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Hispanic link weekly report, May 25, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 25, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n criticizes a statehood proposal sponsored by Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kan.), citing it as an attempt by Dole to gain support for his presidential campaign among island Republicans. . . U.S. Postmaster General Preston Tlsch appoints Beatrice Sftnchez, dean of the Cranbook Academy of Art in Michigan, as one of three new appointees to the Postal Service Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee. The prestigious 14-member committee reviews and makes recommendations for stamp subject designs... New York Mayor Edward Koch appoints Luis Miranda, 32, research director of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, as his special advisor on Hispanic affairs. He also names the Rev. David Garcia to the 11-member Landmarks Preser-
vation Commission. Garcfa is the rector of St. Mark’s Church In-The-Bowery. His nomination must eventually be approved by the City; Council... Arturo Madrid, president of the Tom£s Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif., and Sonia Hemftfidiz; principal of Gardendale Elementary School in San Antonio, are named py'the Carnegie Foundation to a board that will set the first national standards for the professional certification of teachers. . . Hilda Tagle, the first Hispanic to be elected judge in Nueces County, Texas, has her bid to become the first female member of the founding council of the League of United Latin American Citizens put on hold. The Corpus Christi, Texas, council voted to review its bylaws on a procedural question in the matter. . .The Los Angeles district of the Small Business Administration chooses Laura Balverde-S6nchez as its Small Businessperson of the Year. Balverde-Sanchez is president and CEO of The New El Rey Sausage Co...

scmaContestsouster jjFW Birthday Marred by Ruling
from MALDEF Board * â–  3
Eric Serna, former Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund chairman, filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in San Antonio May 13 seeking reinstatement for himself and other board members ousted at the organization’s April 25 annual meeting in Los Angeles.
The lawsuit asks for a temporary injunction to set aside the board* s action and to prevent newly elected officers and board members from serving. Serna charges the vote violated MALDEF bylaws because a majority of the 34 board members was not present. He is asking the court to reinstate him as board chairman until the matter is decided by new elections. A hearing is scheduled for June 3.
In a meeting in Dallas last January, MALDEPs executive committee, headed by Serna, announced that former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya would replace President Antonia Hernandez. She quickly denounced the move, saying that only the full board could fire her.
Hernandez was vindicated at a Feb. 28 board of directors meeting in Los Angeles that overturned the decision of the executive board and reinstated her. Serna supporters say that a nominating committee the following day selected a slate of prospective board members acceptable to both camps that would be voted in on April 25.
However, new MALDEF Chairman Fidel L6pez said that the nominating committee’s slate was not approved by the full board, and alternative candidates were named to replace them. “The entire board makes the decision” on new board members, he said.
When the alternative slate was nominated, eleven Serna supporters walked out of the meeting in protest One of the eleven, Gilda Bojdrquez Gjurich, said the nomination of the substitute slate was “a breach of faith and promises.” She said the move “smelled to high heaven.”
Alicia Maldonado, communications coordinator at MALDEFs Los Angeles office, said May 18 that Serna’s lawsuit is “frivolous and without merit” The April 25 meeting was a legal quorum, she added.
The United Farm Workers of America, found-ed by C6sar Chdvez in 1962, celebrated its 25th anniversary May 23 at the UFWs“Forty Acres” headquarters in Delano, Calif., amid escalating financial woes.
More than 5,500 workers and supporters converged to demonstrate to growers, at the beginning of the annual grape harvest that the union still has strong public support according to Ken Schroeder of UFW.
Farm workers asked backers to boycott grapes as part of their “Wrath of Grapes^’ campaign which spotlights pesticide contamination of grapes and other farm products, said Schroeder.
A long list of North American and European labor leaders were to attend the event
UFW was founded by Ch&vez with 10 mem-
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights rejected May 15a draft statement criticizing a recent U.S. Supreme Court affirmative action rulinq during a meeting in Washington, D.C.
On a 5-3 vote, the commission decided not to accept the 25- page statement. The twc Latinas on the commission, Blandina Cardenas Ramirez and Esther Buckley, voted to reject the analysis, but for differing reasons.
Cardenas Ramirez, appointed to the commission by Congress* viewed the court’s ruling as supportive of improving women’s employment Reagan appointee Esther Buckley would have supported the statement if it had been revised to better address issues raised by the court She said the statement would give the public the wrong impression.
The court's March 25 decision involved a challenge by a white male to the Santa Clara County, Calif., Transportation Agency’s affirmative action plan. He was passed over for a job in favor of a woman who scored slightly lower on an oral exam.
An employer may sometimes favor women and minority employees to remedy a “conspicuous imbalance” in the employer's work force, the court said.
This was the first time the commission
bers in California’s San Joaquin Valley in 1962.
In 1965 he led the organization, which had grown to 1,200 member families, in a strike against Delano-area grape growers. The strike and boycott forced many growers to sign labor contracts and led to the passage of California’s 1975 Agricultural Labor Relations Act
At its peak in 1970, the union had a membership of 40,000. In 1973 it became a part of the AFL-CIO after earlier problems with the group.
Chavez's problems intensified in 1983 when Republican Gov. George Deukmejian gutted the Agricultural Labor Relations Board. This* along with the continued threat pesticides
continued on page 2
attempted to challenge the court’s legal reasoning and its understanding of constitutional limitations on affirmative action.
Dade Selects FemSndez
Joseph Fern&ndez was appointed May 13 superintendent of Dade County Public Schools, the fourth-largest school district in the nation, making him the first Hispanic ever to fill the seat
The Dade School Board made the selection on a 4-3 vote without conducting any searches or interviews.
Fern&ndez, the district’s deputy superintendent, has held the No. 2 position in Dade County since January 1986. He succeeds Leonard Britton, who resigned May9 to become superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District.
Fern&ndez, 51 and of Puerto Rico descent, assumes duties of the $107,000-a-year job July 1.
The Dade district has 244,000 students, 13,000 teachers, 253 schools and a $1.3 billion budget The school district’s student population is 42% Hispanic.
Civil Rights Panel Nixes Draft Paper


Hispanics Applaud U.S> Supreme Court Ethnic Ruling
Latino civil rights groups are applauding the May 18 unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruling which expands the scope of a 100-year-old federal civil rights law to encompass members of ethnic groups.
“It’s an important victory for national origin groups, especially the Latino community,” said Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund staff attorney Jos6 Luis Morin, “it narrows the question of whether Latinos fall in racial discrimination categories.”
In writing the court’s opinion, Justice Byron
R. White said the 1866 law, which allows a broad range of suits for damages by victims of discrimination, was clearly intended to protect people who are “subjected to intentional discrimination solely because of their ancestry or ethnic characteristics”
The court said that when the 1866 law referred to “race,” it meant to include what are now defined as ethnic groups, such as Hispanics Arabs and Jews These ethnicities are now regarded as belonging to the Caucasian race, said the decision.
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 forbids employment discrimination but applies only to employers of 15 or more while the post-Civil War law applies to all employers The 1866 law allows for other suits such as rental housing discrimination, Morfn said.
In addition, the 1866 law allows for a jury trial, damages for pain and suffering, punitive damages and is more flexible on time limits for filing suits. Under Title VII, plaintiffs must file within 180 days and the trial will be before a judge, not a jury.
Pefia Runs Second, Reaches Runoff
UFW Marks 25 Years
continued from page 1
pose to farm workers and consumers prompted Chdvez to renew his grape boycott in 1984.
Presently, the UFW is also entangled in a legal battle which some claim threatens its very existence. In January, a superior court judge in Imperial County, Calif., ordered the union to pay $1.7 million in damages to a lettuce grower.
The court ruled that the union had sanctioned violence against hired workers filling in for those involved in a 1979 strike against Maggio Inc.
UFW has charged Judge William Lehnhardt with bias saying that his wife was among the many local residents who volunteered to help harvest the grower's lettuce.
The union plans to appeal the decision but California law will require it to post a $3 million bond, said Barbara Macri-Ortiz of UFWs legal department.
UFW Disappearance ‘An Illusion’
According to several reports, UFW officials have asserted that if the union is forced to pay, it would be so financially weakened that its continued operation would be jeopardized.
“We are not going to concede the $1.7 million and have filed a motion in the waiver of the bond,” Macri-Ortiz told Weekly Report “A lot of people have the illusion that this case is somehow going to make the UFW disappear.”
Ronald Barsamian, lawyer for the produce grower who won the settlement said his client would resist any attempt to have the bond waived. He cited a report submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor last fall that said the union collected about $2 million a year in dues and its assets totaled more than $4.8 million.
“You have to take into consideration our operating needs and what the assets are in,” said Macri-Ortiz, “and if you turn those in, what kind of shape you’re in.”
Asked what the status of the U FW would be if it were forced to post the bond, Macri-Ortiz said that things would not be normal but the union would survive. “We’re used to working with very little resources... we’re survivors.”
Presently, UFW is reported to have about 30,000 farm workers under contract in California, less than 10% of that state's total. It has no major contracts in other states.
- Julio Laboy
Denver Mayor Federico Pefia faces a June 16 re-election runoff against attorney Don Bain, who edged Pefia by nearly 5% in the city’s May 19 mayoral primary.
Pefia, 40, received 51,060 votes (37.1 %) to Bain’s 58,003 votes (41.7%).
Denver’s two daily newspapers endorsed Bain. Their coverage of Pefia, who is seeking a second term, spurred an outcry from some Hispanic organizations and publications.
Pefia’s popularity decreased when he encouraged the retirement of Police Chief Tom
Bilingual EcL Students Outscore Their Peers
Spanish-speaking third graders enrolled in bilingual education programs in El Paso, Texas, scored higher on annual standardized reading and writing exams than their classmates who took the test in English, according to test scores released this month by the El Paso Independent School District.
Of the 400 students who took the first-ever Spanish version of the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills, 94% passed the reading test and 95% passed the writing exam. Seventy percent of the 3,900 third graders who took the English version passed the reading test and 65% passed the writing exam. Math scores were virtually equal for both groups: 83% of those who took the Spanish test passed, compared with 85% of those who took the English exam.
Jeanne Saunders, director of the school district's research and evaluation division, said that the scores “have been blown out of proportion.” She warned against using the results as a measure of the success of bilingual education in Texas.
Saunders said that while the scores“speak well of the bilingual effort” in El Paso, the number of children tested was “too small to make a broad general statement.” She added that scores on the English test may have been held down by 1,160 limited-English-proficient students who took that test
However, Oscar Cctrdenas, director of compliance for bilingual education at the Texas Education Agency, said that the El Paso test results were“the first public indication” of the success of the state's bilingual programs
Coogan after Coogan admitted he was romantically involved with a policewoman.
Public approval rating of Pefia, which was 70% when he entered office in 1983, plunged in recent months to 40%.
Roybal Allard Sworn In
Lucille Roybal Allard was sworn in May 18 by California Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy as the new assemblywoman for the 56th District. It is the first elective office held by the 45-year-old daughter of U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.).
Roybal Allard, with 5,443 votes, or 62% of the total, beat out nine others in a May 12 special election to fill the remainder of a term vacated by Gloria Molina Molina was elected to the Los Angeles City Council in February.
Ortiz Apparent Winner
In Philadelphia incumbent City Councilman Angel Ortiz is expected to maintain his at-large seat following May 19 elections there. With 67% of the vote in, Ortiz was a solid fourth place finisher among 13 vying for the five Democratic at-large positions. Ortiz was appointed to his seat in 1984.
The Philadelphia City Council is comprised of 10 single-member district representatives and seven at-large members, with the minority party holding two of those seats
Rita Hayworth Dies at 68
Rita Hayworth, star of more than 60 Hollywood films in the 1940s and ’50s, died May 14 in New York City of Alzheimer’s disease. She was 68.
Hayworth, whose on-screen persona earned her the title"love goddess,” was born Margarita Carmen Dolores Cansino Oct. 17,1918, to a family of Spanish American dancers in Brooklyn, N.Y.
Hayworth appeared on the cover of Life magazine four times, a record equaled only by Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Her career was highlighted by such films as “Blood and Sand,” 1941; “Gilda,” 1946; and “Miss Sadie Thompson,” 1956.
She is survived by her daughters Rebecca Welles, the only child from her marriage to Orson Welles, and Princess Yasmin Khan Embiricos, from her marriage to Prince Aly Khan.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
BILINGUAL EDUCATION SPECIAL REPORT: Education Week magazine included a comprehensive 28-page insert on bilingual education in its April 1 issue. The insert covers various facets, including the historical, political and cognitive context of bilingual education. Rates are $3 each for 1-5 copies, $2.25 each for 6r 10. (Lower prices for larger orders.) To obtain a copy, write to: Education WeeK c/o Back Issues, 1255 23rd St NW, Suite 755, Washington, D.C. 20037(202)466-5190.
RACE, CLASS ANDGENDER STUDIES: The National Association for Ethnic Studies has issued a call for papers, media productions or panels on the theme "Race, Class and Gender Old Ideas and New Perspectives.” Send four copies of an abstract not to exceed 100 words plus four copies of a 2-3 page summary or completed paper by Oct. 19,1987. Send proposals and vitae to: Foster Brown, School of Social Work, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, 111.62901 (618) 453-2243.
8(A) PROGRAM GRADUATES: The Senate Committee on Small Business has released an 86-page study which found that more than 70% of the businesses that participated in the federal minority contract program stay in business after leaving it. For a copy of the study, "Survey of Graduates of the Small Business Administration’s Section 8(A) Minority Business Development Program,” write to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (The price was not available at presstime.)
FUND RAISING AND PUERTO RICAN NON-PROFITS: The National Puerto Rican Coalition recently released two studies highlighting problems Puerto Rican non-profit organizations face in raising funds. The studies are titled "Major U.S. Foundations and Corporations Responsiveness to Puerto Rican Needs and Concerns,” 35 pages, "United Way Giving A Survey of Puerto Rican Agency Participation and of the the Attitudes of the United Way System,” 25 pages. To obtain a copy of either report, send $7.50 to: NPRC, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915.
CONNECTING
AGUIRRE ELECTED TO BOARD
Jesse Aguirre, vice president of corporate relations for Anheusei* Busch Companies, has been elected to the board of directors? of Anheuser-Busch Inc., the world’s largest brewer.
His election was announced May 12 by August Busch III, president of the St Louis-based companies.
Aguirre joined Anheuser-Busch in 1981 as director of corporate affairs and was promoted to his present position three years later.
DE LA GARZA APPOINTED
Dr. Rodolfo de la Garza, director of the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, has been appointed to the board of a nationwide research project aimed at studying relations between new immigrant groups and established residents.
The research is supported by the Ford Foundation, which will award between $100,000 and $200,000 to as many as eight research teams.
De la Garza was one of six persons named to the board to coordinate the research, which will be done over a two-year period beginning in 1988.
N.Y.C. ARTS FUNDING INCREASED
The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs allocated increases totaling $95,000 to three Hispanic groups which present or produce art, bringing their total funding for fiscal year 1988 to $156,000.
Ballet Hisp6nico, the internationally acclaimed professional dance company, will receive an additional $35,000 in city funding.
Repertorio Espahol, the New York City Hispanic dance company, will receive a $35,000 increase. The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art will receive an increase of $25,000.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION LAW SEMINAR Washington, D.C. May 25
A seminar detailing the effects of the federal immigration law will be offered during the 50th convention of the National Lawyers Guild. Christopher Homig (202) 293-7621
HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Phoenix May 25,26
MBuilding Institutional Strength Through Partnerships?’ is the theme of the first meeting of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Panels will address Hispanic initiatives in higher education and the involvement of foundations and corporations Antonio Rigual (512) 434-6711
HISPANIC DROPOUT PROBLEM Washington, D.C. May 26 The film “Hispanic Dropouts, America’s Timebomb?’ will be shown during a panel discussion with education experts concerning the high Hispanic dropout rate. The symposium is sponsored by the D.C. Hispanic News Media Association and the Northeast region of the League of United Latin American Citizens
Andr6s Tobar (202) 347-1493
CAREER FAIR Denver May 26 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
The U. S. Department of Labor will host a one-day career fair as part of a program to increase its Hispanic representation. Applications will be accepted for positions in computing, accounting and other entry-level jobs.
Dolores Board (202) 523-7316
NATIONAL IMAGE CONFERENCE Denver May 26 - 30
Training workshops dealing with employment education, political awareness and other issues relevant to the Hispanic community will be offered during the "Knowledge is Power” conference of National Image Inc.
Maurice VelAsquez (303) 293-1554
HISPANIC MARKET Houston May 28
The Houston Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a networking session aimed at promoting the growing significance of the Hispanic market "Stretching Your Marketing Dollar- Tap The H ispanic Market’ is the theme of the chamber's event Jorge Colorado (713) 224-5322
WOMEN’S SYMPOSIUM New York May 28,29
SER-Jobs for Progress Inc. is sponsoring a regional seminar to identify barriers keeping Hispanic women from parity in the workplace.
Judy Freyre (214) 631-3999
CHICANO LITERARY CONFERENCE Stanford, Calif. May 28 - 30 “Chicano Literary Criticism in a Social Context’ is a conference sponsored by Stanford University to
May 25,1987
bring together critics and writers.
H6ctor Calderdn (415) 725-1981 \
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN CONVENTION Hartford, Conn. May 29 - 31 Organized by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, the fourth National Puerto Rican Rights Convention will open with the theme "Closing Ranks: Foward to Justice and Progress.’’ It will focus on current economic and social conditions confronting Puerto Ricans in the continental U & Yilda Rodriguez (212) 923-0022
WOMEN OF COLOR Omaha, Neb. May 29-31
The third Women of Color Conference will have more than 30 workshops on women and dealing with self, work, family and money. It is sponsored by the Nebraska Commission on the Status of Women and other groups.
Marta Nieves (402) 291-3493
ETHNIC MINORITY CONFERENCE St. Paul, Minn. May 30
"Educating a New Generation’’ is the theme of the third annual Ethnic Minority Conference sponsored by the Minnesota Education Associatioa Sandi Fields (612) 227-9541
PUERTO RICAN WEEK KICKOFF Chicago May 31
Mayor Harold Washington will issue a proclamation for Puerto Rican Week and the 1987 Puerto Rican Parade queen and her court will be presented during a Boricua garden ceremony.
Martha Ramos (312) 292-1414
3


The Extended Family-Three Experiences
The “extended family” continues to gain recognition as a cultural trait of special value to Latinos This week, three contributing columnists to Hispanic Link News Service -Cuban American Achy Obejas, Puerto Rican Julio Ojeda and Chicano Herman Sillas- invite Weekly Report readers to share personal experiences in their uniquely Latino familial relationships
Sin pelos en la lengua
FAST LEARNER: Miami Mayor Xavier Sudrez demonstrated his South Florida political training as luncheon banquet speaker at the fifth annual conference of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Los Angeles May 15.
“On my right..,” he introduced half of his fellow head-table occupants For the other half, he guided the audience, “And on your right.(In Miami, ifs expedient not to be on the left)
LATINO PASSION: This is lifted from San Diego Union columnist Tom Blair,
Eight-year-old Adrian Reyes came home from school with an important announcement for his father, Homero. His school -planned to stage a production of the Passion Play.
“And I,” young Reyes said proudly, “get to play Poncho Pilot”
HELPING THY HISPANIC NEIGHBOR: Los Angeles Hispanics continue to express their outrage at the city’s board of education for passing up the most logical candidate to head LA’s 56%-Hispanic school district- deputy superintendent William Anton, a Chicano and 35-year veteran of the system there.
Instead, the board picked Leonard Britton, who headed the Dade County Public Schools in Florida
That made room for Dade’s No. 2 man to move up. And move up he did this past week. The Dade board picked as Britton’s replacement Joseph Fernandez, a Puerto Rican born and raised in New York City’s Spanish Harlem.
MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPER: An 8-year-old Whittier, Calif., boy found his mother in a trance-like state last week. Concerned, he quickly counted out 25 of his pennies took them to a convenience store to exchange for a quarter, went to a public phone booth and called the police.
They responded promptly, drove him home and - sizing up the situation - arrested his mother, Diane Mendoza Reyna, on charges of being under the influence and possession of PCP. And child endangering.
JOAN’S BAD JOKES: In one of her final regular late night television shows, Joan Rivers did a series of tasteless, humorless gags on what happens when you crossbreed various species of animals.
Unfortunately, for one gag she chose to use an animal and a human being - a Hispanic.
As sketches of an elephant and a stereotypical sombrero-thatched Mexican peasant flashed on screen, Rivers challenged her usual low-IQ audience with a puzzler on what happens when you breed an elephant with an illegal alien. (The answer- jo-jo-jo-is a parking lot attendant who never forgets where he parked your car.)
Chicago’s Latino Committee on the Media, which is encouraging that indignation be expressed to Derk Zimmerman, president of Fox Television (1020 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90035), informed us of this latest racist display on the tube.
Their thorough report leaves us with just one question: Who did they know who would watch Joan Rivers?
~i.-;,Kay Barbaro
Achy Obejas
Collecting Cuban Cousins
Next month I’ll be spending time with my cousins Pedro Javier and Titi. They’re coming up from Florida with friends, but my apartment may not be able to hold them all so Pedro Javier and his pal may have to crash over at my cousin George’s. He lives a few blocks away.
When I told an American friend this, she seemed a bit puzzled. She’s heard of my cousins George (not to be confused with Cousin George a few blocks away) and Eddie, Marivi, Cristina, Lisa, Patricia,
Tom&s, Michelle, Bernie, Marta, Merci, Ernie,
Mario, David et aL
She’d also met my cousins Manolito and Mario Francisco.
“Geez, how many cousins do you have?” she asked, amazed.
Dozens, I told her. I also have a string of aunts and uncles: 7la Olga, Pedro and Eliana,
Yolanda and Manolo, Catin, Eva and Bernard, Juana and the late greats Alberto and Raul. Every now and then I also claim Maggie, a bawdy blonde octogenarian. She used to be married to Marito, grandfather of Bernie, Lisa and Michelle. She’s French, but she’s family.
ACQUIRED PARENTELA OVER YEARS
All this confusion and, truth be told, my parents have a total of only one sister and one brother between them, with a combined offspring of three.
The rest are what my brother and I refer to as the parentela, relatives we’ve acquired over the years.
We arrived from Cuba in 1963, a pair of ragamuffins just off the boat. Our family was as nuclear as Three-Mile Island. Every natural relative was still back on the island. When we moved to Terre Haute, Ind., in the mid ’60s as part of a government-sponsored resettlement program, neither we nor others in the program had any cousins or aunts and uncles stateside. So we adopted each other. That’s how we got the Pelaezes(thaf s Pedro and Eliana, and the kids-Titi, Pedro Javier- and much later, Patricia and Tomds).
I’d wagerthey’reatthetoponour“in-exile” relative list Growing up, we didn’t really look much like each other, but we looked more like each other than anybody else we knew. We also sounded similar, whether it was in our native Spanish or our first few tentative English words. So we knew we were related.
We understood each other like nobody else did, or ever has.
GRANDPARENTS WERE AUTHENTIC
Over the years, my brother and I, in typical Cuban overachiever mode, managed to attract dozens of new relatives. About the only connection we weren’t able to pull off was grandparents. We both had lived with our maternal grandparents for a while in Cuba, and no one could quite fit their shoes.
When our abuelos finally got out of Cuba many years later(we were adults already), we knew they were authentic. As for our real aunts and uncles, as well as cousins - in all honesty, we were staring at strangers.
And yet they really do look like us. When I look at my “rear T/a Yolanda, nobody but me looks back, we’re so alike. On the phone, she and my mother are completely interchangeable. My “real” cousin Manolito and I have the same little habit of biting our tongues just before we laugh. And our laugh, other than the difference in gender, is the same.
My brother reports duplicate experiences and we question the narcissistic aspect of all this- a very American thing to do, our parents would surely tell us, an americanada Oh well.
We draw no conclusions. Our natural family is a delightful addition to our already well established parentela It sort of completes the picture, different sides of the same coin and a lot of love in between.
(Achy Obejas, of Chicago, is a free-lance writer.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4
May 25,1987


Julio Ojeda
The Boricua Leash
Mom kept repeating the same thing over and oven “Ay, Julio, you don’t know how happy I am that you’re spending time with your sister.”
I was passing through Minneapolis during Christmas, and it seemed only natural to visit with Ita, my sister, and check out a few nightclubs. No big deal. But to Mom, the fact that Ita and I were together was cause for celebration.
Mom shares a great sorrow with other Puerto Rican mothers- the scattering of her children to the U. S. mainland. Like Ita and me, thousands of young boricuas fly off every year to study at U.S. colleges. And like Ita and me, many remain to pursue careers.
We are cut off from the island. As we make friends and build lives here, there are fewer and fewer reasons to return.
Mom knew this would happen, but she did nothing to prevent it In fact she encouraged us to go. “The universities are better in the U.S.,” she told us.
Also, she was badly frightened by the tidal wave of crime that has swept over the island in recent years. She desperately wanted her children to study in a safe, peaceful place.
MOM RESORTED TO BLACKMAIL
“There,” she had said a few years earlier, grabbing a brochure from St. John’s University in rural Stearns County, Minn. “You should study there.”
But when the time came, it was not easy for her to let her children go. “Minnesota is so far away!” Mom pleaded for letters. She even resorted to blackmail, threatening to withhold our monthly allowance checks if we didn’t scribble a few lines.
Our intermittent notes were filled with horror stories of below-zero temperatures and wind chill factors, a fearsome challenge to our tropical metabolisms. This didn’t faze Mom. Her three kids were together behind the St Johns “Pine Curtain.” Better a touch of frostbite, she reasoned, than muggers and rapists.
This cozy arrangement could not last forever, of course Eventually, her children graduated and moved to Chicago (with its own soaring crime rate) and Alaska (a savage wilderness fraught with unknown perils).
She made efforts to adjust to our “second scattering.”
As always, she continued to advise us. She never refused collect calls. But she could no longer control us. (To her, “control” was synonymous with “protect.”)
When Ita- a reckless adventurer- suddenly faded from view during a hitchhiking expedition across Alaska and Washington, Mom could do little more than bite her knuckles and wait by the phone. And when my brother Frankie - another free spirit - made a similar trek across Canada, she again camped by the phone.
“Guess what,” I said to Mom. “I went rock climbing this weekend.”
She managed a weak reply. “Can’t you find a safer hobby, Julio?”
Mom’s dismay was easy to understand. “My children are scattered across North America, putting their lives in peril,” she said. “They are not together. We are not a family.”
LONG-DISTANCE CHRISTMAS GATHERING
For a Puerto Rican mother, that was hard to bear. That*s why she was so happy when Ita and I met in Minneapolis, and happier still when we arranged to be together on Christmas Eve.
Mom prepared for the moment. She express mailed a huge parcel of presents to Ita’s apartment with strict orders to leave it untouched until the 24th.
That night the whole family- Mom, Dad, Frankie, Ita and I - folight over the phones as we opened our presents. It was a conference-call gathering, almost as good as the real thing. We were together.
(Julio Ojeda recently quit a reporting job in Chicago to wander in Europe)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Herman Sillas
The Compadre Collection
For Hispanic Catholics, a baptism is more than a ritual to admit a baby into the Christian community. It gives birth to new relationships.
The event has tradition, religion and good times all rolled into one occasion. The celebrated baby will not remember, but the day will have impact on child and parents for the rest of their lives.
The first decision facing the parents of the new baby is choosing the godparents to sponsor the child into the church. They must be Christians. The selection reflects the high esteem that the parents have for the child’s padrino and madrina - godparents.
The honor is not taken lightly. There will be a special bond between the parents and godparents. They will call each other com-padres collectively or compadre (male) and comadre (female) singularly from then on.
Their relationship will always have a common focus, the child. As backup parents, the godparents will be called nino and nina by the youngster.
Every Christmas and birthday, the child will receive a gift from her or his ninos If the ninos are wealthy, so much the better. The godparents accept the responsibility tt> raise the child in the event a life-ending tragedy strikes the parents.
COMPADRES SPEAK FOR WORDLESS CHILD
The first duty of the new godparents is to purchase el vestido de bautismo - the baptismal dress. It must be white and made oft satin, silk or lace or a combination. It must be new unless one has been traditionally used in the family.
The godparents will also give a religious medal of the name saint of the child and a rosary to the baby as a gift
The ceremony has a great deal of symbolism to demonstrate the cleansing of the soul and the entrance of a new body into the armsgf the church. The compadres speak on behalf of the wordless child and pledge that it will follow the ways of Christ
I have been to baptisms where there have been scores of babies baptized at the same time and I have been to ceremonies where only the child that my wife Cora and I were baptizing was present.
Following the church ceremony, the four compadres return to the parents’ home, where family and guests will celebrate. In New Mexico, just before the festivities begin, the godparents return the child to its parents with these words:
“Aqui esta esta rosa fresca que de la iglesia salio, con los santos sacramentosy el agua que recibio( name of child).” Here is this fresh rose from the church with the sacred sacraments and water (name of child) has received.
The parents respond: “Te recibo, rosa fresca, que de la iglesia salistes con los santos sacramentos y el agua que recibistes.” We receive you, fresh rose, from the church from whence you came with your sacred sacraments and water which you have received.
CHILDREN SCRAMBLE FOR BOLO
Now the party starts Merriment, food, laughter and music- sometimes mariachis. The women marvel at how well behaved the child was during the ceremony. The men joke with the godfather about how good the child will have to be to make up for all the sins that both the father and the godfather have committed in their lifetimes.
At an appropriate time, the children in attendance shout “Bo/o/ Bolor Then the godparents toss coins - el bolo - into the air for the young ones to gather. The priest blesses the gathering.
The godchild is passed from arm to arm to receive kisses and praises. Finally, the little saint is placed to rest unaware of the new lifelong ties that he or she has created between four people and their families.
(Herman Sillas, a Los Angeles attorney, is padrino - godfather- to 12 children and compadre to their 24 parents. He shares his own five children with five compadres and five comadres.)
May 25,1987
5


Come to NSA!
The National Security Agency has vacancies for the following positions:
• Elevator Mechanics
• Boiler and Steam Plant Mechanics
• Air Conditioning Equipment Mechanics
• Distribution Facilities Electricians (High Voltage)
SECURITY OFFICERS
Duties include:
• Protecting federal property and ensuring safety of personnel
• 8 weeks of training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia
Requirements:
• Valid driver's license
• Officers are required to carry firearms
Building Maintenance Personnel and Security Officer positions offer good entry into federal workforce, excellent health insurance, paid vacation and a retirement plan. All candidates must undergo a full background investigation.
Please send your resume, letter of interest^ or SF-171 to:
National Security Agency
Attn: M322 (DCZ)j Fort Meade, Maryland 20755-6000
An equal opportunity employer
U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members.
PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OFFICER
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund invites applications for the position of Propram Development Officer. Under direction of the Executive Director, the Officer will organize and execute a variety of program development efforts from the headquarters office. A list of duties follows: establish and maintain Alumni and volunteer network; develop and implement annual campaign for individual and matching gifts; initiate and oversee production of newsletter, news releases, and media PR; assist in writing corporate funding proposals and coordinating special events and projects; research and maintain donor data base records.
Candidates should have three to five years experience in fund raising or related work, strong organizational and communication skills, and demonstrated effective writing ability. A bachelor’s degree or higher is required.
Salary: mid-30’s, depending on experience and salary history. Send resume by June 15, 1987 to: Personnel Committee, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101. Contact Ernest Z. Robles (415) 892-9971.
The following two positions are with La-Guardla Community College
PERIODICALS/REFERENCE LIBRARIAN Responsible for periodical collection of 5000 titles which includes microforms and periodicals, information desk coverage by non-professional staff, ongoing analysis of the periodicals collection, heavy reference and bibliographic instruction schedule. Qualifications: ALA accredited MLS Degree; knowledge of periodicals; excellent interpersonal skills; academic library experience. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience. Full-time, one-year position.
EVENING, WEEKEND LIBRARIAN Supervision of a clerical and adjunct librarian staff of 8, heavy bibliographic instruction and reference services schedule. Qualifications: ALAaccredited MLS Degree; experience with an academic library’s public services program; supervisory and communication skills. Experience and facility with micros desirabla Second MA/MS preferable. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience. Full-time, one-year position. Send letter and resume indicating position by July 17 ta Chief Librarian, Room 2, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/ AA Employer.
May 25,1987
EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICE APPRENTICE $20,802.08 #52237AFIR
Trainee level position in the Emergency M edical Services Division of the Arlington County Fire Department This is a new division within the department with responsibility for providing a full range of emergency services to the citizens of Arlington County. Employee learns and performs emergency medical treatment duties, drives an ambulance, assists in providing medical treatment; completes and maintains reports and records and participates in drills and classes in fire operations and medical procedures Requires high school or equivalent and EMT-Cardiac (EMT-C) certification by the Commonwealth of Virginia or EMT-Paramedic (EMT-P) certification issued by the National Registry of Medical Technicians Applicants must submits copy of current certification with application.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes SF-171S etc. without a completed official Arlington ap-|plication form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than July 2, 1987' at 5:00 PM. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired).
The Following Position Closes June 4, 1987 PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE $23,244 Ann.#61187CDHS Permanent County-funded position in the Maternal and Child Health Care Clinics in the Health Services Division. Delivers prenatal and child health nursing services in the clinic setting to the limited English proficient community; interviews and assesses clients admits groups of clients and conducts classes to educate clients about pregnancy; teaches and supports high risk patients to assure awareness and compliance with necessary routines Requires Bachelor's degree in nursing from a four year college accredited by the National League of Nursing or a Master's degree in a two year generic nursing program accredited by the National League of Nursing. Referto announcement for Preferred qualifications SPECIAL REQUIREMENT Must have English/ Spanish bilingual ability sufficient to communicate with Hispanic clients in the clinic setting and to teach programs in Spanish.
All applicants must submit an official Arlingtor County application form. A separate application form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes SF-171 s etc, submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department by 5:00 PM on the closing date. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Department of Personnel 2100 14th St North Arlington, Va 22201
EEO
DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financial, personnel, purchasing, insurance and administrative functions Requires M A, 10 years financial/administrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred). Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms. A Herndndez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th FI, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by May 22,1987.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
Washington, D.C., national Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist in the planning/imple-mentation of Annual Conference. College degree/ equivalent experience in job*related area Strong writing, typing (70 wpm), telephone skills. Selfstarter can work under pressure without need of close supervision. Position available immediately. Salary range: $14-16,000. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza at (202) 628-9600.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)962-3408.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders* varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
The following two positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College
DATA BASE COORDINATOR Responsible for updating/maintaining existing files as well as development of new programs and enhancements to interface with CUNY Personnel System. BA/BS, min. 2 yr& exp. combining programming and admin, req. Salary: $24,471/A.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #422 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 6/17/87.
ASST. ADMINISTRATIVE SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS & GROUNDS
For $130,000,000 campus Knowledge of Buildings and Grounds operations including personnel, supervision, maintenance, repairs, contract specifications, construction problems, personnel and material safety, budget preparation and training. Engineering exp. and license; significant exp. with major facility desirable. Salary range: $27,734 - $51,000/A REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #CS-330 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 5/29/87.
Ms Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY (M/F), AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
TH E C ATH OLIC U NIVERSITY of Washington, D.C, has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND.
DlRECTOR OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE SUNY/ESC, a national leader in non-traditional higher education, seeks a Director of Institutional Research. The Director Is responsible for managing the centralized enrollment system; preparing reports highlighting data trends & projections for future planning; &• assisting in conducting program evaluation, student flow, trend analysis & retention studies. Master's req’d, doctorate prefd, in one of the social sciences or higher ed & 3 years of IR experience. Knowledge of the IBM/PCXT, Lotus or Enable desired. Excellent communication skills & report writing ability essential. Position available 9/1/87. The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications after 6/12/87. Send letter of applications & resume to: Dr. Timothy Lehmann, Assistant Vice President, Office of Research & Evaluation, Rm. 302, SUNY/ESC, One Union Avenue, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866. (518) 587-2100, ext 287. AA/EOE
NOTICE TO HISPANIC EMPLOYEES OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA)
AND HISPANICS INTERESTED IN EMPLOYMENT AT NSA
A proposed settlement has been reached in an equal employment lawsuit brought on behalf of certain Hispanic employees of NSA and Hispanics who have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment at NSA. If you are a Hispanic employee of NSA, if you are a Hispanic who has unsuccessfully applied for a position at NSA, or if you are a Hispanic who has considered applying for a position at NSA but has been discouraged from doing so, this proposed settlement may affect you.
The proposed settlement would address NSA’s recruitment and promotion processes for Hispanics. It also would maintain and develop programs designed to aid Hispanic employees of NSA Further, it would require NSA to conduct an examination of the testing program used by NSA as part of its hiring process. It would also provide for record keeping and monitoring of NSA’s progress in employing Hispanics.
For further information concerning the proposed settlement, you should write, as soon as possible, to the following attorneys:
Irving Kator, Esq.
Douglas Huron, Esq.
Kator, Scott and Heller 1079 Vermont Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20005
If you wish to review the proposed settlement, you may obtain a copy from these attorneys, or you may go to the Office of the Clerk, United States District Court, 101 W. Lombard St, Baltimore, Md., 21201, and ask to review the proposed consent decree in Veldsquez v. Faurer, No. K-82-1760.
If you are a member of the classes on whose behalf this lawsuit was brought, you may submit any written objections you may have concerning the proposed settlement to the Clerk of the Court, at the address listed above, by June 1,1987. If you submit any written objections by the due date, you may also be heard orally at a hearing which will be held to consider whether the proposed settlement should be made final. That hearing will be held at 10:00 a.m. on June 19,1987, in courtroom No.7C at the same address. If you wish, you may retain your own attorney to represent you in making written objections or at the hearing.
DEAN FOR THE DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE LIFE INDIANA UNIVERSITY-BLOOMINGTON Indiana University- Bloomington seeks nominations and applications for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life to assume office no laterthan July 1,1988. The dean will report directly to the chief executive of the Bloomington campus and will serve as a member of the administrative and planning group. The dean will be responsible for coordinating the activities of academic advising for freshmen and sophomores, minority-oriented special services, freshman orientation, learning-support services, career and placement activities, scholarships and financial aids, and health and counseling services.
A candidate should have an earned doctorate or equivalent credentials, substantial administrative experience, a proven ability to work well with students and faculty, a strong commitment to deliver effective student services, and a thorough understanding of the missions of a research institution To be assured of consideration, nominations and applications should be received by August 1,1987. In keeping with the commitment to its affirmative-action policies, Indiana University particularlyseeksnominationsfororapplications from minority or women candidates. Nqminations and applications, with vitae and relevant lists of references, should be sent to Professor Dennis G. Peters, Chairman, Search and Screen Committee for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (£1) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Arts & Entertainment
The second installment of Miamfs Hispanic theater festival continues . this week - without controversy.
Works by Cuban or Cuban American writers dominate the II Festival de Teatro Hlspano, which began May 1 with the world premiere of Virgilio Pifiero’s Una caja de zapatos vacla.
The Cuban playwright sent the play to the United States in 1968, where it was first published last year. It was staged May 1-3 by Miamfs Teatro Avante.
A bilingual production by Spanish contemporary Alfonso Vallejo and a play in English by Cuban American writer Maria Forn6s are part of this year's program. Orquideas was staged May 2 and 3 at the Coconut Grove Playhouse; Mud continues at the South End Alternative Theatre through May 30.
Opening this week are plays by a Spaniard and a Venezuelan, respectively, Jos& Luis Alonso de Santos’ El album familiar is staged at the Miami-Dade Community College May 29-31 and Rom&n ChalbaucTs El viejo grupo will be at the Teatro de Bellas Artes May 31 to June 21.
Last year’s festival was spotted with controversy, when protesters
demanded the cancellation of performances of a play by Cuban American Dolores Prida The author, nonetheless, appeared for a staged reading of Coser y cantar.
The Prida controversy inspired the creation of Miamfs pro-free speech Intercultural Action Network. The group recently handed awards to Miami locals who objected to the cancellation of Prida’s play.
Awardees included El Miami Herald arts and entertainment columnist Norma Niurkaand The Miami News editorial writer Cheryl Brownstein-Santiago.
A total of 91 works, meanwhile- paintings, sculptures, photos and multimedia pieces - are part of an exhibit, Outside Cuba/Fuera de Cuba, due to embark on a national tour. Dates are set for stops in New York (June 25-Aug. 2); Oxford, Ohio (Oct. 16-Dec. 20); Ponce, Puerto Rico(April 29-June30,1988); and Miami(Oct 7-Dec.4,1988)
ONE LINERS: An exhibit of paintings by Venezuelan painter Beatriz Sanchez opens May 27 at the Washington, D.C, Museum of Modern Art of Latin America . .Atlanta’s Clrculo Hispanoamericano stages El afinador, by Spanish playwright Vital Aza, May 30 at the city’s Historical Society Theatre... And the third annual National Hispanic Book Fair will be held May 30 and 31 at Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
GOING NATIONAL: Two Southern California-based Latino media groups revealed their intentions to go nationwide last week.
The National Hispanic Media Coalition, which has kept its activities within the Los Angeles Basin since its formation in August 1986, will hold a planning meeting in Washington, D.C., July 18.
The NHMC was credited last month with helping force a major shake-up at KCBS-TV in Los Angeles which resulted in the firing of vice-president/general manager Tom Van Amburg.
Attorney John Huerta of the group’s steering committee identified Chicago, Miami and New York as cities where links are presently being established.
The coalition presented its concerns and agenda to participants at the National As-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
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Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre.
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sociation of Hispanic Elected and Appointed Officials conference in Los Angeles May 16 in a session guided by another steering committee member, Attorney Armando Dur6n.
Duron described the coalition’s effort as a community-based one which is willing to work with professional Hispanic mediagroupsthat may use less direct approaches to resolving hiring and portrayal issues with both print and broadcast media.
The coalition has also had an active interest in actions involving Universal Studios and The Los Angeles Times.
The board of directors of a second Southern California group the Hispanic Public Relations Association, voted unanimously May 16 to engage in a national expansion.
Its president, Esther Renteria, said that El Paso and Miami are among cities where Hispanic p.r. practitioners have expressed immediate interest in forming chapters.
The association will be working toward holding its first meeting of chapters nation-
wide at the 1988 National Hispanic Media Conference, set for Dallas next April.
ELSEWHERE: The California Chicano News Media Association has announced the receipt of a $75,000 grant by the Gannett Foundation in support of its education programs for 1987... The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has inaugurated a scholarship fund in the memory of Mark Zambrano, Chicago Tribune reporter who diedatage27onMarch21. TheTribunehas offered to match contributions made by its employees on a $2 for $1 basis...
PEOPLE: California broadcast news veteran Yolanda Nava has joined KCBS-TV as a general assignment reporter... Phillip Sdnchez, who has been working as associate publisher of New York’s Notlcias del Mundo, has been named publisher of New World Communications’ chain of Spanish-language dailies nationally...
- Charlie Ericksen
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week vation Commission. Garcia is the rector of St. Mark's Church Bowery. His nomination must eventually . be apprqved by the . . Arturo Mad;ld, president of the Tomas Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif. and Sonia Hemanaez: J!lfilfcipal -of Gardendale Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n criticizes a statehood proposal sponsored by Sen . Robert Dole (R-Kan.), citing it as an attempt by Dole to gain support for his presidential campaign among island Republicans. . . U.S. Postmaster General Preston Tisch appoints Beatrice Sanchez, dean of the Cranbook Academy of Art in Michigan, as one of three new appointees to the Postal Service Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee. The prestigious 14-member committee reviews and makes recommendations for stamp subject designs ... New York Mayor Edward Koch appoints Luis Miranda, 32, research director of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, as his special advisor on Hispanic affairs. He also names the Rev . David Garcia to the 11-member Landmarks Preser• . r •• , u ZJ u d ' , , h c . Elementary School in San Antomo, are name by t e arneg1e Foundation to a board that will set the first national standards for the professional certification of teachers. . . Hilda Tagle, the .first Hispanic to be elected judge in Nueces County, Texas, has her b1d to become the first female member of the founding council of the League of United Latin American Citizens put on hold The Corpus Christi, Texas, council voted to review its bylaws on a procedural question in the matter . . . The Los Angeles district of the Small Business Administration chooses Laura Balverde-Sanchez as its Small Businessperson of the Year. Balverde-Sanchez is president and CEO of The New El Rey Sausage Co ... Vo. 5 No. 20 HISPANIC Ll KWEE Y REP Serna Contests Ouster UFW Birthday Marred by Ruling from MALDEF Board Eric Serna, former Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund chairman, filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in San Antonio May 13 seeking reinstatement for himself and other board members ousted at the organization's April25 annual meeting in Los Angeles. The lawsuit asks for a temporary injunction to set aside the boards action and to prevent newly elected officers and board members from serving. Serna charges the vote violated MALDEF bylaws because a majority of the 34 board members was not present. He is asking the court to reinstate him as board chairman until the matter is decided by new elections. A hearing is scheduled for June3. In a meeting in Dallas last January, MALDEPs executive committee, headed by Serna, nounced that former New Mexico Gov. To_ney Anaya would replace President Antonia Hernandez. She quickly denounced the move, that only the full board could fire her. HernAndez was vindicated at a Feb. 28 board of directors meeting in Los Angeles that overturned the decision of the executive board and reinstated her. Serna supporters say that a nominating committee the following day selected a slate of prospective board members acceptable to both camps that would be voted in on April 25. However, new MALDEF Chairman Fidel L6pez said that the nominating committee's slate was not approved by the full board, and alternative candidates were named to replace them. "The entire board makes the decision" on new board members, he said . When the alternative slate was nominated, eleven Serna supporters walked out of the meeting in protest. One of the eleven, Gilda Boj6rquez Gjurich, said the nomination of the substitute slate was "a breach of faith and promises. " She said the move "smelled to high heaven." Alicia Maldonado, communications coordi nator at MALDEPs Los Angeles office, said May 18 that Serna's lawsuit is "frivolous and without merit." The April 25 meeting was a legal quorum, she added. The United Farm Workers of America, found ed by Cesar Chavez in 1962, celebrated its 25th anniversary May23 at the UFWs "Forty Acres'' headquarters in Delano, Calif., amid escalating financial woes. More than 5,500 workers and supporters converged to demonstrate to growers, at the beginning of the annual grape harvest, that the union still has strong public support, according to Ken Schroeder of UFW. Farm workers asked backers to boycott grapes as part of their "Wrath of Grapes" campaign which spotlights pesticide contami nation of grapes and other farm products, said Schroeder. A long list of North American and European labor leaders were to attend the event UFW was founded by Chavez with 1 0 bers in California's San Joaquin Valley in 1962. In 1965 he led the organization , which had growrT to 1 ,200 member families, in a strike against Delano-area grape growers. The strike and boycott forced many growers to sign labor contracts and led to the passage of california's 1975 Agricultural Labor RelatiOns Act At its peak in 1970, the union had a member ship of 40,000. In 1973 it became a part of the AFLCIO after earlier problems with the group . Chavez's problems intensified in 1983 when Republican Gov. George Deukmejian gutted the Agricultural labor Relations Board. This, along with the continued threat pesticides continued on page 2 Civil Rights Panel Nixes Draft Paper The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights rejected May 15 a draft statement criticizing a recent U .S. Supreme Court affirmative action rulinq during a meeting in Washington, D.C. On a 5 vote, the commission decided not to accept the 25-page statement. The two Latinas on the commission, Blandina Cardenas Ramirez and Esther Buckley, voted to reject the analysis, but for differing reasons. Cardenas Ramirez , appointed to the mission by Congress, viewed the court's ruling as supportive of improving women's employ ment Reagan appointee Esther Buckley would have supported the statement if it had been revised to better address issues raised by the court She said the statement would give the public the wrong impression . The court's March 25 decision involved a challenge by a white male to the Santa Clara County, Calif., Transportation Agency's affirma tive action plan. He was passed over for a job in favor of a woman who scored slightly lower on an oral exam. An employer may sometimes favor women and minority employees to remedy a spicuous imbalance" in the employer's work force, the court said . This was the first time the commission attempted to challenge the court's legal rea soning and its understanding of constitutional limitations on affirmative action. . Dade Selects Femandez I Joseph Fernandez was appointed May 13 superintendent of Dade County Public Schools, the fourth-largest school district in the nation, making him the first Hispanic ever to fill the seat. The Dade School Board made the selection on a 4-3 vote without conducting any searches or interviews. Fernandez, the districts deputy super intendent, has held the No. 2 position in . Dade County since January 1986. He suc ceeds Leonard Britton, who resigned May9 . to become superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. Fernandez, 51 and of Puerto Rico descent, assumes duties of the $1 07 ,000-a-year job July 1. The Dade district has 244,000 studen ts, 1:3,000 te achers, 253 sc h o ols and a $1.3 billion b udget. The school di st ricts student population is 42% Hispanic.

PAGE 2

Hispanics Applaud U.S. Supreme Court Ethnic Ruling Latino civil rights groups are applauding the May 18 unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruling which expands the scope of a 100year-old federal civil rights law to encompass members of ethnic groups. "lfs an important victory for national origin groups, especially the Latino community," said Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Edu cation Fund staff attorney Jose Luis Morin. "It narrows the question of whether Latinos fall in racial discrimination categories. " In writing the courfs opinion, Justice Byron UFW Marks25 Years continued from page 1 pose to farm workers and consumers, prompted Chavez to renew his grape boycott in 1984. Presently, the UFW is also entangled in a legal battle which some claim threatens its very existence. In January, a superior court judge in Imperial County, Calif., ordered the union to pay $1.7 million in damages to a lettuce grower. The court ruled that the union had sanctioned violence against hired workers filling in for those involved in a 1979 strike against Maggio Inc . UFW has charged Judge William Lehnhardt with bias, saying that his wife was among the many local residents who volunteered to help harvest the grower's lettuce. The union plans to appeal the decision but California law will require it to post a $3 million bond, said Barbara Macri-Ortiz of UFWs legal department. UFW Disappearance 'An Illusion' According to several reports, U FW officials have asserted that if the union is forced to pay, it would be so financially weakened that its continued operation would be jeopardized. "We are not going to concede the $1.7 million and have filed a motion in the waiver of the bond," Macri-Ortiz told Weekly Report . "A lot of people have the illusion that this case is somehow going to make the UFW disappear . " Ronald Barsamian, lawyer for the produce grower who won the settlement, said his client would resist any attempt to have the bond waived . He cited a report submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor last fall that said the union collected about $2 million a year in dues and its assets totaled more than $4. 8 million . " You have to take into consideration our operating needs and what the assets are in," said Macri-Ortiz, "and if you turn those in , what kind of shape you're in ." Asked what the status of the UFW would be if it were forced to post the bond, Macri-Ortiz said that thi ngs would not be normal but the union would survive. "We're used to working with very little resources . . . we're survivors." Presently, UFW is reported to have about 30,000 farm workers under contract in Cali fornia , less than 10% of that state's total . It has no major contracts in other states. Julio Laboy 2 R . White said the 1866 law, which allows a broad range of suits for damages by victims of discrimination, was clearly intended to protect people who are "subjected to inten tional discrimination solely because of their ancestry or ethnic characteristics." The court said that when the 1866 law referred to "race," it meant to include what are now defined as ethnic groups, such as Hispanics, Arabs and Jews. These ethnicities are now regarded as belonging to the Cau casian race, said the decision. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 forbids employment discrimination but applies only to employers of 15 or more while the post-Civil War law applies to all employers. The 1866 law allows for other suits, such as rental housing discrimination, Morin said. In addition, the 1866 law allows for a jury trial, damages for pain and suffering, punitive damages and is more flexible on time limits for filing suits. Under Title VII, plaintiffs must file within 180 days and the trial will be before ajudge, not a jury. Peiia Runs Second, Reaches Runoff Denver Mayor Fede rico Pena faces a June 16 r&election runoff against attorney Don Bain, who edged Pena by nearly 5% in the city's May 19 mayoral primary. Pen a, 40, received 51 ,060 votes (37 .1 %) to Bain's 58,003 votes (41.7%) . Denver's two daily newspapers endorsed Bain. Their coverage of Pena, who is seeking a second term, spurred an outcry from some Hispanic organizations and publications. Pena's popularity decreased when he en couraged the. retirement of Police Chief Tom Bilingual Ed Students Outscore Their Peers Spanish-speaking third graders enrolled in bilingual education programs in El Paso, Texas, scored higher on annual standardized reading and writing exams than their class mates who took the test in English , according to test scores released this month by the El Paso Independent School District. Of the 400 students who took the first-ever Spanish version of the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills , 94% passed the reading test and 95% passed the writing exam . Seventy percent of the 3 ,900 third graders who took the English version passed the reading test and 65% passed the writing exam . Math scores were virtually equal for both groups: 83% of those who took the Spanish test passed, compared with 85% of those who took the English exam . Jeanne Saunders , director of the school district's research and evaluation division, said that the scores " have been blown out of proportion . " She warned against using the results as a measure of the success of bilingual education in Texas. Saunders said that while the scores"speak we:l of the bilingual efforf' in El Paso, the number of children tested was "too small to make a broad general statement." She added that scores on the English test may have been held down by 1,160 limited-English proficient students who took that test. However, Oscar Cardenas , director of compliance for bilingual education at the Texas Education Agency, said that the El Paso test results were "the first public indication" of the success of the state's bilingual programs. Coogan after Coogan admitted he was mantically involved with a policewoman . Public approval rating of Pena, which was 70% when he entered office in-1983, plunged in recent months to 40% . Roybal Allard Sworn In Lucille Roybal Allard was sworn in May 18 by California Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy as the new assemblywoman for the 56th District. It is the first elective office held by the 45-year old daughter of U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (D Calif .). Roybal Allard , with 5,443 votes, or 62% of the total, beat out nine others in a May 12 special election to fill the remainder of a term vacated by Gloria Molina Molina was elected to the Los Angeles City Council in February. Ortiz Apparent Winner In Philadelphia , incumbent City Councilman Angel Ortiz is expected to maintain his at large seat following May 19 elections there. With 67% of the vote in, Ortiz was a solid fourth place finisher among 13 vying for the five Democratic at-large positions . Ortiz was appointed to his seat in 1984. The Philadelph i a City Council is comprised of 10 sing I& member district representatives and seven at-large members, with the minority party holding two of those seats. Rita Hayworth Dies at 68 Rita Hayworth , star of more than 60 Holly wood films in the 1940s and ' 50s, died May 14 in New York City of Alzheimer's disease. She was 68. Hayworth , whose on-screen persona earned her the title " love goddess," was born Margarita Carmen Dolores Cansino Oct. 17, 1918, to a family of Spanish American dancers in Brooklyn, N . Y . Hayworth appeared on the cover of Life magazine four times, a record equaled only by Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Her career was highlighted by such films as" Blood and Sand," 1941;"Gilda," 1946; and"MissSadie Thompson," 1956. She is survived by her da•Jghters Rebecca Welles, the only child from her marriage to Orson Welles, and Princess Yasmin Khan Embiricos, from her marriage to Prince Aly Khan . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING BILINGUAL EDUCATION SPECIAL REPORT: Education Week magazine included a comprehensive 28page insert on bilingual education in its April 1 issue. The insert covers various facets, including the historical, political and cognitive context of bilingual education. Rates are $3 each for 1 copies, $2.25 each for 10. (Lower prices for larger orders.) To obtain a copy, write to: Edu cation Week, C/o Back Issues, 1255 23rd St NW, Suite 755, Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 466. . RACE, CLASSANDGENDER STUDIES: The National Association for Ethnic Studies has Issued a call for papers, media productions or panels on the theme "Race, Class and Gender: Old Ideas and New Perspectives." Send four copies of an abstract not to exceed 1 00 words plus four copies of a 2 page summary or completed paper by Oct. 19, 1987. Send proposals and vitae to: Foster Brown , School of Social Work, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Ill. 62901 (618) 45343. 8(A) PROGRAM GRADUATES: The Senate Committee on Small Business has released an 86-page study which found that more than 70% of the businesses that participated in the federal minority contract program stay in business after leaving it. For a copy of the study, " Survey of Graduates of the Small Business Administration's Section 8(A) Minority Business Development Program," write to: Superintendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office , Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783. (The price was not available at presstime.) FUND RAISING AND PUERTO RICAN NON PROFITS: The Na tional Puerto Rican Coalition recently released two studies highlighting problems Puerto Rican non-profit organizations face in raising funds. The studies are titled "Major U.S. Foundations and Corporations Responsiven ess to Puerto Rican Needs and Concerns," 35 pages, "United Way Giving: A Survey of Puerto Rican Agency Participation and of the the Attitudes of the United Way System," 25 pages. To obtain a copy of either report, send $7 .50 to: N PRC, 1700 K St. NW , Suite 500, Washington, D . C . 20006 (202) 223. CONNECTING' AGUIRRE ELECTED TO BOARD Jesse Aguirre, vice president of corporate relations for Anheuser Busch Companies, has been elected to the board of directorS' of Anheuser-Busch Inc., the worlds largest brewer. His election was announced May by August Busch Ill, president of the St. Louis-based companies. Aguirre joined Anheuser-Busch in 1981 as director of corporate affairs and was promoted to his present position three years later. DE LA GARZA APPOINTED Dr. Rodolfo de Ia Garza , director of the Center f5>r Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin , has been appointed to the board of a nationwide research project aimed af studying relations between new immigrant groups and established residents . The research is supported by the Ford Foundation, which will award between $1 00,000 and $200,000 to as many as eight researCh teams . De Ia Garza was one of six persons named to the board to coordinate the research , which will be done over a two-year period beginning in 1988. N. Y.C. ARTS FUNDING INCREASED The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs allocated increases totaling $95,000 to three Hispanic groups which present or produce art , bringing their total funding for fiscal year 1988 to $156,000. Ballet Hispfwico, the internationally acclaimed professional dance company, will receive an additional $35,000 in city funding. Repertorio the New York City Hispanic dance company, will receive a $35,000 increase. The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art will receive an increase of $25,000. Calendar THIS WEEK The U . S . Department of labor will host a one-day career fair as part of a program to increase its Hispanic representation. Applications will be ac cepted for positions in computing, accounting and other entry-level jobs. bring together critics and writers. Hector Calder6n(415) 725 NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN CONVENTION Hartford, Conn. May 29-31 IMMIGRATION LAW SEMINAR Washington, D .C. May 25 A seminar detailing the effects of the federal im migration law will be offered during the 50th con vention of the National Lawyers Guild. Christopher Hornig (202) 293 HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Phoenix May 25, 26 " Building Institutional Strength Through Partnerships'' is the theme of the first meeting of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Panels will address Hispanic initiatives in higher education and the involvement c:A foundations and corporations. Antonio Rigual (512) 434 HISPANIC DROPOUT PROBLEM Washington, D.C. May 26 The film" Hispanic Dropouts, America's Time bomb'' will be shown during a panel discussion with cation experts concerning the high Hispanic out rate . The symposium is sponsored by the D.C . Hispanic News Media Association and the Northeast region of the league of United latin American Citizens Andres Tobar (202) 347 CAREER FAIR Denver May 26 Hispanic Link Weekly Report Dolores Board (202) 523 NATIONAL IMAGE CONFERENCE Denver May 26 30 Training workshops dealing with employment, cation, political awareness and other issues relevant to the Hispanic community will be offered during the " Knowledge is Power" conference of National Image Inc. Maurice Velasquez (303) 293 HISPANIC MARKET Houston May 28 The Houston Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a networking session aimed at promoting the growing significance of the Hispanic market "Stretching Your Marketing DollarTap The Hispanic Marker• is the theme of the chamber's event Jorge Colorado (713) 224 WOMEN'S SYMPOSIUM New York May 28, 29 SERJobs for Progress Inc. is sponsoring a regional seminar to identify barriers keeping Hispanic women from parity in the '!YOrkplace . Judy Freyre (214) 631 CHICANO LITERARY CONFERENCE Stanford, Calif . May 28 30 "Chicano literary Criticism in a Social Contexf' is a conference sponsored by Stanford University to May25, 1987 Organized by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, the fourth National Puerto Rican Rights Convention will open with the theme "Closing Ranks: Foward to Justice and Progress." It will focus on current economic and social conditions confronting Puerto Ricans in the continental u:a. Nilda Rodriguez (212) 923 WOMEN OF COLOR Omaha, Neb. May 29 The third Women of Color Conference will have more than 30 workshops on women and dealing with self , work, family and money. It is sponsored by the Nebraska Commission on the Status of Women and other groups. Marta Nieves (402) 291 ETHNIC MINORITY CONFERENCE St. Paul, Minn. May 30 "Educating a New Generation" is the theme of the third annual Ethnic Minority Conference sponsored by the Minnesota Education Association. Sandi Fields (612) 227 PUERTO RICAN WEEK KICKOFF Chicago May 31 Mayor Harold Washington will issue a proclamation for Puerto Rican Week and the 1987 Puerto Rican Parade queen and her court will be presented during a Boricua garden ceremony. Martha Ramos(312).292 3

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The Extended Family Three Experiences The "extended family" continues to gain recognition as a cultural trait of special value to Latinos. This week, three contributing columnists to Hispanic Link News ServiceCuban American Achy Obejas, Puerto Rican Julio Ojeda and Chicano Herman Sillasinvite Weekly Report readers to share personal experiences in their uniquely Latino familial relationships. Sin pelos en Ia lengua FAST LEARNER: Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez demonstrated his South Florida political training as luncheon banquet speaker at the fifth annual conference oft he National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Los Angeles May 15. "On my right. .. ," he introduced half of his fellow head-table occupants. For the other half, he guided the audience, "And on your right. .. " ( (In Miami, ifs expedient not to be on the left.) LATINO PASSION: This is lifted from San Diego Union columnist Tom Blair: • . Eight-year-old Adrian Reyes came home from school with an important announcement for his father, Homero. His school planned to stage a production of the Passion Play . "And I," young Reyes said proudly, "get to play Poncho Pilot." HELPING THY HISPANIC NEIGHBOR: Los Angeles Hispanics continue to express their outrage at the city's board of education for passing up the most logical candidate to head LA's 56% Hispanic school district-deputy superintendent William Anton, a Chicano and 35-year veteran of the system there. Instead, the board picked Leonard Britton, who headed the . Dade County Public Schools in Florida That made room for Dade's No . 2 man to move up . And move up he did this past week. The Dade board picked as Britton's replacement Joseph Fernllndez, a Puerto Rican born and raised in New York City's Spanish Harlem. MOTHER'S LITTLE HELPER: An 8-yearold Whittier, Calif., boy found his mother in a trance-like state last week. Concerned, he quickly counted out 25 of his pennies, took them to a convenience store to exchange for a quarter, went to a public phone booth and called the police. They responded promptly, drove him home and-sizing up the situation arrested his mother, Diane Mendoza Reyna, on charges of being under the influence and possession of PCP. And child endangering. JOAN'S BAD JOKES: In one of her fina l regular late night television shows, Joan Rivers did a series of tasteless, humorless gags on what happens when you crossbreed various species of animals. Unfortunately, for one gag . she chose to us e an animal and a human being-a Hispanic. As sketches of an elephant and a stereotypical sombrero thatched Mexican peasant flashed on screen, Rivers challenged her usuallow-10 audience with a puzzler on what happens when you breed a n elephant with an illega l alien . (The answerjo-jo-jo is a parking lot attendant who never forgets where he parked your car.) Chicago's Latino Committee on the Media, which is encouraging that indignation be expressed to Derk Zimmerman, president of Fox Television (1 020 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90035), informed us of this latest racist display on the tube. Their thorough report leaves us with just one question: Who did they know who would watch Joan Rivers? Kay Barbaro Achy Obejas Collecting Cuban Cousins Next month I'll be spending time with my cousins Pedro Javier and Titi. They're coming up from Florida with friends, but my apartment may not be able to hold them all so Pedro Javier and his pal may have to crash over at my cousin George's. He lives a few blocks away. When I told an American friend this, she seemed a bit puzzled. She's heard of my cousins George (not to be confused with Cousin George a few blocks away) and Eddie, Cristina, Lisa, Patricia, Tomas, Michelle, Bernie, Marta, Merci, Ernie, Mario, David et al She'd also met my cousins Manolito and Mario Francisco. "Geez, how many cousins do you have?" she asked, amazed. Dozens, I told her. I also have a string of ,aunts and uncles: Tia Olga, Pedro and Eliana, Yolanda and Manalo, Catin, Eva and Bernard, Juana and the late greats Alberto and Raul. Every now and then I also claim Maggie, a bawdy blonde octogenarian. She used to be married to Marito, grandfather of Bernie, Lisa and Michelle. She's French, but she's family. ACQUIRED PARENTELA OVER YEARS All this confusion and, truth be told, my parents have a total of only one sister and one brother between them, with a combined offspring of three. The rest are what my brother and I refer to as the parentela, relatives we've acquired over the years. We arrived from Cuba in 1963, a pair of ragamuffins just off the boat. Our family was as nuclear as Three-Mile Island. Every natural relative was still back on the island. When we moved to Terre Haute, Ind., in the mid '60s as part of a government-sponsored resettlement program, neither we nor others in the program had any cousins or aunts and uncles stateside. So we adopted each other. Thafs how we got the Pelaezes(thafs Pedro and Eliana, and the kids-Titi, Pedro Javier-and much later, Patricia and Tomas). I'd wager they're at the top on our"in-exile" relative list Growing up, we didn't really look much like each other, but we looked more like each other than anybody else we knew. We also sounded similar, whether it was in our native Spanish or our first few tentative English words. So we knew we were related. We understood each other like nobody else did, or ever has. GRANDPARENTS WERE AUTHENTIC Over the years, my brother and I, in typical Cuban overachiever mode, managed to attract dozens of new relatives. About t he only connection we weren ' t able to pull off was grandparents. We both had lived with our maternal grandparents for a while in Cuba, and no one could qui te fit their shoes. When our abuelos f i na lly got out of Cuba many years later(we were adults already), we knew they were authentic. As for our real aunts and uncles, as well as cousins-in all honesty, we were staring at strangers. And yet they really do look like us. When I look at my "real" Tia Yolanda, nobody but me look s back, we're so alike. On the phone, she and my mother are completely interchangeable. My " rea r' cousin Manolito and I have the same little habit of biting our tongues just before we laugh. And our laugh, other than the difference in gender, is the same. My brother reports duplicate experiences and we question the narcissistic aspect of all this-a very American thing to do, our parents would surely tell us, an americanada Oh well. We draw no con clusions . Our natural family is a delightful addition to our already well established parentela It sort of completes the picture, different sides of the same coin and a lot of love in between . (Achy Obejas, of Chicago, is a free-lance writer.) 4 May 25, 1987 Hispanic link Weekly Report

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Julio Ojeda The Boricua Leash Mom kept repeating the same thing over and over: "Ay, Julio, you don't know how happy I am that you're spending time with your sister.;' I was passing through Minneapolis during Christmas, and it seemed only natural to visit with Ita, my sister, and check out a few nightclubs. No big deal. But to Mom, the fact that Ita and 1 were together was cause for celebration. Mom shares a great sorrow with other Puerto Rican mothers-the scattering of her children to the U. S. mainland. Like Ita and me, thousands of young boricuas fly off every year to study at U.S. colleges . And like Ita and me, many remain to pursue careers. We are cut off from the island. As we make friends and build lives here, there are fewer and fewer reasons to return. Mom knew this would happen, but she did nothing to prevent it In fact, she encouraged us to go. "The universities are better in the U .S.," she told us . Also, she was badly frightened by the tidal wave of crime that has swept over the island in recent years. She desperately wanted her children to study in a safe, peaceful place. MOM RESORTED TO BLACKMAIL " There," she had said a few years earlier, grabbing a brochure from St. John's University in rural Stearns County, Minn. "You should study there." But when the time came, it was not easy for her to let her children go. " Minnesota is so far away!" Mom pleaded for letters . She even resorted to blackmail, threatening to withhold our monthly allowance checks if we didn't scribble a few lines . Our intermittent notes were filled with horror stories of below-zero temperatures and wind chill factors, a fearsome challenge to our tropical metabolisms. This didn't faze Mom . Her three kids were together behind the St. Johns "Pine Curtain." Better a touch of frostbite , she reasoned , than muggers and rapists. This cozy arrangement could not last forever, of course . Eventually , her children graduated and moved to Chicago (with its own soar i ng crime rate) and Alaska (a savage wilderness fraught with unknown perils) . She made efforts to adjust to our " second scattering." As always , she continued to advise us. She never refused collect calls. But she could no longer control us. (To her, "control" was synonymous with "protect.") When Itaa reckless adventurersuddenly faded from view during a hitchhiking expedition across Alaska and Washington , Mom could do little more than bite her knuckles and wait by the phone . And when my brother Frankie-another free spirit-made a similar trek across Canada, sh e again camped by the phone . "Guess what," I sai d to Mom. "I went rock climbing this weekend." She managed a weak reply . "Can't you find a safe r hobby, Julio? " Mom's dismay was easy to understand. " My children are scattered across North America, putting their lives in per il," she said . " They are not together. We are not a family . " L O NG-DISTANCE CHRISTMAS GATHERING For a Puerto Rican mother , that was hard to bear. Thafs why she was so happy when Ita and I met in Minneapolis , and happier still when we arranged to be together on Christmas Eve . Mom prepared for the moment. She express mailed a huge parcel of presents to Ita's apartment wJth strict orders to leave it untouched until the 24th. That night the whole familyMom, Dad, Frankie, Ita and 1-fought over the phones as we opened our presents. It was a conference-call gathering , almost as good as the real thing . We were together. (Julio Ojeda recently quit a reporting job in Chicago to wander in Europe.) Herman Sillas The Compadre Collection For Hispanic Catholics, a baptism is more than a ritual to admit a baby into the Christian community. It gives birth to new relationships. The event has tradition, religion and good times all rolled into one occasion . The celebrated baby will not remember, but the day will have impact on child and parents for the rest of their. lives. The first decision facing the parents of the new baby is choosing the godparents to sponsor the child into the church . They must be Christians. The selection reflects the high esteem that the parents have for the childs padrino and madrina-godparents. The honor is not taken lightly. There will be a special bond between the parents and godparents. They will call each other com padres collectively or com padre (male) and comadre (female) singularly from then on . Their relationship will always have a common focus, the child. As backup parents, the godparents will be called nino arid nina by the youngster . Every Christmas and birthday, the child will receive a gift from her or his ninos. If the ninos are wealthy, so much the better . The godparents accept the responsibility to raise the child in the event a tragedy strikes the parents : COMPADRES SPEAK FOR WORDLESS CHILD The first duty of the new is to purchase el vestido de . bautismo the baptismal dress. It must be white and made o( satin, silk or lace or a comb . ination. It must be new unless one has been traditionally used in the family. The godparents will also give a religious medal of the name saint of the child and a rosary to the baby as a gift The ceremony has a great deal of symbolism to demonstrate the cleansing of the soul and the entrance of a new body into the arms9( the church. The compadres speak on behalf of the wordless child and pledge that it will follow the ways of Christ I have been to baptisms where there have been scores of babies baptized at the same time and I have been to ceremonies where only the child that my wife Cora and I were baptizing was present. Following the church ceremony, the four com padres return to the parents' home, where family and guests will celebrate. In New Mexico, just before the festivities begin , the godparents return the child to its parents with these words: "Aqui esta est a rosa fresca que de Ia iglesia sali6, con los santos sacramentos y el agua que recibi6( name of child)." Here is this fresh rose from the church with the sacred sacraments and water (name of child) has received . The parents respond : "Te recibo , rosa fresca, que de Ia iglesia salistes co n los santos sacramentos y el agua que recibistes. " We receive you, fresh rose, from the church from whence you came with your sacred sacraments and water which you have received. CHILDREN SCRAMBLE FOR BOLO Now the party starts. Merr i ment, food, laughter and music-somet i mes mariachis. The wom en marvel at how well behaved the child was during the ceremony . The men joke with the godfather about how good the child will have to be to make up for all the sins that both the father and the godfather have committed in their lifetimes . At an appropriate time, the children in attendance shout " Bolo! Bolo! " Then the godparents toss coins el bolo-into the air for the young ones to gather. The priest blesses the gathering . The godchild is passed from arm to arm to receive kisses and praises . Finally , the little saint is placed to rest, unaware of the new lifelong ties that he or she has created between four people and their families. (Herman Sillas, a Los Angeles attorney, is padrino-godfather-to 12 children and com padre to their 24 parents. He shares his own five children with five compadres and five comadres.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report May 25,1987 5

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6 --BUILDING MAINftNANCE--• Elevator Mechanics • Boiler and Steam Plant Mechanics • Air Cond _ itioning Equipment Mechanics • Distribution Facilities Electricians (High Voltage) ----sECUIIIft orncas--outies include: • Protecting federal property and ensuring safety of personnel • 8 weeks of training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia Requirements: • Valid driver's license • Officers are required to carry firearms Building Maintenance Personnel and Security Officer positions offer good entry into federal workforce, excellent health insurance, paid vacation and a retirement plan. All candidates must undergo a full background investigation. Please send your resume, letter of interest ; or SF-171 to: National Security Agency Attn: M322 (DCZ)/ Fort Meade, Maryland 20755-6000 An equal opportunity employer U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members. PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OFFICER The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Invites applications for the position of PrOQram Development Officer. Under direction of the Executive Director, the Officer will organize and execute a variety of program development efforts from the headquarters office. A list of duties follows: establish and maintain Alumni and volunteer network; develop and Implement annual campaign for Individual and matching gifts; Initiate and oversee production of newsletter, news releases, and media PR; assist In Writing corporate funding proposals and coordinating special events and projects; research and maintain donor data base records. Candidates should have three to five years experience In fund raising or related work, strong organizational and communication skills, and demonstrated effective writing ability. A bachelor's degree or higher Is required. Salary: mid-30's, depending on experience and salary history. Send resume by June 15, 1987 to: Personnel Committee, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, P .O. Box 748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101. Contact Ernest Z Robles (415) 892. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE APPRENTICE $20,802.08 #52237 A FIR Trainee level position in the Emergency Medical Services Division of the Arlington County Fire Department. This is a new division the department with responsibility for providing a full range of emergency services to the citizens of Arlington County. Employee learns and per forms emergency medical treatment duties, drives an ambulance, assists in providing medical completes and maintains reports and records and participates in drills and ciasses In fire operations and medical procedures. Requires high school or equivalent and EMTCardlac (EMTC) certification by the Commonwealth of Virginia or EMT Paramedic certification issued by the National Registry of Medic a l Technicians. Applicants must submit a copy of current certification with application. All applica nts must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes, SF-171s, etc . without a completed official Arlington ap : . plication form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Departmen t no _ later than July 2, 1987' at 5:00 PM. To request application material please call (703) 558 or(703) 284 (hearing impaired). The Following Position Closes June 4, 1987 PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE $23,244 Ann.#61187CDHS Permanent, County-funded position in the Maternal and Child Health Care Clinics in the Health Services Division. Delivers prenatal and child health nursing services in the clinic setting to the limited English proficient community; interviews and assesses clients, admits groups of clients and conducts classes to educate clients about pregnancy; teaches and supports high risk patients to assure awareness and compliance with necessary routines. RequireE Bachelor's degree in nursing from a four year college accredited by the National League of Nursing or a Master's degree in a two year generic nursing program accredited by the National League of Nursing. Refer to announce ment for Preferred qualifications. SPECIAL REQUIREMENT: Must have English/ Spanish bilingual ability sufficient to communi cate with Hispanic clients in the clinic setting and to teach programs in Spanish. All applicants must submit an official Arlingtor County application form. A separate application form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes, SF-171 s, etc, submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department by . 5:00 PM on the closing date. To request application material pleasecall(703)558 or TDD (703) 284 (hearing impaired only). The following two positions are with La Guardia Community Col/ega PERIODICALS/REFERENCE LIBRARIAN Responsible for periodical collection of 5000 titles which includes microforms and periodicals, Information desk coverage by non-professional staff, ongoing analysis of the periodicals collection, heavy reference and bibliographic Instruction schedule. Qualifications: ALA accredited MLS Degree; knowledge of periodicals; excellent Inter personal skills; academic library experience. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience . Full-time, one-year position : EVENING, WEEKEND LIBRARIAN Supervision of a derical and adjunct librarian staff of 8, heavy bibliographic Instruction and reference services schedule. Qualifica tions: ALA accredited MLS Degree; experience with an academic library's public services program; supervisory and communication skills. Experience and facility with micros desirable. Second MNMS preferable. Salary. Commensurate with qualifications and experience . Full-time, one-year position . Send letter and resume indicating position by Ju l y 17 to: Chief Librarian, Room 2, • _ aGua rdia Community College/CUNY, 31 0 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 111 0 1 . EOE/ AA Employer. May25, 1987 ARLINGTON COUNTY Department of Personnel 2100 14th .. St. North Arlington, Va 22201 EEO DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financial, personnel, pur chasing, insurance and administrative functions. Requires M.A., 10 years financiaVadministrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred) . Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms. A. H ernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Angeles, Calif . 90014 by May 22, 1987. HisPanic Link Weekly Report

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NOTICE TO HISPANIC EMPLOYEES OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA) AND HISPANICS INTERESTED IN EMPLOYMENT AT NSA A proposed settlement has been reached in an equal employment lawsuit brought on behalf of certain His panic employees of NSA and Hispanics who have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment at NSA. If you are a Hispanic employee of NSA, if you are a Hispanic who has unsuccessfully applied for a position at NSA, or if you are a Hispanic who has considered applying for a position at NSA but has been discouraged from doing so, this proposed settlement may affect you. The proposed settlement would address NSA's recruitment and promotion processes for Hispanics. It also would maintain and develop programs designed to aid Hispanic employees of NSA Further, it would require NSA to conduct an examination of the testing program used by NSA as part of its hiring process. It would also provide for record keeping and monitoring of NSA's progress in employing Hispanics. For further informat i on concerning the proposed settlement, you should write, as soon as possible, to the following attorneys: Irving Kator, Esq. Douglas Huron, Esq . Kator, Scott and Heller 1079 Vermont Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20005 If you wish to review the proposed settlement, you may obtain a copy from these attorneys, or you may go to the Office of the Clerk, United States District Court, 101 W. Lombard St. , Baltimore, Md. , 21201, and ask to review the proposed consent decree in Velasquez v. Faurer, No. K-82. If you are a member of the classes on whose behalf this lawsuit was brought, you may submit any written objections you may have concerning the proposed settlement to the Clerk of the Court, at the address listed above , by June 1, 1987. If you submit any written objections by the due date, you may also be heard orally at a hearing which will be held to consider whether the proposed settlement should be made final. That hearing will be held at 10:00 a . m . on June 19,1987, in courtroom No. 7C at the same address. If you wish, you may retain your own attorney to represent you in making written objections or at the hearing. DEAN FOR THE DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE LIFE INDIANA UNIVERSITYBLOOMINGTON Indiana University-Bloomington seeks nominations and applications for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life to assume office no laterthanJuly 1, 1988. The dean will report directly to the chief executive of the Bloomington campus and will serve a member of the administrative and planning group. The dean will be responsible forcoordmatmg the activities of academic advising for freshmen and sophomores, minority-oriented special services, freshman orientation, learning-support services, career and placement activities, scholarships and financial aids, and health and counseling services. A candidate should have an earned doctorate or equivalent credentials, substantial administrative experience, a proven ability to work well with students and faculty, a strong commitment to deliver effective student services, and a thorough understanding of the missions of a research institution. To be assured of consideration, nominations and applications should be received by August 1, 1987. In keeping with the commitment to its affirmative-action policies, Indiana University particularly seeks nominations for or applications from minority or women candidates. and applications, with vitae and relevant lists of references , should be sent to Professor Dennis G. Peters, Chairman, Search and Screen Committee for the Dean for the Division of Undergraduate Life, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405. The following two positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College. DATA BASE COORDINATOR Responsible for updatingfmaintaining existing files as well as development of new programs and enhancements to interface with CUNY Personnel System. BNBS, min. 2 yrs. exp. combining programming and ad min. req. Salary: $24,471/A. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #422 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 6/17/87. ASST. ADMINISTRATIVE SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS & GROUNDS For $130,000,000 campus. Knowledge of Buildings and Grounds operations including personnel, supervision, maintenance, repairs, contract specifications, construction problems, personnel and material safety, budget preparation and training. Engineering exp. and license; significant exp. with major facility desirable. Sala_ry range: $27,734-$51 ,000/A REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #C$-330 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 5/29/87. Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY (M/F), AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITYofWashington, D.C, has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND. Dl RECTOR OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE SUNY/ESC, a national leader in higher education, seeks a Director of Institutional . Research. The Director Is responsible for. managing the centralized enrollment system; preparing reports highlighting data trends & projections for future planning; & assisting In conducting program evaluation, student flow, trend analysis & retention studies. Master's req'd, doctorate prefd, in one of the social sciences or higher ed & 3 years of IR experience. Knowledge of the IBM/PCXT, Lotus or Enable desired . Excellent communication skills & report writing ability essential Position available9/1 /87. The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications after 6/12/87. Send letter of ap plications & resume to: Dr. Timothy Lehmann, Assistant Vice President, Office of Research & Evaluation, Rm .. 302, SUNY/ESC, One Union Avenue, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866. (518) 587-2100, ext. 287. ANEOE. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE CONFERENCE COORDINATOR Washington, D.C., national Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist in the planning/imple mentation of Annual Conference. College degree/ equivalent experience in job-related area Strong writing, typing (70 wpm), telephone skills. Self starter can work under pressure without need of close supervision . Position available mediately. Salary range: $14-16,000. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza at (202) 628-9600. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone(202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery . County, . Md., are available on a continuous basis. . Call(301) 251-2252. Hispanic link Weekly . Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per colum.n inch . Ordered by -----------Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & ZiP-----,-----Area Code & Phone---------7

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Arts & Entertainment demanded the cancellation of performances of a play by Cuban American Dolores Prida. The author, nonetheless, appeared for a staged reading of Coser y cantar. The second installment of Miamrs Hispanic theater festival continues , this week-without controversy . The Prida controversy inspired the creation of Miami's pro-free speech Intercultural Action Network. The group recently handed awards to Miami locals who objected to the cancellation of Prida's play. Works by Cuban or Cuban American writers dominate the II Festival de Teatro Hispano , which began May 1 with the world premiere of Virgilio Pinero's Una caja de zapatos vacia. The Cuban playwright sent the play to the United States in 1968, where it was first published last year. It was staged May 1-3 by Miamrs Teatro Avante . Awardees included El Miami Herald arts and entertainment ist Norma Niurka and The Miami News editorial Santiago . A bilingual production by Spanish contemporary Alfonso Vallejo and a play in English by Cuban American writer Maria Fornes are part of this year's program. Orquideas was staged May 2 and 3 at the Coconut Grove Playhouse; Mud continues atthe South End Alternative Theatre through May 30. A total of 91 works, meanwhile-paintings, sculptures, photos and multimedia pieces-are part of an exhibit, Outside Cuba/Fuera de Cuba, due to embark on a national tour. Dates are set for stops in New York (June 25-Aug. 2); Oxford, Ohio (Oct. 16-Dec. 20); Ponce, Puerto Rico(Aprii29-June30, 1988); and Miami(Oct. 7-Dec.4, 1988) ONE LINERS: An exhibit of paintings by Venezuelan painter Beatriz Sanchez opens May 27 at the Washington, D.C, Museum of Modern Art of Latin America . . Atlanta's Circulo Hispanoamericano stages El afinador, by Spanish playwright Vital Aza, May 30 at the city's Historical Society Theatre ... And the third annual National Hispanic Book Fair will be held May30 and31 at Houston's Museum of Fine Arts . . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Opening this week are plays by a Spaniard and a Venezuelan, respectively; Jose Luis Alonso de Santos' El album familiar is staged at the Miami-Dade Community Colle .ge May 29-31 and Roman Chalbauds El viejo grupo will be at the Teatro de Sellas Artes May 31 to June 21. Last year's festival was spotted with controversy, when protesters Media Report GOING NATIONAL: Two Southern Cali fornia-based Latino media groups revealed their intentions to go nationwide last week. The National Hispanic Media Coalition, which has kept its activities within the Los Angeles Basin since its formation in August 1986, will hold a planning meeting in Wash ington, D.C., July 18. The NHMC was credited last month with helping force a major shake-up at KCB8-TV in Los Angeles which resulted in the firing of vice-president/general manager Tom Van Am burg. Attorney John Huerta of the group's steering committee identified Chicago, Miami and New York as cities where links are presently being established . The coalition presented its concerns and agenda to participants at the National AsHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editoi: Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias Rentas, Mel fnda Machado, Julio Laboy , Richard Sayre . . Graphics/Productioo Cartos Arrien, Zoila Elias, Yanira Cruz. No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Week l y Reports mailed Fr i day of same wee"' Multiple use rates on request. 8 soc1ation of Hispanic Elected and Appointed Officials conference in Los Angeles May 16 in a session guided by another steering com mittee member, Attorney Armando Dur6n. Dur6n described the coalition ' s effort as a community-based one which is willing to work with professional Hispanic media groups that may use less direct approaches to resolving hiring and portrayal issues with both print and broadcast media. The coalition has also had an active interest in actions involving Universal Studios and The Los Angeles Times. The board of directors of a second Southern California group, the Hispanic Public Relations Association, voted unanimously May 16 to engage in a national expansion. Its president , Esther Renteria, said that El Paso and Miami are among cities where Hispanic p . r . practitioners have expressed immediate interest in forming chapters. The association will be working toward holding its first meeting of chapters wide at the 1988 National Hispanic Media Conference, set for Dallas next April. ELSEWHERE: The California Chicano News Media Association has announced the receipt of a $75,000 grant by the Gannett Foundation in support of its education pro grams for 1987 . .. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has inaugurated a scholarship fund in the memory of Mark Zambrano, Chicago Tribune reporter who died at age 27 on March 21. The Tribune has offered to match contributions made by its employees on a $2 for $1 basis. .. PEOPLE: California broadcast news veteran Yolanda Nava has joined KCB8-TV as a general assignment reporter ... Phillip sanchez, who has been working as associate publisher of NewYorl