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Hispanic link weekly report, April 20, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 20, 1987
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Making The News This Week
Los Angeles Archbishop Roger Mahony sends a letter to U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Commissioner Alan Nelson, saying that all family members of individuals who qualify for legalization under the immigration law, including the parents of both spouses, should be given legal status... Illinois state Sen. Miguel del Valle, Chicago Aldermen Luis Gutierrez and Jesus Garcia, and the Chicago Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs call a hearing to stop the deployment of the Illinois National Guard in Honduras.. .Texas state Rep. Lena Guerrero (D-Austin) introduces a bill that would make it illegal to discriminate against AIDS victims. Guerrero charges that the people suffering from the always fatal disease are discriminated
against in jobs, housing and insurance coverage.. .James Raymond Diaz, an architect with the San Francisco firm of Kaplan, McLaughlin and Diaz, is named to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects. Being named a fellow is the highest honor the profession .confers... The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women names singer, dancer and actress. Rita Moreno as its chairwoman for its Bicentennial project titled Nosotros, El Pueblo... A sheriffs deputy in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., shoots and kills 19-year-old ' Leonard Falcon. The deputy mistook Falcon’s laser tag plastic gun fora real weapon while investigating a report of armed prowlers... Norberto Luna, 24, rescued after being trapped six hours in the rubble of two collapsed buildings in New York, promises to buy the rescuers anything they please. They choose a case of beer...

$â–  SCORECARD
States Where Action -PASSED BEATEN
‘Official English’ Battle Widens
31 States Consider Legislation This Year
In yeanof
Arkansas 1987
Mississippi 1987
North Dakota 1987
California 1986
Georgia 1986
Virginia 1986
Nevada 1985
Indiana 1984
Kentucky 1984
Tennessee 1984
Illinois 1923
Nebraska 1920
in 1987
Arizona
Colorado
Maryland
Montana
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Mexico
Oklahoma
South Dakota
Washington
West Virginia
Wyoming
(1987 actions current as of April 6.)
Thirty-one of the nation’s 50 state legislatures considered- with most still weighing - actions to make English the official state or national language this year, a Weekly Report survey has disclosed.
Official-English proponents are reaching millions of people in mail campaigns to exert pressure on lawmakers to restrict multilingualism.
Language-equity groups, including many Hispanic organizations, are calling for much greater funding of programs to help non-English speakers learn English while fighting proposed restrictions on their language rights
Both sides are gearing for a lengthy battle
Delay Sought on Employer Sanctions
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce asked the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to delay employer sanctions for six months, during an April 10 Senate Judiciary Immigration Subcommittee hearing.
Citing the complexity of the law, a chamber spokesman said employers needed more time to understand the law before sanctions go into effect June 1.
Other organizations, such as the National Council of La Raza, United Farm Workers and the U.S. Catholic Conference also called into
Notice to Subscribers
You will not be receiving Weekly Report next week.
Weekly Report publishes 50 editions annually. Its two non-publishing weekv are in December following Christmas and April following the National Hispanic Media Conference. Both weeks are proceeded by special eight-page editions.
We hope you find this edition on the national Official-English movement informative and useful. If you would like to order additional copies, see Marketplace, page 7.
Your next issue will be May 4.
Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher
question proposed regulations for implementing the new law.
There will be no delay in implementation, said INS spokesman Verne Jervis, adding the agency will begin accepting amnesty applications as planned on May 5.
“We’ve made some progress,” said Rick Swartz, President of the National Immigration Refugee and Citizenship Forum, concerning INS rules on legalization for families.
In the meantime, INS has yet to receive appropriations from Congress to implement the new law, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson told senators during the hearing.
Martinez Accepts Proposal
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez and a Hispanic state legislator announced a compromise April 9 in the dispute over the future of the state Commission on Hispanic Affairs. But the commission must still decide to agree to the compromise.
The plan, developed by Arnhilda Gonzalez-Quevedo (R-Coral Gables), would keep the commission within the governor's office, but transfer its budget and operations to the state Department of Administration.
The commission had not decided whether to accept the proposal by press time.
which appears certain to increase in intensity in the ’90s and likely to extend into the 21 st century.
Official-English advocacy group membership is booming. U.S. English, founded by former U.S. Sen. S. I. Hayakawa in 1983, nearly doubled its members (minimum dues are $20) last year- from 150,000 to 275,000, according to its director of government affairs* Steve Workings.
Another group, English First, has enrolled 200,000 members since opening in 1986, according to its president, former Virginia legislator Larry Pratt Pratt, who sent out five million mailers last year, explained that any donation qualifies an individual for membership.
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, League of United Latin American Citizens and other Hispanic groups are broadening their lobbying and court efforts against the movement. The National Puerto Rican Coalition has made the issue its major imperative for the coming year.
So far this year (as of April 6), Official-English groups have had more success in 12 Bills Killed or Withdrawn introducing bills than passing them. Of the 31 proposals, 12 have been defeated or withdrawn. Only in Arkansas, Mississippi and North Dakota have initiatives passed. That brings the number of states with officiah English laws to 12.
Only two official-English states have Hispanic populations over 100,000 (based on 1980 census figures). California passed its referendum last November by a 2-to-1 margin. Illinois passed its law in 1923.
Attempts to pass official-English legislation !in three other states with large Hispanic -^populations - Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico - failed this year.
In Texas, 60 state House members signed a petition against a proposed constitutional amendment, nine more than necessary to kill it.
The co-sponsor of a Massachusetts bill said he sees it “going nowhere this year.”
continued on page 2


Movement ‘ Plays to Xenophobes’
continued from page 1
In 1981, Hayakawa, a Republican from California, proposed an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to make English the official language. According to Workings, legislators have introduced similar bills every year since,1 but not one has been voted out of committee.
With official-English opponent Paul Simon (D-lll.) chairing the Senate Subcommittee on: the Constitution, the chances for action on a federal amendment this year appear to be slim. Workings reacted: â– 
“The women’s suffrage movement took 60 years... We don’t have to amend the Constitution to make progress: Sometimes the Intimidation Charged legislative process can be more important than the legislation itself.”
He complained of intimidation by Hispanic groups. He said that while he was testifying for a bill in New Mexico, a student group, Movimiento Estudiantil de Chicanos en Aztlan, harassed him and the legislators.
“I was heckled. I was abused verbally and nearly physically.”
He added that in Arizona, “the intimidation just ruined the opposition there.”
Pratt commented: “To the credit of folks on
the other side,___they’ve convinced a lot of
the politicians that political wisdom dictates following their line.”
Mario Moreno, an attorney with MALDEF, said Hispanic groups can usually defeat official-‘Nativist Fears’ Aroused English legislation when they have the opportunity to make their case.
Both sides use grassroots lobbying. For example, official-English opponents recruited 50 witnesses to testify in Texas, according to the National Association for Bilingual Education. U.S. English regularly urges members through its newsletter to contact lawmakers in support of its cause.
According to Hispanic leaders, arguments in favor of official-English often play on nativist fears of the public.
Alan Alvarez, an attorney with the Miami-based Spanish American League Against Discrimination, said that he will not accuse
the U.S. English leadership of racism. Yet, he said, when he appears on radio talk shows, people “call on the phone and they’re talking about ‘these people’ and ‘they and they re talking about Hispanics... There are people who do not want to mix with Hispanics.” Weekly Report received a copy of an anonymous letter, dated Aug. 3, i 986, circulated to some members of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce It said, “Hispanics in America represent a very dangerous, subversive force that is bent on taking over our nation’s political in-: stitutions for the purpose of imposing Spanish as the official language of the United States and, indeed, of the entire Western Hemisphere” A report from the Council for Inter-American Security, documenting what it called a plan by activists to create a Chicano nation in the southwestern United States, accompanied the letter.
Moreno, citing projections that say 48,000 people will be on waiting lists for Los Angeles Federal Support Sought area adult English classes by the end of this school year, said, “The thing they (official-English groups) should be doing is supporting efforts like the English Proficiency Act.” The act provides $ 10 million in federal support for adult English training.
Workings said U.S. English supports English training but has reservations about the costs.
“ I just don’t think that our government has the money to assign a classroom and teacher” to all who want training, he said.
Official-English groups see California-style referendums as a means to combat what they view as state governments overriding the will of the people.
U.S. English plans to put an English-language amendment on the Florida ballot in State Amendments Watched 1988, Workings said. The group has 125,000 of the required 350,000 signatures according to a U.S. English spokeswoman in Florida “I don’t really think it (the Florida amendment) is going to get on the ballot," Alvarez said. However, if it does it could very well pass, he added.
U.S. English Leader Says She Is Quitting
The executive director of U.S. English told Hispanic Link April 9 that she will step down as soon as a successor is found.
Gerda Bikales has headed U.S. English since its founding in 1983.
After more than four years as the nation’s most visible official-English advocate, Bikales said she has had enough for a while.
“I’m weighing my options. Maybe take a rest. Sleep late,” she commented._________
Workings said legislators in Colorado and Arizona, where official-English bills were withdrawn, are considering sponsoring similar initiatives in their states.
Hector Gonzalez, executive director of tlt4/ Washington State Commission on Mexicah , American Affairs, told Weekly Report he expects a campaign to put an official-English constitutional amendment on the 1988 ballot there.
Hispanic Link’s survey of official-English states found no changes in education or government policy resulting from official-English legislation.
State constitutional amendments are a different matter. MALDEFs Moreno said that under California’s amendment courts may be able to prohibit foreign-language advertising for instance.
Stanley Diamond, who heads U.S. English’s California office, called that possibility“utter ‘Advertising in English Only’ nonsense.”
“We wouldn’t dream of getting into that kind of economic nonsense,” he said, adding, that the issue is government use of English.
However, Diamond, who is also on U.S! English’s six-person board of directors, told reporters in 1985: “We object to Philip Morris or any other companies who are advertising in languages other than English. We certainly would feel that the corporations, the telephone company with the Spanish Yellow Pages, should change.. .We will do everything to put this advertising in English only.”
In a September 1985 letter to the Federal Communications Commission, U.S. English proposed that radio licenses be limited so that “under no circumstances would the foreign-language stations on the radio dial exceed the English ones?’ in any given market “English has been largely crowded out of the radio dial Courts Will Interpret in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley,” it said.
Hispanic groups also say they fear losing bilingual services such as 911 emergency service.
“MALDEF.. .is one of those who orchestrated this campaign of deceit and scare tactics and fear - you’re going to lose 911 emergency services, social services, translators- all lies, unconscionable,” Diamond added.
One thing Moreno and Diamond agree on is that no one can predict precisely how the courts will interpret the California English amendment. - Mike Orenstein
(Research assistance by Julio Laboy)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Tower Being Built to Eye Refuge
A 25-foot watchtower is being built to monitor activities at Casa Oscar Romero, a Central American refugee center near Brownsville, Texas, said opponents of the sanctuary site.
Casa Romero expects to open on a six-acre plot by mid-May following its ouster from San Benito, a nearby town. That city is levying a daily fine on the Catholic Archdiocese of Brownsville, which runs the center, until it relocates.
“We’ve been trying to persuade the Catholic bishop here to move the operation away from the neighborhood environment,” said businessman Joe King, a member of the United We Stand Committee, which was organized to oppose Casa Romero’s relo-
cation to Brownsville.
Herndn Gonzalez, a diocese spokseman, said: “We’ve suggested that if people want to see Casa Romero and know what goes on there, that they ought to volunteer their time and they can be on the property every day.”
The committee plans to monitor the site from the tower with video cameras and night glasses. The tower is to be marked with a sign calling it the“lllegal Alien Movement Control Tower."
King said local immigration officials have said Casa Romero is a “magnet that attracts illegal aliens into this country.” King also expressed concern about alien smuggling occurring at the refuge.
2


Nationwide Tally on ‘Official-English9 Activity
State Introduced Decision Nature Attributes State Introduced Decision Nature Attributes
Alabama 1986 defeated resolution 5 Montana 1987 defeated act 1
Alaska none Nebraska 1987 defeated act 1,4,6,7
Arizona 1987 withdrawn const, am. 1,2,3,7 1920 passed const, am. 1,4,7
Arkansas 1987 passed act 1 Nevada
California 1986 passed const, am. 1,6 AJR 11 1987 pending const, am. 1
Colorado 1987 withdrawn act 1 SJR 4 1985 passed resolution 5
Connecticut New Hampshire 1987 defeated resolution 5
SJR 19 1987 pending const, am. 1 New Jersey 1986 pending act 1
Bill 190 1987 pending act 1,2,3 New Mexico 1987 defeated act 1
I Delaware 1987 pending act 1 New York 1987 pending act 1
Florida none North Carolina
Georgia HB 158 1987 pending const, am. 1,6,9
Act 70 1986 passed resolution 1 SB 115 1987 pending act 1
HB 633 1987 pending act 1
North Dakota 1987 passed act 1
! Hawaii 1978 passed const, am. 10 Ohio 1987 pending act 1
Idaho none Oklahoma 1987 defeated resolution 5.
Illinois 1923 passed act 1 Oregon none
Indiana Pennsylvania
PL 1 1984 passed act 1 HB 77 1987 pending const, am. 1
SCR 44 1987 pending resolution 5 HB 233 1987 pending act 1
Iowa Rhode Island 1987 pending act 1
HF 362 1987 pending act 1,4 South Carolina
SF212 1987 pending act 1 S364 1987 pending act 1,2,3
Kansas 1987 pending act 1 S365 1987 pending const, am. 1,2,3
Kentucky 1984 passed act 1 South Dakota 1987 defeated act 1
Louisiana none Tennessee 1984 passed act 1,4
Maine none Texas 1987 pending const, am. 1,6
Maryland Utah none
HB703/86 1987 defeated act 7 Vermont none
HB948/86 1987 defeated act 3,7 Virginia 1986 passed act 1,7
Massachusetts 1987 pending act 1 Washington 1987 withdrawn const, am. 1,2,6
Michigan none West Virginia 1987 defeated act 1
Minnesota 1987 pending act 1 Wisconsin 1985 defeated const, am. 1
Mississippi 1987 passed act 1 Wyoming
Missouri HB 41 1987 withdrawn act 1
HB 359 1987 pending act 1 SF 70 1987 defeated act 1
HB 395 1987 pending act 3,7
ABBREVIATIONS: Const Am. - Constitutional Amendment SJR - Senate 4. Calls for all official proceedings or publications to be in English.
Joint Resolution, HB- House Bill, PL- Public Law, SCR- Senate Concurrent 5. Urges passage of federal official-English law or amendment
Resolution, HF - House File, SF - Senate File, AJR - Assembly Joint 6. Empowers citizens and businesspeople of state to sue to enforce official-English
Resolution. SB - Senate Bill. S - Senate Joint Resolution. law.
7. Declares English to be the basic language in public schools.
ATTRIBUTES (Actions current as of April 6, 1987) 8. States that law shall not apply when public health, welfare, safety and justice
1. Declares English to be the state’s official language. require the use of other languages.
2. Says the state shall not require use of any other language other than English. 9. Forbids the leglislature from passing any law which diminishes or ignores the
3. Permits bilingual education. (Note: this entry does not imply that other laws official status of English.
prohibit bilingual education, but that the statute specifically permits it.) 10. Declares English and Hawaiian to be the state’s official languages.
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart, Copyright 1987
Ferrer Favored for Bronx Presidency
New York City Councilman Fernando Ferrer is the new choice for Bronx borough president among most of his Bronx colleagues, it was announced by Democratic party officials April 10. The officials will vote this week on the matter.
Ferrer, 36, will be the youngest member of New York City’s powerful eight-member Board of Estimate and the second Hispanic borough president in recent history.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Ferrer resigned from the City Council April 10. He was required to do so by law before the vote on the presidency.
Ferrer will serve an interim term that expires at the end of the year. He has said he will be a candidate in November for the remaining two years of the former borough president’s term.
At least four of the six other City Council members from the Bronx are expected to April 20,1987
vote for Ferrer at a council meeting April 22.
Ferrer has been a full-time government worker all of his adult life. He was in legislative and borough president staff posts from 1976 until he was elected to the council in 1982.
Assemblyman Jose Serrano decided not to pursue a primary challenge against Ferrer for the borough presidency. Serrano will remain in the Assembly and possibly run for the seat of U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia, also from the Bronx. Garcia is currently under investigation for allegedly accepting bribes.


COLLECTING
Following are some of the major organizations that oppose or support the official-English movement.
U.S. ENGLISH: For a free brochure describing this organization and its goats, write: U.S. English, 142416th St N W, Washington, D.C. 20016.
SALAD: The Spanish American League Against Discrimination will send free of charge its position paper opposing official-Engiish laws to those who write to: SALAD, 900 S.W. First St., Miami, Fla. 20009.
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION: NPRC has recently prepared a position paper opposing official-Engiish. For a free copy, write NPRC at 1700 KSt. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006.
TOMAS RIVERA CENTER: This think tank has four publications covering official-Engiish:
“English-Language Amendments in the National Interests?: An Analysis of
Proposals to Establish Enaiish as the Official Language of the United
States;”
“California’s Non-English Speakers;”
“One Country, One Language: A Historical Sketch of English-Language
'Movements in the United States;” and
“Testimony on Proposition 63: Delivered to the Joint Legislative Committee
of the California Legislature.”
These publications cost $1 each or $3 for all four. To order, write: TRC, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA: For action alerts, background information and articles on official-Engiish write to: National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. N W, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. Attention: Rosemary Aguilar.
LULAC: The League of United Latin American Citizens has a booklet titled “The English Only Movement: An Agenda For Discrimination.” For a copy, send $2.00 plus postage to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001, or call Rudy Arredondo at (202) 628-8516.
ENGLISH FIRST: For newsletters and a copy of a speech by Secretary of Education William Bennett write: English First, 801 Forbes Place, Suite 102, Springfield, Va. 22151.
Sin pelos en la lengua
“I’m just a passenger in the Chevrolet of life..
- Anonymous Aztlan warrior
FIRST STOP: Washington, D.C. - Introducing his $50 million per year English Proficiency Act to the Senate press last month, Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) patiently explained the special need for federally assisted English literacy programs in Spanish-dominant communities where new immigrants are settling in large numbers.
Why, asked one solemn young reporter, couldn’t the congressman introduce a bill that would cause those folks to “disperse?”
The senator's stunned response included something about the Constitution or Bill of Rights or similar document which the reporter's editors obviously never brought to his attention.
SECOND STOP: El Paso, Texas- La Fe(The Faith) health clinic needs funds- about half a million dollars. So, perhaps inspired by Oral Robert’s $8 million threat from the White Man’s God, clinic director Pete Duarte announced on April 1 that he was to be sacrificed to Xochitlizquatl, the Goddess of Aztldn, in 40 days if he could not come up with the $500,000 to buy essential equipment (Aztldn, defines ,artist/writer Jos6 Antonio Burciaga, is that “mythical promised land of the Southwest from which the Aztecs came and are scheduled to return in the form of illegal aliens, Central Americans and Chicanos.”)
Xochi has led Duarte out onto the desert as the “ Let Pete Live” campaign grows and the checks come in.
Before wandering off, Duarte informed the caring world that contributions are not only deductible, but contributors will receive a Green Card providing legal residency in Aztldn.
Burciaga plugs: “Contributions may be sent to: The Let Pete Live Fund, P.O. Box 10640, El Paso, Texas 79996. And may your sun shine brighter.”
LAST STOP: Lily-white; Missouri - Addressing a middle-American crowd this month on education, President Reagan rambled: “We’re talking about teaching in both languages when the move should be if they’re going to be in America, they have to learn our language in order to get along. Teach them English.”
- Kay Barbaro
Calendar
THIS WEEK
CATHOLIC EDUCATION CONVENTION New Orleans April .20-23 The Rev. Vicente L6pez, associate director of the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs at the National Con ference of Catholic Bishops will celebrate the opening liturgy at the 84th annual National Catholic Education Association convention. “The Multi-Cultural Parish” and “Heads-You Win; Tails-1 Lose: A Call Hispanic Students Can Do Without” are two of the workshops offered.
Patricia Feistritzer(202) 293-5954
ENGLISH TEACHERS CONVENTION Miami April 21-25
Bilingual education and refugee concerns will be among the topics discussed during the 21 st annual convention of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.
Maria Santamaria (305) 376-1355
CHICANA LITERATURE COLLOQUIUM Irvine, Calif. April 22
“Charting New Frontiers in American Literature: Chicana Creativity and Criticism” is part of the Chicano/Latino Colloquium Series sponsored through the University of California at Irvine.
F6lix Rodriguez (714) 856-6463
HISPANIC MEDIA CONFERENCE Los Angeles April 22-25
Besides business meetingsfor various professional organizations, the National Association of Hispanic Journalist’s conference will feature Florida Gov. Bob Martinez, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Gloria Molina and Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Antonia Hern&ndez as guest speakers.
Frank Newton (202) 783-6228
MINORITIES AND CANCER SYMPOSIUM Houston April 22-25
“The Realities of Cancer in Minority Communities:’ symposium, sponsored by the University of Texas System Cancer Center, will include a panel on specific cancers affecting Hispanics.
Paula Gray (713) 792-3030
HISPANIC FEDERAL EXECUTIVES Washington, D.C. April 23 The Association of Hispanic Federal Executives will discuss the new federal employee retirement system during a dinner meeting.
Gil Chavez (202) 732-3673
MAYORS’ BALL Denver April 25
League of United Latin American Citizens Council 3022 is sponsoring the third annual Mayors' Ball,
featuring Denver Mayor Federico Peha as host More than 60 mayors from Texas, California, New Mexico, Arizona, Florida, Utah and Colorado have been invited as guests of honor.
Naomi Montoya (303). 986-4462
FESTIVAL LATINO Los Angeles April 26
An open house celebration of Hispanic arts, crafts and culture will be held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Latin Jazz artist Poncho Sdnchez will perform and actor Ren6 Enriquez is slated for a special appearance.
John Watson (213) 825-1901
COMING SOON
LANGUAGE MINORITY STUDENTS SEMINAR San Jose, Calif. April 30-May 2 “Enhancing Educational Opportunities for Language Minority Students!’ is the topic of a spring training institute sponsored by the Multifunctional Resource Center/Northern California Bruce Akizuki (415) 834-9458
DECADE OF THE HISPANICS Chicago May 1
“The 1980s - The Decade of the Hispanics: Is It Fact or Fiction?” is a training seminarsponsored by Image tie Chicago.
William Luna (312) 523-3406
5
April 20, 1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Larry Pratt
.. . English First
Making English the official language of the United States is an idea whose time has come.
It is something that generations of immigrants have taken for granted - when coming to the United States, one learns English. In fact, those immigrants were proud to have learned
It seems unfairforforeign-speaking groups to come to the United States and demand a right from their new country to not only have their language put on street signs and used in the delivery of government services, but also to have their children taught in their own languages, rather than in English.
The sons and daughters of the previous immigrants have objected to the demands of the current crop of newcomers who insist that their own languages be used as public languages in their new land.
Those who want to have a common language so communication can be facilitated, national harmony promoted and economic prosperity maximized are denounced by the Hispanic*Asian coalition as antiimmigrant and xenophobic.
Let's take a look at the charges. I am bilingual, having learned Spanish during the 23 years I have been married to my wife, who was born in Panama and whose first language was Spanish. My wife is a naturalized American who passed her citizenship examination using the English she has mastered.
WILLIAM BENNETT SAID IT WELL
The drive to make English the official language of the country cannot be characterized fairly as an effort to stamp out other languages and cultures. It is an effort to have a common language, even to have a bilingual people, but also to have one plane of communication on which all can meet.
Secretary of Education William Bennett said it well: "The rise in ethnic consciousness, the resurgence of cultural pride in recent decades is a healthy thing. But a sense of cultural pride cannot come at the price of proficiency in English, our common language.”
The word bilingual has come to mean contradictory things. In Canada, the bilingual laws resulted in the French-only policy in the province of Quebec. The French mandate applied to both private and public sectors. The divisiveness that resulted became so oppressive that businesses fled in droves to Ontario. Finally, the economic downturn was so severe that the French-speaking voters of Quebec decided that they were tired of starving in French and wanted to get back to work in English. They threw the Anglophobe government out.
‘BILINGUALISM’ RHETORIC DIVISIVE
The kind of rhetoric we hear about bilingualism from some of the Hispanic groups sounds too much like the rhetoric heard in Canada that resulted in the damaging divisiveness.
To top it off, the bilingual education advocated by the non-English speaking extremists is quite different from what they say. The “transitional” approach to teaching English to non-English speaking kids turns out to be a way of not learning English.
From all of the teachers who have contacted English First, it is clear that an intensive period of instruction, perhaps as much as a, year, should be provided so that a student can study English full time during that period. Then the student is ready to study the other courses in the curriculum - in English.
Bilingual education should make the student bilingual, not be a code word for refusal to speak English.
To continue the current failed policies characterizing much of bilingual education will produce a growing number of high school graduates who cannot speak English. They will not be bilingual, and (hey will not be employable.
; (Larry Pratt is president of English First, an organization which claims 200,000 members in its first year of existence.)
Fernando Pin6n
.. .Language Equity
Let’s give three loud, enthusiastic Spanish Ole’s to Texas state Rep. Jim Horn, who as a member of the national organization “English First” is attempting to make English the country’s official language and who, for assurance, also has introduced a bill in the legislature to make English the official language of the state.
But let’s be clear right from the beginning.
The Ole's are not meant to support his efforts. They are to applaud his timing. Appropriately so, his English-only resolution comes in the year Americans are celebrating the bicentennial of the Constitution of the United States of America.
Let’s repeat it, for emphasis. The Constitution of the United States of America
What better time to appreciate it and learn from it than now, when Horn’s efforts can be observed and assessed, from the vantage point of how this government was created and from the fears of those who were involved in making it work.
TEXAS SHOULDN’T CHANGE
LESSON NO. 1: The central government- the one we now call the United States government- is a creation of the 13 original colonies, not vice versa. The delegates to the Philadelphia Convention were very forceful in making this distinction, declaring unequivocally that the Constitution they had just drafted would become effective only when ratified by the states.
When entering into this Upion, the 13 states and the others that were to follow were fully expected to retain their own individuality. Each was to be an integral part of the whole, and not become lost in it
LESSON NO. 2: At the time Texas joined the Union, there were from 80,000 to 100,000 Mexicans in the state, many of them descendants of the Indians who first settled the territory; others, descendants of the Spanish colonizers who came to Texas as far back as the 16th century. Accordingly, these Mexicans, and their descendants, had- and have- as much right as the Anglo Texans who first came to the state in the early 1800s, and their descendants, to maintain their own identity - and their own language.
Texas, multicultural and multilingual when it joined the Union, was not and should not be, required to change its character.
LECCldN NUMERO 3: Horn’s arguments for English-only are neither new nor correct. Horn writes: “I don’t know about your forefathers but when mine came to America, the first thing they did was to learn English.”
Listen to Benjamin Franklin, a pillar at the constitutional convention, speak about Germans, the first large non-English group migrating to America “I have misgivings about Germans because of their clannishness, their little knowledge of English, the German pressand the increasing need of interpreters.”
And again, Horn writes: u... the next American president could well, be elected by people who can’t read or speak English.” This obviously was meant to frighten people into an ethnocentric phobia SCAPEGOAT FOR BIGOTRY
But listen to Franklin speak at the turn of the 17th century, again referring to German immigrants: “I suppose in a few years it will be necessary to tell one-half of our legislators what the other half say.”
So much for misconceptions.
The English-only movement provides a scapegoat for bigotry. It singles out a particular group, one that is relatively more defenseless, as a threat to society, and it makes it a target for abuse.
It happened with the Ku Klux Klan against blacks, the Know-Nothings against Eastern European immigrants and - much more tragically- the Nazis against Jews.
So Ole to Horn for espousing his English-only effort at a time when most Americans will get a refresher course on the U.S. Constitution. Muchas gracias, fellow Texan.
(Fernando Pihdn, of San Antonio, Texas, is editor of the Spanish-language Catholic weekly, El Visitante.)
THE CASE FOR.
English.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 20,1987
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ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS For Public Relations
Develop and implement a comprehensive public relations campaign for a dynamic community college. Write press releases, newsletters and copy for publications. Establish contacts with newspapers, magazines, radio and television. Bachelor's degree required; Master's degree in journalism desirable. Salary $25,114 to $35,430 based upon credentials and experience. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #332 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER AND WRITING SAMPLES BY 5/1/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
TRANSLATORS
TRANSLATORS WANTED, English and Portuguese to Spanish and English and Spanish to Portuguese. Professional translating experience and knowledge of Catholic Church essential. Journalistic background helpful.
Part-time positions at $10 per hour. Letters of application and resume to National Catholic News Conference, Attention: Translation Desk, 1312 Mass. Ave.. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
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Hispanic Link News Service 1420 ‘N’ St. N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280
MIA CARA & ASSOCIATES
For representation in one of the nation’s fastest growing Hispanic markets -
Washington, D.C.
Mia Cara, President
• Advertising • Marketing t • Public Relations •
Suite 909, 1110 Fidler Lane, Silver Spring, Md. 20910 (301)565-2384.
REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650-word feature /opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer's guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, H ispanic Li n k, 1420 N St N W, Washington, D.C. 20005.
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
KPFK- FM Pacifica Radio, Los Angeles, seeks program director. Send resume to General Manager, KPFK-FM, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West North Hollywood, Calif. 91604. Telephone (818) 985-2711.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Media Specialist for national professional membership association, responsible for researching, writing and placing news stories, preparing promotional materials and obtaining media coverage. BA degree in journalism or communications preferred. Self-starter with 5 years experience required. Excellent verbal and writing skills a must. Working knowledge of social or mental health issues helpful. Starting salary to $26,000 plus excellent benefits. Resume to: Employment specialist, National Association of Social Workers, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910 EOE
THE CHICAGO REPORTER
The Chicago Reporter, an investigative monthly focusing on racial issues and urban affairs, has an opening for a Hispanic reporter. Also, a paid three-month internship from June to September is available. Send resume, clips to: Managing Editor, Chicago Reporter, 18 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60603.
WASHINGTON, D.C., INTERNSHIPS: Hispanic Link News Service expects to have new paid internships for developing journalists to work in Washington, D.C., in 1988. if interested in receiving an application for any such opportunities, write now to Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
SALES-ADVERTISING
Leading National Hispanicconsumer English-language magazine seeks experienced professional for New York office. Proven sales ability a must Pressure requires solid planning, organizational and implementing capabilities. Excellent salary/com missions. Send letter with resume to: Personnel, 501 5th Ave., Suite 1208, New York, N.Y. 10017.
Coronado Four-County Broadcasting Inc.
H ispanic-owned media company in California seeks individual for radio sales. Applicant must have excellent bilingual communication skills, be highly motivated and result-oriented For more information, contact Malu Herndndez, (714) 981-8893.
MARKETING MANAGER Catholic University of America Press Duties: Plan and implement the marketing program, including developing and managing the marketing budget preparing sales forecasts and reports, producing catalogs, direct mail pieces and other marketing material and planning the exhibits program. Responsible in addition for customer relations and day-to-day liaison with fulfillment service bureau.
Qualifications: B.A. degree required, preferably in a field of the humanities. Higher degree desirable. Three years of prior experience in book marketing, including experience with direct- mail techniques preferred. Salary up to $23,500 depending upon qualifications.
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design #. Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, .D.C. 20010(202) 483-1140.
PERSONNEL OFFICER
Stanford University Libraries
Full responsibilities directing Personnel Office, working in library system with staff of 390. Includes employee relations, staff planning, compensation & staff development
Qualifications required are understanding of employment conditions in an academic institution, a strong commitment to affirmative action, ability to develop & implement administrative policies, skill in handling employee relations issues, supervisory experiences suitable formal education (a graduate library degree or library experience is desirable but not required). RankofSeniorLibrarian/Administrative Service Manager III. Initial salary between $36,000 & $53,300-depending on qualifications.
Send letter (cite #300-HL), resume, supporting documentation & list of professional references by May 8, 1987, to: Director of Libraries, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305-6004. EEO/AAE.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE the city university of new yurk
DIRECTOR OF GRANTS A DEVELOPMENT
Exciting opportunity to lead a dynamic College in both its grant and fund-raising activities. Working closely with faculty and staff, the Director will identify potential funding sources, stimulate and support proposal writing activities, and serve as a liaison with the CUNY Research Foundation. The Director will also work with the BMCC Fund and BMCC Alumni Association in all areas of development including fund-raising events, annual fund drives and outreach to private and corporate supporters. Bachelors degree i required Salary to $55,000 based upon cre-• dentials and experience.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #331.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER (Assistant to HEO)
Develop and coordinate instructional technology programs (CAI, video, eta), seminars and workshops for students, faculty and staff; assist in managing the operation of Learning Resource Center; supervise computer based activities and computer labs; assist in development of grant proposals; and coordinate LRC publicity. BA in Instructional Technology, Computer Science or related field plus ability to develop original materials; good organization & communication skills. Salary: $23,035+. Vacancy #336.
ASSISTANT TO DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS (Assistant to HEO)
Coordinate and oversee administrative services; collect data; assist in monitoring/planning of budget and purchasing; design/manage projects; manage office. B.A plus minimum 2 years experience, excellent writing & verbal skills required and ability to supervise. Salary $23,035/A Vacancy #335.
DESIGN ASSISTANT •
Under supervision, design, prepare mechanicals for, and oversee to completion a wide variety of posters, newsletters and publications for a dynamic community college. Opportunity to develop a diversified portfolio. Bachelor's degree required. Salary. $18,470 to $24,303 based upon credentials and experience REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #333.
THEATRE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Theatre Technical Director needed for the Triplex, the new performing arts center of Manhattan Community College. Effective 7/1/87. Responsible for all technical aspects of 3 theatres (seating 99,282 and 941). Extensive experience in sound, lights, crew supervision and facility maintenance. BA in Technical Theatre and minimum of 2 years professional experience required. Salary to $32,251/A based upon experience and ere dentials. Vacancy #334.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY # ABOVE AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY
5/15/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY; 199 Chambers St, New York, N.Y. 10007
ATTORNEY
National Hispanic Civil Rights organization seeks attorney to direct Employment Program in Los Angeles. Duties include management and supervision of all litigation conducted by program staff. Requirements: 3 to 5 years of civil rights legal experience and advocacy. Prefer someone with federal court litigation experience and some Title VI I. Bilingual (English/ Spanish) desirable. Resume, references and writing sample to: E. Richard Larson, VP Legal Programs, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by May 15.
EXTRA COPIES
Additional copies of this newsletter are available. To order, call or write Hispanic Link.
The following prices include postage and handling
1-10 copies $1.50 each 11 -50 copies $1.00 each 51 & over 75 cents each If ordering by mail, please include check. Thank you.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
California Teachers Association A letter will constitute a formal application and should be accompanied by a resume that includes academic background, work experience and other personal experience or achievements. The names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references who may be contacted must accompany the application. Interested individuals should apply to: Judie Lowman, President West Orange County United Teachers, 8511 Heil Ave., Westminster,Calif. 92683-7888.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK
The 1987 theme is “Hispanics - A Proud History... Enhancing America’s Future.” For posters, banners, video materials, contact Steve Rodriguez, ROD Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105.
EXECUTIVES, PROFESSIONALS
Hispanic-owned executive search firm seeks resumes from managers; engineers, including electrical and environmental; scientists; and computer specialists for positions with major corporations from coast to coast. Please submit resumes to Maes Associates, Inc., PO Box 16222, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87506 (505) 471-7600.
ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ASSESSMENT SUNY/Empire State College at Buffalo^ N.Y.
Innovative college emphasizing individual degree programs seeks Assistant'Dean to begin 8/87 to provide leadership for evaluation of prior learning process; review of all degree programs & portfolios; training expert evaluators; counseling students regarding college policies & assessment & program planning.
Administrative skills, demonstrated interest in alternative programs & adult students, significant teaching or related academic experience, master's required; doctorate preferred.
Letter & resume by4/24/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Director Personnel/AA, SUNY/ESC, Room 54, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. An AA/EOE
NY NEW YORK
IT INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Opportunity and excellence... tor today and tomorrow
Center for Business and Economics
Full-time positions for Fall 1987; assistant/associate professors at campuses in Manhattan and Long Island, e Marketing: Ph.D. required, e Business Law: J.D. required; Master's preferred, e Management Ph.D. required, e Quant Methods/Statistics: Ph.D. required, e Accounting: CPA/MBA required, e Hotel Management Master's required; Ph.D. preferred.
• Secretarial Science/Business Education; Master's required.
Send vita ta Dr. Carol H. Schwartz, Dean, NYIT Center for Business and Economics, Old Westbury, N.Y. 11568.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts& Entertainment
LA.’S THE PLACE: The screening of a major Hollywood fnm, panels on Latino participation in the film and TV industries and live entertainment are part of this week’s fifth annual National Hispanic Media Conference and Expo in Los Angeles.
La Bamba, the story of Hispanic rock star Ritchie Valens, screens after an opening-night reception April 22. Directed by Luis Valdez and with music by Los Lobos, the film stars Esai Morales, Roseanne de Soto and Elizabeth Pefia.
The Columbia Pictures release, due out this summer, initiates the conference’s Film and Video Screening Program. Some 20 titles will be screened throughout the conference, which continues through April 25.
The program, as well as various panels, is sponsored by the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences.
Some conference panels deal specifically with Latinos in the entertainment industry: “Hispanic Image in the Entertainment Industry” and “Moving From Newswriting to Screenwriting”
The conference, put on by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, ends with a live show and dance, with musical performances by local Hispanic talent. Scheduled to appear are Alex
Garza, Marc Allen Trujillo, Lupe Ontiveros, Richard Yfiiguez, Ada Maris, Irma Rangel and the band Califas
Visiting journalists and conference participants may enjoy a variety of events in the City of the Angels throughout the week.
Opening April 22 at the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts is Ricardo Talesniks play Cien veces no debo. Performances in Spanish and English, directed by Hugo Quintana, continue through May 31.
Immediately following the conference on April 26, the University of California in Los Angeles holds Festival Latino on its Westwood campus. Three performances by!local" artists and "mini- lectures are intended to attract students to Hispanic-themed courses.
Continuing through April 28 at the city’s Nuart Theatre is the Cinema Mexico series. Screening April 21 are Roberto Garaldbn’s Macario and Cervando Gonzalez’s Yanco. The series closes with Jaime Humberto Hermosillo’s Matinee and Arturo Ripstein’s Place Without Limits
Also: Lucie Arnaz opens in Social Security April 28 attheAhmanson Theatre. . . Beatriz Rodriguez dances the Profane Love role in Illuminations a Joffrey Ballet revival April 30 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavillion... The nearby Anaheim council of the League of United Latin American Citizens holds a Tribute to Hispanics in the Film Industry May 2.,. And the first California Latino Fair is staged at East Los Angeles College May 1 -10... _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HALLMARK BROADCAST COUNCIL FORMED: Hallmark Cards Inc. has formed a 10-member broadcast advisory council to inform the company on the concerns and interests of Hispanic communities in the United States. The council met forthe first time April 8.
The Federal Communications Commission is currently considering Hallmark’s bid to buy 11 Spanish-language television stations. Several prominent Hispanics have charged that Hallmark will move away from the Spanish-language format.
Last July, Hallmark and First Chicago Venture Capital announced plans to acquire 10 of the stations from the Spanish International Communications Corporation. An agreement was reached in November for another station in San Francisco.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
i Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
» Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Rafael Tejeda, Zoila Elias,Yanira L. Cruz. .
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced | or broadcast in dny form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
The advisory council members, most of whom are Hispanic, represent a broad cross section of leadership in the business, art, philanthropic, academic, religious and community areas.
CHICANA WRITERS: A daylong discourse on“Charting New Frontiers in American Literature: Chicana Creativity and Criticism” is scheduled for Wednesday, April 22, at the University of California, Irvine.
Among those participating from around the nation: Lorna Dee Cervantes, Denise Chavez, Helena Maria Viramontes, Lucha Corpi, Maria Herrera-Sobek, Norma Alarcbn and Evangelina Vigil.
Admission is free. Call (714) 856-6463 for more details.
UNIVISION MIGRATING WEST: The 6:30 p.m. Noticiero Univision, based in Miami since 1982, will air from Los Angeles starting April 28. About half of the program’s personnel, including anchors Andrea Kutyas and Jorge Ramos, will head to California
Unlvisibn’s corporate offices, except for marketing sales and research, are also moving
NEW PUBLICATION: A weekly tabloid covering Southern California’s Orange County and Inland Empire communities will debut on Cinco de Mayo- May 5.
Published by Josie Escobedo, it will be titled La Vox del Pueblo.
WHO CAN VOTE? A bylaw revision which would prohibit Radio Marti reporters and editors and other journalists working for government-sponsored news agencies from joining the NAH J as voting members will face a membership vote this month.
BILINGUALSERIES: Following aspreading trend among English-language dailies in the Southwest, the Houston Chronicle ran its March 22-24 series, “Back Door to America: illegal Immigration,” with Spanish translation.
The series was reported and written by Dianne Klein, with translation provided by Chronicle copy editor Jaime Guerra.
- Charlie Ericksen
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This aga inst in jobs, housing and insurance coverage .. . James Raymond Diaz, an architect with the San Francisco firm of Kaplan, Mclaughlin Los Angeles Archbishop Roger Mahony sends a lefter ib u . s . and Diaz, is named to the College of Fellows of the American Institute ; of Architects. Being named a fellow is the highest honor the profession confers ... The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women names 'singer, dancer and actress. Rita Moreno as its chairwoman for its Bicentennial project titled Nosotros, El Pueblo . . . A sheriffs deputy in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., shoots and kills 19-year-oldLeonard Falcon. The deputy mistook Falcon's laser tag plastic gun for a real weapon while investigating a report of armed prowlers ... Norberto Luna, 24, rescued after being trapped six hours in the rubble of two collapsed buildings in New York, promises to buy the rescuers anything they_ choose a of beer ... Immigration and Naturalization Commissioner Alan Nelson, saying that all family members of individuals who qualify for legalization under the immigration law, including the parents of both spouses, should be given legal status ... Illinois state Sen . Miguel del Valle, Chicago Aldermen Luis Gutierrez and Jesus Garcia, and the Chicago Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs call a hearing to stop the deployment of the Illinois National Guard in Honduras ... Texas state Rep . Lena Guerrero (D-Austin) introduces a bill that would make it illegal to discriminate against AIDS victims. Guerrero charges that the people suffering from the always fatal disease are discriminated liiiiii .. Vol. 5 No. 16 LINK WEEKLY REP Aprll 1 20, 1987 * SCORECARD States where Action PASSED BEATEN in year___of Arkansas 1987 Mississippi 1987 North Dakota 1987 California 1986 Georgia 1986 Virginia 1986 Nevada 1985 Indiana 1984 Kentucky 1984 Tennessee 1984 Illinois 1923 Nebraska 1920 in 1987 Arizona Colorado Maryland Montana Nebraska New Hampshire New Mexico Oklahoma South Dakota Washington West Virginia Wyoming (1987 actions current as of April 6.) 'Official : English' Battle Widens 31 States Consider Legislation This Year Thirty-one of the nation ' s 50 state legislatures considered-with most still weighing-actions to make English the official state or national language this year , a Weekly Report survey has disclosed . Official-English proponents are reaching millions of people in mail campaigns to exert pressure on lawmakers to restrict multilin gualism . Language-equity groups, including many Hispanic organizations, are calling for much greater funding of programs to help non English speakers learn English while fighting proposed restrictions on their language rights. Both sides are gearing for a lengthy battle which appears certain to increase in intensity in the '90s and likely to extend into the 21st century. Official-English advocacy group membership is booming. U.S . English, founded by former U.S. Sen. S. I. Hayakawa in 1983, nearly doubled its members (minimum dues are $20) last year-from 150,000 to 275,000, according to its director of government affairs, Steve Workings. Delay Sought 'On Employer Sanctions Another group, English First, has enrolled 200,000 members since opening in 1986, according to its president, former Virginia legislator Larry Pratt. Pratt, who sent out five million mailers last year, explained that any donation qualifies an individual for membership. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, League of United Latin American Citizens and other Hispanic groups are broadening their lobbying and court efforts against the movement. The National Puerto Rican Coalition has made the issue its major imperative for the coming year. The U.S . Chamber of Commerce asked the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to delay employer sanctions for six months, during an April1 0 Senate Judiciary Immigration Subcommittee hearing. Citing the complexity of the law , a chamber spokesman said employers needed more time to understand the law before sanctions go into effe.::t June 1 . Other organizations, such as the National Council of La Raza, United Farm Workers and the U.S. Catholic Conference also called into Notice to Subscribers You will not be receiving Weekly Report next week Weekly Report publishes 50 edit. 'ons annually: Its two non-publishTri(,fweek • ; are in December following Christmas and April following the National Hispanic Media Con ference. Both weeks are proceeded by special eight-page editions. We hope you find this edition on the national Official-English movement infor mative and useful. If you would like to order additional copies, see Marketplace, page 7. Your next issue will be May 4 . Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher question proposed regulations for implementing the new lavy. There will be no delay in implementation, said INS spokesman Verne Jervis, adding the agency will begin accepting amnesty applica tions as planned on May 5 . "We've made some progress," said Rick Swartz, President of the National immigration Refugee and Citizenship Forum, concerning INS rules on legalization for families. In the meantime, INS has yet to receive appropriations from Congress to implement the new law, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson told senators during the hearing . Martinez Accepts Proposal Florida Gov . Bob Martinez and a Hispanic state legislator announced a compromise April 9 in the dispute over the future of the state Commission on Hispanic Affairs. But the commission must still decide to agree to the compromise. The plan, developed by Arnhilda Gonzalez Quevedo (A-Coral Gables) , would keep the commission within the governor's office, but transfer its budget and operations to the state Department of Administration. The commission had not decided whether to accept the proposal by press time. So far this year (as of April 6), official English groups have had more success in 1 2 Bills Killed or Withdrawn introducing bills than passing them. Of the 31 proposals , 12 have be en defeated or withdrawn . Only in Arkansas, Mississippi and North Dakota have initiatives passed . That brings the number of states with official English laws to 12. Only two official-English states have His panic populations over 100,000 (based on 1980 census figures) . California passed its referendum last November by a 2-to-1 margin . Illinois passed its law in 1923. Attempts to pass official-English legislation 'in three other states with large Hispanic Arizona, Colorado and New Mexicofailed this year. In Texas, 60 state House members signed a petition against a proposed constitutional amendment, nine more than necessary to kill it. The co-sponsor of a Massachusetts bill said he sees it "going nowhere this year. " continu ed o n page 2

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Movement 'Plays to Xenophobes' contmued from page 1 . U.S. English Leader In 1981, Hayakawa, a Republican from California, proposed an amendment to the U.S . Constitution to make English the official language. According to Workings, legislators have introduced similar bills every year since,,_ but not one has . been voted out of committee. With official-English opponent Paul Simon (D-Ill.) chairing the Senate Subcommittee on the Constitution, the chances for action on a ' federal amendment this year appear to be slim. Workings reacted: ""The women's suffrage movement took 60. years ... We don't have to amend the c;:on stitution to make Sometimes the Intimidation Charged legislative process can be more important than the legislation itself." He complained of intimidation by Hispanic groups. He said that while he was testifying for a bill in New Mexico, a student group, Movimiento Estudiantil de Chicanos en Aztlan, harassed him and the legislators. "I was heckled. I was abused verbally and nearly physically." He added that in Arizona, "the intimidation just ruined the opposition there." Pratt commented: "To the credit of folks on the other side, .... they've convinced a lot of the politicians that political wisdom dictates following their line." Mario Moreno, an attorney with MALDEF, said His panic groups can usually defeat official'Nativist Fears' Aroused English legislation when they have the op portunity to make their case. Both sides use grassroots lobbying. For example, official-English opponents recruited 50 witnesses to testify in Texas, according to the National Association for Bilingual Edu cation. U.S. English regularly urges members through its newsletter to contact lawmakers in support of its cause. According to Hispanic leaders, arguments in favor of official-English often play on nativist fears of the public. Alan Alvarez, an attorney with the Miami based Spanish American League Against Discrimination, said that he will not accuse . . the u.s. English leadership of racism . Yet, he Says she Is Quitting said, when he appears on radio talk shows, The executive director of U .S. English people "call on the phone and they're talking told Hispanic Link April 9 that she will step about 'these people' and 'they' and they're down as soon as a successor is found. talking about Hispanics ... There are people (]erda Bikales has headed U.S. English who do not want to mix with Hispanics." since its founding in 1983. Weekly Report received a copy of an anonyAfter more than four years as the nation's mous letter, dated Aug. 3, 1986, circulated to most visible official-English advocate, Bikales some members of the U.S. Chamber of Cornsaid she has had enough for a while. merce. It said, "Hispanics in America represent "I'm weighing my options. Maybe take a a very dangerous, subversive force that is rest. Sleep late , " she commented bent on taking over our nation's political in-' __ ---J stitutions for the purpose of imposing Spanish Workings said legislators in Colorado and as the official language of the United States Arizona , where official-English bills were and, indeed, of the entire Western Hemisphere." withdrawn, are considering sponsoring similar A report from the Council for Inter-American initiatives in their states. Security, documenting what it called a plan Hector Gonzalez, executive director of theJ. by ac;tivists to create a Chicano nation in the Washington State Commission on Mexican • southwestern United States, accompanied American Affairs, told Weekly Report he expects the letter. a campaign to put an official-English Moreno, citing projections that say ' 48,000 constitutional amendment on the 1988 ballot people will be on waiting lists for Los Angeles there. . Federal Support Sought Hispanic Link's survey of official-English area adult English classes by the end of this states found no changes in education or school year, said, "The thing they (officialgovernment policy resulting from officialEnglish legislation English groups) should be do1ng is supporting efforts like the English Proficiency Act." The State constitutional amendments are a actprovides$10 millioninfederalsupportfor different matter. MALDEPs Moreno said that adult English training. under California's amendment, courts may Workings said u.s. English supports English be able to prohibit foreign-language advertising, training but has reservations about the costs. for instance. "I just don ' t think that our government has the Stanley Diamond, who heads U.S. English's money to assign a classroom and teacher" to California office, called that possibility "utter all who want training, he said. _ 'Advertising in English Only' OfficialEnglish groups see California-style nonsense." referendumsasameanstocombatwhatthey "We wouldn't dream of getting into that view as state governments overriding the will kind of economic nonsense," he said, adding, of the people. that the issue is government use of English. U.S. English plans to put an EnglishHowever, Diamond, who is also on u.s: language amendment on the Florida ballot in English's six-person board of directors, told State Amendments Watched reporters in 1985 : "We object to Philip Morris 1988, Workings said . The group has 125,000 or any other companies who are advertising of the required 350,000 signatures, according in languages other than English . We certainly to a U.S. English spokeswoman in Florida. would feel that the corporations, the telephone "I dori't really think it (the Florida amendment) company with the Spanish Yellow Pages, is going to get on the ballot," Alvarez said. should change ... We will do everything to put However, if it does, it could very well pass, he this advertising in English only. " added. In a September 1985 letter to the Federal Communications Commission, U.S. English Tower Being Built to Eye Refuge proposed that radio licenses be limited so that "under no circumstances would the foreign language stations on the radio dial exceed the English ones' in any given marl
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Nationwide Tally on 'Official-English' Activity State Introduced Decision Nature Attributes State Introduced Decision Nature Attributes Alabama 1986 defeated resolution 5 Montana 1987 defeated act Alaska none Nebraska 1987 defeated act 1 ,4,6,7 Arizona 1987 withdrawn const. am. 1,2,3,7 1920 passed const. am . 1 ,4,7 Arkansas 1987 passed act 1 Nevada California 1986 passed const. am. 1,6 AJR 11 1987 pending const. am. 1 Colorado 1987 withdrawn act 1 SJR4 1985 passed resolution 5 Connecticut New Hampshire 1987 defeated resolution 5 SJR 19 1987 pending const. am. 1 New Jersey 1986 pending act Bill190 1987 pending act 1,2,3 New Mexico 1987 defeated act Delaware 1987 pending act 1 New York 1987 pending act Florida none North Carolina Georgia HB 158 1987 pending const. am. 1,6,9 Act 70 1986 passed resolution SB 115 1987 pending act 1 HB633 1987 pending act North Dakota 1987 passed act Hawaii 1978 passed const. am . 10 Ohio 1987 pending act Idaho none Oklahoma 1987 defeated resolution 5 Illinois 1923 passed act Oregon none Indiana Pennsylvania PL 1 1984 passed act 1 HB77 1987 pending const. am. SCR44 1987 pending resolution 5 HB233 1987 pending act Iowa Rhode Island 1987 pending act HF 362 1987 pending act 1,4 South Carolina SF 212 1987 pending act 1 S364 1987 pending act 1,2,3 Kansas 1987 pending act 1 S365 1987 pending const. am . 1,2,3 Kentucky 1984 passed act South Dakota 1987 defeated act 1 Louisiana none Tennessee 1984 passed act 1,4 Maine none Texas 1987 pending const. am . 1,6 Maryland Utah none HB703/86 1987 defeated act 7 Vermont none HB948/85 1987 defeated act 3,7 Virginia 1986 passed act 1,7 Massachusetts . 1987 pending act Washington 1987 withdrawn const. am. 1,2,6 Michigan none West Virginia 1987 defeated act 1 Minnesota 1987 pending act Wisconsin 1985 defeated const. am . 1 Mississippi 1987 passed act Wyoming Missouri HB41 1987 withdrawn act HB 359 1987 pending act 1 SF70 1987 defeated act HB395 1987 act 3 , 7 ABBREVIATIONS: Const. Am. Constitutional SJRSenate Joint Resolution, HB-House Bill, PL-Public Law, SCR-Senate Concurrent Resolution, HF House File , SF-Senate File , AJR Assembly Joint Resolution , SB-Senate Bill , S-Senate Joint Resolution . 4 . Calls for all offi c ial proceedings or publications to be in English . 5 . Urges passage of federal law or amendment 6 . Empowers c itizens and businesspeople of state to sue to enforce law . 7 . Declares Engli s h to be the basi c language in public schools . ATTRIBUTES (Actions current as of April 6 , 1987) 8 . States that law shall not appl y when public health . welfare , safety and justice require the use of other languages. 1. Dec lares English to be the state's offic i al language . 2. Says the state shall not require use of any other language other than English. 3. Permits bilingual education. (Note: this entry does not imply that other laws prohibit bilingual educ ation . but that the statute specifically permits it.) 9 . Forbids the leglislature from pas s ing any law which diminishes or ignores the official status of English. 10. Declares English and Hawaiian to be the state' s official languages. -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart, Copyright 1987 Ferrer Favored for Bronx Presidency vote for Ferrer at a council meeting April22. Ferrer has been a full-time government worker all of his adult life . He was in legislative and borough president staff posts from 1975 until he was elected to the council in 1982. New York City Councilman Fernando Ferrer is the new choice for Bronx borough president among most of his Bronx colleagues, it was announced by Democratic party officials Apri l1 0 . The officials will vote this week on th e matter. Ferrer, 36, will be the youngest member o f New York City's powerful eight-member Board of Estimate and the second Hispanic borough president in recent history. H1span1c Lmk Week l y Report Ferrer resigned from the City Council April 10. He was required to do so by law before the vote on the presidency. Ferrer will serve an interim term that e xpires at the end of the year. He has said he will be a candidate in November for the remaining two years of the former borough presidenfs term . At least four of the six other City Council members from the Bronx are expected to April 20, 1987 Assemblyman Jose Serrano decided not to pursue a primary challenge against Ferrer for the borough presidency. Serrano will remain in the Assembly and possibly run for the seat of U . S . Rep. Robert Garcia , also from the Bronx. Garcia is currently under investigation for allegedly accepting bribes. 3

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COLLECTING Following are some of the major organizations that oppose or support the official-English movement. !J.S. ENGLISH: For a free brochure descr ibing this organization and its goals, write: U .S. English , 1424 16th St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20016. SALAD: The Spanish American League Against Discrimination will send free of charge its position paper opposing official-English . laws to those who write to: SALAD, 900 S.W . First St., Miami, Fla . 20009. NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION: NPRC has recently prepared a position paper opposing official-English . For a free copy, write NPRC at 1700 KSt. NW , Suite 500, Washington, D . C . 20006. TOMAS RIVERA CENTER: This think tank has four publications covering official-English: ."English-Language Amendments in the Nationallnti:!fe!lts? : An Analysis of Proposals to Establish Enalish as the Official Language of the United States;" "California's Non-English Speakers;" "One Country, One Language : A Historical Sketch of English-Language !Movements in the United and "Testimony on Proposition 63: Delivered to the Joint Legislative Committee of the California Legislature." These publications cost $1 each or $3. for all four. To order, write: TRC, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif . 91711 . NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA: For action alerts, background information and articles on official-English write to: National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. Attention: Rosemary Aguilar . LULAC: The League of United Latin American Citizens has a booklet titled "The English Only Movement: An Agenda For Dis crimination. " For a copy, send $2.00 plus postage to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001, or call Rudy Arredondo at (202) 628-8516. ENGLISH FIRST: For newsletters and a copy of a speech by Secretary of Education William Bennett write : English First, 801 Forbes Place , Suite 102, Springfield, Va. 22151 . Sin pelos en Ia lengua . "I'm just a passenger in the Chevrolet of life ... " Anonymous Aztlan warrior FIRST STOP: Washington, D.C. Introducing his $50 million per year English Proficiency Act to the Senate press last month, Sen. Jeff Blrigaman (D-N.M.) patiently explained the special need for federally assisted English literacy programs in Spanish dominant communities where new immigrants are settling in large numbers. Why, asked one solemn young reporter , couldn't the congressman introduce a bill that would cause those folks to "disperse?" The senator's stunned response included something about the Constitution or Bill of Ri9hts or similar document which the. reporter's editors obviously never brought to his attention. SECOND STOP: El Paso, Texas-La Fe(The Faith) health clinic needs funds-about half a million dollars. So, perhaps inspired by Oral Robert's $8 million threat from the White Man's God, clinic director Pete Duarte announced on April 1 that he was to be sacrificed to Xochltllzquatl, the Goddess of Aztlan, in 40 days if he could not come up with the$500,000 to buy essential equipment (Aztlan , defines . • artisVwriter Jose Antonio Burciaga, is that "mythical promised land of the Southwest from which the Aztecs came and are scheduled to return in the form of illegal aliens, Central Americans and Chicanos . ") Xochl has led Duarte out onto the desert as the" Let Pete Live " campaign grows and the checks come in . Before wandering off, Duarte informed the caring world that contributions are not only deductible, but contributors will receive a Green Card providing legal residency in Aztlan . Burciaga plugs : "Contributions may be sent to: The Let Pete Live Fund, P .O. Box 10640, El Paso , Texas 79996. And may your sun shine brighter. " LAST STOP: ' Lily-white, Missouri-Addressing a middle-American crowd this month on education , President Reagan rambled: "We're talking about teaching in both languages when the move should be if they're going to be in America, they have to learn our language in order to get along . Teach them English . " Kay Barbaro . Calendar Felix Rodriguez (714) 856 HISPANIC MEDIA CONFERENCE Los Angeles April 22 featuring Denver Mayor Federico Pen a as host More than 60 mayors from Texas, California, New Mexico, Arizona, Florida , Utah and Colorado have been invited as guests af honor. THIS WEEK CATHOLIC EDUCATION CONVENTION New Orleans April _20 _ The Rev . Vicente L6pez , associate director of thr, Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs at the National Con fe r ence of Catholic Bishops, will celebrate the opening liturgy at the 84th annual National Catholic Education Association convention . " The Parish" and "Heads-You Win ; Tails-1 Lose: A Call Hispanic Students Can Do Withouf' are two of the workshops offered . Patricia Feistritzer (202) 293 ENGLISH TEACHERS CONVENTION Miami April 21 25 Bilingual education and refugee concerns will be among the topics discussed during the 21st annual convention of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages . Maria Santamaria (305) 376 CHICANA LITERATURE COLLOQUIUM Irvine , Calif. April 22 "Charting New Frontiers in American Literature : Chicana Creativity and Criticism" is part of the Chicano/ Latino Colloquium Series sponsored through the University of California at Irvine. 5 Besides business meetings for various professionai organizations , the National Association of Hispanic Journalisfs conference will feature Florida Gov. Bob Martinez, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Gloria Molina and Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Antonia Hernandez as guest speakers . Frank Newton (202) 783 MINORITIES AND CANCER SYMPOSIUM Houston April 22 "The Realities of Cancer in Minority Communities'' symposium, sponsored by the University of Texas System Cancer Center, will include a panel on specific cancers affecting Hispanics. Paula Gray (713) 792 HISPANIC FEDERAL EXECUTIVES Washington , D.C. April 23 The Association of Hispanic Federal Executives will discuss the new federal employee retirement system during a dinner meeting . Gil Chavez (202) 732 MAYORS' BALL Denver April 25 League of United Latin American Citizens Council 302_ 2 _ is sponsoring the third annual Mayors' Ball , Apri120 , 1987 Naomi Montoya (303) . 986 FESTIVAL LATINO Los Angeles April 26 An open house celebration of Hispanic arts , crafts and culture will be held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Lat i n Jazz artist Poncho Sanchez will perform and actor Rene Enriquez is slated for a special appearance. John Watson (213) 825 COMING SOON LANGUAGE MINORITY STUDENTS SEMINAR San Jose, Calif . Aprii30May 2 " Enhancing Educational Opportunities for Language Minority Students'' is the topi c of a spring training institute sponsored by the Multifunctional Resource Center/Northern California Bruce Akizuki (415) 8349458 DECADE OF THE HISPANICS Chicago May 1 "The 1980sThe Decade of the Hispanics: Is It Fact or Fiction? " is a training seminar sponsored by Image de Chicago . William Luna (312) 523 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Larry Pratt THE CASE FOR ... fernando Piii6n English First Making English the official language of the United States is an idea whose time has come. It is something that generations of immigrants have taken for granted-when coming to the United States, one learns English . In fact, those immigrants were proud to have learned English. It seems unfair for foreign-speaking groups to come to the United States and demand a right from their new country to not only have their language put on street signs and used in the delivery of government services, but also to have their children taught in their own languages, rather than in English. The sons and daughters of the previous immigrants have objected to the demands of w;;;;;,;;o-....-.,;,;,;..,;,. __ _, the current crop of newcomers who insist that their own languages be used as public languages in their new land . Those who want to have a common language so communication can be facilitated , national harmony promoted and economic prosperity maximized are denounced by the Hispanic-Asian coalition as anti immigrant and xenophobic . Lefs take a look at the charges. I am bilingual, having learned Spanish during the 23 years I have been married to my wife , who was born in Panama and whose first language was Spanish. My wife is a naturalized American who passed her citizenship examination using . the English she has mastered . WILLIAM BENNETT SAID IT WELL The drive to make English the official language of the country cannot be characterized fairly as an effort to stamp out other languages and cultures. It is an effort to have a common language, even to have a bilingual people, but also to have one plane of communication on which all can meet. Secretary of Education William Bennett sa i d it weii:"The rise in 1 ethnic consciousness, the resurgence of cultural pride in recent 1 decades is a healthy thing. But a sense of cultural pride cannot come at the price of proficiency in English, our common language . " The word bilingual has come to mean contradictory things. In Canada, the bilingual laws resulted in the French-only policy in the province of Quebec. The French mandate applied to both private and public sectors. The divisiveness that resulted became so opr pressive that businesses fled in droves to Ontario. Finally , the • economic downturn was so severe that the French-speaking voters of Quebec decided that they were tired of starving in French and 1 wanted to get back to work in English . They threw the Anglophobe 'government out. 'BILINGUALISM' RHETORIC DIVISIVE The kind of rhetoric we hear about bilingualism from some of the Hispanic groups sounds too much like the rhetoric heard in Canada 1 that resulted in the damaging divisiveness. To top it off, the bilingual education advocated by the non-English speaking extremists is quite different from what they say . The " transitionar• approach to teaching English to non-English speaking kids turns out to be a way of not learning English. From all of the teachers who have contacted English First, it is clear lthat an intensive period of instruction, perhaps as much as a year, 1, should be provided so that a student can study English fult' time •,during that period. Then the student is ready to study the other c ourses in the curriculum-in English . Bilingual education should make the student bilingual, not be a code word for refusal to speak English . To continue the current failed policies characterizing much of bilingual education will produce a growing number of high school graduates who cannot speak English. They will not be bilingual, and they will not be employable. ' (Larry Pratt is president of English an organization which c laims 200 , 000 members in its first year of existence . ) ... Language Equity Lefs give three loud, enthusiastic Spanish Ole's to Texas state Rep. Jim Horn, who as a member of the national organization "English Firsf' is attempting to make English the. country's official ' language and who, for assurance, also has introduced a bill in the legislature to make English the official language of the state . But lefs be clear right from the beginning. The Ole ' s are not meant to support his efforts. They are to applaud his timing. Ap propriately so, his English-only resoiution comes in the year Americans are celebrating the bicentennial of the Constitution of the United States of America . Lefs repeat it , for emphasis . The Coll stitution of the United States of America What better time to appreciate it and learn from it than now, when Horn's efforts can be observed and assessed, from the vantage point of how this government was created and from the fears of those who were involved in making it work TEXAS SHOULDN'T CHANGE LESSON NO.1: The central government-the one we now call the United States government-is a creation of the 13 original colonies, not vice versa . The delegates to the Philadelphia Convention were very forceful in making this distinction, declaring unequivocaily that the Constitution they had just drafted would become effective only when ratified by the states . When entering into this Upion , the 13 states and the others that were to follow were fully expected to retain their own individuality. Each was to be an integral part of the whole, and not become lost in it. LESSON NO.2: At the time Texas joined the Union, there were from 80,000 to 100,000 Mexicans in the state, many of them descendants of the Indians who first settled the territory; others, descendants of the Spanish colonizers who came to Texas as far back as the 16th century. Accordingly, these Mexicans, and their descendants , had-and have-as much right as the Anglo Texans who first came to the state in the early 1800s, and their descendants, to maintain their own identity-and their own language. Texas , multicultural and multilingual when it joined the Union, was not, and should not be, required to change its character. LECCI6N NUMERO 3: Horn's arguments for English-only are neither new nor correct. Horn writes: "I don't know about your forefathers but when mine came to America, the first thing they did was to learn English . " Listen to Benjamin Franklin, a pillar at the constitutional convention, speak about Germans, the first large noll-English group migrating to America: "I have misgivings about Germans because of their clannishness, their little knowledge of English, the German press and the increasing need of interpreters. " And again, Horn writes: " ___ the next American president could well. be elected by people who can't read or speak English:' This obviously was meant to frighten people into an ethnocentric phobia. SCAPEGOAT FOR BIGOTRY But listen to Franklin speak at the turn of the 17th century, again referring to German immigrants : "I suppose in a few years it will be necessary to tell one-half of our legislators what the other half say." So much for misconceptions. The English-only movement provides a scapegoat for bigotry. It singles out a particular group, one that is relatively more defenseless, as a threat to society, and it makes it a target for abuse. It happened with the Ku Klux Klan against blacks, the Know Nothings against Eastern European immigrants and -much more tragically-the Nazis against Jews. So Ole to Horn for espousing his English-only effort at a time when most Americans will get a refresher course on the U . S . Constitution. Muchas gracias, fellow Texan . Pinon, of San Antonio, Texas, is editor of the Spanish . Janguage Catholic weekly, El Visitante.) H ispanic Link W eek l y Report April20 , 1987

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6 0 p p 0 R T u N I T I ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS For Public Relations Develop and implement a comprehensive public relations campatgn . for a dynamic community college. Write press releases, newsletters and copy for publications. Establish contacts with newspapers, magazines, radio and television. BacheiOI's degree required; degree in journalism desirable. Salary: $25,114 to $35,430 based upon credentials and experience. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #332 AND SEND RES.UME WITH COVEP LETTER AND WRITING SAMPLES BY 5/1/87 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y . 10007 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer TRANSLATORS TRANSLATORS WANTED, English and Portl.t' ' guese to Spanish and English and Spanish to Portuguese. Professional translating experience and knowledge of Catholic Church essential. Journalistic background helpful. Part-time positions at $10 per hour. Letters of application and resume to National Catholic News Conference, Attention: Translation Desk, 1312 Mass. Ave. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. NEWS YOU CAN USE! MIA CARA & ASSOCIATES For representation in one of the nation's fastest growing Hispanic markets-Washington, D.C. Mia Cara, President • Advertising • Marketing • • Public Relations • Suite 909, 1110 Fidler Lane, Silver Spring , Md. 20910 (301) 565-2384. REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS: THE CHICAGO REPORTER The Chicago Reporter, an investigative monthly focusing on racial issues and urban affairs, has an opening for a Hispanic reporter. Also, a paid three-month internship from June to September is available. Send resume, clips to: Managing Editor, Chicago Reporter, 18 S . Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60603. WASHINGTON, D.C., INTERNSHIPS: Hispanic Link News Service expects to have new paid internships for developing journalists to work in Washington, D.C., in 1988. If interested in receiving an application for any such oppor tunities, write now to Hector EricksenMendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. SALES.ADVERTISING Leading National language magazine seeks experienced profes sional for New York office. Proven sales ability a must. Pressure requires solid planning, or ganizational and implementing capabilities. Excellent salary/commissions. Send letter with resume to: 501 5th Ave., Suite 1208, New York, N.Y . 10017. Coronado Four-County Broadcasting Inc. E .. -s . ISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE ntly serving 200 magazines nd newspapers across the USA something new UST FOR YOU! Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650word feature /opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen , Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington , D .C. 20005. Hispanic-owned media company in California seeks individual for radio sales. Applicant must have excellent bilingual communication. skills, be highly motivated and result-oriented For more information, contact Malu Hernandez, (714) 981-8893. I N T H E M E HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR NATIONAL 10 NEWS-WEEKLY SPECIAL COVERING FEATURES HISPANIC * Calendar S A * Media Report U. * The Good News * Editorial Cartoons ' * Arts & Entertainment * Names Making News -:. Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua START MY SUBSCRIPTION: D . .' I . . . . . . . . . A 0 Start 13-week trial Subscription $26 0 Start 50-week Subscription$96.00 OBill me 0 Bill my Organization 0 Check encl. . . Hispanic Link News Service 1420 'N' St. N.W. Wash i ngton. D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 PROGRAM DIRECTOR KPFKFM Pacifica Radio, Los Angeles, seeks program director. Send resume to General Manager , KPFK-FM , 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West, North Hollywood, Calif. 91604. Telephone(818) 985-2711 . PUBLIC RELATIONS Media Specialist for national professional membership association , responsible for re searching , writing and placing news stories, preparing promotional materials and obtaining media coverage. BA degree in journalism or communications preferred. Self-starter with 5 years experience required Excellent verbal and writing skills a must. Working knowledge of social or mental health issues helpful. Starting salary to $26,000 plus excellent benefits. Re sume to: Employment specialist, National As sociation of Social Workers, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring , Md. 20910 EOE MARKETING MANAGER Catholic University of America Press Duties: Plan and implement the marketing program , including developing and managing the marketing budget, preparing sales forecasts and reports, producing catalogs, direct mail pieces and other marketing material and planning the exhibits program. Responsible in addition for customer relations and day-to-day liaison with fulfillment service bureau . Qualifications: B.A degree required, pre ferably in a field of the humanities. Higher degree desirable . Three years of prior experience in book marketing , including experience with. directmail techniques preferred. Salary up to $23,500 depending upon qualifications . GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design e . Illustration • Type setting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington , ,D.C. 2001 . 0 (202)483-1140. PERSONNEL OFFICER Stanford University Libraries Full responsibilities directing Personnel Office, working in library system with staff of 390. Includes employee relations, staff planning, compensation & staff development Qualifications required are understanding of employment conditions in an academic institution, a strong commitment to affirmative action, ability to develop & implement administrative policies, skill in handling employee relations issues, supervisory experience & suitable formal education (a graduate library degree or library experience is desirable but not required) . Rank ot"Senior Librarian/ Administrative Service Manager Ill . Initial salary between $36,000 & $53,300-depending on qualifications. Send letter (cite #300-HL), resume, supporting documentation & list of professional references by May 8, 1987, to: Director of Libraries, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif . 94305-6004. EEO/AAE. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE THF. CITY t ::m' ERSITY OF :>OEW YORK ATTORNEY DIRECTOROFGRANTS&DEVELOPMENT. Exciting opportunity to lead a dynamic College in both its grant and fund-raising activities . Working closely with faculty and staff, the Director will identify potential fund ing sources, stimulate and support proposal writing activities, and serve as a liaison with the CUNY Research Foundation. The Director will also work with the BMCC Fund and BMCC Alumni Association in all areas of development including fund-raising events, annual fund drives and outreach to private and corporate supporters. Bachelo(s degree i required. Salaryto$55,000 based upon ere ; dentials and experience . REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #331. ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER (Assistant to HEO) Develop and coordinate instructional tech-ASSISTANT TO DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS (Assistant to HEO) Coordinate and oversee administrative ser vices; collect data; assist in monitoring/plan ning of budget and purchasing; desig!Vmanage projects; manage office. B.A plus minimum 2 years experience, excellent writing & verbal skills required and ability to supervise . Salary $23,035/A. Vacancy #335. DESIGN ASSISTANT Under superv1s1on, design, prepare mechanicals for, and oversee to completion a wide variety of posters, newsletters and publications fora dynamic community college. Opportunity to develop a diversified portfolio. . Bachelo(s degree required Salary: $18,470 to $24,303 based upon credentials and ex perience. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #333. THEATRE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR National Hispanic Civil Rights organization seeks attorney to direct Employment Program . in Los Angeles. Duties include management and supervision of all litigation conducted by program staff. Requirements : 3 io 5 years of civil rights legal experience and advocacy. Pre fer someone with federal court litigation ex perience and some Title VII. Bilinguai(Englishf Spanish) desirable . Resume, references and . writing sample to: E. Richard Larson, VP Legal Programs, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St. , Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by May 15. EXTRA COPIES Additional copies of this newsletter are availa ble. To order, call or write Hispanic Link. The following prices include postage and handlinQ: 1-10 copies $1.50 each 11-50 copies $1.00 each 51 & over 75 cents each If ordering by mail , please include check. Thank you. nology programs (CAl, video, etc.), seminars Theatre Technical Director needed for the and workshops for students, faculty and staff; Triplex, the new performing arts center of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR assist in managing the operation of Learning Manhattan Community College . Effective Resource Center, supervise computer based 7/1/87. Responsible for all technical aspects California Teachers Association activities and computer labs; assist in developof 3 theatres (seating 99, 282 and 941 ). Ex-A letter will constitute a formal application and should be accompanied by a resume that includes academic background, work experience and other personal experience or achievements. The names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references who may be contacted must accompany the application . Interested individuals should apply to : Judie Lowman, West Orange County United Teachers, 8511 Heil Ave., Westminster ;Calif. 92683-7888. mentofgrantproposals;andcoordinateLRC tensive experience in sound , lights, crew publicity. B.A in Instructional Technology, supervision and facility maintenance. B.A in ComputerScienceorrelatedfieldplusability Technical Theatre and minimum of 2 years to develop original materials; good organiprofessional experience required. Salary to zation & communication skills. Salary: $32,251/A based upon experience and cre-$23,035+. Vacancy #336. dentials. Vacancy #334. _ REFER TO BMCC VACANCY# ABOVE AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 5/15/87 TO: Ms . Alyne Holmes Coy , Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY; 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007 PROFESSiONAL SERVICES HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK The 1987 theme is "HispanicsA Proud History. . . Enhancing America's Future." For posters, banners, video materials, contact Steve , Rodriguez, ROD Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472,, Pasadena, Calif . 91105. EXECUTIVES, PROFESSIONALS Hispanic-owned executive search firm seeks resumes from managers; engineers, including electrical and environmental; scientists; and computer specialists for positions with major corporations from coast to coast. Please submit resumes to Maes Associates, Inc., PO Box 16222, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87506 (505) 471-7600. ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ASSESSMENT SUNY/Empire State College at Buffalo, N.Y. Innovative college emphasizing individual degree programs seeks Assistant . Dean to begin8/87 to provide leadership for. evaluation of prior learning process ; review of all degree programs & portfolios; training expert evalu ators; counseling students regarding college policies & assessment & program planning. Administrative skills, demonstrated interest in alternative programs & adult students, signi ficant teaching or related academic experience , maste(s required ; doctorate preferred. Letter& resumeby4/24/87 to : Janet Zim mer , Director PersonneVAA, SUNY/ESC, Room 54, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N . Y . 12866. An AA/EOE . H is p a n ic Link W eekly Report NEW YORK NY IT INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Opportunity and excellenc& . . . ror today and tomorrow Center for Business and Economics FuiHime positions for Fall1987; assistant/associate professors at campuses in Manhattan and Long Island e Marketing: Ph.D . required . e Business Law: J.D . required; Master's preferred . e Management Ph .D. required. e Quant : Methods/Statistics: Ph.D. required. e Accounting: CPNMBA required . e Hotel Management Maste(s required; Ph . D . preferred . e Secretarial Science/Business Education ; Master's required . Send vita to: Dr. Carol H. Schwartz, Dean, NYIT Center for Business and Economics, Old Westbury , N.Y. 11 568. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . use rates on request. i:f,>. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied sizes) $35 per column inch. .A Ordered by ___________ _ Organization Street ________ .,____ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code & Phone ____ ___ _ _ 7

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Arts & Entertainment Garza, Marc Allen Trujillo, Lupe Ontiveros, Richard Yniguez, Ada Maris, Irma Rangel . and the band Ca/ifas. ' Visiting journalists and conference participants may enjoy a variety of events in the City of the Angels throughout the week. LA.'S THE PLACE: The screening of a major Hollywood fum, panels on Latino participation in the film and TV industries and live entertainment are part of this week's fifth annual National Hispanic Media Conference and Expo in Los Angeles . La Bamba, the story of Hispanic rock star Ritchie Valens, screens after an opening-night reception April 22. Directed by Luis Valdez and with music by Los Lobos, the film stars Esai Morales, Roseanne de Soto and Elizabeth Pena. The Columbia Pictures release, due out this summer, initiates the conference's Film and Video Screening Program. Some 20 titles will be screened throughout the conference, which continues through April25. The program, as well as v arious panels, is sponsored by the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences. Some conference panels deal specifically with Latinos in the entertainment industry: "Hispanic Image in the Entertainment Industry" and "Moving From Newswriting to Screenwriting:' The conference, put on by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, ends with a live show and dance, with musical per formances by local l-:lispanic talent. Scheduled to appear are Alex . Media Report Opening April22 at the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts is Ricardo Talesnik's play Cien veces no debo. Performances in Spanish and English, directed by Hugo Quintana, continue through May 31. Immediately following the conference on April26, the University of California in Los Angeles holds Festival Latino on its Westwood campus. Three performances by! local artists-andmini . lectures are intended to attract students to Hispani&themed courses. Continuing through April 28 at the city's Nuai1 Theatre is the Cinema Mexico series. Screening April 21 are Roberto Garald6n's Macario and Cervando Gonzalez's Yanco . The series closes with Jaime Humberto Hermosillo's Matinee and Arturo Ripstein's Place Without Limits. ' . Also: Lucie Arnaz opens in Social Security April28 at theAhmanson Theatre ... Beatriz Rodriguez dances the Profane Love role in Illuminations, a Jaffrey Ballet revival April30 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavillion . . . The nearby Anaheim council of the League of United Latin American Citizens holds a Tribute to Hispanics in the Film Industry May 2., .. And the first California Latino Fair is staged at East Los Angeles College May 1-10. . . -Antonio Mejias -Rentas . .. . Univisi6n's corporate offices, except for marketing, sales and research. also moving,. HALLMARK BROADCAST COUNCIL FORM ED: Hallmark Cards Inc . has formed a 10-member broadcast advisory council to inform the company on the concerns and interests of Hispanic communities in the United States. The council met for the first time April 8. The advisory council members, most of whom are Hispanic, represent a broad cross section of leadership in the business, art, philanthropic, academic, religious and com munity areas . CHICANA WRITERS: A daylong discourse on "Charting New Frontiers in American Lite rature: Chicana Creativity and Criticism" is scheduled for Wednesday, April 22, at the University of California, Irvine . Among those participating from around the nation: Lorna Dee Cervantes, Denise Chavez, Helena Maria Viramontes, Lucha Corpi, Maria Herrera-Sobek, Norma Alarc6n and Evangelina Vigil . NEW PUBLICATION: A weekly tabloid covering Southern California's Orange County and Inland Empirecommunitieswilldebuton Cinco de Mayo-May 5. Published by Josie Escobedo, it will be titled La Voz del Pueblo. WHO CAN VOTE? A bylaw revision which would prohibit Radio Marti reporters and editors and other journalists working for government-sponsored news agencies from joining the NAHJ as voting members will face a membership vote this month. 8 The Federal Communications Commission is currently considering_ Hallmark's bid to buy 11 Spanish-language television stationS. Several prominent Hispanics have charged that Hallmark will move away from the Spanish language format. Last July , Hallmark and First Chicago Venture Capital announced plans to acquire 10 of the stations from the Spanish International Com munications Corporation. An agreement was reached in November for another station in San Francisco. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publi ca tion of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234..0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Feli x Perez I Reporting : Charlie Er ic ksen , Antonio Mejias Rentas, , Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy. .Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Rafael Tejeda , Zoila Elias , Yanira L Cruz. No portion of Hisponic Weekly Report may be reproduced 1 or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday w i ll run in Wee . kly Reports mail ed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. Admission is free . Call (714) 856-6463 for more details. UNIVISION MIGRATING WEST: The 6:30 p . m . Noticiero Univisi6n, based in Miami since 1982, will air from Los Angeles starting April 28. About half of the program's personnel , including anchors Andrea Kutyas and Jorge Ramos, will head to California BILINGUAL SERIES: Following a spreading trend among Engiish-language dailies in the Southwest , the Houston Chronicle ran its March 22-24 series, "Back Door to America : Illegal Immigration," with Spanish translation. The series was reported and written by Dianne Klein, with translation provided by Chronicle copy editor Jaime Guerra. Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Weekly Report