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Hispanic link weekly report, May 18, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 18, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, in a speech given at the Stanford University Law School, warns against current trends that may lead to ‘cultural genocide.” “The human diversity found in California is not something to be tolerated, but to be enjoyed,” Reynoso said.. . Colorado Gov. Roy Romer appoints Audrey Alvarado, director of the Denver-based Latin American Research and Service Agency, as co-chairperson of a Minority Business Opportunities Task Force... Sammy Ntilkez, president of the Louisiana state Senate, holds a $500-a-head reception in a Washington, D.C, townnouse much in the news lately. The townhouse was the one in which Gary Hart and a male friend had dinner with two
Miami women... Linda Chivez, Republican candidedp for a U.S. V Senate seat in Maryland last year, is nam^|lfiB#»Rft List of the. Coalition of Labor Union Women as a person who “hindered and degraded the status'of working women” Cited wfer^.Cti&vez’s campaign tactics .. New York Mayor Ed Koclv names Rend Valero, auxiliary bishop of Brooklyn as chairman of a new immigration advisory committee The committee will report on problems concerning the federal immigration law... The National Puerto Rican Coalition praises a resolution introduced by Pennsylvania state Repi Babette Josephs declaring the state multilingual and multicultural. . Convicted bank robber Dorinda LOpez, who received national attention when she was plucked from a prison courtyard by a helicopter, tells a judge she escaped because of threats on her life from the prison warden...
Mariel Refugees Show Steady Economic Gains
The men and women who came to the United States aboard the Mariei Flotilla six years ago are making vast improvements economically but have not reached income levels of other post-Castro immigrants, according to two reports released this year.
Approximately 125,000 Cubans arrived in Florida from the Cuban port of Mariel between April and June of 1980 during the Carter administration. About 90,000 settled in Miami The balance of the refugees were relocated
300 Picket U.S. English
Almost 300 members of the Pennsylvania English Plus Coalition, an organization supporting multilingualism, demonstrated outside U.S. English convention headquarters in Philadelphia May 3.
“It was our impression that U.S. English was trying to use Philadelphia to wrap its message in a patriotic thame,” said coalition spokesperson attorney Ken Trujillo.
The coalition was formed in March by Asian and Hispanic representatives of organizations such as the National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights and the Hispanic Bar Association.
A coalition of 40 Latino organizations expressed outrage at the May 9 decision by the Los Angeles School Board to name a non-Hispanic to head the nation's second largest school system.
The coalition, Latinos for Excellence in Education, led a letter-writing campaign on behalf of William Anton, a 35-year Hispanic veteran of the school system and currently its deputy superintendent.
Led by the League of United Latin American Citizens and Padres Unidos, a parents’ organization, the Coalition argued that the time had arrived for the 56% Hispanic school district to be headed by a Hispanic. There are 590,000 students in the Los Angeles district.
Gina Alonso, chairwoman of the coalition, told Weekly Report the school board “totally disregarded the needs of parents and students
in several states, mostly in the Southwest but many have since returned to South Florida
A report by Alejandro Portes of Johns Hopkins University and Juan Clark of Miami-Dade Community College followed a sample of 514 “Marielites," who were interviewed in 1983 and then again in 1986.
Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Mental Health, it found that in Greater Miami, where most of the Mariel refugees have settled, their unemployment rate declined from 27% in 1983 to 13.6% in 1985.
“The Political Economy of Cubans in South Florida," a study by Antonio Jorge and Raul Moncarz published by the University of Miami included similar findings.
This report released in Mardli Hhks the increased number of Mariel refugees and other Cubans in the labor market to their willingness to work for wages below the prevailing market rate.
The Portes and Clark study showed that in 1983 the median monthly earnings of Mariel refugees was $200 lower than those of Cubans who arrived during the 197Q& Mariel refugees’
and ignored over5,000 letters from parents.” Current superintendent Harry Handler resigned to teach at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education.
Alonso said the naming of Leonard Britton, currently superintendent of Dade County schools in Florida, breaks a 33-year tradition of hiring superintendents from within the school system/“The message is clear,” she said. “If you are a Latino - and the best qualified - don't bother to apply.”
William Rivera, assistant to the superintendent of Los Angeles Public Schools, told Weekly Report on May 12 that the board had “no reaction” to the protests from the Hispanic community regarding Britton's appointment and that “the school board has no plans to reconsider” its decision.
Britton will take office July 1.
- Richard Sayre
earnings increased between 1983 and 1985. from $718 to $800. Their home ownership rose from 6% to 11.8%.
In the Miami metropolitan area, most of the refugees are self-employed or working as pieddlers.
Graciela*Beecher, chairperson of the Cuban American Legal Defense and Education Fund, told Weekly Report that the number of immigrants selling goods on the streets, many vending 'duro-trios - scraped ice and flavored syrup - indicates their hard-working spirit.
Forty-five percent of the employed sample was working in Cuban enterprises, the report said.
CALDEF was one of the many Cuban organizations that were instrumental in helping the refugees out of detainment camps.
Of those working, 6% were employed in , continued on page 2
Council Balks on Latina
An effort to install the first female member of the founding council of the League of United Latin American Citizens in Corpus Christi, Texas, has mpt with resistance from council members.
Hilda Tagle, the first Latina to be elected judge in Nueces County, Texas, was nominated May 7. She said she was spurred by the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that an all-male civic organization must allow women to join.
Tagle told Weekly Report that after an informal polling of council members, she felt the chances were “slim to none” that her nomination would be approved. An anonymous nominating committee was to rule on the matter late last week.
The native Texan said she would not pursue legal redress if she was refused entry into Council No. 1. “This is not something you can convince people about. You have to hope they see the writing on the wall.’’
Council President Roberto Rivera said, “We have had many female applicants over the years and the membership has rejected them.”
Choice for LA. School Chief Decried


Latino Federal Contracts Down $79 Million in ’86
Federal contracting with Hispanic firms declined by $79 million, or almost 10%, in 1986, according to an audit of the Small Business Administration’s 8 (a) minority procurement program.
The audit, released May 6 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed
LATINO 8(a) CONTRACTING 1986 (in thousands)
1984 1985 Change
Calif. $173,071 $103,160 -40%
N.Y. 114,077 37,070 - 68%
Texas 105,468 100,179 - 5%
Colo. 52,981 25,911 -51%
N.J. 22,231 14,024 -37%
Ariz. 18,209 42,552 +134%
N.M. 16,460 24,844 + 51%
Fla. 5,426 22,224 +310%
Source: NALEO, Small Business Administration.
given by the federal government.
According to the NALEO report, Hispanic businesses in New York and California together suffered a loss of $147 million.
“One problem we are seeing with 8(a) is that the contracts are not being spread out over many small firms. Instead, agencies are developing a relationship with one or two firms and giving them very big contracts,” said Louis DeSipio, a research associate with NALEO. For example, one $15 million contract from the U.S. Department of State is responsible for Florida’s 300% increase in 1986, he said.
A move toward “omnibus contracting,” particularly by the U.S. Department of Defense impacts oh Hispanic businesses, especially in California where several military bases are located. Instead of contracting with individual firms for janitorial, security and other services, military bases are seeking one company that can supply a variety of support services - omnibus contracting.
Defense contracts account for 80% of all 1986 federal procurements, yet that department ranks among the lowest in percentage of all Hispanic contracts, the audit showed.
- Melinda Machado
FEDERAL 8(A) CONTRACTING TO LATINO FIRMS
1986 (in thousands)
Officials, showed Hispanic firms received $831 million in fiscal year 1985 and $752 million in 1986.
Approximately two-thirds of all federal contracts with minority firms come through the 8(a) program. NALEOs fourth annual audit revealed federal procurement to. minority firms has continued a drop begun in 1984, from $2.7 billion to $2.4 billion in 1986.
Hispanics accounted for 31.2% of all 8(a) contracts last year. However, Hispanicfirms were awarded only 0.4% of all contracts
Total Total 8 (a) HiSfX 8 (a) Hisp. Hisp. % Total
Contracts Contracts Contracts 8(a) % Contracts
Agriculture 2,044,465 88802 14,594 38.2% 0.7 %
Commerce 334,653 9,094 944 10.4% 0.3%
Defense 145,896,606 1,489,153 499,158 33.5% 0.3%
Education 143,247 4,903 2,511 51.2% 1.8%
Energy 13,872,983 147,674 24,003 16.3% 0.2%
Health and Human Serv. 1,092,066 108,490 63,751 58.8% 5.8%
HUD 100,654 8,173 166 2.0% 0.1%
Interior 1,011,286 61,370 30,550 49.9% 3.0%
Justice 323,690 12,735 12,524 98.3% 3.9%
Labor 545,389 4817 342 7.9% 0.1%
State 341,648 50,647 25,777 50.9% 7.5%
Transportation- 1,221,227 158,956 28,134 17.7% 2.3%
Treasury 307,908 13,109 1,356 10.3% 0.4%
Total 182,558,799 2,408,646 751,893 31.2% 0.4%
Source: NALEO, the Small Business Administration and the Office of Management and Budget.
Watsonville Elects Latino
Tony Campos, a real estate agent and son of farm workers, became the first Hispanic in history to be elected to the seven-member City Council of Watsonville, Calif., May 13.
The city, more than 50% Hispanic, won a voting rights challenge by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Jan. 30. MALDEF had sought to make the agricultural community switch from at-large to district elections.
With three council seats at stake, Campos, 43, gained the second-highest number of votes, 25,023, in a field of five.
Bustelo Joins ‘Partners’
Partners of the Americas, a Washington, D.C.-based volunteer organization that provides technical and economic assistance to Latin America, announced May 7 that New York City Commissioner of Employment Manuel Bustelo had been named its new president
Employment commissioner since May 1985, Bustelo will assume his new position in mid-June. Partners of the Americas has a budget this year of $6.2 million and more than 20,000 volunteers.
Bustelo, 44, had previously served as publisher of New York’s Spanish-language newspaper, El Diario-La Prensa, and as president of the National Puerto Rican Forum.
Florida House Extends State Commission Life
The Florida state House, in a 106-2 vote, passed a bill May 5 that would keep the state Commission on Hispanic Affairs alive for another 10 years and keep it in the office of the governor.
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez angered Hispanic leaders earlier this year with a proposal to transfer the commission to the Department of Commerce.
“We feel it was important that out of the House of Representatives we had a clear message to the governor that the commission was not to be downgraded in any way,” said commission Chairman Rafael Pefialver.
Governor Martinez told Weekly Report at an earlier date, “The changes were proposed because the governor's office shouldn’t be an operating office.”
In an unusual move, the House took the final vote on the bill the same day it was debated.
The Senate was expected to vote on the bill late last week.
Latino Joblessness Grows
The Hispanic jobless rate rose to 9.2% in April from 9% in March, according to figures released May 8 by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Refugees Make Advances
continued from page 1
professional or managerial occupations, the Portes/Clark report found. Eighteen percent reported their occupations in Cuba to be professional or managerial.
Of the 125,000 refugees who arrived during the boatlift, 86,852 were men, 37,811 were women; 22,585 were under the age of 17.
Another report, “The Children of Mariel” by Helga Silva, found that many of the 9,000 Mariel students who entered Dade County Schools in 1980 initially tested poorly, particularly in reading and math.
There has been no systematic study on the progress of Mariel children into society, said Silva Emerging,however, are success stories such as that of Florida high school students Esteban Torres and his sister, Maria. Both are seniors at Coral Gables High School.
Esteban will be class valedictorian with a grade point average of 4.88 in a 4 point system (extra credit is given for college-level courses). Esteban has been accepted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard. Maria maintained a 3.9 average.
Presently, 3,400 Mariel refugees remain indefinitely imprisoned in the United States. U.S. law says that aliens found guilty of a felony or a series of misdemeanors are “excludable,” even if the acts were committed in their native country.
- Julio Laboy
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist
Inside the Tortilla
My earliest recollection of the tortilla is my mami telling me not to play with it. I had bitten eye holes in it and was using it as a mask at the dinner table.
By biting holes, I learned to make many interesting designs. My family claims that I owe my career as an artist to the tortilla. That early, informal training, they say, provided me with the essential motivation and foundation, although sometimes I wore tortillas on my head, like yarmulkes, and never had any great urge to convert from Catholicism to Judaism.
As a child, I also used tortillas as hand warmers on cold days.
For Mexicans, this circular maize bread has been both versatile and sustaining over the centuries. It originated with the Mayan civilization, perhaps predating Europe's wheat bread.
For millions, it has served as the spoon and the fork, the chopsticks, the sandwich... and the napkin. There is much more to it than meets the gringo eye.
Tortillas have a bottom and a top, a left and a right, an inside and an outside. They can be paper-thin. These are used for flautas, a type of taco that is filled, rolled, and then fried crisp There are also gorditas small fat ones, or sopes These can be fried or baked and then filled with friioles or meat, or both. Or eaten plaia
The most handsome of all tortillas is the handmade tortilla, using nixtamai, not instant masa harina A connoisseur can smell the quality. It takes generation-to-generation experience to create one that is truly delicious, truly sabrosa
GIVING A TORTILLA CHARACTER
But now machine-made tortillas are monopolizing the mercadoa Handmade tortillas are becoming a rarity. Sadly, assemblyline tortillas never receive the individual tender slaps that give them character.
As a youngster living in El Paso, Texas, I used to visit a tortilla factory where all of the products were handmade, near the open mercado in Ciudad Ju&rez. The factory was in an ancient adobe building. As you approached it, you could hearthe rhythmic slapping of the masa between skilled hands, forming the perfectly round tortilla They could barely keep up with the demand.
In the mercado you could buy taquitoa To create a poor man’s taco, you placed a warm tortilla across your left palm, sprinkled it with salt, and with the fingertips of your right hand, rolled it up tight Then there were also left- handed people.
How did tortilla chips originate?
In Mexican homes it is the custom to save all the left-over tortilla pieces and day-old tortillas and fry them. Presto. You have tostadas or tostaditaa That is why there is always a bowl of tortilla chips and chile in Mexican restaurants This is not to say they are made from yesterday’s tortillas
HEAT THE BOTTOM SIDE LAST
The tortilla has also suffered from discrimination. A few years back a padre was found guilty of celebrating the Holy Mass using a tortilla as a host, and discharged from his duties Now what if Jesucristo has been born in Mejico? I must assume that some European priest would have been punished for using unleavened wheat bread.
The best way to warm a tortilla is over an open fire from a gas range. I remember amazing many a gringo friend by sticking my fingers into the fire and flipping the tortilla. For best results, heat.the bottom side last Try heating a tortilla on an electric range and in two seconds it will burn and taste awful You can solve the problem by dragging the tortilla slowly across the hot steel coils.
Our next door neighbor swears by her microwave oven, but I find the heat too ihtense. So what we do at home is heat a pan and use it like a comaL
What is a comal? Well, that’s another story.
(Jos6 Antonio Burciaga, ol Stanford, Calif., is an artist and writer ana a member of the California comedy troupe Culture Clash.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE SCURVY PRESS: Snap on your barf bags, boys and girls, We’re about to embark on a journey to the wonderland of big city journalism:
SAN DIEGO - A mere 18 miles south of downtown San Diego, civilization ends and a wasteland populated by murderers, armed robbers, rapists, smugglers and their victims begins
The neatly maintained streets and towering glass high-rises are replaced by a threatening montage of finger canyons flood levees and river bottoms
Helpless women scream in the night as their mates are clubbed senseless or dispatched with a gun or a knife
And every evening, as predictable as the cooling breezes from the Pacific, human waves of aliens a majority of them Mexicans attempt to overwhelm a thin line of U.S. Border Patrol agents and enter this country illegally.
The nightly scenario is often a nightmare.. Taco vendors start circulating through the crowd, providing a perfect disguise for bands of young Mexican toughs armed with clubs sharpened sticks and firearms who have come to prey on the aliens..
On especially active nights the acrid fumes of tear gas fired by agents mingles with the stench of perspiring bodies as the battle rages..
No, that’s not from The-National Inquirer or The Star. It’s what veteran reporter Bob Wiedrlch fed, in a full-page news feature, to the 1.1 million Sunday (May 3) readers of the once-proud Chicago Tribune.
The Chicago Tribune? Isn't that where Manuel Galvin, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, works as a reporter?
Yes. And he promises to deal with his editors on it
AD NAUSEAM: Georgetown's Key Theater in Washington, D.C., showed the film “Doha Herlinda and Her Son” last week. It advertised it in The Washington Post as “From the Land of th.e Nacho, the Taco and the Macho."
It makes one wonder how it promoted films like “Roots.”
BERRY BERRY QUESTIONABLE: Los Angeles Times sports columnist Scott Ostler likes stereotypes, too, He devotes his April 29 column topromoting Chico Esquela of NBC-TV“Saturday Night’ notoriety (“Base-e-bol been berry berry good to me'*) in the late ’70s as the ballplayer he misses most
He quotes Garrett Morris, who played the simpleton Latino infielder, as saying: “I have never had a bad response from anyone about Chico. Hispanics in particular like him..."
Por favor, Chico.
GAFFE TIME: An Associated Press article on Attorney General Edwin Mease’s questionable Wedtech Corp. ties, which ran in The Washington Post (and presumably everywhere else) May 7, carried this jolten
“The Wedtech case has led to the indictments of two New York Democratic congressmen, Mario Biaggi and Robert Garcia”
Garcia indicted? No, Not true. (Biaggi has been indicted recently, but on a different matter.)
Sin Pelos called Garcia’s office for a reaction.
The response was uncharacteristically laid back. “These things do happen,” a spokesman told us.
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting. .
CARLOS FUENTES, reflecting on the United States’ lack of a sense of history, in an interview with the Christian Science Monitor “Dan Rather appears on the set and defines the history of the day so that the memory of the previous day can be thrown into the garbage can."
3
May 18,1987


COLLECTING
MARIEL CHILDREN: “The Children of Mariel,” a 68-page booklet on how Dade County, Fla, public schools absorbed more than 10,000 children of the Mariel boat I ift, is available. For a copy, send $2 to: The Cuban American National Foundation, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265-2822.
MARIEL STUDY: For a copy of the study “Mariel Refugees Six Years After,” by Alejandro Portes and Juan Clark send $3 to the Department of Sociology, 530 Mergenthaler Hall, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 21218.
MARIEL INFORMATION: A study conducted by the University of Miami gives information on the political and economic status of Cubans, including Mariel refugees For a copy of the 46-page report “The Political Economy of Cubans in South Florida,” send $5 to the Institute of Inter-American Studies P.O. Box 248123, University of Miami, Coral Gables Fla. - 33124 (305) 284-4303.
MCDONALDS’ 1987 ART CONTEST: Paintings or drawings on 11" x 14” or 12” x 18” cream or white paper, with an entry form or facsimile, must be sent to: Hispanic Heritage Contest, P.O. Box 11189, Chicago, III. 60611. For details call Raul Godoy at (312) 575-3429 or Deborah Charnes Vallejo at (312) 836-7133.
COORS ART EXHIBIT AND TOUR: Entry packets may be obtained by writing Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artistic Images Attn. Maureen Le6n Acosta P.O. Box 11434, Denver Colo. 10311 (303) 433-2661.
PLAYWRIGHTS LABORATORY: Persons who wish to be considered should submit a copy of a script and a brief biographical narrative to: INTAR, HPRL, c/o Maria Irene Fornes, P.O. Box 788, New York N.Y. 10108. Authors should include a self-addressed, stamped envelope to have their scripts returned.
JORGE HERNANDEZ AWARDS: Boston-based Inqullinos Boricuas en Accidn is seeking nominations for its newly created Jorge Hemdndez Awards. The two national awarda one for Latino leadership and the other for community development leadership, will recognize persons for long-term career achievements. To obtain nomination forms, write to: Jorge Hern&ndez Awards, c/o IBA, 405 Shawmut Ave., Boston, Mass. 02118 (617) 262-1342. Nominations must be submitted by May 22.
CONNECTING
(Late newson what’s occurring within the US Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
CRIME PROJECT FINANCED
The California Office of Criminal Justice Planning’s Special Victims Assistance Program awarded a $40,000 grant to the Crime Victim Center in Los Angeles to fund a Latino Crime Victim Project
The CVC, a non-profit community service organization, provides psychological counseling to victims of violent crime and their families.
The Latino Crime Victim Project also offers support groups, emergency transportation, translation services and advocacy.
In addition, the grant will help finance a hotline number that will help Latinos who do not speak English seek police help deal with court authorities and obtain financial compensation.
Bilingual volunteers staff the hotline-(213) 937-7753- from 9 am. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.
EDUCATION FUNDS RAISED
Denver Mayor Federico Pefta hosted 68 Hispanic mayors at the annual Hispanic Mayor's Summit, which attracted nearly 1,000 people to its third annual Mayor’s Ball.
Mayors from Texas, California, New Mexico, Arizona Florida, Utah and Colorado attended.
The ball raised more than $10,000 for Hispanic educational opportunities.
Proceeds from the ball will provide 10 college scholarships for students and help fund educational organizationa
The summit included discussions on revenue increases and small business development.
The ball was sponsored by the Adolph Coors Company and the U.S-Council of the League of United Latin American Citizens,
A BRIEF OPPORTUNITY
Jockey International is seeking Hispanics to model its line of underwear in a national advertising campaign.
Jockey is looking for Hispanic women and men who consider themselves successful The ads will appearin major national magazines.
If interested, write to Bill Herrmann at Jockey International, 2300 60th St, Kenosha, Wis. 53140. Send one head-and-shoulders photo of yourself and one full length.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Albany, N.Y. May 19
The Hispanic Political Coalition of New York State is hosting its annual scholarship dinner. New York Lt Gov. Stan Lundine will be the keynote speaker. Ralph Morales (518) 382-0950
IMMIGRATION LAW Los Angeles May 20
The South Central Los Angeles Regional Center Hispanic Parent Group is sponsoring an informational program in Spanish concerning aspects of the new immigration law. Speakers include Ernest Gustafson, district director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, and Vera Weisz, an attorney.
Octavio Figueroa (213) 734-1884, ext. 235
ARIZONA CHICANO CONFERENCE Tucson, Ariz. May 20-22
“The State of the State: Arizona’s Next Four Years” is the theme of the eighth annual Arizona Chicano Conference. Behavioral health, criminal justice, rural
issues and the new immigration law are among the conference sessions.
Raul Aguirre (602) 323-0903
URBAN COALITION CONVOCATION Washington, D.C. May 20-22 The National Urban Coalition is hosting a 20th anniversary convocation of business people, community activists, labor and religious leaders and others interested in urban affairs. Diane Sdnchez, chairwoman of the Spanish Speaking Unity Council, Willie Veldsquez, executive director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and Louis Nuhez, president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition, are among the forum participants.
Tom Blackbum-Rodrlguez (202) 628-2990
MENTAL HEALTH CONFERENCE San Antonio May 20-22
The third annual South Texas Mexican American Mental Health Association Conference will address mental health and spirituality.
Lloyd Davis (512) 734-5054
HISPANIC MOTHERS Washington, D.C. May 21
“ H ispanic Mothers and Babies: Preserving Healthy Traditions in a Challenging Era” is the theme of a health conference sponsored by the D.C. Mayor’s
Office of Latino Affairs.
Romana Campos (202) 939-8765
ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT Delano, Calif. May 23
Luis Vdldez and the Teatro Campesino will be the , featured entertainment at the 25th anniversary celebration of the United Farm Workers. The event will also focus attention on the grape boycott Cecilia Cruz (805) 822-5571
CHIU COOKOFF Washington, D.C. May 23
Fifty chili aficionados are expected to compete in a, cookoff sponsored by the National Capital Council of the League of United Latin American Citizens and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Proceeds will benefit a scholarship fund.
Carl Custer (202) 447-2006
COMING SOON
HISPANICS AND HIGHER EDUCATION Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Phoenix, Ariz. May 25,26 Antonio Rigual (512) 434-6711
HISPANIC DROPOUT PROBLEM Washington, D.C. May 26 LULAC, the Hispanic News Media Association Andres Tobar (202) 347-1493
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
NOTICE TO HISPANIC EMPLOYEES OP THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA)
AND HISPANICS INTERESTED IN EMPLOYMENT AT NSA
A. proposed settlement has been reached in an equal employment lawsuit brought on behalf of certain Hispanic employees of NSA and Hispanics who have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment at NSA. If you are a Hispanic employee of NSA, if you are a Hispanic who has unsuccessfully applied for a position at NSA, or if you are a Hispanic who has considered applying for a position at NSA but has been discouraged from doing so, this proposed settlement may affect you.
The proposed settlement would address NSA’s recruitment and promotion processes for Hispanics. It also would maintain and develop programs designed to aid Hispanic employees of NSA. Further, it would require NSA to conduct an examination of the testing program used by NSA as part of its hiring process. It would also provide for record keeping and monitoring of NSA’s progress in employing Hispanics.
. For further information concerning the proposed settlement you should write, as soon as possible, to the following attorneys;
Irving Kator, Esq.
Douglas Huron, Esq.
Kator, Scott and Heller 1079 Vermont Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20005
If you wish to review the proposed settlement, you may obtain a copy from these attorneys, or you may go to the Office of the Clerk, United States District Court, 101 W. Lombard St, Baltimore, Md., 21201, and ask to review the proposed consent decree in VelAsquez v. Faurer, No. K-82-1760.
If you are a member of the classes on whose behalf this lawsuit was brought you may submit any written objections you may have concerning the proposed settlement to the Clerk of the Court at the address listed above, by June 1,1987. If you submit any written objections by the due date, you may also be heard orally at a hearing which will be held to consider whether the proposed settlement should be made final. That hearing will be held at 10:00 am. on June 19,1987, in courtroom No. 7C at the same address. If you wish, you may retain your own attorney to represent you in making written objections or at the hearing.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY SPECIALIST
$25,376 - $35,624 Ann. #1638-7A-CMG
Professional investigative, analytical and evaluative equal employment opportunity compliance work. Responsible for applying EEO laws, regulations, precedent decisions and County policy to insure non-discrimination and barrier-free equal opportunity in employment conducting investigations, and making independent reports to the Special Assistant to the County Manager for EEO.
Requires; Two years professional experience in EEO administration, coordination, management and/or complaint investigation, plus a Bachelor's degree in Public Administration, human resource management or related field Considerable knowledge of applicable federal, state and local laws and court decisions.
Completed Official Arlington County Application Form must be received by closing date of June 11, 1987, by 5 p.m. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only.)
ARLINGTON COUNTY
Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th St.
Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE
DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION
Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financial, personnel, purchasing, insurance and administrative functions. Requires MA, 10 years financial/administrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred). Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms. A Hern&ndez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th FI., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by May 22,1987.
EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICE APPRENTICE $20,802.08 #52237AFIR
Trainee level position in the Emergency Medical Services Division of the Arlington County Fire Department. This is a new division within the department with responsibility for providing a full range of emergency services to the citizens of Arlington County. Employee learns and performs emergency medical treatment duties, drives an ambulance, assists in providing medical treatment completes and maintains reports and records and participates in drills and classes in fire operations and medical procedures Requires high school or equivalent and EMT-Cardiac (EMT-C) certification by the Commonwealth of j Virginia or EMT-Paramedic(EMT-P) certification issued by the National Registry of Medicalj Technicians Applicants must submit a copy of current certification with application.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes, SF-171S, etc. without a completed official Arlington application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than July 2, 1987 at 5:00 PM. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or(703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired). ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 14th Street North Arlington, Virginia 22201
Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer
THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS has an employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, English or Spanish. Contact: Lucienne Loman (202) 783-6228.
QIRL SCOUTS OF THE U. & A has several openings available at various locations: MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT (DALLAS) This position provides consultation and technical assistance in the total management function to Girl Scout councils based on market segment size.
Candidate should have broad management experience (identify needs and solve problems), knowledge of management systems, fund development and financial operations. Background in not-for-profit agency with national affiliation preferred. Excellent communication written/verbal and human relations skills a must Travel approximately 40-60%. Salary to mid $30’s.
FUND DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT (NEW YORK CITY)
This position provides consulting and/or technical assistance in comprehensive fund development to Girl Scout councils.
Expertise of candidate should include resource identifications, market analysis, campaign planning, plus the ability to conduct training workshops in techniques and strategies. Excellent communication written/verbal and human relations skills a must Must be willing to travel at least 50%. Salary to mid $30’s.
PERSONNEL CONSULTANT (CHICAGO) This position provides consulting and/or technical assistance in various areas of personnel Candidates should have broad experience in the Human Resources field. Expertise should include: current knowledge of personnel practices and legislation, salary administration, performance and conflict management as well as recruitment, AA/EOE, and good platform skills. Not-for-profit and/ or voluntary agency experience highly desirable Salary to low $30’a Travel approximately 40-50%.
We offer excellent benefits, including 3 weeks vacation. For immediate consideration please indicate opening desired and send resume to:
Janice Jacobs, Employment Specialist GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.SA 830 Third Avenue New York, N.Y. 10022 AA/EOE M/F/H/V
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE CONFERENCE COORDINATOR Washington, D.C, national Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist in the planning/imple-mentation of Annual Conference College degreed equivalent experience in job-related area Strong writing, typing (70 wpm), telephone skills. Selfstarter can work under pressure without need of close supervision. Position available immediately. Salary range: $14-16,000. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza at (202) 628-9600.
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • layout • silkscreen and • Stata El Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
May 18,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Seattle central
community college
Dr. Donald G. Phelps, Chancellor of the Seattle Community College District, invites nominations and applications for the position of President of Seattle Central Community College located in Seattle, Washington.
• Institutional Setting: Established in 1966, Seattle Central Community College is a fully accredited two-year institution offering educational programs in college transfer, vocational training, general education and community service classes, plus a full range of student support services. The College currently serves approximately 7,500 students per quarter; over 37 percent are ethnic minorities or foreign bom.
• Responsibilities: The president is responsible for operation and management of the campus. S/he provides leadership which assures that Seattle Central Community College provides a broad spectrum of educational opportunities to meet student and community needs. The president reports directly to the chancellor.
• Qualifications: The applicant should possess the following qualifications: Top level community college administrative experience or equivalent; work experience in a multilevel, multi-ethnic, multi-cultural environment; demonstrated ability to develop and manage a major institutional budget and to work with a wide variety of constituencies to accomplish Institutional goals. A master's degree is required, and an earned doctorate or equivalent experience is desirable.
• Application Procedures: Submit letter of application in response to the above qualifications, vita, and a minimum of three current letters of reference directly from individuals familiar with the candidate’s work experience by June 12,1987, to:
Dr. Donald G. Phelps, Chancellor Attn: SCCC President Search Committee Seattle Community College District VI 300 Elliott Avenue West Seattle, Wash. 98119 Phone: (202) 587-4160
Applications must be postmarked by midnight, June 12,1987.
Seattle Community College District Is an equal opportunity employer.
PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OFFICER
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund invites applications for the position of Program Development Officer. Under direction of the Executive Director, the Officer will organize and execute a variety of program development efforts from the headquarters office. A list of duties follows: establish and maintain Alumni and volunteer network; develop and implement annual campaign for individual and matching gifts; initiate and oversee production of newsletter, news releases, and media PR, assist in writing corporate funding proposals and coordinating special events and projects; research and maintain donor data base records.
Candidates should have three to five years experience in fund raising or related work strong organizational and communication skills, and demonstrated effective writing ability. A bachelor's degree or higher is required.
Salary: mid-30's, depending on experience and salary history. Send resume by June 15, 1987 to: Personnel Committee, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101. Contact Ernest Z. Robles (415) 892-9971.
* The following two positions are with La-Guardia Community College
PERIODICALS/REFERENCE LIBRARIAN Responsible for periodical collection of 5000 titles which includes microforms and periodicals, information desk coverage by non-professional staff, ongoing analysis of the periodicals collection, heavy reference and bibliographic instruction schedule. Qualifications: ALA accredited MLS Degree; knowledge of periodicals; excellent interpersonal skills; academic library experience. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience. Full-time, one-year position.
EVENING, WEEKEND LIBRARIAN Supervision of a clerical and adjunct librarian staff of 8, heavy bibliographic instruction and reference services schedule. Qualifications: ALA accredited MLS Degree; experience with an academic library's public services program; supervisory and communication skills. Experience and facility with micros desirable. Second MA/MS preferable. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience. Full-time, one-year position. Send letter and resume indicating position by July 17 to: Chief Librarian, Room 2, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/ AA Employer.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Community based educational agency seeks an Executive Director with 7 years experience in program development administration, budget-
ing, staff supervision and fundraising. College degree a must and graduate work preferred. Salary high 40’s to low 50’s. Please send resume by May 22 to: Mr. William Radinson, 305 W. 18th St, #2B, New York N.Y. 10011.
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
DIRECTOR OF HOUSING SERVICES
The University of Minnesota invites applications for the position of Director of Housing Services; The director is responsible for the administration and management of University-owned student and faculty housing on the Twin Cities Campus Responsibilities include the planning, staff development evaluation and direction of operations and residential life programs in University housing. This position initiates and reviews operating policy and fiscal control to maintain accountability within University accounting and business procedures guidelines. It initiates and reviews residential life policy and procedures within appropriate University governance mechanism. The director is further responsible for the administration of the Off-Campus Housing office and a management agreementcovering University Family Housing operations.
The overall responsibility of this position includes the operation of University residence halls, non-residence halls, student housing and faculty housing. The University housing residence hall system includes eight buildings and five food service operations with a total student/full time staff of more than 360 FTE. The residence hall system houses 45,000 and has an annual*budget of 14 million dollars. In addition, housing operates a campus rentals division responsible for 90 University-owned apartment units; provides listing and mediation services to approximately 16,000 students and staff annually through Off-Campus Housing Division; and manages 40 faculty townhouse units and provides specialized services to another 101 faculty single family homes located on University-based owned property.
The position is a 12-month, academic administrative, sixth term contract appointment He reports jointly to Assistant Vice-President for Student Affairs and Support Services Operations. Salary is negotiable depending on qualifications and experience. Starting date is August 1987.
Required minimum qualifications: 1) at least seven years of full time employment within Collegiate/University housing operations with at least five years in a managerial positions). 2) at least 3 years of full time managerial experience in a College/University residence hall operation of over 2,500 beds. 3) managerial experience in at least two of the following areas: A Food Services B. Custodial Services C. Maintenance and D. Residential life. 4) direct involvement with fiscal management of residence hall/housing operations 5) a bachelor’s degree.
All applications MUST include 1) A current resume, including name, address and daytime phone numbers of three professional references, 2) a letter of application and ADDRESSING THE QUALIFICATIONS. Applications must be postmarked by May 22, 1987, or received by 4 p.m. May 22,1987, if not mailed. Send application to:
Chair, Housing Director Search University of Minnesota 2618 Como Ave. SE, Room 207 Minneapolis, Minn. 55414
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer and specially invites and encourages applications from women and minorities.
6
May 18,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


B/v££
ANTICIPATED ADJUNCT POSITIONS 1987-88
Day and Evening ALL ACADEMIC SUBJECTS
Accounting
Anthopology
Art
Astronomy
Banking
Biology
Black Studies
Business Administration
Chemistry
Community Mental Health Cooperative Education Corporate/Cable Communications Dance
Data Processing: Operations
Data Processing: Programming
Early Childhood Education
Economics
English
ESL
French
Geography
Health Education
History
Italian
Library Science
Marketing
Mathematics
Media Productions
Medical Records
Music
Nursing
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science Psychology
Puerto Rican/Dominican Studies
Reading
Real Estate
Respiratory Therapy
Secretarial Science
Spanish
Social Service
Sociology
Speech
Student Personnel Services
Swimming
Theatre
Travel and Tourism
RANK AND SALARY DEPENDENT UPON QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE. MUST SEND RESUME AND COVER LETTER SPECIFYING AREA OF INTEREST BY 9/30/87.
(NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
DIRECTOR OF MEDIA CENTER Higher Ed. Assoc.
Director for audio and 2 TV studios, editing suites, equipment distribution facility, and video graphics installation. Center serves as production facility for College, commercial and non-profit groups, as a lab, for academic program, and training facility for funded programs. Flexibility, creativity, technical proficiency with equipment and system design and excellent organizational/supervisory skills essential Familiarity with teleconferencing and fiber optic systems important 5 yrs. prof. exp. req. with non-broadcast TV applications preferred. Teaching exp. a plus. BA/BS req. Salary from $32,726 + benefits.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #338 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 6/10/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
STANFORD
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIES
MUSIC CATALOGER: provides original dee-criptive cataloging following AACR2, LC interpretations for Western European language monnographs in books, scores, sound recordings & visual materials formats, including rare materials Prepares authority records, provides subject analysis for all materials, provides LC classification for music scores & books on music, participates in Music Library reference service, serves as back-up to Section Head. Requires: MLS, subject knowledge of music history/theory, reading knowledge lof at leastpnelWestem Euro: pean language, ability to resolve complex bibliographic issues, demonstrated human relations & communication skills. Previous experience preferred. Assistant ($24,800 - $34,500) or associate Librarian ($27,500 - $38,300) rank depending on qualifications. Submit letter of application, resume, names & addresses of 3 references to: Irene Yeh, Employment Coordinator, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif. 94305 by July 10,1987. Cite #301-HL, on all correspondence. EOE/AA.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C, has prerecorded* job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND.
GRANTS OFFICE FI8CAL COORDINATOR Under the supervision of the Director of Grants and Development, coordinate all administrative and fiscal activities of the College’s grants and contracts including accounting, payroll and purchasing operations. Work closely with College faculty and staff on the development and implementation of grant funded projects. Serve as liaison with CUNY Research Foundatioa Assist in the College’s fund raising activities with private corporations, foundations, benefactors and alumni. Bachelor’s degree required. Salary range $23,035 to $34,281' based upon experience and credentials. REFER TO BMCC VACANCV #337 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 5/22/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community CoHege/CUNY 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
Dl RECTOR OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE SUNY/ESC, a national leader in non-traditional higher education, seeks a Director of Institutional Research. The Director is responsible for managing the centralized enrollment system; preparing reports highlighting data trends & projections for future planning; & assisting in conducting program evaluation, student flow, trend analysis & retention studies Master’s req’d, doctorate prefd, in one of the social sciences or higher ed & 3 years of IR experience. Knowledge of the IBM/PCXT, Lotus or Enable desired. Excellent communication skills & report writing ability essentiaL Position available 9/1 /87. The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications after 6/12/87. Send letter of applications & res Li me to: Dr. Timothy Lehmann, Assistant Vice President, Office of Research & Evaluation, Rm. 302r SUNY/ESC, One Union Avenue, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866. (518) 587-2100, ext 287. AA/EOE
DEAN FOR THE DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE LIFE INDIANA UNIVERSITY-BLOOMINGTON Indiana University- Bloomington seeks nominations and applications for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life to assume office no laterthan July 1,1988. The dean will report directly to the chief executive of the Bloomington campus and will serve as a member of the administrative and planning group. The dean will be responsible for coordinating the activities of academic advising for freshmen and sophomores, minority-oriented special services, freshman orientation, learning-support services, career and placement activities, scholarships and financial aids, and health and counseling services.
A candidate should have an earned doctorate or equivalent credentials, substantial administrative experience, a proven ability to work well with students and faculty, a strong commitment to deliver effective student services, and a thorough understanding of the missions of a research institution. To be assured of consideration, nominations and applications should be received by August 1,1987. In keeping with the commitment to its affirmative-action policies, Indiana University particularly seeks nominations for or applications from minority or women candidates. Nominations and applications, with vitae and relevant lists of references, should be sent to Professor Dennis G. Peters, Chairman, Search and Screen Committee for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405.
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May 18,1987
7


Arts& Entertainment
DEADLINES, DEADLINES: Artwork received before the end of the month can be entered in one of the growing number of Hispanic art contests now held in the United States.
Entries for McDonald's 1987 Hispanic Heritage Art Contest must be received by May 30. The theme of the contest - open to U.S. children in grades one through six- is "What My Hispanic Heritage Means to Me.”'
Winning entries will be displayed in Washington, at the Capital Children’s Museum, during Hispanic Heritage Week - Sept. 13-19.
The deadline for another contest - the 1988 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour- has been extended to June 15 due to an “outstanding response to the call for entries.”
Up to 50 works selected for the exhibit, subtitled Expresiones Hispanas, will tour several U.S. cities next year.
A June 30 deadline has been announced for the 1987-88 INTAR Hispanic Playwrighte-in-Residence Laboratory, a program for the advanced study of writing techniques and development of plays for six to 10 authors writing in English.
Chosen playwrights, who must be available to live in New York, will
receive a $100 weekly stipend for a period of 25 weeks beginning in j
the fall.
(See Collecting for entry details.)
Other art dates around the country include GRRR, an installation and video presentation by Venezuelan artist Carlos Zerba, which continues at New Yorks INTAR Gallery through May 22.
Recollections of Frida, an evening of conversations with friends of Frida Kahlo, will be staged at San Francisco’s New Performance Gallery on May 22. An exhibit of works by Kahlo continues at the citys Mexican Museum, while Recuerdos de Frida, a concurrent mixed-media exhibit at Galerla de la Raza remains through June 27.
ONE LINERS: Linda Carter is among 150 “stark’ celebrating Happy Birthday Hollywood, a 100th anniversary special airing on the ABIC network.. OnMay21 Santa Marta Hospital in East Los Angeles will raffle a 1955 Chevrolet convertible donated by comedian Cheech Marin; the automobile is seen in his Born in East LA music videa..
The May 21 broadcast of America on Unlvlsldn contains a segment on the Afro/Cuban religious practice known as santeria. . And Rockaway Boulevard, a play directed by Pepe Douglas, closes New Yorks Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors’ Festival '8 7 series on May 24...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
EDITORS’ SURVEY: The percentage of Hispanic journalists employed by U.S. dailies inched upward from 1.64% to 1.69% during 1986, accord ing to a survey by the American Society of Newspaper Editors.
Based on a response of 61 % to a member-questionnaire, the ASNE report - distributed at the group's annual conference in San Francisco last month- projected that H ispanics account for 922 of the 54,700 news professionals employed by the nation’s 1,600 daily newspapers
The survey, conducted between October and December of 1986, showed an increase of 04% since 1980, when 1.3% of the executives editors, reporters photographers and artists were Latino.
Employment for all minorities rose from 6.3% in 1985 to 6.6% in 1986. Blacks re-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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presented 3.6%, Asian Americans 1.0% and Native Americans 0.3%. These percentages were up slightly over 1985 for blacks and Asian Americans, unchanged for Native Americans.
Minority employment among newspaper management remained low. Only 3.9%, or 478, of all news executives were minorities; 1.1%, or 132, were Hispanic
In 1978 ASNE adopted theyear2000 as its target date to make the nation's newsrooms reflect its population. Hispanics are expected to be 9.4% of the population by then, according to U.S. Census Bureau projections.
Manuel Galvdn, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and a reporter with the Chicago Tribune, told Weekly Report that the minimal gain is the result of “a lack of any significant recruitment of minorities overall.
“The reason ASNE is failing is that the vast majority of individual newspapers didn’t set targets for themselves,” he said.
Of the 922 Hispanics working for dailies, ASNE projected that508 (55%) were reporters, 164 were photographers or artists, 132 were news executives and 118 worked on copy desks.
CHICAGO DAILIES: While ASNE was collecting national data, The Chicago Reporter, a civil rights monthly, took a look at minority hiring by that city’s two major dailies, the Tribune and Sun-Times.
In its May issue, it reported that the Tribune had 38 minorities in its editorial staff of 503. That’s 7.5%. Thd Sun-Times' numbers were 26 out of 248 (10.5%).
Figures for Hispanics, gathered by Weekly Report from the Reporter and other sources, were much lower.
Of 116 reporters at the Sun-Times, one was Hispanic; of 192 at the Tribune, two were Hispanic
Of 43 editors at the Sun-Times, one was Hispanic; of 102 editors at the Tribune, none were Hispanic. — Richard Sayre
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Miam i women ... Linde Chivez, Republlcat;t Cafldida,tl, for a u.S:/ Senate seat in Maryland last year, is 'List of thet ' Coalition of Labor Union Women as a person and degraded the status of working women ." paign tactics. .. New York Mayor Ed KM"'r\ames Ren6 Valero, auxiliary bishop of Brooklyn, as chairman of a new immigration advisory committee. The committee will report on problems concerning the federal immigration law . . . The National Puerto Rican Coalition pra i ses a resolution introduced by Pennsylvan i a state Rep. Babette JoHpha declaring the state mul t ilingual and multicultural .. Convicted bank robber Dorinda L6pez, who received national attention when she was plucked _from a prison courtyard by a helicopter, tells a judge she escaped because of tl'lreats on her life from prison warden . . . Former CQiifomia Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoao, in a speech given at the Stanford University Law School , warns against current trends that may lead to "cultural genocide. " "The human diversity found in California is not something to be tolerated, but to be enjoyed," Reynoso said . . Colorado Gov. Roy Romer appoints Audrey Alvarado, director of the Denver-based Latin American Research and Service Agency, as co-chairperson of a Minority Business Opportunities Task Force ... Sammy Nuflez, president of the Louisiana state holds a $50Q-a-head reception in a Washington, D.C. townhouse much in the news lately. The townhouse was the one in wh ich Gary Hart and a male friend h.addinner with two HI SPAN I Ll K WEE Y REP Mariel Refugees Show Steady Economic Gains The men and women who came to t he United States aboard the Ma r iel Flot i lla six years ago are mak i ng vast improvements econom i cally but have not reached income levels o f other post-Castro immigrants, ac cording to two reports released this year. Approximate ly 125,000 Cubans arrived in Florida from the Cuban port o f Mariel between April and June of 1980 during the Carter administration. About 90,000 settled in MiamL . The balance of the refugees were relocated 300 Picket. U.S. English Almost 300 of the Pennsylvania English Plus Coalition, an organizat i on sup porting multilingualism, demonstrated outside U.S. English convention headquarters in Philadelphia May 3. "It was our impression that U.S. English was try i ng to use Philadelphia to wrap its message in a patriotic tMme," said coalition spokesperson attorney Ken Trujillo. The coal i tion was formed in March by Asian and Hispanic representatives of organizations such as the National Congress of Puerto Ric a n Righ t s and t he Hispa n ic Bar Association. in several states, mostly in the Southwest, but many have since returned to South Florida A report by Alejandro Portes of Johns Hopkins Univer s ity and Juan Clark of Miami-Dade Community College followed a sample of514 " Marielitos, " who were interviewed in 1983 and t hen again in 1986. Funded by the National SCience Foundation and the National Institute of Mental Health, it found that in Greater Miami , where most of the Mariel refugees have settled, their unem ployment rate declined from 27% in 1983 to 13.6% in 1985 . "The Political Economy of Cubans in South Florida, " a study by Antonio Jorge and Raul Moncarz published by the University of included similar findings. 1 nis report, released in Mtdl\ tklks the. increased number of Mariel refugees and other Cubans in the labor market to their willingness to work for wages below the pre vailing market rate. The Portes and Clark study showed that in 1983 the median monthly earnings of Mariel refugees was $200 lower than those of Cubans who during the 1970& Ma rie I refugees' Choice for LA. School Chief Decried A co a lition of 40 Latin o organizations ex presse d outrage at the May9 decision by the Lo s Angeles School Bo a rd to name a non Hispa ni c to. head the nation's second largest s ch o ol sy s tem. T he c o a l itio n , L at in os for Excellence in Education, led a letter-writing campaign on behalf o f Will iam Anton, a 35-year Hispanic vet e ran of the school system and currently its deputy superintendent. Led by the League of United Latin American Citizens and Padres Unidos, a parents' or ganization, the coalition argued that the time had arrived for the 56%Hispanic school district to be headed by a Hispanic. There a r e 590,000 stude n ts in the Los Angeles di s trict. ' G i n a A lon s o , ch ai rwoman of th e coal ition, told Week ly Report the school boar d "to ta ll y disr eg a r ded the needs o f parents and studen ts and ignored over5,000 letters from parents." Current superintendent Harry Handler resigned to teach at UCLA's Graduate School of Edu cation. Alonso said tlte• naming of leonard Britton, currently superintendent of Dade County schools in Florida, breaks a 33-year tradition of hiring superintendents from . within the school system. '"The message is clear," she . said. "If you are a Latino and t he best qualifieddon't bother to apply." William Rivera, assistant to the super intendent of los Angeles Public Schools, told Weekly Report on May 12 that the board had "no reaction" to the protests from the Hispanic community regarding Britton's appointment and that "the school board has no plans to reco n si d e r " it s decis i on . B r itton w ill t a k e office J ul y 1 . Ri c hard Say r e earnings increased 1983 and 1985 . . from $ 71 8 to $800. Their home ownersnip rose from 6% to 11.8%. In the Miami metropolitan area, most of the refugees are self-employed or working as Peddlers. Graciela'Beecher , chairperson of the Cuban American legal Defense and Education Fund, told Weekly Report that the number of immigranta selling goods on the streets, many vending 'duro-trios scraped ice and flavored syrup . indicates their hard-working spirit. _ Forty-five p ercent of the e m ployed sample was working in cuban enterprises, : the report said. CAlDEF was one of the many Cuban organizations that were instrumental in helping the refugees out of detainment camps. Of those working , 6% were employed 111 , continued on page 2 Council Balks on Latina' An effort to instafl the first female membef of the , founding council of the league of United latin American Citizens in Corpus Chr i sti , Texas, has w ith r esistance from council membe rs. Hil da Tagle , the fir st l atin a to be elected judge in N u eces County, w a s n omt nated May 7. She said she was spurred by the recent U.S. Supreme Court dec i sion an all-male civic organization must allow women to join. Tagle told Weekly Report that after an informal polling of council members, she felt the chances were "slim to none" t.hat her nomination would be approved. An anonymous nominating committee was to rule on . the matter late last week. The native Texan said she would not pu r sue legal redress if she was refused entry into Council No. 1. "This is not some thing you can convince people about. You have to hope they see the writing on the wall." Council President Roberto Rivera said, "We have had many female applicants over the years and t h e membership has rejected th e m."

PAGE 2

Latino Federal Cont racts Down $79 Million in '86 Federal contracti ng with Hispanic firms declined by $79 million , or almost 10%, in 1986, according to an audit of the Small Business Administration's 8 (a) minority pro curement program . The audit, released May 6 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed LATINO 8(a) CONTRACTING 1986 ( i n thousands) Calif . N . Y . Texas Colo. N.J. Ariz . N .M. Fla . 1984 $173,071 114,077 105,468 52, 981 22, 231 18,209 16,460 5,426 1985 Change $103,160 -40% 37,070 -88% 100,179 • 5% 25,911 • 51% . 14,024 37% 42,552 . + 134% 24,844 . +51% 22,224 + 310% Source : NALEO, Small Business Administration . given by the federal government. According to the NALEO report, Hispanic businesses in NewYorkand California together suffered a loss of $147 million . "One problem we are seeing with 8(a) is that the contracts. are not being spread out over many small firms. Instead, agencies are developing a relationship with one or two firms and giving them very big contracts, " said Louis DeSipio, a research associate with NALEO . . For example, 5 million . contract from the U .S. Department of State is responsible for Florida's 300% increase in 1986, he said . A move toward "omnibus contracting, " particularly by the U.S. Department of Defense, impacts on Hispanic businesses, especially in California where several military bases are located. Instead of contracti ng with individual firms for janitorial, security and other services, military bases are seeking one company that can supply a variety of support services-omnibus contracting. Defense contracts account for 80% of all 1986 federal procurements, yet that department ranks among the lowest i n percentage of all Hispanic contracts, the audit showed. Melinda Machado FEDERAL 8(A) CONTRACTING TO LATINO FIRMS 1986 (in thousa n ds) Total TotatB (a) Hisp . 8 (a) Hisp . Hisp.% Total Contracts Contracts Contracts 8 (a)% Contracts Agriculture 2 ,044,465 88,202 14,594 38.2% 0. 7% Commerce 334,653 . 9,094 944 10.4% 0.3% Officials, showed Hispanic firms received Defense 145, "896 ,606 1 ,489,153 499,158 33.5% 0 .3% $831 million in fiscal year 1985 and $752 Education 143,247 4 ,903 2 , 5 1 1 51.2% 1 .8% million in 1986. Energy 13,872,983 147,674 24,003 18.3% 0.2% HealthandHumanServ. 1092066 108490 63751 588% 58% Approximately two-thirds of all federal HUD ' 1 00:654 a : 173 '166 2:0% o: 1% contracts with minority firms come through Interior 1 , 011,286 61,370 30,550 49.9% 3.0% the 8(a) program . NALEO ' s fourth annual Justice 323,690 12,735 12,524 98.3% 3 .9% audit revealed federal procurement to. Labor 545,389 4 ,317 342 7.9% 0.1% minorityfirmshascontinuedadropbegunin State 341,648 50,647 25,777 50.9% 7.5% 1984, from $2.7 billion to $2. 4 billion in1986 : Transportation 1 , 221,227 158,956 28,134 17.7% 2. 3 % Hispanics accounted for 31.2% of all 8(a) . Treasury 307,908 13,109 1,356 10.3% 0.4 % contracts last year. However, Hispanic firms Total 182,558,799 2 ,408,646 751 ,893 31.2% 0.4 % were awarded only 0.4% of all contracts Source : NALEO. the Small Business Administration and the Office of Management and Budget . Watsonville Elects Latino Tony Campos, a real estate agent and son of farm workers, became the first Hispanic in history to be elected to the seven-member City Council of Watsonville , Calif., May 13. The city, more than 50% Hispanic, won a voting rights challenge by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Jan . 30. MALDEF had sought to make the agricultural community switch from atlarge to district elections. With three council seats at stake, Campos, 43, gained the second-highest number of votes , 25,023, in a field of five . 2 Bustelo Joins 'Partners' Partners of the Americas , a Washington , D . C.based volunteer organization that provides technical and economic assistance to Latin America , announced May 7 that New York City Commissioner of Employment Manuel Bustelo had been named its new president. . Employment commissioner since May 1985, Bustelo will assume his new position in mid-June. Partners of the Americas has a budget this year of $6. 2 million and more than 20,000 volunteers . Bustelo, 44, had previously served as publisher of New York's Spanish-language newspaper, El DiarioLa Prensa, and as president of the National Puerto Rican Forum . Florida House Extends State Commission Life The Florida state House, in a 106-2 vote , passed a bill May 5 that would keep the state Commission on His panic Affairs alive for another 10 years and keep it in the office of the governor . Florida Gov. Bob Martinez angered Hispanic leaders earlier this year wi t h a proposal to transfer the commission to the. Department of Commerce . " We feel it was important that out of the House of Representatives we had a clear message to the governor that the commission was not to be downgraded in any way," said commission Chairman Rafael Penalver. Governor Martinez told Weekly Report at an earlier date , "The changes were proposed because the gol(ernor's office shouldn't be an operating office . " In an unusual move , the House took the final vote on the bill the same day it was debated. The Senate was expected to vote on the bill late last week. Latino Joblessness Grows The Hispanic jobless rate rose to 9 . 2% in April from 9% in March, according to figures released May 8 by the U .S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics . Refugees Make Advances continued from page 1 professional or managerial occupations , the PorteS/Ciark report found . Eighteen percent reported their occupations in Cuba to be professional or managerial. Of the 125 ,000 refugees who arrived du r ing . the boatlift, 86,852 were men, 37,811 were women ; 22,585 were under the age of 17. Another report , " The Children of Mari el" by Helga Silva , found that man y of the 9 ,000 Mar i el students who entered Dade Coun t y Schools in 1980 init i ally tested poorly , par ticularly in reading and math. There has been no systematic study on the progress of Mariel children into society, said Silva Emerging , however , are success stories such as that of Florida high school studen t s Esteban Torres and his sister , Maria . Both are seniors at Coral Gables High School . Esteban will be class valedictor i an w1th a grade point average of 4.88 in a 4 point system (extra credit is given for collegel evel courses). Esteban has accepted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard . Maria maintained a 3 . 9 average . Presently , 3,400 Mariel refugees remain indefinitely imprisoned in the United States. U.S. law says that aliens found guilty of a felony or a series of misdemeanors are "excludable," even if the acts were committed in their native country. -Julio Laboy H i spani c Lin k Weekl y R e p ort

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Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist Inside the Tortilla My earliest recollection of the tortilla is my mama telling me not to with it. I had bitten eye holes iri it and was using it as a mask at the dinner table. By biting holes, I learned to make many interesting designs . My family claims that I owe my career as an artist to the tortilla. That early, informai training, they say, provided me with the essential motivation and foundation, although sometimes I wore tortillas on my head , like yarmulkes, and never had any great urge to convert from Catholicism to Judaism. As a child, I also used tortillas as hand warmers on cold days . For Mexicans, this Circular maize bread has been both versatile and sustaining over the centuries. It originated with the Mayan civilization , perhaps predating Europe's wheat bread. For millions, it has served as the spoon and the fork, the chopsticks, the sandwich . . . and the napkin. There is much more to it than meets the gringo eye. Tortillas have a bottom and a top, a left and a right, an inside and an outside. They can be paper-thin. These are used for flautas, a type of taco that is filled, rolled, and then fried crisp . There are also gorditas, small fat ones, or sopes. These can be fried or baked and then filltld with frijoles or meat, or both. Or eaten plain. The most hands<;>me of all tortillas is the handmade tortilla, using nixtama( not instant masa harina A connoisseur -can smell the quality. It takes generation-to-generation experience to create one that is truly delicious, truly sabrosa GIVING A TORTILLA CHARACTER But now machin&-made tortillas are monopolizing the mercados. Handmade tortillas are becoming a rarity. Sadly, assemblyline tortillas never receive the individual tender slaps that give them character. As a youngster living in El Paso, Texas, I used to visit a tortilla factory where all of the products were handmade , near the open mercado in Ciudad Juarez. The factory was in an ancient adobe building. As you approached it, you could hear the rhythmic slapping of the masa between skilled hands, forming the perfectly round tortilla They could barely keep up with the demand. In the mercado you could buy taquitos. To create a poor man's taco, you placed a warm tortilla across your left palm, sprinkled it with salt, and with the fingertips of your right hand, rolled it up tight. Then . there were also lett-handed people. How did tortilla chips originate? In Mexican homes it is the custom to save all the left-over tortilla pieces and day-old tortillas and fry them. Presto." You have tostadas, or tostaditas. That is why there is always a bowl of tortilla chips and chile in Mexican restaurants. This i s not to say they are made from yesterday's tortillas . HEAT THE BOTTOM SIDE LAST Sin pelos en Ia lengua . . . . . . . THE SCURVY PRESS: Snap on your barf bags, boys and girls. We're about to embark on a journey to the wonderland of big city journalism : SAN DIEGOA mere 18 miles south of downtown San Diego, civilization ends and a wasteland pop'llated by murderers, armed robbers, rapists, smugglers and their victims begins. The neatly maintained streets and towering glass high-rises are replaced by a threatening montage of finger canyons, flood levees and river bottoms. Helpless women scream in the night as their mates are clubbed senseless or dispatched with a gun o ' r a knife. And every evening, as predictable as the cooling breezes from the Pacific, human waves of aliens, a majority of them Mexicans, attempt to ov11rwhelm a thin line of U.S Border Patrol agents and enter this country illegally. The nightly scenario is often a nightmare. . . Taco vendors start circulating through the ' crowd, providing a perfect disguise for . bands of young Mexican toughs armed with clubs, sharpened sticks find firearms who have come to prey on the alienS. . . On especially aCtive nights, the acrid fumes of tear gas fired by agents mingles with the stench of perspiring bodies as the battle rages... No; thafs not from TheNationallnquirer or The Star. lfs what veteran reporter Bob Wiedrich fed, in a full-page news feature, to the 1 . 1 million Sunday(May3) readers of the one&proud Chicago Tribune. The Chicago Tribune? Isn't that where Manuel Galvin, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, works as a . Yes. And he promises to deal with his editors on it AD NAUSEAM: Georgetown's Key Theater in Washington, D . C . , showed the film "Dona Herlinda and Her Son" last week. It advertised it in The Washington Post as "From the Land of the Nacho, the Taco and the Macho." It makes one wonder how it promoted films like "Roots." BERRY BERRY QUESTIONABLE: Los Angeles Times sports columnist Scott Ostler likes stereotypes , too. He devotes his . April29 column to-promoting Chico Esquela of NBGTV"Saturday Nighf' notoriety(" Bas&-&-bol been berry berry good to me'') in the late '70s as the ballplayer he misses most He quotes Garrett Morris, who played the simpleton Latino infielder, as saying : " I have never had a bad from anyone about Chico. Hispanics in particular like him ... " Por favor, Chico . GAFFE TIME: An Associated Press article on Attorney General Edwin Meese's questionable Wedtech Corp. ties, which ran in The Washington Post (and presumably everywhere else) May 7, carried this jolter: "The Wedtech case has led to the indictments of two New York Democratic congressmen, Mario Blaggl and Robert Garcia" Garcia indicted? No. Not true. (Biaggi has been indicted recently, but on a different matter . ) Sin Pelos called Garcia's office for a reaction. The response was uncharacteristically laid back. "These things do happen," a spokesman told us. The tortilla has also suffered from discrimination. A few years back a padre was found guilty of celebrating the Holy Mass using a tortilla as a host, and discharged from his duties. Now what if Jesucristo has been born in Mejico? I must assume that some European priest would have been punished for using unleavened wheat bread. The best way to warm a tortilla is over an open fire from a gas Kay Barbaro range. I remember amazing many a gringo friend by sticking my •••••••••••••••••••••llliiilliillliill. fingers into the fire and flipping the tortilla . For best results, heat.the bottom side last Try heating a tortilla on an electric range and in two seconds it will burn and taste awful .You can solve the problem by dragging the tortilla slowly across the hot steel coils. Our next door neighbor swears by her microwave oven, but 1 find the heat too rntense . So what we do at home is heat a pan and use it like a comaL What is a comaf? Well, thafs another story. (Jose Antonio Burciaga. of Stanford, Calif., is an artist and writer a no a member of the California comedy troupe Culture Clash . ) Quoting. • • CARLOS FUENTES, reflecting on the United States' lack of a sense of histo ,ry, in an interview with the Christian Science Monitor: "Dan Rather appears on the set and defines the history of the day so that the memory of the previous day can be thrown into the garbage can." Hispanic Link Weekly Report May 18, 1987 3

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COLLECTING CONNECTING MARIEL CHILDREN: "The Children of Mariel,'' a68page booklet on how Dade County, Fla, public schools absorbed more than 10,000 children _of the. Mariel boatlift, is available . . For a copy; $8nct (Late news on what's occurring within the U. $. Hispanic community $2 to: The Cuban American National Foundation, 1000 Thomas and those agencies and corporations that work with it) Jefferson St NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265 2822. . MARIEL STUDY: For a copy of the study "Mariel Refugees: Six Years After," by Alejandro Portes and Juan Clark, send $3 to the Department of Sociology, 530 Mergenthaler Hall, Johns Hopkins University , Baltimore, Mcf 21218. MARIEL INFORMATION: A study conducted by the University of Miami gives information on the political and economic status of Cubans, including Mariel refugees. For a copy of report, ' ' The Politica l Economy of Cubans in South Florida, " send $5 fo the Institute of Inter-American Studies, P.O. Box 248123, University of Miami , Coral Gables, Fla 33124 (305) 284. MCDONALDS' 1987 ART CONTEST: Paintings or drawings on 11" x 14" or 12" x 18" cream or white paper, with an entry form or facsimile, must be sent to: Hispanic Heritage Contest, P.O. Box 11189, Chicago , Ill. 60611 . For details call Raul Godoy at (312) 575 3429 or Deborah Charnes Vallejo at (312) 836-7133. . COORS ART EXHIBIT AND TOUR: Entry packets may be obtained by writing Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artist'ic Images, Attn . Maureen Le6n Acosta, P.O. Box 11434, Denver Colo . 1 0311 (303) 433. PLAYWRIGHTS LABORATORY: Persons who wish to be con sidered should submit a copy of a script and a brief biographical narrative to: INTAR , HPRL , c/o Mari a Irene Fornes , .P.O. Box 788, New York, N.Y. 10108. Authors should include a self-addressed , stamped envelope to have their scripts returned. JORGE HERNANDEZ AWARDS : Boston-based lnqui/inos Boricuas en Acci6n is seeking nominations for its newly created Jorge Hernandez Awards. The two national awards, one for Latino leadership and the other for community development leadership, will recognize persons for long-term career achievements. To obtain nomination forms , write to: Jorge Hernandez Awards , c/o IBA, 405 Shawmut Ave. , Boston, Mass. 02118 (617) 262 . Nominations must be submitted by M _ay22. CRIME PROJECT FINANCED The California Office of Criminal Justice Planning's Special Victims Assistance Program awarded a $40,000 grant to the Crime Victim Center in Los Angeles to fund a Latino Crime Victim Project The eve, a non-profit community service organization, provides : psychological counseling to victims of violent crime and their families. The Latino Crime Victim Project also offers support groups, emer gency transportation, translation services and advocacy. _ . 1 In addition, the grant will help finance a hotline number tt\e;t ; help Latinos who do not speak English seek police help, deal witt) Crt authorities and obtain financial compensation. Bilingual volunteers staff the hotline-(213)937-from9 am. to 5 p . m . Monday through Friday. EDUCATION FUNDS RAISED Denver Mayor Federico Pei'la hosted 68 Hispanic mayors at the annual Hispanic Mayor's Summit, which attracted nearly 1,000 people to its third annual Mayor's Ball. Mayors from Texas, California, New Mex !co, Arizona, Florida, Utah and Colorado attended . The ball raised more than $10,000 for Hispanic education a l opportunities. Proceeds from the ball will provide 1 0 college scholarships for students and help fund educational organizations. The summit incl u ded discussions on revenue increases and small business development. The ball was sponsored by the Adolph Coor s Company and the U.S. Council of the League of United Latin American Citizens. . . A BRIEF OPPORTUNITY Jockey International is seeking H i spanics to model its line of underwear in a national advertising campa ign. Jockey is looking for Hispanic women and men who consider themselves successful The ads will appear in major national magazines. If interested, write to Bill Herrmann at Jockey International, 2300 60th St., Kenosha, Wis . 53140. Send one photo of yourself and one full length. Calendar issues and the new immigration law are among the conference sessions. Office of Latino Affai rs. Romana Campos (202) 939 ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT Delano, Cali f . May 23 THIS WEEK SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Albany , N.Y. May 19 The Hispanic Political Coalition o f New Yo r k State is hosting its annual scholarship dinner. New York Lt Gov. Stan Lundine will b e the keynote speaker . Ralph Morales (518) 3820950 IMMIGRATION LA W Los Angeles May 20 The South Central Los Angeles Regional Center His p anic Parent Group is sponsoring an in f ormational program in Spanish concerning aspects of the new immigration law. Speakers include Ernest Gustafson, district director of the Immigration and Natu r alization Service , and Vera Weisz, an attorney. OctavioFigueroa (213) 734, e xt. 235 ARIZONA CHICANO CONFERENCE Tucson, Ariz . May 20 " The State of ttle State : Arizona's Next Four Years" is the theme of the eighth annual Arizona Chicano Conference. Behavioral health, criminal justice, r u ral Hispanic Link We e kly Report Raul Aguirre (602) 3230903 . URBAN COALITION CONVOCATION Washington , D . C . May 2D-22 The National Urban Coalition is hosting a 20th anniversary con vocation of business people, com munity activists, labor and r eligious leaders and others interested in urban affa irs. Diane Sanchez, chairwoman o f the Span i sh Speaking Unity Council, Will i e Velasquez , execu t ive director of the South w est Voter Registration Educa t ion Project, a nd Loui s Nuiiez, presiden t of the Nat i onal Puerto R i can tion , are among the forum p articipants. Tom Blackburn-Rod r iguez (202) 628 MENTAL HEALTH CONFERENCE San Antonio May 20 The third annual South _ Texas Mexican Ame r ican Mental Health Association Conference will address mental health and spirituali t y . Lloyd Davis (512) 734 HISPANIC MOTHERS Washington, D .C. May 21 "Hispanic Mot hers and Babies: Preserving Healthy Traditions in a Challenging Era" is the theme of a health conference sponsored by the D.C. Mayor's Luis V aldez and the Teatro Campesino will be the f eatured en t ertainment at the 25th anniversary ' celebratio n of the United Farm Workers. The event will also focus attention o n the grape boycott Cecilia Cru z (805) 8227 1 C HILl COO KOFF Washington, D.C. May 23 Fifty chi l i afi cionados are expect ed to compete i n a _ . cookoff sponso re d by the N a t io n a l C api t al Council o f the League of Uni t ed Latin American Ci t i zen s an d the U . S . Department of Agriculture . P roceeds will benefit a scholarship fund . Carl Custer (202) 447 COMING S OO N HISPANICS AND HIGHER E D UCATION H i spanic Association of Colleges and Univers i t i es Phoenix, Ariz . May 25, 26 Antonio Rigual (512) 434 6711 HISPANIC DROPOUT PROBLEM Washington, D.C. May 26 LULAC, the Hispanic News Media Association Andres Tobar(202) 3471493 4

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5 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS NOTICE TO HISPANIC EMPLOYEES OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA) AND HISPANICS INTERESTED 11'.1 EMPLOYMENT AT N .SA A . proposed settlement has been reached in an equal employment lawsuit brought on behalf of certain His panic employees of NSA and Hispanics who have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment at NSA. If you are a Hispanic employee of NSA , if you are a Hispanic who has unsuccessfully applied for a position at NSA, or if you are a Hispanic who has considered applying for a position at NSA but has been discouraged from doing so, this proposed settlement may affect you. The proposed settlement would address NSA's recruitment and promotion processes for Hispanics. It also would maintain and develop programs designed to aid Hispanic employees of NSA. Further, it would require NSA to conduct an examination of the testing program used by NSA as part of its hiring process. It would also provide for record keeping and monitoring of NSA ' s p r ogress in employing Hispanics . . For further information concerning the prvposed settlement, you should write , as soon as possible, to the following attorneys: Irving Kator, Esq. Douglas Huron , Esq. Kator, Scott and Heiler 1079 Vermont Ave . NW Washington, D . C . 20005 If you wish to review the proposed settlement, you may obtain a copy from these attorneys, or you may go to the Office of the Clerk, United States District Court, 101 W . Lombard St., Bahimore , Md. , 21201 , and ask to review the proposed consent decree in VelAsquez v. Faur er, No. K -82. If you are a member of the classes on whose behalf this lawsuit w a s brought, you may submit any written objections you may have concerning the proposed settlement to the Clerk of the Court, at the address listed above , by June 1, 1987. If you submit any written objections by the due date, y ou may also be heard orally at a hear i ng which will be held to consider whe t he r the proposed settlement sfiould be made final. That hearing will be held at 10:00 a . m . o n June 19, 1987, in courtroom No. 7C at the same address. If you wish , you may retain your own attorney to represent you in making written objections or at the hearing . EQUAL OPPORTUNITY SPECIALIST $25,376-$35,624 Ann . #1638 7ACMG Profess i onal investigative , analytic ' al and evaluative equal employment opportunity com pliance work. Responsible for applying EEO laws, regulations, precedent decisions and County policy to insure non-discrimination and barrier free equal opportunity in emp l oyment, conducting investigations, and making independent reports t o the Special the County Manager for EEO . EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE APPRENTICE $20,802.08 #52237 AFIR GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. has several openings available at various locations: MANAGEMENTCONSULTANT(DALLAS) This position provides consultation and technical assistance in the total management function to Girl Scout councils based on market segment size. Candidate should have broad management experience (identify needs and solve pro. blems), knowledge of management systems, fund development and financial operations. Background in not-for-profit agency with na tional affiliation preferred Excellent com munication written/verbal and human relations skills a must. Travel approximately 40-60% . Salary to mid $30's. FUND DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT . (NEW YORK CITY) This position provides consulting and/or technical assistance in comprehensive fund development to Girt Scout councils. Expertise of candidate should include re source identifications, market analysis, cam paign planning , plus the ability to conduct training workshops in techniques and strate gies. Excellent communication written/verbal and human relations skills a must Must be willing to travel at least 50%. Salary to mid $30's. PERSONNEL CONSULTANT (CHICAGO) This position provides consulting and/or technical assistance in various areas of per sonnel Candidates should have broad ex perience in the Human Resources field. Ex pertise should include: current knowledge of personnel prac;tices and legislation, salary administration, performance and conflict management as well as recruitment, AA/EOE, and good platform skills . Not-for-profit and/ or voluntary agency experience highly desir able. Salary to low $30's. Travel approximately 40%. We offer excellent benefits, including 3 weeks vacation . For immediate consideration please indicate opening desired and send resume to : Janice Jacobs, Employment Specialist GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U .S.A. 830 Third Avenue New York, N . Y . 10022 ANEOE M/F/H/V Requ ires: Two years professional experience i n EEO administration , coordination, management and/ or complaint investigation, plus a Bachelo( s d egree in Public Admin i stration , human re source managemen t or related field Considerabl e k nowledge o f applicable federal , s t ate and local law s a n d court decisions . Trainee level position i n the Emergency Medical Serv ices Division of the Arlington County Fire Department. This is a new division within the department with responsibility for providing a full range of emergency services to the citizens of Arlington County. Employee learns and per forms emergency medical treatment duties, drives an ambulance, assists in providing medical treatment completes and maintains reports and records and participates in drills and classes in fire operations and medical procedures. Requires high school or equivalent and EMTCardiac ( EMTC) certificati on by the Commonwealth of i Virgi nia or EMT P a ramedic (EMT P) certification 1 issued by the National Registry of Medical I L------------..------l Completed Offi ci a l Ar1t n g ton County A ppllcatton Form mus t b e r eceived by c l osing da t e o f J u n e 11, 1987, b y 5 p.m . To request applicati o n m at erial , plea se call (703) 558 2167 o r TOO (703) 284 5521 (hearing imp a ire d only . ) ARLI N GTON COUNT Y Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th St. A r ling t on , VA. 22201 EOE DIRECTOR , FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Hispanic Civil Rights O r gani z ation seeks Director to oversee financial , personnel, pur chas i ng, insurance and admin i strative functions. Requires M . A., 10 years financial/administrative experience (Mul tistate, nonprofit preferred). Submit salary history, resume wi t h r eferences to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th FL, Los Angeles, Calif . 90014 by May 22 , 1987. Te c hnicians. Appli cants must subm tt a copy of current certi f ication with application . All applican t s must submit an official A rlington Cou nty application form . Resumes, SF 171 s, etc. without a complet ed official Arlington ap plication form wi ll not be accept ed . A pplica t ions must be received into the Personn e l Department no later than July 2, 1987 a t 5 :00 PM . To request applica t ion material pl eas e c all (703) 5582167 or(703) 28 4 5521 ( h ea r i n g i mpaired) . ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 14th Street North Arlington, Virginia 22201 Arlington Coun t y i s an E q ual Opportunity Employer THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HIS. PANIC JOURNALISTS has a n e mp l oyment referral service for Hi s panic professionals and students in th e media, English or Spanish . Contact: Lucienne Loman (202) 7832 28. May 18,1987 ADMINISTR ATIVE ASS I STANT FOR THE CONF E RENC E COORDINATOR Washin gton, D . C , national Hispanic organization seeks i ndividual to assist in the planning/imple menta t ion of Annual Conference. College degre&' equiv a lent experience in job-rela t ed area S t rong w r iting, t yping (70 wpm), telephone skills . Self starter can work under pressure without need o f close supervision . Position available im . med i ately. Salary range : $1416,000. Contact Lupe Aguirre , National Council o f La Raza at (202) 628. GRAPHICS: El Ba"io G r aphics, Washington, ' D.C., prov ides: e Design e illustration e Type setting • layout e silkscreen and e Slats. Ei Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington , D . C . 20010 (202) 483. H i span ic Link Weekly Report

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6 seattle central community college Dr. Donald G. Phelps, Chancellor of the Seattle Community College District, invites nominations and applications for the position of President of Seattle Central Community COllege located in Seattle, Washington. • InstitUtional Setting: Established in 1966, Seattle Central Community College is a fully accredited two-year institution offering educational programs in college transfer, vocational training, general education and community service classes, plus a full range of student .support services. The College currently serves approximately 7,500 students per quarter; over 37 percent are ethnic minorities or foreign born . e Responsibilities: The president is responsible for operation and management of the campus. S/he provides leadership which assures that Seattle Central Community College provides a broad spectrum of educational opportunities to meet student and community needs . The president reports directly to the chancellor . • Qualifications: The applicant should possess the following qualifications : Top level community college administrative experience or equivalent; work experience in a multtmultt-ethnic, multt-cultural environment; demonstrated ability to develop and manage a major institutional budget and to work with a wide variety of constituencies to accomplish mstitutional goals. A master's degree is required, and an earned doctorate or equivalent ' experience . is desirable . • Application Procedures: Submit letter of application in response to the above qualifications, vita, and a minimum of three current letters of reference directly from individuals familiar with the candidate ' s work experience by June 12, 1987, to: Dr . Donald G . Phelps, Chancellor Attn: SCCC President Search Committee Seattle Community College District VI 300 Elliott Avenue West Seattle, Wash . 98119 Phone : (2021 587-4160 Applications must be postmarked by midnight, June12, 1987. Seattle Community College District Ia an equal opportunity employer. PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OFFICER The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund invites applications for the position of Program Development Officer . Under direction of the Executive Director , the Officer will organize and execute a variety of program development efforts from the headquarters office. A list of . duties follows: establish and maintain Alumni and volunteer network; develop and implement annual campaign for individual and matching gifts; initiate and oversee production of newsletter, news releases, and med.ia PR; assist in writing corporate funding proposals and coordinating special events and projects; research and maintain donor data base records. Candidates should have three to five years experience in fund raising or related work, strong organizational and communication skills, and demonstrated effective writing ability . A bachelor's degree or higher is required . . Salary: mid-30's, depending on experience and salary history. Send resume by June 15, 1981 to : Personnel Committee, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, P . O . Box 748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101 . Contact Ernest z . Robles (415) 892-9971. The following two positions are with La Guardia Community College. PERIODICALS/REFERENCE LIBRARIAN Responsible for periodical collection of 5000 titles which includes microforms and periodicals, information desk coverage by non-professional staff, ongoing analysis of the periodicals collection, heavy reference and bibliographic instruction schedule . Qualifications: ALA accredited MLS Degree ; knowledge of periodicals; excellent inter personal skills; academic library experience . Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience . Full-time, one-year position. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Community based educational agency seeks an Executive Dlrectorwith 7 years experience in program development, administration, budget-EVENING, WEEKEND LIBRARIAN Supervision of a clerical and adjunct librarian staff of 8, heavy bibliographic instruction and reference services schedule. Qualifica tions: ALA accredited MLS Degree; experience with an academic library's public services program ; supervisory and communication skills. Experience and facility with micros desirable. Second M.IVMS preferable . Salary. Commensurate with qualifications and ex perience. FuiHime, one-year position . Send letter and resume indicating position by July 17 to : Chief Librarian , Room 2 , LaGuardia Community College/CUNY , 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N . Y . 11101. EOE/ AA Employer. ing , staff supervision and fund raising . College . degree a must and graduate work preferred Salary high 40's to low 50's. Please send resume by May 22 to: Mr. William Radinson , 305 W . , 18th St, #28, New York, N.Y. 10011 . May 18, 1987 UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DIRECTOR OF HOUSING SERVICES The University of Minnesota invites ap plications for of Director _ of Housing Services: The Director iii responsible for the administration and management of University owned student and faculty housing on the Twin Cities Campus. Responsibilities inClude the planning , staff development, evaluation and direction of operations and residential life programs in University housing. This position initiates and rev i ews operating policy and fiscal control to maintain accountability within University accounting and business procedures guidelines. It initiates and reviews residential life policy and procedures within appropriate University governance mechanism . The director is further responsible for the administration of the Off-Campus Housing office and a management agreement covering University Family Housing operations . The overall responsibility of this position includes the operation of University residence halls, non-residence halls, student housing and faculty housing. The University housing residence hall system includes eight buildings and five food service operations with a total student/full time staff of more than 360 FTE. The residence hall system houses 45,000 and ha . s an annual"budget of 14 million dollars. In addition, housing operates a campus rentals division responsible for 90 University-owned apartment units; provides and mediation services to approximately 16,000 students and staff annually through Off-Campus Housing Division ; and manages 40 faculty townhouse units and provides specialized services to another 1 01 faculty single family homes located on University based owned property. The position is a 12-month, academic ad ministrative, sixth term contract appointment He reports jointly to Assistant Vice-President for Student Affairs and Support Services Operations. Salary is negotiable depending on qualifications and experience . Starting date is August 1987. Required minimum qualifications: 1) at least seven years of full time employment within Collegiate/University housing operations with at least five years in a managerial position( s). 2) at least 3 years of full time managerial experience in a College/University residence hall operation of over 2,500 beds. 3) mana gerial experience in at least two ofthe following areas: A Food Services B Custodial Services C. Maintenance and D . Residential life. 4) direct involvement with fiscal managttment of residence haiVhousing operations 5) a . bachelor's degree. All applications MUST include 1) A current resume , including name, address and daytime phone numbers of three professional re ferences, 2) a letter of application and AD DRESSING THE QUALIFICATIONS. Ap plications must be postmarked by May 22 , 1987, or received by4 p .m. May22, 1987, if not mailed . Send application to: Chair, Housing Director Search University of Minnesota 2618 Como Ave . SE, Room 207 Minneapolis, Minn. 55414 The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer and specially invites and encourages applications from women and minorities. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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ANTICIPATED ADJUNCT POSITIONS 1987-aa Day and Evening ALL ACADEMIC SUBJECTS Accounting Anthopology Art Astronomy Banking Biology Black Studies Business Administration Chemistry Community Mental Hearth Cooperative Education Corporate/Cable Communications Dance Data Processing : Operations Data Processing: Programming Early Childhood Education Economics English ESL French Geography Health Education History Italian Library Science Marketing Mathematics Media Productions Medical Records Music Nursing Philosophy Physical Education Physics Political Science Psychology Puerto Rican/Dominican Studies Reading Real Estate Respiratory Therapy Secretarial Science Spanish Social Service Sociology Speech Student Personnel Services Swimming Theatre Travel and Tourism RANK AND SALARY DEPENDENT UPON QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE . MUST SEND RESUME AND COVER LETIER SPECIFYING AREA OF INTEREST BY 9/30/87. (NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) . DIRECTOR OF. MEDIA CENTER Higher Ed. Assoc. Director for audio and 2 TV studios , editing suites. equipment distribution facility, and video graphics installation . Center serves as production facility for College, commercial and non-profit groups, as a lab , for academic program, and training facility for funded programs . Flexibility, creativity, technical proficiency with equipment and system design and excellent organizationaVsupervisory skills essential. Familiarity with teleconferencing and fiber optic systems important 5 yrs. prof . exp. req. with nonbroadcast TV applications preferred . Teaching exp. a plus. BA/BS req . Salary from $32,726 +benefits. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #338 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 6/10/87 TO: Ms . Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street , New York, N .Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMAT!VE ACTION EMPLOYER STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES MUSIC CATALOGER: provides original de& criptive cataloging following AACR2, LC inter pretations for Western European language monnographs in books, scores. sound recordings & visual materials formats. inc;luding rare materials. Prepares authority records, provides subject analysis for .all materialS. provides LC cation for music scores & books on music, participates in Music Library reference service, serves as back up to Section Head . Requires: MLS. subject knowledge of music history/theory, reading k,nowledge! of pean language, ability to resolve complex biblio graphic issues. demonstrated human relations & communication skills . Previous experience preferred. Assistant ($24,800 $34,500) or associate Librarian ($27,500$38, 300) rank depending on qualifications. Submit letter of application, resume, names & addresses of 3 references to: Irene Yeh, Employment Coordi nator , Stanford University Libraries. Stanford, Calif . 94305 by July 10, 1987. Cite #301HL. on all correspandence. EOE/AA. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSrTY of Washington, D . C . has prerecorded. job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND. . GRANTS OFFICE FISCAL COORDINATOR Under the supervision oft he Director of Grants and Development,coordinate all administrative and fiscal activities of the College's grants and contracts including accounting. payroll and purchasing operation& Work closely with College faculty and staff on the development and im plementation of grant funded projects. Serve as lia,ison with CUNY Research Foundation . Assist in College's fund raising activities with private corporations, foundations, bene factors and alumni. Bachalol's degree required Salaly range $23,035 to $34,281' based upon experience and credentials . REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #337 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 5/22/87 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan CommunityCollegetCUNY 199 Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER DIRECTOROFINSTITUTIONALRESEARCH EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE SUNY/ESC , a national leader in non-traditional higher education , seeks a Director of lnstituiional Research . The Director is responsible for: managing the centralized enrollment system; preparing reports highlighting data trends & projections for future planning; & assisting in conducting program evaluation, student flow , trend analysis & retention studies. Master's req'd, doctorate prefd, in one of the social sciences or higher ed & 3 years of IR experience . Knowledge of the IBM/PCXT , Lotus or Enable desired. Excellent communication skills & report writing ability essential Position available9/1/87 . The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications after 6/1 2/87. Send letter of ap plications & resume to: Dr. Timothy Lehmann, Assistant Vice President, Office of Research & Evaluation , Rm. 302, SUNY/ESC, One Union Avenue , Saratoga Springs , NY 12866. (518) 587 00, ext. 287. AA/EOE. DEAN FOR THE DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE LIFE INDIANA UNIVERSITY-BLOOMINGTON Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report Indiana University-Bloomington seeks nominations and applications for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life to assume office no later than July 1, 1988. The dean will report directly to the chief executive of the Bloomington campus and will serve as a member of the administrative and planning group. The dean will be responsible for coordinating the activities of academic advising for freshmen and sophomores. minority-oriented special services, freshman orientation, learning-support services, career and placement activities, scholarships and financial aids , and health and counseling services. A candidate should have an earned doctorate or equivalent credentials. substantial administrative experience, a proven ability to work well with students and faculty, a strong commitment to deliver effective student services, and a thorough understanding of the missions of a research institution To be assured of consideration, nominations and applications should be received by August 1, 1987. In keeping with the commitment to its affirmative-action policies, Indiana University particularly seeks nominations for or applications from minority or women candidates. Nominations and applications, with vitae and relevan t lists of references, should be sent to Professor Dennis G . Peters, Cha i rm an, S e arch a nd Screen Committee for the Dean for the Division of Und e rgraduate Life, Department of Chemistry , Indiana University , Bloomington , Indiana 4740 5 . May 18 , 1987 7

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Arts & Entertaininent receive a $100 weekly stipend for a period of 25 weeks beginning in the fall. DEADLINES, DEADLINES: Artwork received bef()re the end of the month can be entered in one of the growing number of Hispanic art contests now held in the United States. (See Collecting for entry details.) . Other art dates around the country include GRRR, an installation and video presentation by Venezuelan artist Carlos Zerba, which continues at New York's INTAA Gallery through May 22. Recollections of Frida, an evening of conversations with friends of . Frida Kahlo , will be staged at San Francisco's New Performance Gallery on May 22. An exh i bit of works by Kahlo continues at the city's Mexican Museum, while Recuerdos de Frida, a concurrent exhibit at Galerfa de Ia Raza remains through June 27. Entries for McDonalds 1987 Hispanic Heritage Art Contest must be received by May 30. The theme of the contest open to U.S. children in . grades one through six-is "What My HisPanic Heritage Means to Me. " ' • Winning entries will be displayed in Washington, at the Capital Children's Museum, during Hispanic Heritage WeekSept. 13. The deadline for another contest the 1988 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour-has been extended to June 15 due to an "outstanding response to the call for entries." Up to 50 works selected for the exhibit, subtitled Expresiones Hispanas, will tour seve r al U.S. cities next year. A June 30 deadline has been announced for the 1987 INTAR Hispanic . Playwright&-ir:Residence Laboratory, a program for the advanced study of writing techniques and development of plays for six to 1 0 authors writing in English . ONE LINERS: linda Carter is among 150 "stars'' celeb r ating Happy 'Birthday Hollywood , a 1 OOth anniversary special airing on the network. .. On May 21 Santa Marta Hospital in East Los Angeles will raffle a 1955 Chevrolet convertible donated by comedian Cheech Marin; the automobile is seen in his Born in East LA music video. .. The May21 broadcast of Amerk,a on contains a segment on the Afro/Cuban religious practice known as santerfa. . And Rockaway Boulevard, a play directed by Pepe Douglas, closes New York's Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors' Festivai'B7 series on May24 ... Chosen playwrights, who must be available to live in New York. will -Antonio Mejfas-Rentas Media Report EDITORS' SURVEY : The percentage of Hispanic journalists employed by U .S. dailies inched upward from 1.64% to 1 . 69% during 1986, according to a survey by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Based on a response of 61% to a member questionnaire , the ASNE report distributed at the group's annual conference in San Francisco last month-projected that Hispanics account for 922 of the 54,700 news profes sionals employed by the nation ' s 1 ,600 daily newspapers. The survey , conducted between October and December of 1986, showed an increase of 0.4% since 1980, when 1.3% of the executives, editors, reporters, photographers and artists were Latino. Employment for all minorities r ose from 6 . 3% in 1985 to 6.6% in 1986. Blacks r&-HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a n ati on a l pu b licati o n of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-G280 or 234-G737 Pub l isher. Hector Eri cksen-Mendoza Editor. Fe li x P erez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antonio.Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Mike Orenstein, Julio Laboy, Richard Sa y re. GraphicS/Pro du ction: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias. No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASS I FIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Dis p lay ads are $35 per column inch. Ad s p laced by Tuesday wi ll ru n i n Weekly Reports m ai l ed F riday o f s a m e w eek. Multipl e use rates o n r e qu est. 8 --------------------------presented 3.6%, Asian Americans 1.0% and Native Americans 0.3% . These percentages were up slightly over 1985 for blacks and Asian Amer i cans, unchanged fo r Native Ame ricans. Minority employment amo n g newspaper management remained low . Only 3.9%, or 478, of all news executives were minorities; 1 .1%, or 132, were Hispanic . In 1978 ASNEadoptedtheyear2000 as its target date to make the nation's newsrooms reflect its population. Hispanics are expected to be 9.4% of the population by then, according to U . S . Census Bureau projections. Manuel Galvan, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and a reporter with the Chicago Tribune, told Weekly Report that the minimal gain is the result of"a lack of any significant recruitment of minorities overall. " The reason ASNE is failing is that the vast majority of individual newspapers didn ' t set targets for themselves," he said. Of the 922 Hispanics working for dailies, ASNE pro j ected that 508 (55%) were reporters, 164 were photographers or artists, 132 were news executives and 118 worked on copy desks . CHICAGODAILIES: lecting national data, The Chicago Reporter, a civil r ights monthly , took a look at minority hiring by that city's two major dailies, the Tribune and Sun-Times. In its May issue, it reported that the Tribune had 38 minorities in its editorial staff of 503. Thafs 7.5% . The Sun-Times' numbers were 26 out of 248 (1 0.5%) . Figures for HisPanics, gathered by Weekly Report from the Reporter and other sources, were much lower. Of 116 reporters at the SunTimes, one was Hispanic ; of 192 at the Tribune , two were Hispanic. Of 43 editors at the SunTimes, one was Hispanic; of 102 editors at the Tribune, none were Hispanic . -Richard Sayre H ispa ni c Lin k W eek!y Report