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Hispanic link weekly report, April 13, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 13, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
House Majority Whip and Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) is one of twenty members of a House delegation visiting the Soviet Union... Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.) stops in Miami to drum up support for his recently introduced bill that would help establish by 1992 more than 8,000 scholarships for Latin American students interested in attending U.S. colleges... Flora Mancuso Edwards officially becomes the second Latina to head a postsecondary institution upon her inauguration ceremony. Mancuso Edwards heads Middlesex Community College in Edison, N.J. . . Roxanne Bradshaw, secretary-treasurer of the National Education Association, calls for an “unrelenting campaign” to boost the number of bilingual and multilingual teachers to handle the surge in the
number ot non- and limited-English-speaking students... The New York Police Department recognizes retired police officer Edward del Pino with the Civilian Commendation Award for his role in the capture of a man on a Staten Island ferry who stabbed several passengers with a sword... Pablo Morales, a student at Stanford University takes his third consecutive 200-yard medley national swimming title. He finished in 1:45.42. . . In its second annual College Achievement Awards, Time magazine honors juniors Kristin Cabral, a student at the University of Michigan, Olveen Carrasquillo, from the City College of New York, Robert Col6n, enrolled at the University of Rochester, Elizabeth Cuervo, from Dartmouth College, Anita Gonsalves Ramasastry, from Harvard-Radcliffe College, and David Villanueva, from the University of Delaware, as six of the nation’s 100 most outstanding college juniors. Cabral was among the top 20 winners...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
HispanicsSet Sail for 1992
Texas: Cisneros Wins, Bonilla Forces Runoff
Henry Cisneros was easily re-elected to his fourth term as mayor of San Antonio April 4. Two other Hispanics were involved in major Texas municipal elections. Tony Bonilla, may-oral candidate in Corpus Christi, forced a runoff there, and for the second time in the history of Dallas, a Hispanic was elected to the City Council.
Cisneros won re-election to his fourth two-year term with 74,250 votes, or 67%, in a city that is roughly 55% Hispanic
Cisneros, 39, won over businessman Phil Pyndus, who ran second with 34,414 votes. Three other candidates trailed.
Bonilla, 51, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens from 1981 to 1983, ran second to Betty Turner in his bid to seek the mayoral seat of Corpus Christi. Bonilla, an attorney, received 34% of the vote in a field of five. Forty-four percent of the vote went to Turner.
No matter what the outcome of the April 18 runoff election, Corpus Christi will experience a first- either a Hispanic or female elected as mayor.
In Dallas, businessman Al Gonz&lez, 50, was elected to Place 10 on the 11-member City Council, an at-large position. He received 58% of the vote.
Hispanics. number about 125,000, or about 13%, in Dallas.
Gonzalez’s closest competitor in a field of six, Verna Thomas, received 9,155 votes to Gonzalez’s 49,207.
And in El Paso, mayoral candidate Joe Mendoza narrowly missed forcing three-term incumbent Jonathan Rogers into a runoff. Mendoza received 11,395 votes, or 34%, to Rogers^ 18,310 votes, or 54%.
Latino Jobless Rate Dips
The Hispanic jobless rate dropped to 9.0% in March from 9.6% in February, according to figures released April 3 by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
In March, 753,000 Latinos were unemployed, compared with 813,000 the previous month. The Hispanic jobless rate has dropped every month in 1987.
Building toward a yearlong celebration in 1992, Hispanics nationwide are moving forward with a multitude of tributes and projects to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus^ arrival in the New World.
Numerous Latino groups, with the National Hispanic Quincentenary Association at their 'forefront, are developing cultural events, museum exhibits and media programs to venerate the birth of the Indo-Hispanic culture in the Americas.
The Quincentenary will provide U.S. Hispanics with “an opportunity to tell the rest of America how much a part we are and have been of this nation,” NHQA President Raul Yzaguirre said. The association, headquartered at the National Council of La Raza, which Yzaguirre heads in Washington, D.C., is composed of educators, scholars, community organizers and business and religious leaders from throughout the country.
Yzaguirre and other Latinos expressed concern over the direction of the national celebration after Congress created the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission in 1983. Its 30 members, most appointed by the president and the Congress, initially included only three Hispanics: chair-
The U.S. Agriculture Department expects to release this week guidelines that would expand greatly the definition of undocumented agricultural workers eligible for legalization under the new immigration law.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act includes a special legalization program for agricultural workers who performed “seasonal agricultural services” for at least 90 days in the year ending May 1, 1986. The program begins June 1.
Non-agricultural workers who apply for legalization must have lived here continuously since before Jan. 1, 1982. The law does allow for brief absences.
A confidential draft of the Agriculture Department's rules obtained by The New York Times defines the special agriculture workers as
man John Goudie, a Miami realtor, former Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Ferr6 and Jane Garcia, also Puerto Rican, president of the Bronx Museum of Art Cuban American Tirso del Junco, a Los Angeles surgeon and former chief of the California GOP, was added later.
Ten Italian Americans, but not one Mexican American or Spanish American, were named to the official body.
“We are concerned,” Yzaguirre said. “But this is not the time to fight We want to work with them.”
Francisco Martinez-Alvarez, Goudie’s assistant, said the two groups were in contact and that the commission is encouraging the creation of committees to coordinate state efforts, especially in those states with high Hispanic populations.
Puerto Rico has already created such a committee. Next month, King Juan Carlos of Spain will visit the island to attend a meeting of the Ibero-American Conference of the National Commissions for the Celebration of the 500th Anniversary of the Discovery of America - Encounter ofTwo Worlds. This will mark the first visit by a Spanish monarch to Puerto R|co.
continued on page 2
those who have worked in the cultivation of fruits, vegetables and “other perishable commodities.”
Included among the commodities are “Christmas trees, cut flowers, herbs, hops, horticultural specialties, Spanish reeds, spices, sugar beets and tobacco.” When the final version of the immigration law was shaped by legislators, transcripts of congressional debate reveal that lawmakers specifically intended to cover farmers whose produce would spoil if not picked when ripe. Among such produce were tomatoes, cherries, grapes, peaches and lettuce
Sally Michael; an analyst with the Agriculture Department’s Office of Economics involved in the formulation of the department’s rules, would npt cprhment on the draft She said, however, that some revisions were anticipated.
Farm Worker Legalization to Expand
1 4 1987


Texans Call for Legalization Delay
Texas Hispanic religious, social and labor groups have joined state Agriculture Commissioner Jim Hightower in calling fbr changes in legalization requirements under the new immigration law, especially the definition of agricultural workers.
Members of the newly formed Texas Immigration Policy Task Force were in Washington April 1 to express theirfears that the new law could put some farmers out of business, discriminate against Hispanic workers and adversely impact the state’s agricultural industry, which provides 22% of Texas’ jobs.
The Texas group said that many farm
workers in the state will not qualify for legalization because ranch hands, poultry workers and others are not included in the “field worker” definition.
Hightower called for a delay of the May 5 implementation date, saying neither the state nor the Immigration and Naturalization Service are ready to handle it.
INS spokesmen said the agency is not considering delaying the May 5 date.
“The reality of it is we are finding out now that a lot of our agricultural industries that have neveradmitted to having undocumented workers are now saying they do,” said Norma Plasencia, a facilitator for the task force.
‘Set Asides’ Illegal, Says Fed. Judge
A U.S. Department of Transportation program requiring state and municipal governments receiving federal money to set goals for minority contractor participation was ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge in Atlanta April 1.
U.S. District Judge J. Owen Forrester said programs such as one in Fulton County, Ga, which required that at least 20% of work go to minority subcontractors, are unconstitutional because they were not established tocorrect past wronga
“You obviously see the negative impact it (affirmative action) is having on non-minority contractors. They don’t like the program, they think if s unworkable and they think that if s just reverse discrimination,” said David Morales, executive director for the National Hispanic Association of Construction Enterprises.
Morales? advocacy organization tracks such litigation and believes future U.S. Supreme Court decisions will uphold the constitutionality of affirmative action programs in awarding construction contracts.
Department of Justice attorneys who handled the case are reviewing the ruling but any appeal will depend on Transportation Department officials, said Justice spokeswoman Deborah Burstion-Wade. The Justice Department has spearheaded a drive to kill a 1965 executive order requiring hiring goals for federal contractors.
The ruling involved a 1982 suit filed by S.J.
Garcia Enters LA. Race
Alex Garcia, a 14-year veteran of the California legislature who lost his state Senate seat to Art Torres in a bruising battle in 1982, entered the 10-person field for Gloria Molina’s 56th District Assembly seat April 1. Primary election day is May 12.
When he entered the state Assembly in 1968, Garcia, now 57, was the lone Hispanic in the 120-memberCalifornia legislature.
Molina and long-time foe Richard Alatorre both have endorsed Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of Congressman Ed Roybal, in the Los Angeles Eastside district after Molina joined Alatorre on the Los Angeles City Council this year.
Grovers and Sons Co., a Minneapolis contractor, after Fulton County did not award the low-bidding firm an airport paving contract because it failed to meet the minority subcontractor requirement.
The various Smithsonian museums plan exhibitions, beginning this summer, to mark the 1992 anniversary. The Museum of American History plans an exhibition on early Hispanic settlement in North America; the Museum of American History will highlight America before Columbus and the Office of Folklife Programs will emphasize Latin American and Caribbean cultures.
Lectures on Hispanic culture and contributions are planned throughout the nation by
De Baca Answers Critics
Republican National Hispanic Assembly Chairman Fernando de Baca has issued a call for an April 25 executive committee meeting in New Jersey following the closing of RNHA offices and suspension of the organization by Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf.
De Baca told Weekly Report April 7 that he never received a letter from Fahrenkopf severing support from the RNC auxiliary body.
“ Frank Fahrenkopf has closed the doors of the Republican Party to the Hispanic community,” de Baca said, calling the chairman’s actions “capricious and malicious.”
He also said the $60,000 that RNC claims is owed it by RNHA was spent to advance Republican party efforts to win the Hispanic vote. In addition, de Baca said RNHA is due $30,000 from a fundraiser held in October.
Three RNHA state chairmen, including Bill Wallace of Arkansas, also chided Fahrenkopf for his actions.
Several other state chairmen who have refused to recognize de Baca as the reelected chair have formed an ad hoc committee to organize an election convention in Las Vegas on May 8 and 9.
De Baca said he has called a constitutional convention for that date, also in Las Vegas.
Santiago Loses, Soliz in Chicago Nail Biter
With 93% of the vote counted in the Chicago April 7 runoff election, incumbent 25th Ward Alderman Miguel Santiago appeared to lose his seat to challenger Raymond Figueroa while the race between Alderman Juan Soliz and opponent Ambrosio Medrano in Ward31 remained in doubt as of April 8.
Figueroa received 6,657 votes to Santiago’s 5,924. Soliz was just three votes ahead of Medrano, 4,713 to 4,710.
The unofficial tallies were provided by the Chicago Board of Elections.
Both Santiago and Soliz have voted with opposing factions against newly re-elected Mayor Harold Washington on the 50-member City Council.
Washington, who won re-election with 53% of the vote, won 55% of the Hispanic vote, according to one exit poll.
In other election news, Eddie Muftoz was elected mayor of Gallup, N.M.,April7. Muhoz had previously served as Gallup mayor from 1957 to 1969.
groups such as the Academic Association for the Quincentenary, based in Washington, D.C., the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Foundation in Denver, and the American Historical Association Quincentenary Committee in Arizona
Courses on Puerto Rican heritage are planned at several New Jersey colleges by the International Columbian Quincentenary Alliance.
Evangelization in the New World will be celebrated by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops through symposiums, commissioned papers and local parish celebrations.
The NHQA plans to publish a handbook by 1988 detailing ways to participate in the 1992 celebration.
NHQA the Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans and other groups are also planning television spots to highlight Hispanic achievements, studies to assess U.S, history books and plans for monuments, museums and paintings commemorating 500 years of Hispanic contributions.
- Melinda Machado
Martinez Tactic Assailed
Members of Florida’s Commission on His-: panic Affairs accused Gov. Bob Martinez April 2 of failing to budge in his decision to oust the commission from the governor's office because Hispanic state legislators would not support a sales tax bill he favors.
Rafael Penalver, commission chairman, said Lt Gov. Bobby Brantley told him that “they had asked a number of Hispanic representatives to support the sales tax bill with no success.”
J.M. Stipanovich, Martinez’s aide, said: “They (the representatives) indicated to us that the Hispanic commission remaining in the office was not that important.”
Hispanic Groups Move Toward 1992
continued from page 1
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


ASSIMILATION?
Ricardo Chavira
Mary Sanchez-Jones
It Worked for Me Not for Me, Thank You
Throughout my life, friends, co-workers and virtual strangers have reminded me - because of the Mexican heritage obvious in my brown skin and black hair - that I am somehow different. They do so by asking two questions:
“Do you speak Spanish?” and “Can you cook Mexican food?”
The answer to both is “No”
This always disappoints them. But I have no more idea how to “be” Mexican than they do.
I grew up in Iowa, part of the Midwestern belt of states whose sugar beet and potato fields attracted large numbers of Mexican immigrants during the 1930s.
My paternal grandparents reached Mason City, Iowa, at a time when the large Mexican population there encouraged the celebration and continuation of Mexican customs. They attended traditional Mexican weddings and observed holidays such as Cinco de Mayo.
Amid such ethnic enthusiasm, my parents socialized with other Mexican youth at cultural functions where an appreciation of Mexican customs was kept alive by their parents.
FREED TO ABANDON CUSTOMS
By the time I was born in 1953, Iowa’s Mexican population had begun to drop. Work in the sugar beet fields disappeared and the sugar beet plants closed. Mexican families without work moved on.
Mexican customs and traditions began to lessen with my parents’ generation, a generation constantly exposed to “foreign” modes of speech, mannerisms and dress. As death took some of the earliest, staunchest “old country’ proponents, many second-generation families were freed to abandon their customs.
By the early 1960s, a Mexican community was still in existence, but the collective consciousness of culture that marked the years of my parents’ journey to adulthood was over. Nothing about my family’s lifestyle reflected our cultural heritage - not our food, clothing or speech. My siblings and I preferred Big Macs and french fries to rice and beans. Our parents spoke only English to us.
We were the only Mexican family on Monroe Street, a pleasant middle-class neighborhood of lilac hedges and neat brick houses. Other Mexican families lived on South Jackson, the street where my father grew up - infamous for a tradition of fights and late-night disturbances among poor whites, blacks and Mexicans - or on the citys tough “North End.”
I never had any Mexican playmates. As I began to form a personal identity, I saw myself not as a Mexican born in the United States but as a United States citizen born of Mexican descent. I cultivated a cultural blindness that proved helpful during chilhood incidents of i prejudice.
NO MALICE IN HER WORDS
In grade school, I struck up a friendship with a girl who belonged to an elite group of popular and attractive classmates. One day, she invited me to her home, but her mother sent me away. Our friendship \ was acceptable at school, but not at her home, j As a teenager, I was on our high school cheerleading squad. One day after practice, the team was sitting around talking when the subject of nationality came up. We recited our backgrounds, j No one was particularly impressed until I said mine:
“I am Mexican.”
Amid the clamor and uproar came the observation from one girl, | “But Mary Ann, we thought you were one of us.” There was no malice j in her words.
j Her remark showed me how successfully I had taught my friends to
i regard me as part of any group I chose to be with, not set apart by racial or cultural background any more than by occupation or I physical ability.
Though racial and cultural heritage are part of us, our intrinsic qualities as human beings - our courage, imagination and intelligence-; make us who we are.
(Mary Sanchez-Jones, of Forest City, Iowa, is a free-lance writer.)
As you can tell, if you read the byline on this column, I’m not Irish or Chinese. I’m Hispanic. Chicano, to be exact. I am short, dark and mustachioed. No shifty eyes, I’m afraid, but nobody making my acquaintance would take me for anything but what I am.
I make these points at the outset to establish a fact that continues to escape many of us:
Whether or not we admit it, white America still sees us as different. Apart. Even alien.
No matter how those Hispanics intent on assimilating note their many generations north of the border or argue that they don’t speak Spanish or cook Mexican or Puerto Rican or Cuban food, we as a people have not lost ourselves in the Anglo mainstream.
That is not necessarily a bad thing. The important issue is whether we have equal access to educational and employment opportunities, whether we are subject to unfair treatment from authorities. And presently we do not have that equality.
Denying our ethnicity and insisting that we’re just like Anglos won’t get it for us, either.
My experience is, in fact, that a strong affirmation of my“MekteannessT has been crucial in gaining whatever personal and professional success I’ve enjoyed.
Throughout my childhood, my parents nurtured in me the knowledge that I was a Mexican who happened to be a third-generation, native-born American as well. They taught me Mexican history and insisted I speak Spanish. They took my brothers and me on vacation to Mexico to put us in touch with our heritage.
WANTED TO BE BROWN ANGLO
At first, I resisted such attempts to make me something other than the brown Anglo that I wanted to be. True, I had a name that was rendered unrecognizable in the mouth of my kindergarten teacher, but why couldn’t I be just like the gringitos I saw in books and on our fuzzy black-and-white TV?
My parents^ persistence paid off. By the time I entered McClay Junior High School in Pacoima, Calif., I was proud and excited to know that I shared a common gene pool and history with pre-Colombian Indians and Spanish settlers. My people had been the first in this part of the world, long before Plymouth Rock.
The Chicano awareness movement of the late ’60s, with its emphasis on ethnic pride, struck me as a bit pass&, but welcome nonetheless. My Chicano sensitivity kept me in school I was keenly aware of how few of us held college degrees and how fewer still became professional journalists.
I wanted to reach those goals not just for myself butforChicanos in general.
iMEXICANNESS’ GIVES ME EDGE
As a journalist, I find that my “Mexicanness” has given me a valuable edge. While I have sufficiently good credentials- a BA and M.A. in my field plus years of newspaper and magazine writing and reporting experience - I’ve been especially drawn to Mexico and Central America I covered that region exclusively for five years, two of them in Mexico City. Even now, from my base in Washington, I continue to specialize in Latin America
Apart from the obvious advantage represented by my fluency in Spanish, I bring cultural sensitivity to reporting on that important area of the world. Consequently, I’ve been able to cover stories that only the most adept Anglo reporters can match.
I am not obsessed with being Chicano. If s simply what I am.
Assimilate? Me? Given the joys of an extra culture and language, I wouldn’t want to.
Has being“too Mexican” held me back? No more, certainly, than if I engaged in the charade of trying to be Anglo.
(Ricardo Chavira, of Washington, D.C., covers the State Department for Time magazine)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 13,1987
3


COLLECTING
DISCOVERY OF AMERICA: The Organization of American States is publishing a newsletter on Quincentenary activities in the United States and other member countries. A copy of the newsletter is available free from the Office for the Commemoration of the Quincentennial, Organization of American States, 1889 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
HISPANIC HERITAGE: “Place,"the bi-monthly magazine of Partners for Livable Places, contains articles on Hispanic heritage and a section on the Caribbean contribution to the Quincentenary celebration. For a copy of “The 1992 Campaign: Discovering the Americas,” Vol. 6, send $6 plus $1 for postage and handling to: Partners for Livable Places, 1429 21 st St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
ENDOWMENTS ANDGRANTS: The National Endowmentforthe Humanities is sponsoring several fellowships and grants for projects related to the Quincentenary. One program offers individual scholarships for research on topics relating to the New World. For more information and application guidelines, write or call: Public Affairs Office, National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 409, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0438.
QUINCENTENARY NEWSLETTER: The first issue of the “Academic Association for the Quincentenary 1492 - 1992” newsletter is available by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to the association at: P.O. Box 9481, Washington, D.C. 20016. The newsletter details the history of the organization and contains membership information.
ENCUENTRO: A Colombian Quincentenary newsletter, “Encuentra," is published quarterly by the Latin American Institute of the University of New Mexico as a clearinghouse of information on activities and organizations planning events for the Quincentenary. For a free copy, send a request to Encuentra, Latin American Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M. 87131 (505) 277-5985.
GERONTOLOGY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM: The Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayores is sponsoring Hispanic gerontology internships. Applicants should have five years work experience in human services or a college degree in any human service field. Application deadline is April 17. The six-month program offers a monthly stipend of $1,167. For more information, contact Carmela Acosta-Cooper at (213) 487-1922.
CONNECTING
QUINCENTENARY GROUP RECEIVES $30,000 The Puerto Rican Quincentennial Commission has received $30,000 from the Esso Standard Oil Company toward restoration work on the 137-year-old chapel of the Seminario Conciliar of San lldefonso in San Juan.
HISTORIAN APPOINTED
Herman J. Viola, a historian and author, has been appointed director of Quincentenary programs for the Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution. He was the curator for the j Smithsonian’s exhibition titled “Magnificent Voyagers: The U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1942.” Viola joins Magali Carrera, who was appointed as the Institution’s coordinator of Quincentenary Research and Planning in July 1985.
HISPANIC INFLUENCE IN DESIGN ARTS The Design Arts Program of the National Endowment of the Arts is conducting a research project to identify organizations and individuals concerned with Hispanic, Portuguese and Brazilian influences in the. j design arts, including architecture, urban design and historical preservation Partners for Livable Places is conducting the survey. Send information of.such programs to partners at 142921 stSt.NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 887-5990.
QUINCENTENARY CONTACTS Following are a few of the organizations and people to contact concerning Hispanic involvement in Quincentenary activities: Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission, John N. Goudie, Chairman, 1801 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 632-1992.
Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans, Pedro de Mesones, President and Executive Director, 1612 20th St. j NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 328-0486.
National Conference of Catholic Bishops, Pablo Sedillo, Executive Director, Secretariat of Hispanic Affairs, 1312 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 659-6876.
National Hispanic Quincentennial Commission, Raul Yzaguirre, President 20 F St NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
The Foundation for Arts and Cultural Exchange Services, 55 Hudson St, New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 513-7892.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LUNCHEON SEMINAR
Washington, D.C. April 15
District of Columbia Superior Court Judge Ricardo
Urbina will address the Ibero-American Chamber of
Commerce.
Linda Mayo (202) 296-7335 LITERACY CONFERENCE San Antonio April 15-17
“Literacy: The First Chapter in the American Drearrf’ is the theme of the 21 st annual conference of SER-Jobs for Progress Inc Workshops, seminars and panel discussions addressing the nation's growing illiteracy problem and steps Hispanics can take to find solutions will be presented. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will speak.
Allison Parker (214) 631-3999
EMPLOYERS AND IMMIGRATION San Diego April 16
How the new immigration law will affect employers will be explored during a conference sponsored by San Diego State University’s Institute for Regional
Studies of the Californias and the city of San Diego. Charlotte Fajardo (619) 265-6190
AWARD DINNER Chicago April 16
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Funds Chicago office is hosting a dinner to honor several community leaders George Munoz, president of the Chicago School Board, will get the Public Service Award and the Civic Leadership Award will go to Mary Gonzdlez Koenig, executive director for Spanish Coalition for Jobs Mari Fohrman (312) 427-9363
COMING SOON
CATHOLIC EDUCATION CONVENTION National Catholic Educational Association New Orleans April 20-23 Patricia Feistritzer (202) 293-5954
ENGLISH TEACHERS CONVENTION Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Miami April 21-25 Maria Santamaria (305) 376-1355
HISPANIC MEDIA CONFERENCE National Association of Hispanic Journalists Los Angeles April 22-25 Jocelyn C6rdova (202) 783-6228
MINORITIES AND CANCER SYMPOSIUM University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital Houston April 22-25 Paula Gray (713) 792-3030
FESTIVAL LATINO
University of California at Los Angeles
Los Angeles April 26
John G. Watson (213) 825-1901
LANGUAGE MINORITY STUDENTS SEMINAR Multifunctional Resource Center/Northern California San Jose, Calif. April 30-May 2 Bruce Akizuki (415) 834-9458
SPOTLIGHT
DECADEOFTHEHISPANICS: ImagedeChicago, an organization concerned with employment of Hispanics, is sponsoring a training seminar on “The 1980s - The Decade of the Hispanics: Is It Fact or Fiction?” on May 1 in Chicago, Panelists will discuss Hispanics and the 1990 census, employment of Hispanic women and education. Frank Casillas, former assistant secretary of labor for employment and training under the Reagan administration, will be the luncheon speaker. For more information contact William Luna (312) 523-3408.
4
April 13,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT MANAGER
The Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles is offering outstanding career opportunities fortwo experienced professionals in the f ield of redevelopment project management.
Senior Project Manager(Salary $55,000 - $69,00 plus an excellent management benefits package). This position is responsible for supervising a variety of project managers and for ensuring the direction and coordination of all redevelopment activities within numerous project areas. The successful candidate must have more than 6 years senior management level experience developing program objectives and directing multiple projects in a complex environment, a demonstrated record of achievement in the field of redevelopment/community development and exceptional project management and communications skills.
Project Manager(Salary $50,000- $62,000 plus an excellent management benefits package). This position is responsible for formulating, directing,coordinating and implementing all redevelopment activities within one or more assigned project areas. This position requires more than 5 years experience managing redevelopment/community development activities, plus strong project management skills, the ability to coordinate the work of technical staff and excellent communications skills.
APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Resumes with salary history and list of professional accomplishments must be sent by April 24, 1987, to: Project Management, c/o Human, Resources Department, Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency, 354 South Spring St, Los Angeles, Calif. 90013. Indicate which position you are interested ia Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.
TRANSLATORS WANTED TRANSLATORS wanted, English and Portuguese to Spanish and English and Spanish to Portuguese. Professional translating experience and knowledge of Catholic Church essential. Journalistic background helpful.
Part-time positions at $10 per hour. Letters of application and resume to National Catholic News Service, Attention Translation Desk 1312 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ASSESSMENT
SUNY/Empire State College at Buffalo^ N. Y.
Innovative college emphasizing individual degree programs seeks Assistant Dean to begin 8/87 to provide leadership for evaluation of prior learning process; review of all degree programs & portfolios; training expert evaluators; counseling students regarding college policies & assessment & program planning.
Administrative skills, demonstrated interest in alternative programs & adult students, significant teaching or related academic experience, master's required; doctorate preferred.
Letter& resume by4/24/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director Personnel/AA, SUNY/ESC, Room 54, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866.
An AA/EOE
EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
FACULTY VACANCY SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS & TECHNOLOGY
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE at ROCHESTER, N.Y., a national leader in non-traditional higher education, was founded in 1971 as part of the State University of New York At ESC, each student works one-to-one with a faculty member to develop a degree program & a series of learning contracts. Through the assessment process, ESC evaluates for credit each student’s prior college-level learning from work& life experiences.
Required: Doctorate in a field of science or technology; college-level teaching; experience with micro-computers; experience or significant interest in working with adult students & non-traditional modes of instruction; interest in developing new instructional strategies, using emerging computer & telecommunication technology.
Tenure track assistant professor position available 7/1 /87; salary dependent on qualifications & experience.
For information call: Dean Victor Montana at (716) 244-3641. Letter & resume by 4/24/87 to: M& Janet Zimmer, Director/Personnel & AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm. 74,1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866.
FACULTY VACANCY
MENTOR IN THE ARTS
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE at ROCHESTER, N.Y., a national leader in non-traditional higher education, was founded in 1971 as part of the State University of New York At ESC, each student works one-to-one with a faculty member to develop a degree program & a series of learning contracts. Through the assessment process, ESC evaluates for credit each student’s prior college-level learning from work & life experiences.
Required: Ph.D. in Humanities with a field in art or M.FA with substantial breadth & experience in arts; college-level teaching; broad interest in the arts & interdisciplinary approaches; interest in working with diverse adult students & non-traditional modes of instruction.
Tenure track assistant professor position available 9/1 /87; salary dependent on qualifications & experience.
For information call: Dean Victor Montana at(716) 244-3641. Letters resume by4/24/87 to: Ms. Janet Zimmer, Director/Personnel & AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm. 64,1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866 AA/EOE
NY NEW YORK
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Full-time positions for Fall 1987; assistanl/associate professors at campuses in Manhattan and Long Island.
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Send vita to: Dr. Carol H. Schwartz, Dean, NYIT Center for Business and Economics, Old Westbury, N.Y. 11568.
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Arts & Entertainment
IF YOU LOVE NOVELAS... A newly formed group of U.S. Spanish-language TV stations plans to produce a series of novelas focusing on the dally lives of Mispanics in the United States.
Telemundo Group Inc. will offer daily “block” programming to member stations in New York, Chicago, Miami and Los Angeles.
Planned programming includes two novelas currently being coproduced by Telemundo in Venezuela, Jacques Costeau documentaries dubbed in Spanish and weekly boxing and baseball programs.
Telemundo Group Inc.’s corporate parent is John Blair A Co., a New York-based diversified media company. The group owns TV stations KVEA in Los Angeles, WNJU in New York, WSCU in Miami1 and WKAQ in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Its “network” programming is also carried by WC8U in Chicago.
“This is just the beginning of a campaign to make Telemundo the major programmer for the U.S. Hispanic market,” says Donald G. Raider, group CEO and president.
Telemundo owns eight studios in Puerto Rico and i? completing two more facilities there. The group adds it is “building a stable of writers and producers assigned especially to (the U.S. Hispanic novela) project"
Novelas, or soap operas, continue being the mainstay of Spanish-
language television In this country. Telemundo’s primary competitor, j Unlvlslon, carries more than six hours of novela programming a day I - a third of Its dally schedule.
TO BE LISTED: The Washington, D.C.-based Hispanic Institute forthe Performing Arts plans to have ready by summer its 1987/1988 Qulde to Hispanic Cultural World.
The guide will carry free listings of all “cultural related not-for-profit organizations, Institutions and agencies and for cultural related services of a commercial or business nature based in the D.C, Maryland and Virginia areas.”
New York’s Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors,meanwhile, has its biennial Directory of Hispanic Talent already available. The organization considers its guide, which lists over250 Hispanic actors and actresses, “an indispensable casting tool for anyone involved in reaching the Hispanic market”
ONE LINERS: Edith Maxier's Lissette Falcdn is playing in New York City April 13 and 14 as part of the Latino Playwright's Reading Workshop Series... The 1987 season of the San Diego Repertory Theatre opens April 15 with Luis Valdez’s / Don’t Have to Show You No Stinkin' Badges. . . An exhibit of paintings and drawings by Mexican artist Alejandro Romero opens April 15 at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America in Washington, D.C...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
CONTRACTOR SELECTED: The Immigration and Naturalization Service has selected a partnership including two Southern California-based Hispanic communications agencies, to inform the public about opportunities and requirements of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.
The $10.7 million contract, signed April 7, calls for The Justice Group to direct an information and awareness campaign geared to aliens eligible for legalization, all employers in the United States and the general public.
The Justice Group is made up of Coronado Communications Corp., La Agenda de Orci, and the international public relationsfirm Hill and Knowlton. The group will be based in Hill and Knowlton’s Los Angeles office and use a multifaceted media approach to disseminate the information.
INTERVIEW SLOTS: Developing or experienced journalists who want to talk with representatives of some 20 print publications at the National Hispanic Madia Conference in Los Angeles may still arrange appointments Interviews will be held on April 24. For details contact Lucienne L6pez Loman at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
THREE WINNERS: Three East Coast high school seniors-from New York, Washington, D.C., and Miami - won the 1987 National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ national high school writing contest
Eachwill:receive anexpense paid trip, with chaperone, to the fifth annual National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles April 22-25. The awards will be presented there.
Winners were: English essay contest Henry Harris, of Washington, D.C., for his essay on Pedro Guzmdn, leader of Casa El Salvador there; Spanish essay: Liezi Guzm&n,
of New York, for her essay on actress Rita Moreno; and English published work category: Esteban Torres, of Miamiforan article on the poor working conditions in his high schoofs science laboratory.
IMMIGRATION LAW SERIES: Radio Bilingue KSJV in Fresno, Calif, will develop a series of six one-hour discussions/debates on the Simpson-Rodino immigration law. Funding of $25,000 from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting will aid the station in producing the three English and three Spanish programs for distribution,
BILINGUAL BASEBALL: In Los Angeles, KTLA-TV, which pioneered use of stereo television sets to broadcast bilingually, will use the system in its 48 telecasts of California Angels baseball games this season.
A button on the specially equipped sets allows simultaneous transmission in Spanish on an extra audio channel.
-Julio Laboy and Charlie Erickson
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 2 * ” 0280 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector trickservMendoza Editor Felix Pbrez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Meilas-Rentas, Melinda Machado. Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Rafael Tejeda, Zoila Ellas.Yanira ' Cruz.
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Making The News This Week I number ot nonand limited-English-speaking studentS... The New York Police Department recognizes retired police officer Edward del Plno with the Civilian Commendation Award for his role in the capture of a man on a Staten Island ferry who stabbed several passengers with a sword. . . Pablo Morales, a student at Stanford University takes his third consecutive 200-yard medley national swimming title. He finished in 1:45 . 42. . . In its second annual College Achievement Awards, Time magazine honors juniors Kristin Cabral, a student at the University of Michigan, Olveen Carrasquillo, from the City College of New York, Robert Col6n, enrolled at the University of Rochester, Ellzabelh Cuervo, from Dartmouth College, Anita Gonsalves Ramasastry, from Harvard-Radcliffe College, and David VIllanueva, from the University of Delaware, . as six of the nation' _ s 100 most outstanding college juniors. Cabral was among the top 20 winners. .. House Majority Whip and Congressional His panic Caucus member Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) is one of twenty members of a delegation visiting the Soviet Union. . . Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fia . ) stops in Miami to drum up support for his recently introduced bill that would help establish by 1992 more than 8,000 scholarships for Latin American students interested in attending U.S. colleges. . . Flora Mancuso Edwards officially becomes the second Latina to head a postsecondary institution upon her inaugu ration ceremony. MancusO Edwards heads Middlesex Community College in Edison, N.J ... Roxanne Bradshaw, secretary-treasurer of the Na tional Education Association, calls for an" unrelenting campaign" to boost the number of bilingual and multilingual teachers to handle the surge in the Vol. 5 No. 15 ANIC LINK WEEKLY REP _ Aprll13, 1987 Texas: Cisneros Wins, Bonilla Forces Runoff Henry Cisneros was easily re-elected to his fourth term as mayor of San Antonio April 4 . Two other Hispanics were involved in major Texas municipal elections. Tony Bonilla, may oral candidate in Corpus Christi, forced a runoff there , and for the second time in the history of Dallas, a Hispanic was elected to the City Council. Cisneros won re-election to his fourth two year term with 7 4,250 votes, or 67%, in a city that is roughly 55% Hispanic. Cisneros, 39, won over businessman Phil Pyndus, who ran second with 34,414 votes. Three other candidates trailed. Bonilla, 51, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens from 1981 to 1983, ran second to Betty Turner in his bid to seek the mayoral seat of Corpus Christi. Bo nilla, an attorney, received 34% of the vote in a field of five . Forty-four percent of the vote went to Turner . No matter what the outcome of the April18 runoff election, Corpus Christi will experience a first-either a Hispanic or female elected as mayor . In Dallas, businessman AI Gonzalez, 50, was elected to Place 10 on the 11-member City Council, an at-large position. He received _ 58% of the vote. Hispanics number about 125,000, or about 13%, in Dallas . Gonzalez's closest competitor in a field of six, Verna Thomas, received 9,155 votes to Gonzalez's 49,207: And in El Paso, mayoral candidate Joe Mendoza narrowly missed forcing three-term incumbent Jonathan Rogers i nto a runoff. Mendoza received 11 ,395 votes, or 34%, to Rogers' 18,31 0 votes, or 54% . Latino Jobless Rate Dips The Hispanic jobless rate dropped to 9.0% in March from 9.6% in February, according to figures released April3 by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics. In March, 753,000 Latinos were unemployed, compared with 813,000 the previous month . The Hispanic jobless rate has dropped every month in 1987. Hispanics Set Sail for 1992 Building tuward a yearlong celebration in 1992, Hispanics nationwide are moving for ward with a multitude of tributes and projects to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Chris ' topher Columbus' arrival in the New World . Numerous Latino groups, with the National Hispanic Quincentenary Association at their •forefront, are developing cultural events, museum exhibits and media programs to venerate the birth of the Indo-Hispanic culture in the Americas. The Quincentenary will provide U.S. His panics with "an opportunity to tell the rest of America how much a part we are and have been of this nation," NHQA President Raul Yzaguirre said The association, headquartered at the National Council of La Raza, which Yzaguirre heads in Washington, D.C, is corn posed of educators, scholars, community or ganizers and business and religious leaders from throughout the country . Yzaguirre and other Latinos expressed concern over the direction of the national celebration after Congress created the Chris topher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Corn mission in 1983. Its 30 members, most ap pointed by the president and the Congress, initially included only three Hispanics: chairman John G oudie, a Miami realtor, former. Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Ferre and Jane Garcia, also Puerto Rican, president of the Bronx Museum of Art. Cuban American Tirso del Junco, a Los Angeles surgeon and former chief of the California GOP, was added later. Ten Italian Americans, but not one Mexican American or Spanish American, were named to the official body . _./ "We are concerned," Yzaguirre said. "But this is not the time to fight We want to work with them." Francisco Martinez-Alvarez, Goudie's as sistant, said the two groups were in contact and that the commission is encouraging the creation of committees to coordinate state efforts, especially in those states with high Hispanic populations. Puerto Rico has already created such a committee. Next month, King Juan Carlos of Spain will visit the island to attend a meeting of the lbero-American Conference of the Na tional Commissions for the Celebration of the 500th Anniversary of the Discovery of America Encounter of Two Worlds. This will mark the first visit by a Spanish monarch to Puerto Rico . continued on page 2 Farm Worker Legalization to Expand The U .S. Agriculture Department expects to release this week guidelines that would expand greatly the definition of undocumented agricultural workers eligible for legalization under the new immigration law. The Immigration Reform and Control Act includes a special legalization program for agricultural workers who performed "seasonal agricultural services" for at least 90 days in the year ending May 1, 1986. The program begins June 1. Non-agricultural workers who apply for legalization must have lived here continuously since before Jan. 1, 1982. The law does allow for brief absences . A confidential draft of the Agriculture Depart ment's rules obtained by The New York Times defines the special agriculture workers as those who have worked in the cultivation of fruits, vegetables and "other perishable com modities." Included among the commodities are"Christ mas trees, cut flowers, herbs, hops, horticultural specialties, Spanish reeds, spices, sugar beets and tobacco." When the final version of the immigration law was shaped by legislatorS, transcripts of congressional debate reveal that lawmakers specifically intended to cover farmers whose produce would spoil if not picked when ripe. Among such produce were tomatoes, cherries, grapes, peaches and lettuce. Sally an analyst with the Agriculture Department's Office of Economics involved in the formulation of the department's rules, would not cor:n.!llent on the draft She said, however, that some revisions were anticipated . APR 1 < 1987

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Texans Call for Legalization Delay Texas Hispanic religious, social and labor groups have joined state Agriculture Com missioner Jim Hightower in calling for chan ges in legalization requirements under the new immigration law, especially the definition of agricultural workers. Members of the newly formed Texas Im migration Policy Task Force were in Wash ington April1 to express their fears that the new law could put some farmers out of business, discriminate against Hispanic workers and adversely impact the state's agricultural industry, which provides 22% of Texas' jobs. The . Texas grQup said that many farm workers in the state will . not qualify for legalization because ranch hands , poultry workers and others are not included in the "field worker'' definition. Hightower called for a delay of the May 5 implementation date, saying neither the state nor the Immigration and Naturalization Service are ready to handle it. INS spokesmen said the agency is not considering delaying the May 5 date . ' "The reality of it is we are finding out now that a lot of our agricultural industries that have neveradmitted to having undocumented workers are now saying they do," said Norma Plasencia, a facilitator for the task force. 'Set Asides' Illegal, Says Fed. Judge Grovers and Sons Co., a Minneapolis con tractor, after Fulton County did not award the low-bidding firm an airport paving contract because it failed to meet the minority sub contractor requirement. Santiago Loses, Soliz in Chicago Nail Biter With 93% of the vote counted in the Chicago April? runoff election, incumbent 25th Ward Alderman Miguel Santiago appeared to lose his seat to challenger Raymond Figueroa while the race between Alderman Juan Soliz and opponent Ambrosio Medrano_ in Ward 31 remained in doubt as of April B. Figueroa received 6,657 votes to Santiagds 5 ,924. Soliz was just three votes ahead of Medrano, 4,713 to 4,71 0. The unofficial tallies were provided by the Chicago Board of Elections. Both Santiago and Soliz have voted with opposing factions against newly re-elected Mayor Harold Washington on the So-member City Council. Washington, who won re-election with 53% of the vote, won 55% of the Hispanic vote, according to one exit poll. In other election news, Eddie Munoz was elected mayor of Gallup, N.M., April?. Munoz had previously served as Gallup mayor from 1957 to 1969. A U .S. Department of Transportation program requiring state and municipal governments receiving federal money to set goals for mi nority contractor participation was ruled un constitutional by a federal judge in Atlanta April1. U.S. District Judge J. Owen Forrester said programs such as one in Fulton County, Ga., which required that at least 20% of work go to minority subcontractors, are unconstitutional because they were not established to correct past wrongs. Hispanic Groups Move Toward 1992 "You obviously see the negative impact it (affirmative action) is having on non-minority contractors. They don't like the program, they think ifs unworkable and they think that ifs just reverse discrimination," said David Morales, executive director for the National Hispanic Association of Construction Enterprises. . Morales' advocacy organization tracks such litigation and believes future U.S. Supreme Court decisions will uphold the constitutionality of affirmative action programs in awarding construction contracts. Department of Justice attorneys who handled the case are reviewing the ruling but any appeal will depend on Transportation Depart ment officials, said Justice spokeswoman Deborah Burstion-Wade. The Justice Depart ment has spearheaded a drive to kill a 1965 executive order requiring hiring goals for federal contractors. The ruling involved a 1982 suit filed by S.J. Garcia Enters LA. Race Alex Garcia, a 14-year veteran of the California legislature who lost his state Senate seat to Art Torres in a bruising battle in 1982, entered the 1 0-person field for Gloria Molina's 56th District Assembly seat Apri11. Primary election day is May 12. When he entered the state Assembly in 1968, Garcia, now 57, was the lone Hispanic in the 120-memberCalifornia legislature. Molina and long-time foe Richard Alatorre both have endorsed Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of Congressman Ed Roybal, in the Los Angeles Eastside district after Molina joined Alatorre on the Los Angeles City Council . this year. 2 continued from page f The various Smithsonian museums plan exhibitions, beginning this summer, to mark . the 1992 an . niversary. The Museum of Am e. rican History plans an exhibition on early Hispanic settlement in North America; the Museum of American History will highlight America before Columbus and the Office of Folklife Programs will emphasize Latin Ame rican and Caribbean cultures . Lectures on Hispanic culture and contri butions are planned thro1,1ghout the nation by De Baca Answers Critics Republican National Hispanic Assembly Chairman Fernando de Baca has issued a call for an April 25 executive committee meeting in New Jersey following the closing of RNHA offices and suspension of the or ganization by Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf. De Baca told Weekly Report April? that he never received a letter from Fahrenkopf sever ing support from the RNC auxiliary body . "Frank Fahrenkopf has closed the doors of the Republican Party to the Hispanic com munity," de Baca said, calling the chairman's actions "capricious and malicious." ' He also said the $60,000 that RNC claims is owed it by RNHA was spent to advance Republican party efforts to win the Hispanic vote. In addition, de Baca said RNHA is due $30,000 from a fundraiser held in October. Three RNHA state chairmen, including Bill Wallace of Arkansas, also chided Fahrenkopf for his actions. . Several other state chairmen who have refused to recognize de Baca as the re elected chair have formed an ad hoc committee to organize an . election convention in Las Vegas on May 8 and 9. De Baca said he has called a constitutional convention for that date, also in Las Vegas. groups such as the Academic Association for the Quincentenary, based in Washington, D.C., the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Foundation in Denver, and the American His torical Association QuincehtenaryCommittee in Arizona Courses on Puerto Rican heritage are plan ned at several New Jersey colleges by the International Columbian Quincentenary Alliance. Evangelization in the New World will be celebrated by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops through symposiums, com missioned papers and local parish celebrations. The NHQA plans to publish a handbook by 988 detailing ways to participate in the 1992 celebration. NHQA, the Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans and other groups are also planning television spots to highlight Hispanic achievements, studies to assess U.S. history books and plans for monuments, museums and paintings commemorating 500 years of Hispanic contributions. Melinda Machado Martinez Tactic Assailed Members of Florida's Commission on Hi&' panic Affairs accused Gov. Bob Martinez April2 of failing to budge in his decision to' oust the commission from the governor's office because Hispanic state legislators would not support a sales tax bill he favors. Rafael Peiialver, commission chairman, said Lt. Gov. Bobby Brantley told him that' "they had asked a number of Hispanic representatives to support the sales tax bill with no success." J .M. Stipanovich, Martinez's aide, said: "They (the representatives) indicated to us that the Hispanic commission remaining in the office was not that important." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Mary Sanchez-Jones ASSIMILATION? Ricardo Chavira Not for Me, Thank You It Worked for Me Throughout my life, friends, co-workers and virtual strangers have reminded me-because of the Mexican heritage obvious in my brown skin and black hair-that I am somehow different. They do so by asking two questions: "Do you speak Spanish?" and "Can you cook Mexican food?" The answer to both is "No." This always disappoints them. But I have no more idea howto"be" Mexican than they do. I grew up in Iowa, part of the Midwestern belt of states whose sugar beet and potato fields attracted large numbers of Mexican immigrants during the 1930s. My paternal grandparents reached Mason City, Iowa, at a time when the large Mexican population there encouraged the celebration and continuation of Mexican customs. They attended traditional Mexican weddings and observed holidays such as Cinco de Mayo. Amid such ethnic enthusiasm, my parents socialized with other Mexican youth at cultural functions where an appreciation of Mexican customs was kept alive by their parents. FREED TO ABANDON CUSTOMS By the time I was born in 1953, Iowa's Mexican population had begun to drop. Work in the sugar beet fields disappeared and the sugar beet plants closed . Mexican families without work moved on. Mexican customs and traditions began to lessen with my parents ' generation, a generation constantly exposed to "foreign" modes of speech, mannerisms and dress . As death took some of the earliest, staunchest "old country'' proponents, many second-generation families were freed to abandon their customs. By the early 1960s, a Mexican community was still in existence, but the collective consciousness of culture that marked the years of my parents ' journey to adulthood was over . Nothing about my family's lifestyle reflected our cultural heritage-not our food, clothing or speech. My siblings and I preferred Big Macs and french fries to rice and beans. Our parents spoke only English to us . We were the only Mexican family on Monroe Street, a pleasant middl&class neighborhood of lilac hedges and neat brick houses. Other Mexican families lived on South Jackson, the street where my father grew up infamous for a tradition of fights and lat&night disturbances among poor whites, blacks and Mexicans-or on the city's tough" North End." 1 never had any Mexican playmates. As I began to form a personal identity, I saw myself not as a Mexican born in the United States but as a United States citizen born of Mexican descent. I cultivated a cultural blindness that proved helpful during chilhood incidents of prejudice. NO MALICE IN HER WORDS In grade school, I struck up a friendship with a girl who belonged to an elite group of popular and attractive classmates . One day, she invited me to her home, but her mother sent me away. Our friendship was acceptable at school, but not at her home. As a teenager, I was on our high school cheerleading squad. One day after practice, the team was sitting around talking when the subject of nationality came up . We recited our backgrounds. No one was particularly impressed until I said mine: "I am Mexican." Amid the clamor and uproar came the observation from one girl, "But Mary Ann, we thought you were one of us." There was no malice in her words . Her remark showed me how successfully I had taught my friends to regard me as part of any group I chose to be with, not set apart by racial or cultural background any more than by occupation or physical ability. Though racial and cultural heritage are part of us, our intrinsic qualities as human beings-our courage, imagination and intelligencemake us who we are. (Mary Sanchez-Jones, of Forest City, Iowa, is a free-lance writer.) As you can tell, if you read the byline on this column, I'm not Irish or Chinese. I'm Hispanic . Chicano, to be exact. I am short dark and mustachioed. No shifty eyes, I'm afraid, but nobody making my acquaintance would take me for anything but what I am. rmake these points at the outset to establish a fact that continues to escape many of us: Whether or not we admit it, white America still sees us as different. Apart. Even alien. No matter how those Hispanics intent on assimilating note their many generations north of the border or argue that they don't speak Spanish or cook Mexican or Puerto Rican or Cuban food, we as a people have not lost ourselves in the Anglo mainstream . That is not necessarily a bad thing. The important issue is whether we have equal access to educational and employment opportunities, whether we are subject to unfair treatment from authorities. And presently we do not have that equality. Denying our ethnicity and insisting that we're just like Anglos won't get it for us, either. My experience is, in fact, that a strong affirmation of my"Mexicannes5' has been crucial in gaining whatever personal and professional success I've enjoyed. Throughout my childhood, my parents nurtured in me the knowledge that I was a Mexican who happened to be a third-generation, nativ& born American as well. They taught me Mexican history and insisted I speak Spanish. They took my brothers and me on vacation to Mexico to put us in touch with our heritage. WANTED TO BE BROWN ANGLO At first, I resisted such attempts to make me something other than the brown Anglo that I wanted to be . True, I had a name that was rendered unrecognizable in the mouth of my kindergarten teacher, but why couldn't I be just like the gringitos I saw in books and on our fuzzy black and-white TV? My parents' persistence paid off. By the time I entered McClay Junior High School in Pacoima, Calif., I was proud and excited to know that I shared a common gene pool and history with pr& Colombian Indians and Spanish settlers. My people had been the first in this part of the world, long before Plymouth Rock. The Chicano awareness movement of the late '60s, with its emphasis on ethnic pride, struck me as a bit passe, but welcome nonetheless. My Chicano sensitivity kept me in school. I was keenly aware of how few of us held college degrees and how fewer still became professional journalists. I wanted to reach those goals not just for myself but for Chicanos in general. 'MEXlCANNESS' GIVES ME EDGE As a Journalist, I tind that my "Mexicanness" has given me a valuable edge. While I have sufficiently good credentials-a B.A. and .M.A in my field plus years of newspaper and magazine writing and reporting experience I've been especially drawn to Mexico and Central America . I covered that region exclusively for five years, two of them in Mexico City. Even now, from my base in Washington, 1 'continue to specialize in Latin America Apart from the obvious advantage represented by my fluency in Spanish, I bring cultural sensitivity to reporting on that important area of the world. Consequently, I've been able to cover stories that only most adept Anglo reporters can match. I am not obsessed with being Chicano. lfs simply what I am. Assimilate? Me? Given the joys of an extra culture and language, I wouldn't want to. Has being"too Mexican" held me back? No more, certainly, than if 1 engaged in the charade of trying to be Anglo. (Ricardo Chavira, of Washington, D.C., covers the State Department for Time magazine.) Hi spa nic Link Weekly Report April 13, 1 98"1 3

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COLLECTING DISCOVERY OF AMERICA: The Organization of American States is publishing a newsletter on Ouincentenary activities in the United States and other member countries. Acopy of the newsletter is available free from the Office for the Commemoration • of the Ouincentennial, Organization of American StateS, 1889 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006. HISPANIC HERITAGE: "Piace,"the bi-monthly magazine of Pan ners for livable Places , contains articles on Hispanic heritage and a section on the Caribbean contribution to the Quincentenary celebration. . For a copy of "The 1992 Campaign: Discovering the Americas," Vol. 6, send $6 plus $1 for postage and handling to: Partners for livable Places, 1429 21st St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. ENDOWMENTS AND GRANTS: The National Endowmentforthe Humanities is sponsoring several fellowships and grants for projects related to the Quincentenary. One program offers individual scholar ships for research on topics relating to the New World. For more information and application guidelines, write or call: Public Affairs Office, National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 409, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0438. QUINCENTENARY NEWSLETTER: The first issue of the "Aca demic Association for the Quincentenary 1492 1992" newsletter is available by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to the association at: P.O. Box 9481, Washington, D . C . 20016. The new& letter details the history of the organization and contains membership information. ENCUENTRO: A Colombian Quincentenary newsletter, "Encuentro, w is published quarterly by the Latin American Institute of the University of New Mexico as a clearinghouse of information on activities and organizations planning events for the Quincentenary. For a free copy, send a request to Encuentro, Latin American Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N .M. 87131 (505) 277-5985. GERONTOLOGY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM: The Asociaci6n Nacional Pro Personas Mayores is sponsoring Hispanic gerontology internships. Applicants should have five years work experience in human services or a college degree in any human service field. Appli cation deadline is April17. The six-month program offers a monthly stipend of $1,167. For more i nformation, contact: Carmela Acosta Cooper at (213) 487-1922. CONNECTING : QUINCENTENARY GROUP RECEIVES $30,000 The Puerto Rican Quincentennial Commission has received $30,000 from the Esso Standard Oil Company toward restoration work on the 137-year-old chapel of the Seminario Conciliar of San 1/defonso in San Juan . HISTORIAN APPOINTED Herman J. Viola, a historian and author, has been appointed director of Quincentenary programs for the Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution. He was the curator for the Smithsonian's exhibition titled "Magnificent Voyagers: The U.S. Exploring Expedition , 1838-1942." Viola joins Magali Carrera, who was appointed as the Institution's coordinator of Quincentenary Research and Planning in July 1985. HISPANIC INFLUENCE IN DESIGN ARTS The Design Arts Program of the National Endowment of the Arts is conducting a research project to identify organizations and individuals concerned with Hispanic, Portuguese and Brazilian influences in the design arts, including architecture, urban design and historical preservation. Partners for livable Places is conducting the survey. Send information of. such programs to partners at: 1429 21st St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 887-5990. QUINCENTENARY CONTACTS Following are a few of the organizations and people to contact concerning Hispanic involvement in Quincentenary activities: Christopher Columbus Qulncentenary Jubilee Commission, John N. Goudie, Chairman, 1801 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 632-1992 . Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans, Pedro de Mesones, President and Executive Director, 1612 20th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 328-0486. National Conference of Catholic Bishops, Pablo Sedillo, Executive Director, Secretariat of Hispanic Affairs, 1312 Massachusetts Ave. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 659-6876. National Hispanic Quincentennlal Commission, Raul Yzaguirre, . President, 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. The Foundation for Arts and Cultural Exchange Services, 55 Hudson St., New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 513-7892. Calendar Studies of the Californias and the city of San Diego . Charlotte Fajardo (619) 265 MINORITIES AND CANCER SYMPOSIUM University of Texas M .D. Anderson Hospital Houston April 22 THIS WEEK LUNCHEON SEMINAR Washington, D.C. April 15 District of Columbia Superior Court Judge Ricardo Urbina will address the Chamber of Commerce. Linda Mayo (202) 296 LITERACY CONFERENCE San Antonio April 15 "Literacy: The First Chapter in the American Dream" is the theme of the 21st annual conference of SEA Jobs for Progress Inc. Workshops , seminars and panel discussions addressing the nation's growing illiteracy problem and steps Hispanics can take to find solutions will be presented. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will speak. Allison Parker(214) 631 EMPLOYERS AND IMMIGRATION San Diego April 16 How the new immigration law will affect employers will be explored during a confere nce sponsored by San Diego State University's Institute for Regional 4 AWARD DINNER Chicago April 16 The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Funds Chicago office is hosting a dinner to honor several community leaders. George Munoz, president of the Chicago School Board, will get the Public Service Award and the Civic Leadership Award will ; .go to Mary Gonzalez Koenig, executive director for Spanish Coalition for Jobs. Mari Fohrman (312) 427 COMING SOON CATHOLIC EDUCATION CONVENTION National Catholic Educational Association New Orleans April 20 Patricia Feistritzer (202) 293 ENGLISH TEACHERS CONVENTION Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Miami April21 Maria Santamaria (305) 376 HISPANIC MEDIA CONFERENCE National Association of Hispanic Journalists . Los Angeles Aprif22-25 Jocelyn C6rdova (202) 783-6228 April13, 1987 Paula Gray (713) 792 FESTIVAL LATINO University of California at Los Angeles Los Angeles April 26 John G . Watson (21, 3) 825-1901 LANGUAGE MINORITY STUDENTS SEMINAR Multifunctional Resource Center/Northern California San Jose, Calif . Aprii30-May 2 Bruce Akizuki (415) 834 SPOTLIGHT DECADE OF THE HISPANICS: Image de Chicago , an organization concerned with employment of Hispanics, is sponsoring a training seminar on"The 1980sThe Decade of the Hispanics : Is It !'=act or Fiction?." on May 1 in Chicago. Panelists will discuss Hispanics and the 1990 census, employment of Hispanic women and education. Frank Casillas former assistant secretary of labor for employmeni and training under the Reagan administration, will be the luncheon speaker. For more information . contact William Luna (312) 523. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT MANAGER The Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles is offering outstanding career opportunities for two experienced professionals .in the field of redevelopment project manage ment. Senior Project Manager(Salary$55,000 $69,00 plus an excellent management benefits package). This position is respon sible for supervis i ng a variety of project mana gers and for ensuring the direction and ordination of all redevelopment activities within numerous project areas. The success f ul candidate must have more than 6 years senior management level experience develop ing program objectives and direct i ng multiple projects in a complex environment, a demons trated record of achievement in the field of redevelopment/community development, and exceptional project management and com munications skills . Project Manager(Salary$50,000-$62 ,000 plus an excellent management benefits pack age) . This position is responsible for formulat ing , directing,coordinating and implementing all redevelopment activities within one or more assigned project areas. This position requires more than 5 years experience man aging redevelopment/community develop' ment activities, plus strong project manage ment skills , the ability to coordinate the work of technical staff and excellent communications skills . APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Resumes with salary history and list of professional accomplishments mus t be sent by April 24, 1987, to : Project Management, C/o Human . Resources Department, Los Angeles Com munity Redevelopment Agency, 354 South Spring St, Los Angeles, Calif. 90013. Indicate which position you are interested in. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply . TRANSLATORS WANTED TRANSLATORS wanted , English and Portu guese to Spanish and English and Spanish to Portuguese . Professional translat i ng experience and knowledge of Catholic Church essential. Journalistic background helpful. Part-time positions at $10 per hour. Letters of application and resume to National Catholic News Service , Attention : Translation Desk, 1312 Massachusetts Ave . NW , Washington, D . C . 20005. ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ASSESSMENT SUNY/Empire State College at Buffalo, N.Y . Innovative college emphasiz i ng individual degree programs seeks Assistant-Dean to begin 8 / 87 to provide leadership for: evaluation of prior learning process; review of all degree programs& portfolios; training expert evalu ators; counseling students regarding college policies & assessment & program planning . Administrative skills, demonstrated interest in alternative programs & adult students, signi ficant teaching or related academic experience, master's required ; doctorate preferred . Letter& resume by4/24/87 to: Janet Zim mer , Director PersonneV AA, SUNY/ESC , Room 54 , 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. An AA/EOE H is pani c Link Weekly Report EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK FACUL TV VACANCY SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS& TECHNOLOGY SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE at ROCHESTER, N.Y., a national leader in non traditional higher education, was founded in 1971 as part of the State University of New York. At ESC, each student works with a faculty member to develop a degree program & a series of learning contracts. Through the assessment process, ESC evaluates for credit each studenfs prior college-level learning from work & life e x periences. Required: Doctorate in a field of science or technology; college-level teaching ; experience with experience or significant interest in working with adult students & non-traditional modes of instruction ; interest in developing new instructional strategies, using emerging computer & telecommunication technology . Tenure track, assistant professor position available 7/1 /87; salary dependent on qualifications & experience . For information call: Dean Victor Montana at (716) 244-3641 . Letter & resume by 4/24/87 to: Ms. Janet Zimmer, Director/Personnel & AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm. 74, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N . Y . 12866. FACUL TV VACANCY MENTOR IN THE ARTS SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE at ROCHESTER, N.Y., a national leader in non traditional higher education , was founded in 1971 as part of the State University of New York. At ESC, each student works with a faculty member to develop a degree program & a series of learning contracts. Through the assessment process, ESC evaluates for credit each studenfs prior college-level learning from work & life experiences. Required : Ph.D . in Humanities with a field in art or M .F.A. with substantial breadth & experience in arts ; college-level teaching ; broad interest in the arts & interdisciplinary approaches ; interest in working with diverse adult students & non-traditional modes of instruction . Tenure track, assistant professor position available 9/1 /87; salary dependent on qualifications & experience . For information call: Dean Victor Montana at(716) 244-3641. Letter& resume by4/24/87 to: Ms. Janet Zimmer , Director/Personnel& AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm. 64, 1 Union Ave. , Saratoga Springs , N . Y . 12866 AA/EOE NY NEWYOAK IT INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Opportunity and excellenc& ... tor today and tomorrow Center for Business and Economics FuiHime positions for Fall 1987 ; assistant/associate professors at camp u ses in Manhattan and Long Island . • Marketing: Ph. D . required . e Business Law : J.D. required ; Master's preferred . • Management: Ph. D . required. • Quant. Methods/Statistics: Ph. D . required. • Accounting: CPA/MBA required . e Hotel Management Master's required ; Ph. D . preferred . • Secretarial Science/Business Education; Master's required. Send vita to: Dr. Carol H . Schwartz , Dean, NYIT Center for Business and Economics , Old Westbury , N.Y. 11568. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To !)lace an ad in Marketplace , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads With borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by ___________ _ Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code & Phone--------t;

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Ans & Entertainment language television In this country. Telemundds primary competitor, Unlvlslon, carries more than six hours of nove/a programming a day -a third of Ita dally schedule. IF YOU LOVE NOVELAS ••• A newly formed group of U.S. Spanish language TV stations plans to produce a series of nove/as focusing on the dally lives of Hispanics In the United States. Telemundo Group Inc. will offer dally "block'' programming to member stations In New York, Chicago, Miami and Los Angeles. TO BE LISTED: The Washington, D.C.-based Hispanic lnst"ute tor the Performing Arta' plana to have ready by summer Its 1987/1988 Guide to Hispanic Cultural World. Planned programming includes two nove/as currently being co produced by Telemundo In Venezuela, Jacques Costeau documen taries dubbed in Spanish and weekly boxing and baseball programs. The guide will carry free listings of all "cultural related not-for-profit organizations, Institutions and agencies and for cultural related services of a commercial or business nature based In the D.C., Maryland and V!rglnla areas." New York's Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors, meanwhile, has Its biennial Directory of Hispanic Talent already available. The organization considers Its guide, which lists over250 Hispanic actors and actresses, "an indispensable casting tool for anyone involved in reaching the Hispanic market." Telemundo Group Inc.'s corporate parent is John Blair& Co., a New York-based diversified media company. The group owns TV stations KVEA in los Angeles, WNJU in New York, WSCU in Miami ' and WKAQ in S a n J uan, Puerto Rico. lts"network'' programming is also carried by WCI U in Chicago . "This is just the be ginning of a campaign to make Telemundo the major programmer for the U.S. Hispanic market," says Donald G . Raider, group CEO and president. Telemundo owns eight studios in Puerto Rico and completing two more facilities there. The group adds it is "building a stable of writers and producers assigned especially to (the U.S. Hispanic nove/a) project" ONE LINERS: Edith Maxier's Lissette Fa/c6n is playing in New York City Apri113 and 14 as part of the Latino Playwrighfs Reading Workshop Series. . . The 1987 season of the San Diego Repertory Theatre opens April15 with Luis Valdez's I Don't Have to Show You No Stinkin' Badges. . . An exhibit of paintings and drawings by Mexican artist Alejandro Romero opens April15 at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America in Washington, D.c: . . .. Nove/as, or soap operas, continue being the mainstay of SpanishMedia Report CONTRACTOR SELECTED: The Immi gration and Naturalization Service has selected a partnership, including two Southam California based Hispanic communications agencies, to inform the public about opportunities and requirements of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The S10.7 million contract, signed April7, calls for The Justice Group to direct an infor mation and awareness campaign geared to aliens eligible for legalization, all employers in the United States and the general public. The Justice Group is made up of Coronado Communications La Agencia de Orc4 and the international public relations firm Hill and Knowlton. The group will be based in Hill and Knowlton's Los Angeles office and use a multifaceted media approach to disseminate the information. 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street' NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) Z ' 1)280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector t:ricksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. Melinda Machado , Mike Orenstein , Julio Laboy . . Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Rafael Tejeda, Zolla Elias . Yanir(' • Sruz. No portion o f 1tspanlc Weekly Report may be reproduced or broad casr i n llny form without advance permission Annualt .uoscrlptton (50 Issues) 198. Trial subscription (13 Issues) 128. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word . Display ads are $35 l)er column Inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday ofsame week. Multiple use rates on request. INTERVIEW SLOTS: Developing or ex perienced journalists who want to talk with representatives of some 20 print publications at the National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles may still arrange appointments. Interviews will be held on April24. For details, contact Lucienne L6pez Loman at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. THREE WINNERS: Three East Coast high school seniors-from New York, Washington, and Miami won the 1987 National A88ocl8tlon of Hispanic Journalists' national hiqh school writing contest Each • will : receive' an ;expense paid trip, with chaperone, to the fift'ii annual National Hi& panic Media Conference in Los Angeles April 22-25. The awards will be presented there. Winners were: English essay contest Henry Harris, of Washington, D.C., for his essay on Pedro Guzman, leader of Casa El Salvador there; Spanish essay: Liezi Guzman, . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas of New York, for her essay on actress Rita Moreno; and English published work category: Estebantorres, of Miami,foran article on the poor working conditions in his high schoofs science laboratory. IMMIGRATION LAW SERIES: Radio Blllnglie KSJV in Fresno, Calif., will develop a series of six one-hour discussions/ debates on the Simpson-Rodino immigration law. Funding of $25,000 from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting will aid the station in producing the three English and three : Spanish programs for distribution, BILINGUAL BASEBALL: In Los Angeles, KTLATV, which pioneered use of stereo television sets to broadcast bilingually, will use the system in its 48 telecasts of California Angels baseball games this season. A button on the specially equipped sets allows simultaneous transmission in Spanish on an extra audio channel. -Julio Laboy and Charlie Ericksen ' Hispan ic Link Weekly Report