Philadelphia Inquirer; and Phil Garcia, reporter, Pasha Publications, Washington, D.C. PICKING ON GERALDO? Cover story in the April issue of Vista magazine : " Why Is Everyone Picking on Geraldo Rivera? " In it , former 20/20 colleague Tom J a rriel describes him as a man who had " a very strong cadre of producers and staff who absolutely adored him . With a good executive producer, Rivera is excellent. With a bad executive producer, he can be off the wall . " Rivera ' s self-assessment: "The mainstream guys, the Peter Jennings types-ifs like we ' re on different planets . They perceive their roles to be above the fray , coolly reflecting on it. I see my role as being down in the street fighting it out. I have a much more passionate approach. " They're super cool and I'm super hot. " TALKING TO TONEY: In the premiere i ssue of the latest Latino magazine Americas 2001, former New Mexico Gov : Toney Anaya explains to author Martha Guerrero why he declared his state a sanctuary for Central American refugees: " I did it to draw attention, because the only way that someone from Central America could meet requirements (for political asylum) would be to escape their country, come to the U .S., get caught, get deported, get assassinated, come back in spirit and say, ' I told you so.'" SOCIAL LITERATURE: Some 20 Chicano writers and critics will participate in a national conference on "Chicano Literary Criticism in a Social Contexf' at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., May 28-30. lfs sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center and the Stanford Center for Chicano Research. All sessions are free and open to the public. A complete program and information on meals, lodging and advance registration may be obtained by contacting the Stanford Center for Chicano Research , Cypress Hall, Stanford University , Stanford , Calif . 94305 (415) 7233914 Charlie Ericksen H i spanic Link Week l y R eport