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Hispanic link weekly report, May 11, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 11, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
President Reagan nominates Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Fred Alvarez to an assistant secretary position at the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment Standards Administration... U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas) rejects an offer to have an assault charge dropped against him if he apologizes. Gonz&lez punched a man for allegedly calling him a communist.. Texas Rep. Al Luna (D- Houston) leads a fight against a bill that would allow boards of regents to double the tuition at state colleges and universities. Luna says the bill would price minorities out of an education... The search for a new superintendent for the Los Angeles school district, the nation’s second largest, narrows to three choices. One of these is
veteran Hispanic school administrator * • Former
Puerto Rico Superior Court Judge Antonio 0010016 receives the* Alexis de Tocqueville Society Award for outetendiM volunteer service. The award was conferred at the 100th anMAlai? oftheclvmed Way... In their effort to increase the number of Hispanic organ donors, medical officials in San Antonio cite as a barrier the reluctance of Archbishop Patricio Flores to endorse the practice. Floreaf position is personal, not church-imposed... In the aftermath of an accident that left an infant dead and 18 people injured, Immigration and Naturalization Service Western Commissioner Harold Ezell proposes the construction of a concrete wall north of the Mexican border near San Diego. The accident occurred when a van carrying the victims crashed while seeking to elude the U.S. Border Patrol..

Secretary Brock Issues Field Sanitation Rules
The head of the Farmworker Justice Fund applauded the April 28 issuance of the long-debated rules requiring that clean drinking water, sanitation and hand-washing facilities be provided on farms to nearly500,000 field-workers. She opposed, however, the exclusion of farms with less than 11 workers.
“After 14-years of litigation, we’re finally happy to see field sanitation standards,” said Nancy Bothne, executive director of the Farmworker Justice Fund.” Other workers in the country, of course, have been guaranteed the right to sanitation facilities for decades.” The rules are intended to protect the health of workers exposed to pesticides and parasites Those with fewer workers must follow local and state sanitation rules.
The standards, which were expected to be published in the Federal Register May 4, will reportedly cost employers about $24 million to implement Labor Secretary Bill Brock said the rules would save $49 million a year in the productivity of workers presently lost to sickness
Calz6n to Quit CANF
Frank Calzdn, executive director of the Washington, D.C. -based Cuban American National Foundation since the organization's inception in 1981, announced May 1 that he will resign July 1.
Under his stewardship, the foundation has gained respect from Republican and Democratic congressmen and has been instrumental in the passage of legislation seen as important to the Cuban American community. One such piece of legislation paved the way for Radio Marti a government-owned station which broadcasts to Cuba.
“We accomplished most of the goals that we set out to do and it’s time to move on,” Calzdn told Weekly Report. He said he had not yet decided what he will do, except to say that he will take a vacation. Calzdn, 42, was born in Havana, Cuba.
Jorge Mas Canosa, chairman of the j foundation, declined to name any possible successor.
INS Regs ‘Still Too Restrictive^
While representatives of many national Hispanic organizations agree the final regulations issued May 1 concerning the new immigration law are more equitable than originally proposed, they still criticize the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service for making it difficult for undocumented workers to secure legalization.
“The final regulations are substantially improved but we think they are still too restrictive,” said Charles Kamasaki, legislative, policy analyst for the National Council of La Raza.
Kamasaki said he is concerned that fears over splitting of family units and of applicants being classified as public charges maydeter people from applying for legalization. Medicaid was removed from that definition under, the revised regulations.
“To INS’ credit, they have come a long way but they haven’t come far enough,” said Mario
Moreno, staff attorney for the Washington, D.C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
Jack Otero, president of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, an arm of the AFL-CIO, criticized the I NS for not issuing legalization applications or other information in Spanish.
“The vast majority of workers who are going to be eligible for temporary legal residence are Hispanic. And for most of them, Spanish is the only language they read and speak,” he said.
LCLAA has prepared Spanish-language materials* including60,000 Spanish legaKzatiorr brochures and a videotape, to explain .how, the law works
The INS has established a toll-free number, 1 -800-777-7700, to give callers taped information about the law. Spanish versions will
continued on page 2
Medicare Firm’s Contract Revoked
U.S. health officials rescinded May 1 a $30-million-a-month Medicare contract with Miami-based IntemationalMedical Centers, the nation’s third largest Hispanic-owned firm.
IMC failed to fullfill two integral requirements of a Medicare-certified prepaid health plan ordered last month by the Inspector General's Office of the U.S. Health and Human Services Administration. One was to reduce its number
S.C. Passes English Bill
South Carolina has made English that staters official language under legislation signed by Gov. Carol Campbell April 14.
Act 25 states: “The English language is the official language of the state of South Carolina, to provide that neither this state nor any political subdivision thereof may require the use of any language other than English.”
The new law was originally passed as HB 2191 by the South Carolina House in February and passed the Senate on March 26.
South Carolina becomes the 13th state to pass official English legislation. Eleven have done so since 1984.
of Medicare subscribers to no more than the statutory 50% level The other was to secure an infusion of capital of $8 million. As of March, nearly 80% of the clients IMC served were receiving Medicare.
IMC had been given until April 30 to meet the requirements and maintain its Medicare contract The health concern has 171,000 clients, 135,000 of whom are Medicare recipients.
Federal health regulators set up a bilingual hotline to help IMCs subscribers, all of whom are in Florida, select alternative health care providers.
The contract suspension came eight days after IMC’s president Miguel Recarey, was indicted by a Miami federal grand jury on charges of bribery, obstruction of justice and conspiracy. He resigned.
IMC spokesman Peter Bernal said the firm will appeal the suspension and continue negotiations to obtain financing. Meanwhile, the Florida department of insurance began issuing subpoenas for IMC records, a move which could lead to a court action to seize the co m pany* s assets.


Texas School Funding Found to be Unconstitutional
Mexican American schoolchildren in Texas will be favorably affected by an April 29 decision in which that state's system for financing public education was ruled unconstitutional by Texas District Court Judge Harley Clark, according to a national Hispanic civil rights organization.
Clark’s ruling is a victory for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, which filed the suit on behalf of 69 low-wealth districts In the state’s 50 poorest districts, 95% of the students are Mexican American.
“They do not have the tax base,” said Al Kaufmann, lead MALDEF attorney in the case, adding that “the court recognized the
tremendous inequalities.”
The 1,063 Texas school districts are responsible for 49% of local education costs, with the state picking up43% and the remaining 8% coming from federal and other funds.
In his ruling, Clark said the state is required to “devise and continually sponsor a system of finance for our public schools that will give each school district the same ability to obtain funds for educational expenditures, including facilities and equipment”
Currently, school district property wealth varies in wealth-per-student from a low of $20,000 to $14 million in oil-rich districts. This means low wealth districts have less than $2,500 to spend per student while
wealthier districts may spend $4,000 or more.
“We have finally obtained our dream of a real chance at equal opportunity for children attending our districts," said Jimmy Vdsquez, the superintendent of the Edgewood School District in San Antonio, the lead plaintiff in the case. “ It took a lawsuit to force the state to realize that it has a real responsibility to treat each of its residents equally.”
The case is being appealed by the state to the Texas Supreme Court.
MALDEF will probably not initiate any new legislation concerning school finance until the final outcome of the Texas case, said Richard Larson, MALDEF vice president for legal programs.
I
1
RNHA Committee to issue Decision
Leadership disputes revolving around the constitutionality of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly elections held earlier this year may be resolved on May 27 and 28 when a “blue ribbon” committee meets again in Washington, D.C.
“That is the big issue and the committee came to grips with that,” said Ed Lujdn, chairman of the New Mexico Republican Party and moderator of the committee.
The committee was formed after Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahren-kopf called an RNHA executive committee meeting April 28 to resolve that body's leadership dispute and split
“The issue here is to try and get the group back together. It’s an important year and whoever gets elected now will be the chair in 1988,” Lujdn explained.
Board Apologizes for Skit
The director of the Chicano Awareness Center in Omaha, Neb., received a personal apology April 25 at an Omaha school board committee meeting for a junior high school skit that the director termed “ racist and insulting.”
Patrick Mckee-Velasquez told members of the committee that the skit performed at the Monroe Junior High School talent show April 9 was “the worst example of racism and insensitivity school officials had ever taken part in.”
The skit, called “Lifestyles of the Poor and Hungry,” was written and performed by students of the school’s Spanish club. No Hispanic students appeared in it.
“It was a parody on the television show ‘Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,’ ” said Ralph Bradley, director of public information for the Omaha School District. “It was set in Mexico City and it ended with the mother spending the rent money on a pair of Air Jordan tennis shoes.”
Mckee-Velasquez told Weekly Report that there were instances in the three-minute play when characters told one another “to be good or be sent outside with the cockroaches,” and one scene in which the Mexican mother stole a television set with her child.
RNHA leadership was called into question after Chairman Fernando de Baca was reelected in Nashua, N.H., Feb. 28, three days after an executive committee decision to postpone RNHA elections until May. The association’s constitution calls for biennial elections in February.
To add to the confusion, two decisions were made at a January 1986 meeting in Phoenix. The first decision, made without de Baca present, was to hold elections in May. The second, with the chair present was to have February elections.
The six-member committee is now preparing presentations on whether the Nashua elections followed the constitution.
Discipline Plan Dropped
Prompted by federal and state agencies that said its disciplinary plan may violate civil rights, theTornillo Independent School District in Texas dropped its contract which asked parents to“discipline” students caught speaking Spanish in school.
Also dropped was a Feb. 18 requirement that teachers speak to students in English only, said school Superintendent Francis Brooks.
Brooks said that he had received a telephone call from the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He also met with representatives of the Texas Education Agency which investigates charges of possible civil rights violations.
“The department said there was a chance it could violate civil rights,” said Brooks.
On approval from the board, Brooks had sent 370 letters April 22, one for each child in the school district asking parents to “discipline” children speaking Spanish at school. The intent, Brooks said, was to make Tornillo children learn English faster and improve their grades.
“This time we’re going to offer suggestions,” Brooks said, “reading, homework, a place for children to study, for kids to learn English and Spanish.”
Democratic Party Raps English-Only Activities
The Democratic National Committee unanimously approved April 30 a resolution denouncing the movement to make English the official language of the United States.
Meeting in Santa Fe, N.M., the DNC adopted the proposal of member Billie Carr of Houston who said the importance of English in the United States is uncontested and the drive to give it official status is racist and aimed at Hispanics.
The vote came despite attempts by several jj Democrat-dominated legislatures to make : English their official language.
Arkansas, Mississippi and South Carolina, : all overwhelmingly controlled by Democrats, are three of four states that this year made ; English their official'language.
New Regs Found Wanting 1
continued from page 1
be available later this month.
On April 30, Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) attached an amendment to the appropriations bill to delay employer sanctions, which are scheduled to begin June 1, until Oct. 1.
Among the final regulations are these changes:
• Undocumented workers who left the United States briefly before May 1,1987, will i be eligible for legalization. Earlier regulations made people ineligible if they had left the country without INS permission after Nov. 6,
1986. Allowable absences will still be limited to 45 days for one trip and 180 days since
1982.
• INS relaxed the requirement that aliens seeking legal status must submit original documents. The government will accept certified copies, with the originals being made available to officials at the time of interview.
• Employers must verify citizenship of all workers hired after Nov. 6, 1986, but have until Sept. 1 to verify the status of those hired between that date and June 1,1987. In addition, employers must verify citizenship of new employees within three days but have up to three weeks if a worker has lost the necessary documents. - Melinda Machado
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Carmelo Melendez, guest columnist
A Mother's Gift to Her Son
# I was going on 10 when we left Puerto Rico. My mother Cecilia and I were drowning in a whirlpool of strangers at New YorKs La Guardia Airport It was 1949 and we were surrendering the sun and Spanish of San Juan for a gunpowder sky and a terminal full of English, which neither of us understood.
Neither did I comprehend the motive of my mother's mission. Why was it so important to find my father? He had been gone for well over a year and when they were together, they usually argued, anyway.
I remember the day he waved an article from a San Juan newspaper in my mother's face. Men could earn big money in the apple orchards of New Jersey, the story promised.
My father had run out of work as a house painter and seasonal work in the cane fields paid 30 cents a day. Their argument resolved, he sold the lease on our small, hurricane-proof cement home and bought his one-way ticket to the land of apples and plenty.
He’d send for us later, he said.
My mother kept some of the furniture. We moved in with her sister Aurora and waited. My mother got a job making rugs for a factory. She would sit in the back yard and make rugs so big that they wouldn’t fit into my aunt’s house.
From time to time, my father sent small money orders - from New Jersey, then Utah, then the Midwest. One day, abruptly, my mother sold our remaining furniture and bought plane tickets to New York.
From La Guardia Airport, we somehow made it to Camden, N.J., where Uncle Domingo and Aunt Mercedes lived. My mother wrote letters to my father, who was now in Indiana. As before, he promised to come and get us, but three months went by.
She borrowed money for Greyhound bus tickets to Chicago, which she figured must be near his East Chicago, Ind., return address.
“You don’t speak English. You'll get lost” warned my Uncle Domingo.
“If my letters get to him, I will get to him,” she answered. “I will pretend that I am a letter.”
At Pittsburgh, our first stop, she refused to let me get off for fear the bus would leave without us. In Cleveland, she protested vociferously - in Spanish- to the driver who was trying to explain in English that we had to transfer.
“What are they saying?” she asked me. Of course, I didn’t know.
Finally we were on another bus. We ate the last of the food my aunt had prepared for us before arriving in Chicago early in the morning.
An interpreter summoned by a traveler's aid receptionist told us that East Chicago was in a whole different state. Our benefactor called the Michigan Hotel in East Chicago- the return address of my father’s letters - but was told that no Eugenio Melendez was registered there. “Sehora," he told my mother, “you should go back to Camden.”
‘WOMAN, ARE YOU CRAZY?’
We found our way to yet another bus station and another bus. A couple helped us get off at Michigan Avenue and we walked to the hotel. Sorry, no Eugenio Melendez. A Mexican man, sitting on the porch of a house behind the hotel, said he knew my fatherand that my father usually stopped by to check his mail. The man invited us to wait on his porch.
We sat for hours, watching people come and go.
Finally, the figure of a man who was unmistakably my father came into view down the street. “Eugenio, Eugenio,” shouted our host, “there are some people here to see you.”
When he arrived at the porch steps, my mother stood up.
My father turned pale. “Mujer, pero tu estas loca,” he shouted. Woman, are you crazy? “6 Por que no me esperastes en Camden?” Why didn’t you wait for me in Camden?
, “I got tired of waiting,” she said. “I came because I want our son to have a father.”
(Carmelo Melendez, of Merrillville, Ind., is producer/host of “Our People - Los Hispanosn on Channel 32, in Chicago, IIL)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report May 11
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE UNWRITTEN EDITORIALS: As the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service’s legalization program was launched on Cinco de Mayo (iQue ironfa!), our nation’s editorial writers dipped their quills for one more shot
The New York Times condescendingly called it “Freedom Day’ for “frightened illegals” and expressed dismay at a proposal by Sen. Dennis DeConcIni (D-Ariz.) to delay employer sanctions for four months until INS gets its act together.
The Washington Post called it “Amnesty Day’ and praised INS Commissioner Alan Nelson for his “personal commitment” to the law he’s paid to enforce.
The Los Angeles Times lauded INS agents for having “gone out of their way’ to assuage the fears of “illegal immigrants who qualify.”
Not one of their pompous editorials- nor others I’ve read- raise the issue of why, if la migra really wants to help nuestra gente, it refuses to provide application forms in Spanish. Why must ap-plicants be denied a chance to help themselves and be left at the mercy of rip-off artists and strangers?
Can there be any answer other than that they, too, prefer English-only?
LISTS: Weekly Report’s April 6 lead story stated, incorrectly, that in 1984 there were 27 federal agencies with less than 1% Hispanics in their work force.
Rechecking with our federal statisticians, we must now tell you that there were 54 federal agencies that year with less than 2% Hispanics and 15 with less than 1%.
We are a nation thats nearly 9% Latino. Those agencies- with personnel rosters ranging from 198 (Federal Election Commission) to 15,951 (Bureau of Indian Affairs)- obviously had to concentrate extra hard to fail so miserably in their mandated commitment to be equal opportunity employers.
In case you or your organization would like to present any qf them with a scroll or a plaque, here are the members of the“ Under-One” club: *
0.9%: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA; Statistical Reporting Service, USDA: Office of the Secretary, Treasury, Commodity Futures Trading Commission; 0.8%: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Treasury; Federal Mediations Conciliation Service; Federal Trade Commission; Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA; 0.7%: Office of the Secretary, Commerce; 0.6%: Asst. Secretary for Housing, HUD; Bureau of the Public Debt, Treasury; 0.5%: Federal Election Commission; 0.4%: The Board, Federal Home Loan Bank Board; 0.3%: Farm Credit Administration.
TWO BIRDS/ONE STONE: Maybe, suggests one frustrated federal Hispanic Employment Program director, the administration should bring its 20,000 soon-to-be-unemployed contras to Washington and officially make them U.S. government employees.
The federal work force, if you will recall, needs 65,000 more Latinos to bring its employment record to parity with the Hispanic percentage in the civilian labor force.
Such a move could also help the sex imbalance in the nation’s capital. One survey a couple of years ago found that eligible single women in D.C. outnumber eligible single men by 7-1.
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
U.S. REP. HENRY B. GONZALEZ (D-Texas), responding to a district attorney's offer to drop an assault complaint brought against him by a man whom the 71-year-old congressman admitted punching (Gonz&lez claimed the man had bothered him in a San Antonio restaurant and called him a communist):
“It is a despicable deal with a despicable character arranged by a despicable moral and political coward in the person of the Bexar County district attorney
1987 3


COLLECTING
WORK-FORCE PARTICIPATION: “Hispanics in the Work Force: Part T is a 47-page booklet by the National Council of La Raza on Hispanic demographics, employment status and the effect of federal programs on this status. For a copy, send $3.50 to: NCLR, 20 F St NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
ART TOUR ENTRY DEADLINE EXTENDED: “Expresiones His-panas,” the national Hispanic art exhibit and tour by Coors for 1988, has extended its deadline to June 15. Entries should consist of color slides of art works on canvas, paper or panel. For more information, write to: Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artistic Images, Maureen Le6n Acosta, P.O. Box 11434, Denver, Colo. 80211 (303) 433-2661.
FARM WORKER SUPPORT: The American Civil Liberties Union has prepared a 154-page report titled “The Hands that Feed Us: Undocumented Farm Workers in Florida.” For a copy of the report, send $5 to: ACLU, 122 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002.
IMMIGRATION STUDY TRANSLATED: "Los Efectos Actuates y Futuros de la Inmigracidn Mexicans en California: Resumen Ejecutivo” is a 49-page translation of the study Rand Corp. issued in late 1985. For a copy, send $10 to: The Rand Corp., 2100 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 293-5112.
HISPANIC PROFILES: The Dade County Office of Latin Affairs recently released a 169-page demographic study titled “Hispanic Profile: Dade County, Florida” For a copy of the book, which includes statistics on Hispanic migrations, send $5 plus $1 for postage and handling to the office at 11 NW First St, 6th Floor, Room 330, Miami, Fla 33128(305)375-5270.
IMMIGRATION LAW INFORMATION: The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement an arm of the AFL-CIO, has published a booklet and produced a videotape as part of an information program to assist undocumented workers with the new immigration law. A complimentary copy of the 12-page nove/a-style booklet, written in Spanish and detailing amnesty application procedures, is available by writing ta Jack Otero, LCLAA, 81516th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
The videotape, “Talk to Those You Can Trust,” depicts the steps an eligible undocumented worker must follow to attain legal status under the new law. The tape is available in Spanish from the above address.
LCLAA is willing to supply other organizations with booklets and videos and those groups should contact Sonia Jasso at (202) 347-4223 for cost information.
CONNECTING
(Late news on what's occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
PLAYWRIGHTS WANTED
The AT&T Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Jerome Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York State Council on the Arts and the Rockefeller Foundation are funding the 1987-88 INTAR Hispanic Playwrights-in-Residence Laboratory in New York City.
HPRL is a program for the advanced study of playwrighting techniques. It is open to six to ten Hispanic playwrights nationwide, writing in English.
If selected, playwrights will receive a $100 weekly stipend for 25 weeks. There is no housing allowance. Participants also attend workshops and work on plays that will be considered for production.
Those interested in the 1987-88 HPRL should submit a copy of their script and a brief biography to: INTAR HPRL, c/o Marla Irene Fornes, P.O. Box 788, New York, N.Y. 10108.
Deadline for submission is June 30.
EDUCATION PROGRAM FUNDED
The Center for Excellence in Education at Northern Arizona University and Yuma Elementary District One are involved in an effort to improve the quality of education in Yuma County through a bilingual education project
The four-part Field Based Bilingual Education Training Project, funded by a $163,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education, provides stipends for the continued education of teachers from Yuma County’s school districts. The three-year program also provides other varied stipends and establishes a Yuma-based intern program for university professors and students of bilingual education.
Approximately 700 of the 6,400 students in Yuma'Elementary District One have limited English proficiency, with Spanish as the most prevalent language.
UNIVERSITY RECEIVES GRANT
The Western Association of Food Chains approved last month a grant of $10,000 for the National Hispanic University. It will be used for students interested in retailing and marketing.
Founded in 1981, NHU serves about 300 students and is headquartered in Oakland, Calif.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC AWARENESS WEEK Moorhead, Minn. May 11-15 Moorhead State University and its Hispanic Student Organization are sponsoring a series of events for Hispanics Awareness Week. Midwest Voter Registration Education Project Executive Director Juan Andrade will be the keynote speaker.
David Flint (218) 236-4021
BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. May 12
The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments is sponsoring a regional minority business conference aimed at helping participants access government contracts.
Carl Kalish (202) 223-6800
HISPANIC MILITARY SALUTE
Washington, D.C. May 14
The League of United Latin American Citizens will
4
salute Hispanics in the military with a reception featuring Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) as the keynote speaker. All Hispanic military members of all services and ranks are invited to attend.
Gil Coronado (202) 939-6660
KANSAS HISPANIC RECOGNITION Wichita, Kan. May 14
El Perico, a monthly Hispanic newspaper, and the Hispanic Women’s Network will unite to celebrate the paper's 10-year anniversary and host a banquet in honor of graduating area Hispanic high school seniors. Both organizations will offer scholarships to graduating students.
Martha Sanchez (316) 263-1041
NALEO CONFERENCE Los Angeles May 14-16
“Hispanic Politics in 1988: A Preview” is the theme of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ fifth annual conference. The conference will feature a presidential candidates forum, polling for Hispanic candidates workshop and an overview of political campaigns.
Kelley Parks (202) 546-2536
HISPANIC CULTURE CELEBRATION May 11,1987
Muskegon, Mich. May 16
The Hispanics Organized for Progress and Equality will celebrate Cinco de Mayo by raising the Mexican flag and singing both the American and Mexican national anthems at the Muskegon City Hall. The celebration will continue with folkloric dances, an art exhibit and ethnic fashion show. The event is part of the city’s activities to celebrate Michigan’s Sesquicentennial.
Clara Patricio (616) 777-1297
COMING SOON
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER
Hispanic Political Coalition of New York State
Albany, N.Y. May 19
Ralph Morales (518) 382-0950
ARIZONA CHICANO CONFERENCE Arizona Chicano Coalition Tucson, Ariz. May 20-22 Raul Aguirre (602) 323-0903
HISPANICS AND HIGHER EDUCATION Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Phoenix, Ariz. May 25, 26 Antonio Rigual (512) 434-6711
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
NOTICE TO HISPANIC EMPLOYEES OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA)
AND HISPANICS INTERESTED IN EMPLOYMENT AT NSA
A proposed settlement has been reached in an equal employment lawsuit brought on behalf of certain Hispanic employees of NSA and Hispanics who have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment at NSA. If you are a Hispanic employee of NSA, if you are a Hispanic who has unsuccessfully applied for a position at NSA, or if you are a Hispanic who has considered applying for a position at NSA but has been discouraged from doing so, this proposed settlement may affect you.
The proposed settlement would address NSA’s recruitment and promotion processes for Hispanics. It also would maintain and develop programs designed to aid Hispanic employees of NSA. Further, it would require NSA to conduct an examination of the testing program used by NSA as part of its hiring process. It would also provide for record keeping and monitoring of NSA’s progress in employing Hispanics.
For further information concerning the proposed settlement, you should write, as soon as possible, to the following attorneys:
Irving Kator, Esq.
Douglas Huron, Esq.
Kator, Scott and Heller 1079 Vermont Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20005
If you wish to review the proposed settlement, you may obtain a copy from these attorneys, or you may go to the Office of the Clerk, United States District Court, 101 W. Lombard St, Baltimore, Md., 21201, and ask to review the proposed consent decree in Velftsquez v. Faurer, No. K-82-1760.
If you are a member of the classes on whose behalf this lawsuit was brought you may submit any written objections you may have concerning the proposed settlement to the Clerk of the Court, at the address listed above, by June 1,1987. If you submit any written objections by the due date, you may also be heard orally at a hearing which will be held to consider whether the proposed settlement should be made final. That hearing will be held at 10:00 a.m. on June 19,1987, in courtroom No. 7C at the same address. If you wish, you may retain your own attorney to represent you in making written objections or at the hearing.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY SPECIALIST
$25,376 - $35,624 Ann. #1638-7A-CMG
Professional investigative, analytical and evaluative equal employment opportunity compliance work. Responsible for applying EEO laws, regulations, precedent decisions and County policy to insure non-discrimination and barrier-free equal opportunity in employment conducting investigations, and making independent reports to the Special Assistant to the County Manager for EEO.
Requires: Two years professional experience in EEO administration, coordination, management and/or complaint investigation, plus a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, human resource management or related field Considerable knowledge of applicable federal, state and local laws and court decisions.
Completed Official Arlington County Application Form must be received by closing date of June 11, 1987, by 5 p.m. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only.) ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th St.
Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE
DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION
Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financial, personnel, purchasing, insurance and administrative functions. Requires M.A., 10 years financial/administrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred). Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms. A. HernAndez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th FI., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by May 22,1987.
GRANTS OFFICE FISCAL COORDINATOR Under the supervision of the Director of Grants and Development, coordinate all administrative and fiscal activities of the College’s grants and contracts including accounting, payroll and purchasing operations Work closely with College faculty and staff on the development and implementation of grant funded projects Serve as liaison with CUNY Research Foundation. Assist in the College’s fund raising activities with private corporations, foundations, benefactors and alumni. Bachelor’s degree required. Salary range $23,035 to $34,281 based upon experience and credentials. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #337 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 5/22/87 TO:
Ms Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Community based educational agency seeks an Executive Director with 7 years experience in program development, administration, budgeting, staff supervision and fundraising. College degree a must and graduate work preferred. Salary high 40’s to low 50’s Please send resume by May 22 to: Mr. William Radinson, 305 W. 18th St, #2B, New York, N.Y. 10011.
PROGRAM DIRECTOR KPFK-FM Pacifica Radio, Los Angeles, seeks program director. Send resume to General Manager, KPFK-FM, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West North Hollywood, Calif. 91604. Telephone (818) 985-2711.
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DIRECTOR OF HOUSING SERVICES The University of Minnesota invites applications for the position of Director of Housing Services.* The Director is responsible for the administration and management of University-owned student and faculty housing on the Twin Cities Campus. Responsibilities include the planning, staff development, evaluation and direction of operations and residential life programs in University housing. This position initiates and reviews operating policy and fiscal control to maintain accountability within University accounting and business procedures guidelines. It initiates and reviews residential life policy and procedures within appropriate University governance mechanism. The director is further responsible for the administration of the Off-Campus Housing office and a management agreement covering University Family Housing operations.
The overall responsibility of this position includes the operation of University residence halls, non-residence halls, student housing and faculty housing. The University housing residence hall system includes eight buildings and five food service operations with a total student/full time staff of more than 360 FTE. The residence hall system houses 45,000 and has an annual budget of 14 million dollars. In addition, housing operates a campus rentals division responsible for 90 University-owned apartment units; provides listing and mediation services to approximately 16,000 students and staff annually through Off-Campus Housing Division; and manages 40 faculty townhouse units and provides specialized services to another 101 faculty single family homes located on University-based owned property.
The position is a 12-month, academic administrative, sixth term contract appointment He reports jointly to Assistant Vice-President for Student Affairs and Support Services Operations Salary is negotiable depending on qualifications and experience. Starting date is August 1987.
Required minimum qualifications: 1) at least seven years of full time employment within Collegiate/University housing operations with at least five years in a managerial positions). 2) at least 3 years of full time managerial experience in a College/University residence hall operation of over 2,500 beds 3) managerial experience in at least two of the following areas A Food Services Bi Custodial Services C. Maintenance and D. Residential life. 4) direct involvement with fiscal management Of residence hall/housing operations 5) a bachelor's degree.
All applications MUST include 1) A current resume, including name, address and daytime phone numbers of three professional references 2) a letter of application and ADDRESSING THE QUALIFICATIONS. Applications must be postmarked by May 22, 1987, or received by 4 p.m. May 22,1987, if not mailed. Send application to:
Chair, Housing Director Search University of Minnesota
2618 Como Ave. SE, Room 207 Minneapolis, Minn. 55414
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer and specially invites and encourages applications from women and minorities
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
BALLOTS ARE BEING TABULATED by a Miami-based accounting firm for this week’s first Latin Music Awards, to be televised live from that south Florida city.
Awards are to be presented in various categories - six each for ballad, sa/sa/tropical and pop categories, four in classical and one for “ best music video” - at the ceremony to be televised by Univision on May 14.
The ballots were mailed to top executives in radio and television stations and record companies, as well as entertainment journalists throughout the nation.
Miami, generally known as the U.S. base of the Latin American music industry, was also the latest battleground in the ongoing war by the Record Industry Association of America against copyright violators.
Last March; a federal court ruled in Miami that Casino Record Distributors of Florida willfully violated copyrights of CBS and RCA/Ariola (now BMG Music) by selling “unauthorized parallel imports” of records by artists Jos6 Luis Rodriguez, Julio Iglesias,
Emmanuel and Jos6 Jose.
Three other parallel import cases involving Hispanic businesses in the United States and Latin American artists have been settled this year, and a complaint was filed in March against the New York-based Bate Record Distributors.
AT THE MOVIES: The names of various Hispanic artists appear in credits of current U.S. releases.
The “master of the macabre” himself, George Romero, has returned to the screens this month with Creepshow 2, which he wrote.
The extremely popular Platoon and Lethal Weapon employed actors Charlie Sheen and Gustav Vintas, respectively, while Marla Conchita Alonso is featured in Extreme Prejudice and Alfred Molina is seen in Prick Up Your Ears.
Current Spanish-language imports include Pedro Almodovar's Law of Desire and Francisco Regueiro’s Padre Nuestro, both from Spain, and Man Facing Southeast, by Argentina’s Eliseo Subiela. From Brazil comes Happily Ever After, directed by Bruno Barreto.
And Tito Puente’s Elcayuco, performed by El Chicano, and Francisco Cruz’s El muhequito and Feliz Cumbe, performed by El Haitianito and the Papo Cadena Orchestra, respectively, are musical pieces featured in The Secret of My Success. _ Antonio Mejlas-Rentas
Media Report
IMMIGRATION COVERAGE: National coverage of the new immigration law, with its Cinco de Mayo opening date forthe Immigration and Naturalization Service to take legalization applications, competed with the joint Iran-contra hearings as well as the Gary Hart drama But it fared well.
Spanish-language media continued their intensive coverage of the story, with Univision news leading up to May 5 with a five-part series.
Examples of enterprising English-language coverage:
• On Sunday, May 3,1.4 million readers of The Los Angeles Times received a 16-page bilingual supplement “Becoming Legal - A Guide to the New Immigration Law” with their paper. It was produced jointly by The Times and Los Angeles? Spanish-language daily, La Opinion.
• Several other dailies, including Texas’
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector Erickson*Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias*Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy. â– Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Rafael Tejeda, Zoila Elias,Yanira L. Cruz. .
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced i or broadcast in dny form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. i CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Dallas Times Herald and Houston Chronicle, provided their readers with bilingual series on immigration law developments.
• The National Federation of Communtty Broadcasters, Pacifica and Radio Blllngiia began a series on the law May 9 that concludes July 4. Produced by Samuel Orozco of Radio Biiingue, it includes both English and Spanish programs.
FATHER/SON: In a probable first for Latino media organizations Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, publisher of Hispanic Link Weekly Report, was elected president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., May 4, succeeding his father, Charlie Ericksen, editor/publisher of Hispanic Link News Service. Reporter Phil Garcia who covers the Defense Department for Pasha Publi-, cations, was elected vice-president following Ricardo Chavira, Time magazine State Department correspondent recently elected to chair HNMA’s board of directors ..
GOVERNOR TO TALK: Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hern6ndez-Col6n delivers his first major address in Washington, D.C., May 13,
speaking at a National Press Club luncheon on Puerto Rico’s role as a bridge between the Americas..
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Reporter Carlos Sdnchez moved from Texas? Austin America n-Statesman to The Washington Post . . Weekly Report entertainment columnist Antonio Mejlas-Rentas joined Univision in Los Angeles as an assignment editor... Also moving to Los Angeles. Univision: Sandra Thomas, who had been working forthe network in Washington, D.C. She assumed duties as associate producer of nightly news...
El Miami Herald managing editor Maria Garcia was named day city editor of The Miami Herald. . . El Herald’s Cuba-born Antonio Bosch moved up from news editor to executive news editor, with Mexico-born Tony Espetia moving into the news editor position...
Charles Rivera resigned as director of publications for the National Council for Social Studies and editor of its Social Education magazine in Washington, D.C, to return to Puerto Rico to take care of family concerns...
- Charlie Ericksen
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Making The News This Week veteran Hispanic school administrator ' iilrl .. Former, Puerto Rico Superior Court Judge Anton o • the Alexis de Tocqueville SoCietYAW&rd for WfWlfeer. service. The award wasconferredatthe 1 OOth ... In President Reagan nominates Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Fred Alvarez to an assistant secretary position at the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment Standards Administration ... U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (DTexas) rejects an offer to have an assault charge dropped against him if he apologizes. Gonzalez punched a man for allegedly calling him a communist. .. Texas Rep . AI Luna(DHouston) leads a fight against a bill that would allow boards of regents to double the tuition at state colleges and universities . Luna says the bill would price minorities out of an education ... The search for a new superintendent for the Los Angeles school district, the nation's second largest, narrows to three choices . One of these is their effort to increase the number of Hispanic organ donora, medic&! officials in San Antonio cite as a barrier the reluctance of Archbishop Patricio Florea to endorse the practice. Flores' position Ia personal, not church-imposed . . In the aftermath of an accident that left an infant dead and 18 people injured, Naturalization Service Western Commissioner Harold Ezell proposes tne con: struction of a concrete wall north of. the Mexican !)order near SaJ,\ Diego. The accident occurred when a van carrYing the victims crashed while seeking to elude the U.S. Border . voLsNo.'•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1 .... ,,,,087 Regs 'Still Too Restrictive' The head of the Farmworker Justice Fund applauded the April 28 issuance of the long debated rules requiring that clean drinking water, sanitation and han&washing facilities be on farms to nearly500,000 fiel& workers. She opposed, however, the exclusion of farms with less than 11 workers. "After 14-years of litigation, we're finally happy to see field sanitation standards, " said Nancy Bothne, executive director of the Farm worker Justice Fund." Other workers in the country, of course, have been guaranteed the right to sanitation facilities for decades." The rules are intended to protect the health of workers exposed to pesticides and parasites. Those with must follow local and state sanitat1on rules. The standar,ds, which were expected to be published in the Federal Register May 4, will reportedly cost employers about $24 million to implement Labor Secretary Bill Brock said the ruleswouldsave$49 million a year in the productivity of workers presently lost to sickness. Calz6n to Quit'CANF Frank Calz6n, executive director of the Washington, D.C. -based Cuban American National Foundation since the organization's inception in 1981, announced May 1 that he will resign July 1. Under his stewardship, the foundation has gained respect from Republican and Democratic congressmen and has been instrumental in the passage of legislation seen as important to the Cuban American community. One such piece of legislation paved the way for Radio Mart4 a government owned station which broadcasts to Cuba . "We accomplished most of the goals that we set out to do and ifs time to move on," Calz6n told Weekly Report. He said he had not yet decided what he will do, except to say that he will take a vacation. Calz6n, 42, was born in Havana, Cuba. Jorge Mas Canosa, chairman of the foundation , declined to name any possible successor. While representatives of many national His panic organizations agree the final regulations issued May 1 concerning the new immigration law are more equitable than originally proposed, they still criticize the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service for making it difficult for undocumented workers to secure legali zation. "The final regulations are substantially improved but we think they are still too re strictive," said Charles Kamasaki, legislative, policy analyst for the National Council of La Raza. Kamasaki said he is concerned that fears over splitting of family units and of applicants being classified as public charges may ,deter people from applying for legalization. Medicaid was removed from that definition under. the revised regulations. "To INS' credit, they have come a long way but they haven't come far enough," said Mario Moreno, staff attorney for the Washington, D.C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Jack Otero, president of the Labor Council • for Latin American Advancement, an arm of the AFL-CIO, criticized the INS for not issuing legalization applications or other information in Spanish. "The vast majority of workers who are going to be eligible for temporary legal residence are Hispanic . And for moat of them, Spanish is the only langu11ge they read and speak," he said. LCLAA materials, including 60,000 Sp&nl8h legallzatioiJ brochures and a videotape, to explain the law works. The INS has established a toiHree number, 1-800-777-7700, to give callers taped info,.. mation about the law. Spanish -,erslons will . continued on page 2 Medicare Firm's Contract Revoked U.S. health officials rescinded May1 a$3D million-&month Medicare contract with Miami based lntemationai.Medical Centers, the nation's thir-d largest Hispanic-owned firm. IMC failed to fullfil! two integral requirements of a Medicare-certified prepaid health plan ordered last month by the lnspectorGenerars Office of the U . S. Health and Human Services Administration . One was to reduce its number S.C. Passes English Bill South Carolina has made English that state's official language under legislation signed by Gov . Carol Campbell April 14. , Act 25 states: "The English language is the official language of the state of South Carolina, to provide that neither this state nor any political subdivision thereof may require the use of any language other than English." The new law was origin ally passed as HB 2191 by the South Carolina House in February and passed the Senate on March 26. South Carolina becomes the 13 state to pass official English legis lation. Eleven have done so since 1984. of Medicare subscribers to no more than the statutory 50% leveL The other was to secure an infusion of ca' pital of sa million. As of March , nearly 80% of the cl.ients IMC served were receiving Medicare. IMC had been given until April30 to meet the requirements and maintain its Medicare contract The health concern has 171,000 clients, 135,000 of whom are Medicare recipients. ' Federal health regulators set up a bilingual hotlineto help IMC'ssubscribers, all of whom are in Florida, select alternative health care providers . The contract suspension came eight days after IMC's president, Miguel Recarey, was indicted by a Miami federal grand jury on charges of bribery , obstruction of justice and conspiracy . He resigned. IMC spokesman Peter Bernal said the firm will appeal the suspension and continue negotiations to obtain fina ncing . Meanwhile, the Florida department of insurance began issuing subpoenas for IMC records, a move which could lead to a court action to seize the company's assets .

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Texas School Funding Found to be Unconstitutional .Mexican AIT),ericap in Texas w111 be favor-ably liffectet.l by an April 29 decision in which that state's system for financing public education was ruled unconstitutional by Texas District Court Judge Harley Clark, according to a national Hispanic civil rights organizati on. Clark's ruling is a victory for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, which filed the suit on behalfof69 low wealth districts. In the state's 50 poorest districts, 95% of the students are Mexican American. "They do not have the tax base," said AI Kaufmann, lea d MALDEF attorney in the case, adding that "the court recognized the . tremendous inequalities." The 1,063 Texas school districts are responsible for 49% of local education costs, with the state picking up43% anc;J the remain ing 8% coming from federal and other funds. In his ruling, Clark said the state is required to"devise and continually sponsor a system of finance for our public schools that will give each school district the same ability to obtain funds for edu cat ional expenditures, including facilities and equipment" Currently, school district property wealth varies in wealth-perstudent from a low of $20,000 to $14 million in oil-rich districts. This means low wealth districts have less than $2,500 to spend per student while RNHA Committee to Issue Decision Leadership disputes revolving around the constitutionality of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly elections held earlier this year may be resolved on May27 and 28 when a "blue ribbon" committee meets again in Washington, D.C . " That is the big issue and the committee came to grips with that," said Ed Lujan, chair man of the New Mexico Republican Party and moderator of the committee. The committee was formed after Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahren kopf called an RNHA executive committee meeting April28 to resolve that body's leader ship dispute and split. "The issue here is to try and get the group back together. It's an important year and whoever gets elected now will be the chair in 1988," Lujan explained. Board Apologizes for Skit The director of the Chicano Awareness Center in Omaha, Neb., receive d a personal apology April 25 at an Omaha school board committee meeting for a junior high school skit that the directortermed"racist and insulting." Patrick Mckee Velasquez told members of the committee that the skit performed at the Monroe Junior High School talent show April 9 was "the worst example of racism and insensitivity school officials had ever taken part in." The skit, called "Lifestyles of the Poor and Hungry," was written and performed by students of the school's Spanish club. No Hispanic students appeared in it. "It was a parody on the television show 'Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,' " said Ralph Brad l ey, director of public information for the Omaha School District. "It was set in Mexico City and it ended with the mother spending the rent money on a pair of Air Jordan tennis shoes." Mckee-Velasquez told Weekly Report that there were instances in the three-minute play when characters told one another "to be good or be sent outside with the cockroaches," and one scene in which the Mexican mother stole a television set with her child. 2 RNHA leadership was called into question after Chairman Fernando de Baca was reelected in Nashua, N.H., Feb. 28, three days after an executive committee decision to postpone RNHA elections until May. The as sociation's constitution calls for biennial elections in February . To add to the confusion, two decisions were made at a January 1986 meeting in Phoenix. The first decision, made without de Baca present, was to hold elections in May. The second, with the chair present, was to have February elections. The six member committee is now preparing presentations on whether the Nashua elections followed the constitution. Discipline Plan Dropped Prompted by federal and state agencies that said its disciplinary plan may violate civil rights, the Tornillo Independent School District in Te xas dropped its contract which asked parents to"discipline" students caught speaking Spanish in school. Also dropped was a Feb. 18 requirement that teachers speak to students in English only, said school Superintendent Francis Brooks. Brooks said that he had received a tele phone call from the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He also met with representatives of the Texas Edu cation Agency which investigates charges of possible civil rights violations . "The department said there was a chance it could violate civil rights," said Brooks. On approval from the board, Brooks had sent 370 letters April22, one for each child in the school district, asking parents to "discipline" children speaking Spanish at school. The intent, Brooks said , was to make Tornillo children l earn English faster and improve their grades. "This time were going to offer suggestions, " Brooks said , "reading, homework, a place for children to study, for kids to learn English and Spanish." wealthier districts may spend $4,000 or more . "We have finally obtained our dream of a real chance at equal opportunity for children attending our districts," said Jimmy Vasquez, the superintendent of the Edgewood School Oistrict in San Antonio, the lead plaintiff in t he case. "It took a lawsuit to force the state to realize that it has a rea l responsibility to treat each of its residents equally." The case is being appealed by the state to the Texas Supreme Court. MALDEF will probably not initiate any new legislation concerning school finance until the final outcome of the Texas case, said Richard Larson, MALDEF vice president for legal programs. Democratic Party Raps English-Only Activities 1 The Democratic National Committee unani mously approved April 30 a resolution de nouncing the movement to make Engl ish the official language of the United States. Meeting in Santa Fe, N.M., the DNC adopted the proposal of membe r Billie Carr of Houston who said the importance of English in the United States is uncontested and the drive to give it official status is racist and aimed at Hispanics. The vote came despite attempts by s everal Democrat-dominated legislatures t o make English their o f ficial language. Arkansas, Mississippi and South Caro lina, all overwhelmingly controlled by Democrats, are three of four states that this year made English their officia l "langua ge. New Regs Found Wanting co ntinued from page 1 be available later this month. On April 30, Sen . Dennis DeConcini (D Ariz . ) attached an amendment to t h e appro priations bill to delay employer sanctions, which are scheduled to begin June 1, until Oct. 1 . Among the final regulations are these changes: • Undocumented workers who left the United States briefly before May 1, 1987, will be eligible for legalization. Earlier regulations made people ineligible if they had left the country without INS permission after Nov. 6 , 1986. Allowable absences will still be limited to 45 days for one trip and 180 days since 1982. • INS relaxed the requirement that aliens seeking legal status must submit original documents. The government will accept cer tified copies, with the originals being marle available to officials at the time of interview. • Employers must verify citizenship of all workers hired after Nov. 6, 1986, but have until Sept. 1 to verify the status of those hired between that date and June 1, 1987. In ad dition, employers must verify citizenship of new employees within three days but have up to three weeks if a worker has lost the necessary documents. -Melinda Machado Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Carmelo Melendez, guest A MothersGift to Her Son . I was going on 10 when we left Puerto Rico. My_mother Cecilia and I were drowning in a whirlpool of strangers at New York's La Guardia Airport It was 1949 and we were surrender ing the sun and Spanish of San Juan for a gunpowder sky and a terminal full of English , which neither of us understood. Neither did i comprehend the motive of my mother's mission . Why was it so important to find my father? He had been gone for well over a yea r and when they were together, they usually argued , anyway . I remembe r t he day he waved an article f r om a San J uan newspaper in my mother's f ace . Men could earn big money in the apple o rc ha rds of New Jersey, the story prom i sed. My father had run out o f work as a house painter and seasonal work in the cane fields paid 30 cents a day . Their argument resolved, he sold the lease on our small, hurrican& proof cement home and bought his on& way t icket to the land of apples and plenty . He'd send for us later, he said. My mother kept some of the furniture . We moved in with her sister Aurora and waited . My mother got a job making rugs for a factory . She would sit in the back yard and make rugs so big that they wouldn't fit into my aunfs house . From time to time, my father sent small money orders-from New Jersey , then Utah, then the Midwest. One day, abruptly, my mother sold our remaining furniture and bought plane tickets to New York. From La Guardia Airport , we somehow made i t to Camden, N . J . , where UnCle Domingo and Aunt Mercedes lived. My mother wrote l etters to my father, who was now in Indiana . As b e fore , he promised t o come and get us, but three months went by. She borrowed money for Greyhound bus tickets to Chicago , which she figured must be near his East Chicago, Ind., return address . " You don't speak English. You'll get lost," warned my Uncle Domingo . "If my letters get to him, I will get to him," she answered. "I will pretend that I am a letter." At Pittsburgh, our first stop , she refused to let me get offforfearthe bus would leave without us. In Cleveland, she protested vociferously -in Spanish-to the driver who was trying to explain in English that we had to transfer . . "What are they saying?" she asked me. Of course , I didn ' t know. Finally we were on another bus . We ate the last of the food my aunt had prepared for us before arriving in Chicago early in the morning . An interpreter summoned by a traveler's aid receptionist told us that East Chicago was in a whole different state . Our benefactor called the Michigan Hotel in East Chicago-the return address of my father's letters but was told that no Eugenio Melendez was registered there . "Senora, " he told my mother, "you should go back to Camden." 'WOMAN, ARE YOU CRAZY?' We found our way to yet another bus station and another bus . A couple helped us get off at Michigan Avenue and we walked to the hotel. Sorry, no Eugenio Melendez . A Mexican man, sitting on the porch of a house behind the hotel, said he knew myfatherandthat my father usually stopped by to check his mail. The man invited us to wait on his porch . We sat for hours, watching people come and go. Finally, the figure of a man who was unmistakably my father came , into view down the street. "Eugenio, Eugenio," shouted our host , ; "there are some people here to see you . " When he arrived at the porch steps, my mother stood up. My father turned pale . "Mujer, pero tu est as loca," he shouted. Woman, ! are you crazy? "l Por que no me esperastes en Camden?" Why didn't you wait for me in Camden? "I got tired of waiting, " she said . "I came because I want our son to have a father." (Carmelo Melendez, of Merrillville, lnd, is producer/host of "Our Sin pelos en Ia lengua 1 THE UNWRITTEN EDITORIALS: As the U .S. Immigration and Naturalization Service's legalization program was launched on Cinco de Mayo (;Que ironia!), our nation's editorial writers dipped their quills for one more shot The New York Times condescendingly called it" Freedom Day" for "frightened illegals' ' and expressed dismay at a proposal by Sen . Dennis DeConclnl (D-Ariz.) to delay employer sanctions for : four months until INS gets its act together. The Washington Post called it "Amnesty Day" and praised INS Commissioner Alan Nelson for his • personal commitmenf' to the law he's paid to enforce . The Los Angeles Times lauded INS agents for having"gone out of their way' to assuage the fears of "illegal immigrants who . qualify." Not one of their pompous editorials-nor others I've read-raise the issue of why, if /a migra really wants to help nuestra gente, it refuses to provide application forms in Spanish. Why must ap plicants be denied a chance to help themselves and be left at the mercy of rip-off artists and strangers? Can there be any answer other than that they, too, prefer i English-only? _ LISTS: Weekly Reporfs April 6 lead stated, in
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COtLECTING ' ; '• 'l .; > ,. , , . ' . WORK'FORCE PARTICIPATION: "Hispanics in the Work Force: Part I" is a 47-page booklet by the National Council of La Raza on Hispanic demographics, employment status and the effect of federal programs on this status. For a copy, send $3.50 to: NCLR, 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. ART TOUR ENTRY DEADLINE EXTENDED: "Expresiones His panas," the national Hispanic art exhibit and tour by Coors for 1988, has extended its deadline to June 15. Entries should consist of color slides of art works on canvas, paper or panel . For more information, write to: Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artistic Images, Maureen Le6n Acosta, P .O. Box 11434, Denver, Colo . 8021 1 (303) 433-2661. FARM WORKER SUPPORT: The American Civil Liberties Union has prepared a 154-page report titled "The Hands that Feed Us: Un documented Farm Workers in Florida." For a copy of the report , send $5 to: ACLU, 122 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002. IMMIGRATION STUDY TRANSLATED: "Los Efectos Actuales y Futuros de Ia lnmigraci6n Mexicana en California: Resumen Ejecutivo" is a 49-page translation of the study Rand Corp . issued in late 1985. For a copy, send $10 to: The Rand Corp., 2100 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 293-5112. HISPANIC PROFILES: The Dade County Office of Latin Affairs recently released a 169-page demographic study titled "Hispanic Profile: Dade County, Florida" For a copy of the book, which includes statistics on Hispanic migrations, send $5 plus $1 for postage and handling to the office at 11 NW First St., 6th Floor, Room 330, Miami, Fla 33128 (305) 375-5270. IMMIGRATION LAW INFORMATION: The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, an arm of the AFL-CIO , has published a booklet and produced a videotape as part of an information program to assist undocumented workers with the new immigra tion law. A complimentary copy of the 12-page nove/a-style booklet, written in Spanish and detailing amnesty application procedl!fes, is available by writ ing ta Jack Otero, LCLAA, 815 16th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006. T he videot ape, "Talk to Those You Can Trust," depicts the steps a n e ligible undocumented worker mus t follow to attain legal status under th e new law. The tape is ava ilable in Span ish from the above address. . LCLAA i s w illing to supply other orga n izatio ns with booklets and videos and those groups should contact Sonia Jasso at (202) 347-42.23 for cost information. CONNECTI' NG (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) PLAYWRIGHTS WANTED The AT&T Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Jerome Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York City Departmen t of Cultural Affairs, the New York State Council on the Arts and the Rockefeller Foundation are funding the 1987-88 INTAR Hispanic Playwrights-in-Residence Laboratory in New York City. HPRL is a program for the advanced study of playwrighting techniques. It is open to six to ten Hispan i c p l aywrigh t s nationwide, wr iti ng in English . If selected, playwrights will receive a $100 weekly stipend for 25 weeks. There is no housing allowance. Parti cipants also attend workshops and work on plays that will be considered for p roduction . Ttiose interested in the 1987-88 HPRL should submit a copy of their script and a brief biography to: INTAR HPRL, c/o Maria Irene Fornes, P .O. Box 788, New York, N.Y. 10108. Deadline for submission is June 30. EDUCATION PROGRAM FUNDED The Center for Excellence in Education at Northern Arizona University and Yuma Elementary District One are involved in an effort to improve the quality of education in Yuma County through a bilingual education project The four-part Field Based Bilingual Education Training .Project, funded by a $163,000 grant from the U . S . Department of Education, provides stipends fort he continued education of teachers f rom Yuma County's school districts. The three-yea r p r ogram also provi des other varied stipends and establishes a Yuma-based intern program for un i versity professors and students of bilingual education. Approximately 700 of the 6,400 students in Yuma Elementa ry District One have limited English proficiency, with Span ish as th e mos t prevalent language. UNIVERSITY RECEIVES GRANT The Western A ssociation of Food Chains approved last month a grant of $10,000 for the National His pani c Unive rs ity. It will be used for students interest e d i n retailing and marketing. Founded in 1981, NHU serves about 300 stud ents and is head quartered in Oakland, Cal if. Calendar salute Hispanics in the military w ith a reception featuring Rep. Este ban Torres(D-Calif.) as the keynote speaker. All Hispanic military members of all services and ranks are invited to attend. M usk egon, Mich. M ay 16 The Hispanics Orga ni zed for Progress and Equality will celebrate Cinco de Mayo by ra i sin g the Mexican fl ag and singin g both the America n and Mexican national anthems at the Muskegon City Hall. The celebration will continue with folkloric dances, an art exhibit and ethnic fashion show. The event i s part of the city's activities to celebrate Michigan's Sesquicentennial. THIS WEEK HISPANIC AWARENESS WEEK Moorhead, Minn. May11-15 Moorhead State University and its Hispanic Student Organization are sponsoring a series of events for Hispanics Awareness Week. Midwest Voter Regis tration Education Project Executive Director Juan Andrade will be the keynote speaker. David Flint (218) 236-4021 BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D .C. May 12 The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments is sponsoring a regional minority business conference aimed at helping participants access government contracts. Carl Kalish (202) 223-6800 HISPANIC MILITARY SALUTE Washington, D .C. May 14 The League of United Latin American Citizens will 4 Gil Coronado (202) 939-6660 KANSAS HISPANIC RECOGNITION Wichita, Kan. May 14 El Perico. a monthly Hispanic newspaper, and the Hispanic Women's Network will unite to celebrate the pape(s 1 0-year annive r sary and host a banquet in honor of graduating area Hispanic high school seniors. Both organizations will offer scholarships to graduating students. Martha Sanchez (316) 263-1041 NALEO CONFERENCE Los Angeles May 14-16 "Hispanic Politics in 1988: A Preview'' is the theme of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials' fifth annual conference. The conference will feature a presidential candidates forum, polling for Hispanic candidates workshop and an overview of political campaigns. Kelley Parks (202) 546-2536 HISPANIC CULTURE CELEBRATION May 11, 1987 Clara Patricio (616) 777-1297 COMING SOON SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Hispanic Political Coalition of New York State Albany, N.Y . May 19 Ralph Morales (518) 3820950 ARIZONA CHICANO CONFERENCE Arizona Chicano Coalition Tucson, Ariz. May 20-22 Raul Aguirre (602) 323-0903 HISPANICS AND HIGHER EDUCATION Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Phoenix, Ariz . May 25, 26 Antonio Rigual (512) 434-6711 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I I ! I I ! r; ! ! ' i I I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ) NOTICE TO HISPANIC EMPLOYEES OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA) AND HISPANICS INTERESTED IN EMPLOYMENT AT NSA A prop os!KI settlement has been reached in an equal employment lawsuit brought on behalf of certain Hispanic employees of NSA and Hispan ics who have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment at NSA. If you are a Hispanic employee of NSA , if you are a Hispanic who has unsuccessfully applied for a position at NSA, or if you are a Hispanic who has considered applying for a position at NSA but has been discouraged from doing so, this proposed settlement may affect you. The proposed settlement would address NSA's recruitment and promotion processes for Hispanics. It also would maintain and develop programs designed to aid Hispanic employees of NSA. Further, it would require NSA to conduct an examination of the testing program used by NSA as part of its hiring process. It would also provide for record keeping and monitoring of NSA ' s progress in employing Hispanics . For further information concerning the proposed settlement, you should write , as soon as possible, to the following attorneys: Irving Kator, Esq. Douglas Huron, Esq . Kator, Scott and Heller 1079 Vermont Ave. NW Washington, D . C . 20005 If you wish to review the proposed settlement, you may obtain a copy from these attorneys, or you may go to the Office of the Clerk, United States District Court , 101 W . Lombard St., Baltimore, Md . , 21201, and ask to review the proposed consent decree in Velbquez v . Faurer, No. K-82-1760 . If you are a member of the classes on whose behalf this lawsuit was you may submit any written objections you may have concerning the proposed settlement to the Clerk of the Court, at t he address listed above, by June 1, 1987. If you submit any written objections by the due date, you may also be heard orally at a hearing which will be held to consider whether the proposed settlement should be made final. That hear i ng will be held at 10:00 a.m. on June 19,1987, in courtroom No. 7C at the same address. If you wish, you may retain your own attorney to represent you in making written objections or at the hearing . EQUAL OPPORTUNITY SPECIALIST $25,376-$35,624 Ann. #1638-7 ACMG Professional investigative , analytical and evaluative equal employment opportunity com pliance work. Responsible for applying EEO laws, regulations, precedent decisions and County policy to insure non-discrimination and barrier free equal opportunity in conducting investigations, and making independent reports to the Special Assistant to the County Manager for EEO . Requires: Two years professional e x perience in EEO administration, coordination, management and/or complaint investigation, plus a Bachelo(s degree in Public Administration, human re s ource management or related field Considerable k nowledge of applicable federal , state and local laws and court decisions. Completed Official Arlington County Application F orm must be received by closing date of June 11, 1987, by 5 p.m. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 or TOO (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only. ) ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N . 14th St. Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financial, personnel, pur chasing, insurance and administrative functions. Requires M.A., 10 years financial/administrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred) . Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Fl., Los 'Angeles, Calif . 90014 by May 22,1987. Hispanic Link Wel!kly Report GRANTS OFFICE FISCAL COORDINATOR Under t he supervision of the Director of Grants and Development, coordinate all administrative and fiscal activities of the College's grants and contracts including accounting, payroll and purchasing operations. Work closely with College faculty and staff on the development and im plementation of grant funded projects. Serve as liaison with CUNY Research Foundation. Assist in the College' s fund raising activities with private corporations, foundations, bene factors and alumni. Bachelo(s degree required Salary range $23,035 to $34, 281 based upon experience and credentials. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #337 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 5/22/87 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manha ttan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y . 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Community based educational agency seeks an Executive Director with 7 years experience in program administration, budget ing, staff supervision and fundraising . College degree a must and graduate work preferred. Salary high 40's to low 50's. Please send resume by May 22 to : Mr. William Radinson , 305 W . 18th St., #2B, New York, N.Y . 10011. PROGRAM DIRECTOR KPFK FM Pacifica Radio, Los Angeles, seeks program director. Send resume to General Manager , KPFK-FM, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West, North Hollywood, Calif. 91604. Telephone(818) 985-2711. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DIRECTOR OF HOUSING SERVICES The University of Minnesota invites ap plications fort. he !?OSition of Director of Housing 1 Services. 'The is responsible for the administration and management of University owned student and faculty housing on the T win Cities Campus. Responsibilities include . t h e planning, staff development, evaluation ' and direction of operations and residential life programs in University housing. This position initiates and reviews operating policy and fiscal control to maintain accountability within University accounting and business procedures guidelines. It initiates and reviews residential life policy and procedures within appropriate University governance mechanism . The director is further responsible for the administration of the Off-Campus Housing office and a management agreement covering University Family Housing operations. The overall responsibility of this position includes the operation of University residence halls, non-residence halls, student housing and faculty housing. The University housing residence hall system includes . eight buildings and five food service operations with a total student/full time staff of more than 360 FTE. The residence hall system houses 45,000 and has an annual budget of 14 million dollars. In addition, housing operates a campus rentals division responsible for 90 . Universi t y-owned apartment units; provides listing and mediation services to approximately 16,000 students and staff annually through Off-Campus Housing Division; and manages 40 faculty townhouse units and provides specialized services to another 101 faculty single family homes located on University based owned property. The position is a 12-month, academic ad ministrative , sixth term contract appointment He reports jointly to Assistant Vice-President for Student Affairs and Support Services Operations. Salary is negotiable depending on qualifications and experience. Starting date is August 1987. Required minimum qualifications: 1) at least seven years of full time employment within Collegiate/University housing operations with at least five years in a managerial position(s) . 2) at least 3 years of full time managerial experience in a College/University residence hall operation of over 2,500 beds. 3) mana gerial experience in at least two of the following areas: A. Food Services B. Custodial Services C . Maintenance and D. Residential life. 4) direct involvement with fiscal management of residence hall/housing operations 5) a bachelo(s degree. All applications MUST include 1.) A current resume, including name, address and daytime phone numbers of three professional re ferences, 2) a letter of application and ADDRESSING THE QUALIFICATIONS. Ap plications must be postmarked by May 22, 1987, or received by 4 p.m . May 22, 1987, if not mailed. Send application to: Chair, Housing Director Search University of Minnesota 2618 Como Ave. SE, Room 207 Minneapolis, Minn. 55414 The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer and specially invites and encourages applications from women and minorities. 5

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Arts & Entertainment Emmanuel and Jose Jose. Three other parallel import cases involving Hispanic businesses in the United States and Latin American artists have been settled this year, and a complaint was filed in March against the New York-based Bate Record Distributors. BALLOTS ARE BEING TABULATED by a Miami-based accounting firm for this week's first Latin Music Awards, to be televised live from that south Florida city. AT THE MOVIES: The names of various Hispanic artists appear in credits of current U.S. releases . Awards are to be presented in various categories-six each for ballad, sa/sa/tropical and pop categories, four in classical and one for "best music video"at the ceremony to be televised by Univlslon on The "master of the macabre'' himself, George Romero, has returned to the screens this month with Creepshow 2 , which he wrote. May 14. The extremely popular Platoon and Lethal Weapon employed actors Charlie Sheen and Gustav Vintas, respectively, while Maria Conchita Alonso is featured in Extreme Prejudice and Alfred Molina is seen in Prick Up Your Ears. The ballots were mailed to top executives in radio and television stations and record companies, as well as entertainment journalists throughout the nation. Miami, generally known as the U.S. base of the Latin American music industry, was also the latest battleground in the ongoing war by the Record Industry Association of America against copyright violators. Current Spanish-language imports include Pedro Almodovar's Law of Desire and Francisco Regueiro's Padre Nuestro, both from Spain, and Man Facing Southeast, by Argentina's Eliseo Subiela. From Brazil comes Happily Ever After, directed by Bruno Barreto . Last March ; a federal court ruled in Miami that Casino Record Distributors of Florida willfully violated copyrights of CBS and RCA/Ariola (now BMG Music) by selling "unauthorized parallel : imports'' of records by artists Jose Luis Rodriguez, Julio Iglesias, And Tito Puente's El cayuco, performed by El Chicano, and Francisco Cruz's El munequito and Feliz Cum be, performed by El Haitianito and the Papo Cadena Orchestra, respectively, are musical pieces featured in The Secret of My Success. _Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report IMMIGRATION COVERAGE: National coverage of the new immigration law, with its Cinco de Mayo opening date fort he lmmigra tion and Naturalization Service to take legal ization applications, competed with the joint Iran-contra hearings as well as the Ga,Y Hart drama But it fared well. Spanish-language media continued their intel) _ sive coverage of the story, with Unlvlslon news leading up to May 5 with a five-part series. Examples of enterprising English-language ' coverage: • On Sunday, May 3, 1 .4 million readers of The Los Angeles Times received a 16page bilingual supplement, "Becoming Legal-A Guide to the New Immigration Law" with their paper. It was produced jointly by The Times and Los Angeles' Spanish-language daily, La Opinion. • Several other dailies, including Texas' HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW . . . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234..0280 or 234..0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Feli x Perez I Reporting: Charlie Ericksen. Antonio Mejia s-Rentas, Melinda Machado . Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy . :G raphics/Produclion: <:;arlos Arrien. Rafael Tejeda, Zoila Elias.Yanira L. Cruz. No portion of Weekly Report may be reproduced 1 or broadcast in form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. 6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mai led Friday of same week. Multiple use rat es on request. Dallas Times Herald and Houston Chronicle, provided their readers with bilingual series on immigration law developments. • The National Federation of Community Broadcasters, Pacifica and Radio B/1/ngiie began a series on the law May9 that concludes July4. Produced by Samuel Orozco of Radio Bilingiie, it includes both English and Spanish programs. FATHER/SON: In a probable first for Latino media organizations, Hector . EricksenMendoza, publisher of Hispanic Link Weekly Report, was elected president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D .C., May 4, succeeding his father, Charlie Ericksen, editor/publisher of Hispanic Link News Service. Reporter Phil Garcia who covers the Defense Department for Pasha Publ .. , cations, was elected vice-president, following Ricardo Chavira, Time magazine State Department correspondent recently elected to chair HNMA's board of directors. .. GOVERNOR TO TALK: Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez-Col6n delivers his first ' major address in Washington, D .C., 13, . speaking at a National Press Club luncheon on Puerto Rico's role as a bridge between the Americas. .. ROLODEX ROULETTE: Reporter Carlos Sanchez moved from Texas' Austin American Statesman to The Washington Post. .. Weekly Report entertainment columnist Antonio Mejias-Rentas joined Univlslon in Los Angeles as an assignment editor ... Also moving to Los Angeles . Univision: Sandra Thomas, who had been working for the network in Washington, D.C. She assumed duties as associate producer of nightly news. .. El Miami Herald managing editor Marla Garcia was named day city editor of The Miami Herald. . • !I Herald's Cuba-born Antonio Bosch moved up from news editor to executive news editor, with Mexico-born Tony Espetia moving into the news editor position. . . Charles Rivera resigned as director of publi cations for the National Council for Social Studies and editor of its Social Education magazine in Washington, D .C., to return to Puerto Rico to take care of family concerns ... Charlie Ericksen 1 MMi GRATioN N L i ZA Ti oN ER V t c E: .Have you heen here since before. JANUARY 11 1182? Hispanic Link Weekly Report