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Hispanic link weekly report, June 1, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 1, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Sonia Marie DeLe6n becomes the first woman to conduct a Papal Mass at the Vatican when her group, the 60-member Saint Vibiana Symphony Orchestra from Los Angeles, performed for Pope John Paul II on Ascension Day... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints East Los Angeles Municipal Court Judge Raymond Mireles to the Los Angeles Superior Court.. American Red Cross elects Daniel Villanueva, president and general manager of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, to its 50-member national Board of Governors... King Juan Carlos I of Spain confers knighthood on Samuel Mark, director of the Office of Hispanic Programs at the University of Southern California’s College of Letters, Arts and Sciences Mark
was recognized for his promotion of Hispanic culture... Chicago* Board of Education President George Muftoz, announces he will not* seek re-election to a fourth term as president Murtaz, 36, said he will stay on the board... Chi Chi Rodriguez ties a Senior Professional Golfer's Association Tour record by sinking eight consecutive birdies in winning the $250,000 Silver Pages Classic. He contributes $10,000 of his $37,500 purse to victims of the Saragosa, Texas, tornado... Michael Ortiz, owner of a funeral home in Brooklyn, says he will provide the funeral services for Juan P6rez, the 11 -year-old boy who was fatally mauled by two polar bears at a New York zoo. Juan’s mother, Carmen, had said she could not afford a funeral. Her husband died six weeks earlier... Perennial Republican primary presidential candidate Ben Ferndndez, calls a press conference May 26 at the Washington, D.C., National Press Club to announce his candidacy for 1988. Only one thing was missing: Ferndndez...

Independent Schools Lack Latinos
House Expands Funds for Bilingual Education
Federal bilingual education funds would be increased from $143 million to $246 million under an omnibus education bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives May 21.
“The provisions are excellent The only thing that is disconcerting is the compromise adopted in full committee regarding thefuture funding of special alternative instruction programs,” said Jim Lyons, legislative and policy counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education.
The compromise would eventually allow 75% of funding over the current level to go toward English-only programs after accounting for inflation, he said.
The Senate has not passed an education bill.
Other provisions of the House bill:
• $4.1 billion for basic grants under the Chapter 1 program for low-income and disadvantaged children, $200 million more than now spent
• $100 million for a dropout prevention program.
• $200 million for adult education, almost twice the current $109 million.
• $25 million for a new gifted and talented program.
• $50 million fora new“even start” program which combines literacy training for parents and preschool for children.
Tornado Ravages Town
A funeral for 17 of the 29 victims of the tornado that devastated the predominantly Hispanic ranching town of Saragosa, Texas, was held May 26.
The tornado struck the west Texas town unexpectedly May 22 at 8 p.m. About half of the victims were at a pre-school graduation ceremony at the community center. Six children died. More than 160 people were injured. Saragosa has a population of 350 people.
County Commissioner Bernardo Martinez said, “Things have been donated, but few are asking for things. They are too proud." As of midweek last week, $470,000 had been received in pledges.
The number of Hispanics attending independent schools increased slightly from 1980 to 1986 but their proportion in the schools dropped from 2% to 1.8%, according to new figures released by the National Association of Independent Schools.
Hispanics comprise an estimated 9.6% of the natiorfs primary and secondary school population.
NAIS has about 950 member schools. Of those, 815 participated in the group’s survey for 1986/87. Tallied in the survey were nearly
The Immigration and Naturalization Service delayed until July the issuance of citations to employers who knowingly hire undocumented workers. The employer sanctions, beginning with a one-year warning period, were scheduled to start June 1.
Saying more time is needed for employer education, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson announced the delay May 26. He said the agency would concentrate on issuing millions of employer handbooks explaining the responsibilities of employers underthe Immigration and Reform Control Act of 1986.
The Senate voted May 21 to delay the sanctions until Oct 1. The provision is attached to a catch-all spending bill which was to have been voted on late last week.
“Good faith compliance is all we’re asking,” Nelson said.
one-third of a million students Between 1980 and 1986, the overall enrollment reported by responding schools jumped 61,118. Enrollment of Hispanics increased by 412 - from 5,297 to 5,709.
Fifteen years ago blacks made up 3.7% of the population of NAIS member schools followed by H ispanics and Asians at 0.6%. Today, Asians and blacks each comprise 4.7% of their enrollment with Asians outnumbering blacks 15.193 to 15,096 in the survey.
Continued on page 2
Under the law, employers must complete and retain a one-page form, the I-9, for all persons hired after Nov. 6,1986. Employers have until Sept. 1,1987, to complete the form for persons hired between Nov. 7,1986, and May 31,1987.
Forms must be completed within three business days for those hired after May 31.
Applicants for legalization, Special Agricultural Workers ai £ entrants in the Cuban/Haitian programs are covered by a “special rule” which allows them to work without employment eligibility documents until Sept 1,1987. Until then, these workers must fill out an I-9 form stating they are covered by the rule.
Employers violating the law this year will be - subject to civil or criminal penalties after the first warning No warnings will be issued after June 1988.
ENROLLMENT IN INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
In Select National Association of Independent Schools’ Members *
1971/72 % 1976/77 % 1979/80 % ,1986/1987 %
White 246,563 95.0% 250,090 92.9% 239,686 91.1% 287,680 88.8%
Asian 1,581 0.6 3,572 1.3 5,717 2.2 15,193 4.7
Black 9,627 3.7 11,711 4.4 11,883 4.5 15,096 4.7
Hispanic 1,610 0.6 3,333 1.2 5,297 2.0 5,709 1.8
Indian 159 0.1 208 0.1 324 0.1 347 0.1
TOTALS ** 259,5140 268,914 262,9071 324,025
* Totals represent roughly an 85% response rate to NAIS member survey. In 1986/87, 815 out of 950 schools responded Approximately half of nation’s independent schools are NAIS members.
** Percentages may not total 100 exactly due to rounding.
Source: National Association of Independent Schools
INS Postpones Employer Sanctions


$ Farm Workers See Little Help from Pesticide Report
Farm worker organizations are doubtful that a May 20 report released by the National Academy of Sciences on cancer-causing chemicals in pesticides will cause the government to crack down on the use pesticides in agriculture.
Shelley Davis, staff attorney at the Migrant Legal Action Program’s office in Washington, D.C., said that the report will not provoke immediate changes in the way farmers and their workers use pesticides. Although the use of toxic chemicals that cause an immediate rash or illness is restricted by law, the use of many pesticides that may be carcinogenic but are not immediately toxic is not now restricted, she said.
Davis told Weekly Report that the study is
Fla State Commission to Stay With Governor
The embattled Florida Commission on Hispanic Affairs will stay in the governor’s office as the result of the unanimous approval of a bill May 21 by the state Senate.
The Senate approved the measure, 35-0. It had passed the House May 5. It revives the commission in its current form - inside the governor's executive office.
Gov. Bob Martinez angered Hispanic leaders earlier this year when he announced plans to move the commission out of his office.
“We could veto the bill,” said J.M. Stipanovich, Martinez’s top political aide, “but that wouldn’t help anything."
“I’m delighted,” said commission Chairman Rafael Penalver. “If s time to put these matters behind us and establish a good working relationship with the governor.”
The terms of seven of the 15 commission members, including Peftalver, expire in September. The governor decides either to reappoint or replace them.
Family Legalization Asked
U.S. Reps. Esteban Torres and Edward Roybal were among four California congressional legislators who met May 20 with the head of the Immigration and Naturalization Service to request an order preventing the separation of families under the federal immigration law.
Under the legalization provision of the law, which began May 5, families with members who do not qualify for legalization must separate Also at the meeting were two other Democrats, Senate assistant Majority Whip Alan Cranston and Rep. Howard Berman.
INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said he was not sure how much latitude he had to interpret the law.
Roybal has introduced a bill that would expand the legalization provision to include the parents of children who were born after the law’s cutoff date - Jan. 1,1982. Charles Kamasaki, legislative analyst for the National Council of La Raza, said he is hopeful that such legislation “demonstrates Congress’ intent to maximize legalization.”
2
“a very important step forward in bringing out the danger to everyone who comes in contact with these pesticides.” In the past, “farm workers and their organizations were fighting the battle against pesticide misuse alone, as if we were the only ones in danger.”
The academy report found that 23 pesticides commonly used on the nation’s fruits and vegetables are potential cancer-causers. Requested by the Environmental Protection Agency, the study claimed that inadequate laws regulating the use of pesticides have permitted high levels of these chemicals to reach consumers^ food.
The report recommended that the government adopt a new, stricter standard for pesticides on both fresh and processed foods. The EPA’s
The association defines independent schools as non-profit, tax-exempt entities which maintain fiscal independence from tax or church support.
Reasons cited by educators for the low Latino enrollment range from high costs, lack of outreach, parental reluctance and the preference for parochial schools. None cited a lack of scholastic ability as a reason.
According to Selby Holmberg, spokesperson for the association, NAIS has been trying to attract Hispanics to these schools through outreach programs. She said that NAIS has held meetings with Hispanic leaders.
Selection of students and provision of financial assistance, she explained, is handled by the individual schools.
Holmberg said that NAIS tries to provide leadership and help the schools with their outreach.
NAIS also works with each school so that “people of coloi" will consider the schools as a viable option, said Wanda Speede-Franklin, NAIS director of minority affairs.
When asked how many Hispanics were on the NAIS board, Speede-Franklin said, “I suspect there are none.”
Cecilia Burciaga, associate dean for graduate studies at Stanford University, told Weekly Report that she was not satisfied with the outreach attempts by NAIS or individual independent schools. “They dorft quite know
Bill Restrains Prop. 63
A California Assembly committee May 19 approved a bill by a 6-1 vote that would restrict the scope of lawsuits over the constitutional amendment making English the state’s official language. It goes nexttothe full Assembly.
Under the bill, introduced by Assemblyman Elihu Harris (D-Oakland), civil actions to enforce the new amendment could only be lodged against the state government, not cities, counties, school districts or iridividuals. The bill also says that judges could not award monetary damages or attorney’s fees
top pesticide regulator, Jack Moore, said May 21 the agency was moving toward tighter regulations because of the academy report
Environmental groups charge that the study underestimated cancer risks because it focused on only 28 of the 53 chemicals previously identified by EPA as causing cancer.
Congress last year narrowly failed to pass legislation governing pesticide use. Rep. Kika de la Garza (D-Texas), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, recently introduced a bill similar to the one the House passed last Oct. 16. A companion bill, expected to be sponsored by Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Richard Lugar(R-lnd.), will be introduced in the Senate in the next few weeks.
- Richard Sayre
how to make inroads into our community.”
In response, John Bachman, vice-president of NAIS, commented: “That is a fair assessment. We think it is an important topic. We have been moving- slowly and carefully- but we have a long way to go.”
Details about independent school education are hard to get said Joan Davis Ratteray, president of the Institute for Independent Education. “Information is generally by word of mouth,” she said.
I IE documents the success of independent schools that are primarily owned or comprised of Hispanics and other minorities and provides them with technical assistance.
Manasa Hekymara, executive director for minority affairs at the Independent School Alliance in Southern California, said that their attempts to contact Hispanic organizations for assistance in recruiting Hispanic students met very little response.
The alliance is made up of 23 schools which are a part of the California Association of Independent Schools. The Alliance has 10 board members, none of whom are Hispanic
A spokesperson for another recruiting group A Better Chance, cited parent reluctance in letting their children go away to school as another reason forthe low Hispanic numbers.
- Julio Laboy
Texas School Plan to Halt
Texas has until 1990 to implement a more equitable public school finance system, according to a May 22 court order by Austin District Judge Harley Clark Clark’s order follows his earlier ruling in a lawsuit filed by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on behalf of 69 low-wealth Texas districts.
In an April 29 ruling, the judge declared the .state’s system fordistributing education funds unconstitutional, ruling it discriminated against poor districts.
However, Clark said he found no discrimination against Mexican Americans by the school finance system that violated the state constitution. In the state’s 50 poorest districts, 95% of the students are Mexican American.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
‘Independents’ Enroll 1.8% Hispanics
continued from page 1


COLLECTING
SCHOOL INFO: For information about independent schools, financial aid and how to apply to them, write to: Wanda Speede-Franklin, director of minority affairs, National Association of Independent Schools, 18 Tremont St, Boston, Mass. 02108. NAIS also has a minority information telephone hotline- 1-800-343-9138.
INSTITUTE INFO: For a copy of the Institute for Independent Education’s booklet on why parents choose independent neighborhood schools, titled MDare to Choose,” send $4.50 to the group at: ftCXBox 42571, Washington, D.C. 20015.
EMPLOYER IMMIGRATION INFORMATION: Materials to help employers comply with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 are now available at local Immigration and Naturalization Service offices. INS has developed a one*page employee verification form, the I-9, for employers. There is also an accompanying employer handbook which explains how to fill out the I-9 form and answers questions on the new law. A 15-minute informational videotape is available to employers, labor unions, employer associations and other groups. All materials are free and may be copied. For more information, contact local INS offices or call 1 (800) 777-7700.
IMMIGRANTS, REFUGEES DIRECTORY: “The Directory of Services for Refugees and Immigrants” is a 285-page book listing more than 800 organizations that provide services to refugees and immigrants. The organizations are grouped according to the services they provide and the state in which they are located. For a copy, send $27.95 plus $2 for shipping and handling to: The Denali Press, P.O. Box 1535, Juneau, Ala. 99802.
EXEMPLARY SCHOOL HANDBOOK: The U.S. Department of Education recently released an 80-page handbook, “Schools That Work: Educating Disadvantaged Children,” which gives practical solutions on how to provide a better education to children from impoverished families. To receive a free copy of the book, write to: Schools That Work, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
FIDEL CASTRO AND PUERTO RICO: “Castro’s Puerto Rican Obsession” is a 50-page report by the Cuban American National Foundation on Castro’s intentions to make Puerto Rico a Marxist state. Included are recommendations to prevent this occurrence For a copy of the report, send $4 to: CANF, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265-2822.
CONNECTING
EDUCATION NETWORK REACHES OUT
The St Louis-based Public Education Information Network is seeking to develop working relationships with Hispanic educational organizations on the local and national level to address education issues of concern to Latinos.
The outreach idea grew from an effort to translate the report “Equity and Excellence; Toward an Agenda for School Reform" into Spanish. Funds are being solicited for the final edit and distribution.
The network looks to establish itself nationwide so that parents, teachers and principals can have input into the education process.
Those interested in helping with the network*s H ispanic project can contact network policy board member Barbara Flores, of Tempe, Ariz^ at (602) 965-3133.
LATINO INSTITUTE NAMES HEAD
Jos6 Matos Real, the Illinois state director of the National Puerto Rican Forum, was named executive director May 12 of the Latino Institute in Chicago.
Matos Real, 34, will be responsible for carrying out the institute's mission of empowering Chicago’s Latinos through the agency's divisions of Research, Training and Management Assistance and Advocacy.
SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED
The National Hispanic Scholar Awards Program awarded 1,000 academically talented Hispanic high school seniors scholarships for college.
The program, sponsored by the College Board and funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will present awards of $1,500 each to 500 students and honorable mention awards of $100 each to another 500 students. Roughly 3,200 students have received scholarships since the program’s inception in 1984.
Students enter competition for the Hispanic awards by taking the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQ7) in their junior year of high school.
Select members of the Advisory Committee for the awards are Jose Longoria, director, LULAC National Educational Service Centers; Arturo Madrid, president, The Tom4s Rivera Center in California; Ernest Robles, director, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund; and Juan Rosario, national executive director of ASPIRA of America Inc.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MINORITY ENGINEERS Philadelphia June 2-4
The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering will focus on “Solutions: Preparation, Graduation, Upward Mobility during its seventh annual meeting aimed at access to engineering careers for minority youth. Raul Garcia, president of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, and Louis Fern&ndez, vice president of Chevron Corporation, will be among conference speakers.
Richard Neblett (212) 279-2626
HISPANIC WOMEN CONFERENCE Anaheim, Calif. June 4, 5 The National Council of Hispanic Women will host its third annual conference titled “Business and Education: A Winning Partnership.” Conference sessions will address workplace literacy, financial resources available for skills training and productivity. Arthur Mapps (415) 540-6706
PROCUREMENT OPPORTUNITIES Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Washington, D.C. June 4,5 The Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce is hosting an exposition on government contract procurement in conjunction with a leadership conference. The “PROEXPO 87” will focus on business issues of concern to Hispanic entrepreneurs.
Linda Mayo (202) 296-0335
GUAYABERA NIGHT New York June 5
The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy will celebrate the institute’s fifth anniversary with a cocktail reception under the theme “La Noche de las Guayaberas." A guayabera is a lightweight shirt with bands of embroidery.
Gerson Borrero(212) 546-1075
COMING SOON
G.I. FORUM CONVENTION American G.I. Forum of Michigan Lansing, Mich. June 11-13 Arturo Salas (517) 374-4250
LATINO CHILD POVERTY
National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed
Officials
Washington, D.C. June 12 Sue Keiffer (202) 546-2536
June 1,1987
LATINO ATHLETE LUNCHEON
Hispanic Public Relations Association, California
Association of Latins in Broadcasting
Los Angeles June 12
Jay Rodriguez (818) 840-3842
DIGNITARIES BANQUET
Puerto Rican Parade Committee of Chicago
Chicago June 12
Martha Ramos (312) 292-1414
ANNUAL HISPANIC FESTIVAL Hispanic Festival Committee Takoma Park, Md. June 14 Aura Adams (301) 434-5902
SPOTLIGHT
MINORITY ISSUES CONFERENCE: The 1987 National Association of Social Workers will sponsor 80 workshops on issues ranging from those confronting Hispanic families to political empowerment to the mentally ill Hispanic during a minority issues conference in Washington, D.C., on June 4-7. The “Celebrating Our Strengths” conference will feature United Farm Workers of America President C6sar Chavez. Chavez will speak June 6 on UFWA’s grape boycott For more information, contact Octavio Roca at (301) 565-0333.
3


Guillermo Martinez, guest columnist
An Ethnic Civil War?
The first impression hits you like a kick in the gut. In a May 18 article in the New Yorker magazine, David Rieff writes derisively about Miami Cubans and their relationships with black and white Miamians.
He talks about Miami as“The Second Havana” with little knowledge, a good dose of arrogance and a not-so-light sprinkling of bigotry.
He calls Cubans racists, saying that the 1980 Liberty City riots were as much against Cubans as against whites He says that white Americans stew in their resentment of Cubans because they feel dispossessed in their own city. White Americans, he adds, “know’’ that this community would be mediocre if it were not for the Cuban drive.
In a piece that appeared a few days earlier in The New York Review of Books, Joan Didion’s first in a series of articles about Miami harps on similar themes, though with more polish. Still, her venom comes through.
Didion does a gross caricature of Cuban women, and it offends.
‘PERFECTLY GROOMED MANGOES’
“Cuban women place a more distinct emphasis on the hips and decolletage, more black, more veiling, a generalized flirtatiousness of style not then current in American cities.” To Didion, volunteers for a Liga Contra el Cancer- League Against Cancer- fund-raiser are “a room full of perfectly groomed mangoes.”
Here are two outsiders who spend a few days in ourcommunity and attempt to pit Cubans against black and white Americans. They remind me of the commercial in which former St. Louis Cardinals football player Conrad Dobler sparks a fight between fans at a stadium by giving each a different reason why he likes Miller Light beer.
Upon reading these two articles, I ached to point out their factual mistakes, their erroneous observations, their bigotry. For every insulting stereotype they used about Cubans, I wanted to respond with an equally despicable one about them.
Those desires slowly gave way to a feeling that both Didion and Rieff, in their separate ways, have a point Ours indeed is a community divided. Many white and black Americans don't like Cubans very much and viscerally resent their success. Many Cubans don’t like their American neighbors, either.
Rieff and Didion saw Miami’s warts- and there are many. But they did not see the efforts of many in this community to try and bring people of different backgrounds together. Rieff talks about blacks? resentment for Cubans but conveniently ignores that in the last city elections, a Cuban candidate for mayor got more black votes than did the black man who told him that the Liberty City riot was anti-Cuban.
CHOOSING BETWEEN MOTHER AND WIFE
Didion saw a cultural trait in how Cuban society women dress, and she made fun of it She did not note that many thousands of poor cancer patients are treated yearly with funds that these women raise.
She saw Cubans’ pride in their heritage and their obsession with liberating Cuba But she failed to grasp the love that many of these same people have for their new country. A candidate for political office in Dade County once said that asking him which country he loved best was like asking him if he loved his mother more than his = wife: He was born to one and chose the other.
Still we cannot discount what Didion and Rieff say. There is considerable bigotry, resentment and hatred in this community. Efforts have been made to bring groups together. A few worked. Many failed.
Now we can sit back and watch Rieff s and Didion’s words become prophetic. Or we can renew our efforts at working together to make j this a better place for people of all races and nationalities. Unless we , make this a community with opportunity for all, it will become anj isolated community with opportunities for none. I
(Guillermo Martinez is an editorial board member of The Miami• Herald, Miami, Fla.)
4
Sin pelos en la
KAY’S DICTIONARY: Words and phrases to live, love and lie by
SLEEPING GIANT: The Anglo press? favorite descriptive phrase for U.S. Hispanics. A major daily used it in a headline again the other day. If they would just check, they would find that the sleeping giant has had insomnia for years, complicated by dyspepsia from having to digest such a shallow stereotype so often.
SLEEPING GIANT: A good definition for the Anglo press because of its dearth of coverage on the real Hispanic community.
CHUMP: That, my Ivy League acquaintances tell me, is a Chicano Upwardly Mobile Professional.
JOSE AND MARIA: They are among names announced last week by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for this year’s approaching parade of East Coast hurricanes. But first come Arlene, Bret, Cindy, Dennis...
The West Coasts typhoons include Dora, Fernanda, Jova, Pilar and Ram6n.
ODIO, LAD RON AND SIN: Cassell's Dictionary might list hate and thief for the first two, and Webster’s might define the latter as moral depravity. But we identify them as popular Miami City Manager C6sar Odio, long-time Castro crony Idalberto Ladr6n de Guevara, and the'Philippines’ inappropriately named Cardinal Jaime Sin. Newsmakers all.
Recent Weekly Report newsmakers include Fernando de Baca, embroiled (no pun intended) in the current Republican National Hispanic Assembly dispute, and Frank Calz6n, retiring chief of the Cuban American National Foundation. And Jos6 Roig tells us that he knew a lady in Havana named Dolores Fuertes who married a suitor named Barriga, thus becoming Dolores Fuertes de Barriga.
Such names, of course, are not unique to the Spanish language. The phone directory of any major city will provide a full share of such surnames as Crook, Lynch, Sweat and Fink.
SUSHI: In Mexico, they have a word for it, says Jos6 Sim6n:^ bait
MUY BIEN: Japanese baseball pitcher Masahito Watanabe, on loan this season to Florida’s Miami Marlins, was asked through an interpreter by a local reporter if he had learned any English words yet.
Nodding affirmatively, Watanabe told the reporter “Muy bien”
BESO DE LA SEMANA: Kay’s Kiss of the Week goes to the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, which scrapped its long-planned first annual meeting in Phoenix, Ariz., set for May 25, 26. It did so in protest to Arizona Gov. Evan Mechanfs decision to abolish the celebration of Martin Luther King Day.
If s been rescheduled for Albuquerque on Sept 28, 29.
And an abrazo to Angelo Falc6n, lider of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York. IPRPs fifth anniversary “Guayabera Night’ celebration offers a prize to “the best looking guayabera worn by a man or a woman.”
“I didn’t know there were guayaberas for women,” we called and innocently remarked
“There aren't,” Falc6n closed the conversation.
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting..
JUDITH ZAFFIRINI, elected last November as the first Mexican American woman to serve in Texas? state Senate, quoted in Clamor magazine (May 16) on that state’s official English movement
“It seems to me that advocates of English-only are foolishly looking backward and limiting their growth...
“Undoubtedly, at least some English-only advocates are reflecting their lack of understanding and appreciation of our culture and heritage. We should try to help them develop a more realistic insight into the real world, vintage 1987“
June 1,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
% MILWAUKH »
THE UNIVERSITY OP WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE
ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee invites nominations and applications for the position of Assistant to the Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action. The Assistant to the Chancellor serves as a member of the Chancellor's Cabinet and is responsible for the implementation of the University's equal opportunity and affirmative action policies and programs. Specific duties include:
• Monitoring and auditing the University's hiring, promotions, and terminations for compliance with Federal, State and University of Wisconsin requirements.
• Assisting in the faculty and staff recruitment process.
• Investigating and seeking resolution of internal discrimination and sexual harassment complaints by faculty, staff and students.
• Managing the staff and budget of the Equal Opportunity Office.
Applicants must possess an earned graduate or professional degree. Substantial and progressively responsible administrative experience in the area of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action is required, preferably in an institution of higher educatioa The applicant must demonstrate ability to work and communicate effectively with diverse campus groups, administrators, students, faculty and staff in the context of a strong tradition of shared governance Salary is competitive and negotiable depending on qualifications and experience.
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is a major metropolitan University which serves more than 25,000 students. UWM offers flexible programs that serve the needs of a racially and ethnically diverse student body. As one of the only two doctoral degree-granting schools in the UW system, UWM offers 46 master's and 17 doctoral programs in addition to its undergraduate programs The campus is located on Milwaukee's residential East Side^ several blocks from Lake Michigan.
Nominations must be postmarked by. July 1, applications by July 15,1987. Letters of applications must be accompanied by a current resume and the names of a minimum of three individuals who can address the potential performance of the candidate. Anticipated starting date is November 2,1987. Address correspondence to:
Professor Hdrold M. Rose, Chair Search and Screen Committee for Assistant to the Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Department of Geography, Room 342 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee P.O. Box 413 Milwaukee, Wl 53201
UWM is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS OF ADMISSIONS
UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT Positions require interviewing prospective students, evaluating applications, planning special projects and traveling throughout the U.S. to promote the University of Vermont In addition, there is the opportunity for involvement in the recruitment and selection of minority students.
Candidates must posses strong interpersonal skills and should enjoy relating to the public An effective public speaking style and the ability to write clearly and cogently are essential. Some evening and weekend work required. Bachelor's degree, minimum, Master's degree and/or admissions related experience desirable.
Openings will occur after July 1,1987. Submit resume and cover letter along with the names and telephone numbers of three references by June 15,1987, to: Kathie S. Wei bust, Associate Director of Admissions, 194 S. Prospect St, Burlington, Vermont 05401-3596.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICE APPRENTICE $20,802.08 #52237AFIR
Trainee level position in the Emergency Medical Services Division of the Arlington County Fire Department. This is a new division within the department with responsibility for providing a full range of emergency services to the citizens of Arlington County. Employee learns and performs emergency medical treatment duties, drives an ambulance, assists in providing medical treatment, completes and maintains reports and records and participates in drills and classes in fire operations and medical procedures. Requires high school or equivalent and EMT-Cardiac (EMT-C) certification by the Commonwealth of Virginia or EMT-Paramedic (EMT-P) certification issued by the National Registry of Medical Technicians. Applicants must submit a copy of current certification with application.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes, SP171S, etc. without a completed official Arlington ap-plication form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no^later than July 2, 1987' at 5:00 PM. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or(703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Department of Personnel 2100 14th St. North Arlington, Va 22201
DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financial, personnel, purchasing, insurance and administrative functions. Requires MA, 10 years financial/administrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred). Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms. A Hemdndez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th FL, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by May 22,1987.
PRODUCTION ENGINEER Radio News Service seeks full-time production engineer. Experience required. English/Spanish. Salary$16,000-$20,000 negotiable. Call KXCR-FM, El Paso, Texas, at (915) 542-3164. Position open immediately.
LEGISLATIVE CORRESPONDENT Half-time legislative correspondent position in Washington, D.C. Office of U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzdlez 1 -5 p.m. daily. Good writing and research skills essential. Computer experience and ability to write Spanish preferred. Annual salary $11,000. Contact Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, McL, government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
TH E CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington. D.C, has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND.
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Arts& Entertainment
Two new shows with Hispanic actors and characters will be added to network TV primetime schedules in the fall.
Elizabeth Peha stars in the title role of I Married Dora, a 30-minute comedy about a widower (played by Daniel Hugh Kelly) who hires a Salvadoran nanny for his children (Juliette Lewis and Jason Horst).
The sitcom, from Reeves Entertainment Group, will air Friday nights on ABC.
Ramdn Franco and Miguel Nunez are part of the ensemble cast of Tour of Duty, an hourlong Vietnam War drama to air Thursdays on CBS. It is produced by Zev Braun Films and New World TV.
The three major English-language networks unveiled their fall schedules in mid-May. A total of five programs with lead Hispanic actors and/or characters return from the 1986-87 season to ABC, CBS and top-rated NBC.
NBC-TV, which adds only five new shows to its schedule, has no new shows with Hispanics. Returning, among 18 shows, are three with Latinos: Family T/es(withTina Yothers), LA Law(Jimmy Smitjs) and Miami Vice{Saundra Santiago and Edward James Olmos).
Earlier this season NBC canceled The A-Team, which had added Eddie V6lez to the cast, and Hill Street Blues, where Ren6 Enriquez
made irregular appearances.
Second-rated CBS returns Falcon Crest(with Lorenzo Lamas, Mna Alicia and Cesdr Romero) from among 14 shows from 1986-87. Kay O'Brien, which featured Priscilla L6pez in a regular role, was canceled early in the season.
Tour of Duty is among the networks nine new shows.
The Colbys, the only program with a Hispanic lead to start ABCs ’86-87 schedule, will not return this fall. Still on the schedule is Ohara, an hourlong drama added midseason, with Richard Yhiguez
in a starring role.
I Married Dora is one of the network’s eight new shows.
A total of 66 series programs, excluding movies, news and sports, make up the networks’ announced fall schedule.
Two Hispanic-themed projects are among four documentary series to be coproduced with monies from the Public Television Programming Challenge Fund
WGBH-TV in Boston will produce Mexico, a three-part series that will coincide with the inauguration of Mexico’s next president, and Columbus and the Age of Discovery, a seven-part series planned to commemorate the quincentennial-the500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ landing in the New World.
The Challenge Fund is a joint agreement between the Public Broadcasting Service and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
Media Report
SOAP BOX: Here’s what some Hispanic opinion-makers are currently saying about the media
CARLOS FUENTES, Mexican author, addressing the opening session of the 36th International Press Institute’s general assembly in Buenos Aires:
“Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for the international media to deal with Latin America only in the name of disaster. Our countries, normally invisible, then appear under the headings of earthquake, debt and revolution.
“A country such as El Salvador starts to exist from the instant that the great international TV chains mention it on a daily basis, but El Salvador was already there for five centuries, with its personality and culture.
“It is the duty of cultural journalism to re-
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establish perspectives in the name of basic accuracy. Our nations must be understood as nations with a history, peoples with a culture and bearers of problems of an unresolved past. If this is not understood, we might be deprived of a reasonable future..
LAURA LOPEZ, Time magazine correspondent in Nicaragua, quoted by Editor & Publisher(May 23) at the same conference: “There's a natural distrust(by Latin American officials) of foreign correspondents because they usually report only negative news.”
She described Timers Latin American coverage: “If Washington pays attention, we pay attention.”
CRUZ REYNOSO, former California Supreme Court justice who was beaten at the polls last November, in a Los Angeles Daily Journal interview, labeled the press“a willing partnei” in his defeat.
Accusing it of reporting “misleading” attacks and untruths about the court, he said:
“If reporters know what is being said is untrue, then they have a duty either to not report it or to report the whole truth. To do what they have done, to report only the attacks as if they were true, is to mislead their entire readership, and I think that was done over and over again.”
ELSEWHERE: The Hispanic Public Relations Association and the California Association of Latins in Broadcasting will stage their 10th annual Latino Athlete of the Year award luncheon at the Los Angeles Press Club June 12...
Thompson Publishing Group has launched a new publication, Legalization Report, published every other week providing detailed information on legalization developments of the immigration act
Cost $600 for 26 issues, $450 for nonprofit subscribers. For more information, contact Carol'Medernach at (202) 872-1766.
- Charlie Ericksen
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Making The News This Week was recognized for his promotion of Hispanic culture. . . Chicago • ' Board of Education President George Mul'loz, announces he will nol[' • . seek r&-elect i on to a fourth term as president M ui'loz, 36, sa i d he will . stay on the board ... Chi Chi Rodriguez ties a Senior Professional Golfer's Association Tour record by sinking eight consecutive birdies Sonia Marie Dele6n becomes the first woman to conduct a Papal Mass at the Vatican when her group, the 60-member Saint Vibiana Symphony Orchestra from Los Angeles, performed for Pope John Paul II on Ascension Day ... California Gov . George Deukmejlan appoints East Los Angeles Municipal Court Judge Raymond Mireles to the Los Angeles Superior Court . . American Red Cross elects Daniel VIllanueva, president and general manager of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, to its 50-member national Board of Governors ... King Juan Carlos I of Spain confers knighthood on Samuel Mark, director of the Office of Hispanic Programs at the University of Southern California's College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. Mark in winning the $250,000 Silver Pages Classic. He contributes $10,000 of his $37,500 purse to victims of the Saragosa, Texas, tornado ... Michael Ortiz, owner of a funeral home in Brooklyn, says he will provide the funeral services for Juan Perez, the 11-year-old boy who was fatally mauled by two polar bears at a New York zoo. Juan's mother, Carmen, had said she could not afford a funeral. Her husband died six weeks earlier . . . Perennial Republican primary presidential candidate 1 Ben Fernilndez, calls a press conference May 26 at the Washington, D . C . , National ' Press Club to announce his candidacy for 1988. Only one thing was missing : VoLSNo.2'1l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Schools Lack Latinos Federal bilingual education funds would be increased from $143 million to $246 million under an omnibus education bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives May 21. " The provisions are excellent The only thing that is disconcerting is the compromise adopted in full committee regarding the future funding of special alternative instruction programs," said Jim Lyons, legislative and policy counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Edu cation. The compromise would eventually allow 75% of funding over the current level to go toward English-only programs after accounting for inflation , he said. The Senate has not passed an education b ill. Other provisions of the House bill : • $4. 1 billion for basic grants under the Chapter 1 program for low-income and dis advantaged children , $200 million more than now spent e $100 million for a dropout prevention program. e $200 million for adult education , almost twice the current $1 09 million. • $25 million for a new gifted and talented program . • $50 million for a new " even starf' program which combines l i teracy training for parents and preschool for children. Tornado Ravages Town A funeral for 17 of the 29 vict i ms of the tornado that devastated the predominantly Hispanic ranching town of Saragosa, Texas, was held May 26. The tornado struck the west Texas town unexpectedly May 22 at 8 p.m. About half of the victims were at a pr&-school graduation ceremony at the community center. Six children died. More than 160 people were injured . Saragosa has a population of 350 people . County Commiss i oner Bernardo Martinez said , " Things have been donated , but few are asking for things . They are too proud." As of m idweek last week, $470,000 had been received in pledges. The number of Hispanics attending ind& pendent schools increased slightly from 1980 to 1986 but their proportion in the schools dropped from 2% to 1.8% , according to new figures released by the National Association of Independent Schools. Hispanics comprise an estimated 9.6% of the nation's primary and secondary school population. NAIS has about 950 member schools. Of those , 815 partic i pated in the group's survey for 1986/87. Tallied in the survey were nearly on&-third of a million students. Between 1980 and 1986, the overall enrollment reported by responding schools jumped 61,118. Enroll ment of Hispanics increased by 412 from 5 ,297 te>5,709. Fifteen years ago blacks made up 3.7% of the population of NAIS member schools, fol lowed by Hispan ics and Asians at 0 . 6%. Today, Asians and blacks each comprise 4.7% of their enrollment, with Asians outnumbering blacks 15.193 to 15,096 in the survey. Continued on page 2 ENROLLMENTININDEPENDENTSCHOOLS In Select National Association of Independent Schools' Members* 1971/72 % 1976/77 % 1979/80 % ,1986/1987% White Asian Black Hispanic Indian TOTALS** 246,563 95.0% 250,090 92.9% 239,686 91.1% 287,680 88.8% 1,581 0.6 3,572 1 . 3 5,717 2.2 15,193 4.7 9 ,627 3.7 11,711 4 . 4 11,883 14.5 15,096 4.7 1 ,610 0.6 3 ,333 1.2 5,297 2.0 5 ,709 1.8 159 0.1 208 0.1 324 0.1 347 0.1 251 9 ;514'0 2 ,68,91,4 .21'82 ,9071 32' 4 ,025 * To t als represent r oughly an 85% r esponse r ate t o NA I S member surv ey. In 1986/ 87. 815 o ut of 950 schools re s ponded . Appr ox imately o f nat i on's ind e pendent school s are NAIS members. ** Per centa ges may n o t total! 00 e x actly due to rounding . S o ur ce: N a t io nal A s sociat io n o f Indep endent Sch ools INS Postpones Employer Sanctions The Immigration and Naturalization Service delayed until July the issuance of citations to employers who knowingly hire undocumented workers . The employer sanct i ons, beginning with a on&-yearwarning period, were scheduled to start June 1 . Saying more time is needed for employer education, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson announced the delay May 26 . He said the agency would concentrate on issuing millions of employer handbooks explaining the r&sponsibilities of employers under the lmmigra . tion and Reform Control Act of 1986. The Senate voted May 21 to delay the sanctions until Oct 1 . The provision is attached to a catch-all spending bill which was to ha ve been voted on late last week. "Good faith compliance is all we're asking, " Nelson said. Under the law , employers must complete and retain a on&-page form , the 1-9, for all persons hired after Nov . 6 , 1986. Employers have until Sept. 1,1987, to complete the form for persons hired between Nov. 7 , 1986, and May31, 1987. Forms must be completed within three business days for those hired after May 31. Applicants for legalization , Special Agr i cul tural Workers ar ::entrants in the Cuban/Haitian programs are covered by a '' special rule " which allows them to work without employment eligibility documents until Sept 1 , 1987. Until then , these worke r s must fill out an 1-9 form stating they are covered by the rule . E mploye rs violat i ng the law this year will be subject to civil or criminal penalt ies after the first warning. No warnings will be issued after June 1988.

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Farm Workers See Little Help from Pesticide Report Farm worker organizations are doubtful that a May 20 report released by the National Academy of Sciences on cancer-causing chemicals in pesticides will cause the govern ment to crack down on the use pesticides in agriculture. Shelley Davis, staff attorney at the Migrant Legal Action Program's office in Washington, D.C., said that the report will not provoke immediate changes in the way farmers and their workers use pesticides. Although the use of toxic chemicals that cause an immediate rash or illness is restricted by law, the use of many pesticides that may be carcinogenic but are not immediately toxic is not now restricted , she said . Davis told Weekly Report that the study is "a very important step forward in bringing out the danger to everyone who comes in contact with these pesticides. " In the past, "farm workers and their organizations were fighting the battle against pesticide misuse alone, as if we were the only ones in danger." The academy report found that 23 pesticides commonly used on the nation's fruits and vegetables are potential cancer-causers. Re quested by the Environmental Protection Agency , the study claimed that inadequate laws regulating the use of pesticides have permitted high levels of these chemicals to reach consumers' food. The report recommended that the govern ment adopt a new, stricter standard for pesticides on both fresh and processed foods . The EPA's top pesticide regulator, Jack Moore, said May 21 the agency was moving toward tighter regulations because of the academy report. Environmental groups charge that the study underestimated cancer risks because it focused on only 28 of the 53 chemicals previously identified by EPA as causing cancer. Congress last year narrowly failed to pass legislation governing pesticide use . Rep. Kika de Ia Garza(DTexas), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee , recently introduced a bill similar to the one the House passed last Oct. 16. A companion bill, expected to be sponsored by Sens. Patrick Leahy(D-Vt.) and Richard Lugar (R-Ind . ) , will be introduced in the Senate in the next few weeks. -Richard Sayre Fla State Commission 'Independents' Enroii1.80/o Hispanics ; to Stay With Governor continued from pag e 1 The embattled Florida Commission on His panic Affairs will stay in the governor's office as the result of the unanimous approval of a bill May 21 by the state Senate . The Senate approved the measure, 35-0. It had passed the House May 5 . It revives the commission in its current form-inside the governor's executive office . Gov. Bob Martinez angered Hispanic leaders earlier this year when he announced plans to move the commission out of his office. " We could veto the bill," said J. M. Stipanovich , Martinets top political aide, " but that wouldn't help anything. " "I' m delighted," said commission Chairman Rafael Peflalver. " It's time to put these matters behind us and establ i sh a good working relationship with the governor. " The terms of seven of the 15 commission members, including Peflalver , expire i n Sep tember. The governor decides either to re appoint or replace them . Family Legalization Asked U .S. Reps. Esteban Torres and Edward Roybal were among four Cal i fornia congres sional legislators who met May 20 with the head of the Immigration and Naturalization Service to request an order preventing the separation of families under the federal im migration law . Under the legalization provision of the law , which began May 5 , families with members who do not qualify for legalization must separate . Also at the meeting were two other Democrats, Senate assistant Majority Whip Alan Cranston and Rep . Howard Berman . INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said he was not sure how much latitude he had to interpret the law . Roybal has introduced a bill that would e x pand the legalization provision to include the parents of children who were born after the law's cutoff date-Jan. 1 , 1982. Charles Kamasaki , legislative analyst for the Nat i onal Council of La Raza, sa i d he is hopeful that s uch legislation "demonstrates Congress' i ntent to max imize legalization . " 2 The association defines independent schools as non-profit, tax-exempt entities which main tain fiscal independence from tax or church support. Reasons cited by educators for the low Latino enrollment range from high costs, lack of outreach , parental reluctance and the pre ference for parochial schools. None cited a lack of scholastic ability as a reason. According to Selby Holmberg , spokesperson for the association , NAIS has been trying to attract Hispanics to these schools through ou t reach programs. She said that NAIS has held meetings with Hispanic leaders. Selection of students and provision of finan cial assistance, she explained, is handled by the individual schools. Holmberg said that NAIS tries to provide leadership and help the schools with their outreach. NAIS also works with each school so that "people of color'' will consider the schools as a viable option , said Wanda SpeedeFranklin, NAIS director of minority affairs. When asked how many Hispanics were on the NAIS board , Speede-Frankl i n said , "I suspect there are none . " Cecilia Burciaga, associate dean for gradu ate studies at Stanford University, told Weekly Report that she was not satisfied with the outreach attempts by NAIS or individual independent schools. "They don't quite know Bill Restrains Prop. 63 A California Assembly committee May 19 approved a bill by a 6-1 vote that would restrict the scope of lawsuits over the con stitutional amendment making English the state's official language. It goes next to the full Assembly . Under the bill , introduced by Assemblyman Elihu Harris (D-Oakland) , civil actions to enforce the new amendment could only be lodged against the state government, not cities, counties, school districts or iri'tlividuals. The bill also says that judges could not award monetary damages or attorney's fees. how to make inroads into our community. " In response, John Bachman, vice-pres ident of NAIS, commented: "That is a fair assess ment. We think it is an important topic. We have been movingslowly and carefullybut we have a long way to go." Details about independent school education are hard to get, said Joan Davis Ratteray , president of the Institute for Independent Education. "Information is generally by word of mouth," she said . II E documents the success of independe n t schools that are primarily owned or compr i sed of Hispan i cs and other minorities and provides them with technical assistance. Manasa Hekymara, executive director for minority affairs at the Independent School Alliance in Southern California, said that their attempts to contact Hispanic organizations for assistance in recruiting Hispanic studen t s met very little response. The allia{lce is made up of 23 schools which are a part of the California Association of Independent Schools. The Alliance has 1 0 board members, none of whom are Hispan i c . A spokesperson for another recruiting group . A Better Chance , cited parent reluctance in letting thei r children go away to scho6 1 as another reason for the low Hispanic numbers. -Julio Laboy Texas School Plan to Halt Texas has unti11990 to implement a more equitable public school finance system, ac cording to a May 22 court order by Austin District Judge Harley Clark. Clark's order, follows his e a rlier ruling in a lawsuit filed by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on behalf of69 low-wealth Texas d i stricts . In an April29 ruling, the judge declared the . state's system for distributing education funds unconstitutional , ruling it discriminated against poor districts. However, Clark said he found no discrimi natio n against Mexican Americans by the school finance s ystem that violated the state const i tution. In the state's 50 poorest districts, 95% of-the students are Mexican American . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING SCHOOL INFO: For information about independent schools, financial aid and how to apply to them, write to: Wanda Speede Franklin, director of minority affairs, National Association of Independent Schools, 18 Tremont St., . Boston, Mass . 02108. NAIS also has a minority information telephone hotline1-800-343-9138. INSTITUTE INFO: For a copy of the Institute for Independent Education's booklet on why parents choose independent neighbor hood schools, titled "Dare to Choose," send $4.50 to the group at: Box 42571, Washington, D .C. 20015. EMPLOYER IMMIGRATION INFORMATION: Materials to help employers comply with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 are now available at local Immigration and Naturalization Service offices. INS has developed a one-page employee verification form, the 1-9, for employers. There is also an accompanying employer handbook which explains how to fill out the 1-9 form and answers questions on the new law. A 15-minute informational videotape is available to employers , labor unions, employer associations and other groups. All materials are free and may be copied. For more information, contact local INS offices or call1 (800) 777-7700. IMMIGRANTS, REFUGEES DIRECTORY: "The Directory of Ser vices for Refugees and Immigrants" is a 285-page book listing more than 800 organizations that provide services to refugees and . im migrants. The organizations are grouped according to the services they provide and the state in which they are located . For a copy, send $27.95 plus $2 for shipping and handling to: The Denali Press, P.O. Box 1535, Juneau, Ala. 99802. EXEMPLARY SCHOOL HANDBOOK: The U.S. Department of Education recently released an 80-page handbook, "Schools That Work: Educating Disadvantaged Children," which gives practical solutions on how to provide a better education to children from impoverished families. To receive a free copy of the book, write to: Schools That Work , Pueblo, Colo . 81 009. FIDEL CASTRO AND PUERTO RICO : " Castro ' s Puerto Rican Obsession" is a 50-page report by the Cuban American National Foundation on Castro's intentions to make Puerto Rico a Marxist state. Included are recommendations to prevent this occurrence . For a copy of the report, send$4 to: CANF, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601 , Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265-2822. CONNECTING EDUCATION NETWORK REACHES OUT The St Louis-based Public Education Information Network is seeking to develop working relationships with Hispanic educational organizations on the local and national level to address education issues of concern to Latinos . The outreach idea grew from an effort to translate the report "Equity and Excellence ; Toward an Agenda for School Reform" into Spanish. Funds are being solicited for the final edit and distribution. The network looks to establish itself nationwide so that parents, teachers and principals can have input into the education process. Those interested in he I ping with the network's Hispanic project can contact network policy board member Barbara Flores, of Tempe, Ariz . , at (602) 965-3133. LATINO INSTITUTE NAMES HEAD Jose Matos Real , the Illinois state director of the National Puerto Rican Forum, was named executive director May 12 of the Latino Institute in Chicago. Matos Real, 34, will be responsible for carrying out the institute's mission of empowering Chicago's Latinos through the agency's divisions of Research , Training and Management Assistance and Advocacy. SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED The National Hispanic Scholar AWards Program awarded 1,000 academically talented Hispanic high school seniors scholarships for college . The program, sponsored by the College Board and funded by a grant from the Andrew W . Mellon Foundation, will present awards of $1,500 each to500 students and honorable mention awards of$1 00 each to another 500 students. Roughly 3 ,200 students have received scholarships since the program's inception in 1984. Students enter competition for the Hispanic awards by taking the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude TesVNational Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQl) in their junior year of high school. Select members of the Advisory Committee fort he awards are Jose Longoria, director, LULAC National Educational Service Centers; Arturo Madrid , president, The Tomas Rivera Center in California; Ernest Robles, director, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund; and Juan Rosario, national executive director of ASPIRA of America Inc . Calendar Washington , D . C . June 4, 5 LATINO ATHLETE LUNCHEON THIS WEEK MINORITY ENGINEERS Philadelphia June 2-4 The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineer ing will focus on "Solutions: Preparation, Graduation , Upward Mobility" during its seventh annual meeting aimed at access to engineering careers for minority youth. Raul Garcia, president of the Society of Hispanic Proiessional Engineers, and Louis Fernandez, vice president of Chevron Corporation , will be among co nference speakers. Ric hard Neblett (212) 279-2626 HISPANIC WOMEN CONFERENCE Anaheim , Calif. June 4 , 5 The National Council of Hispanic Women will host its third annual conference titled " Business and Education : A Winning Partnership . " Conference s essions will address workplace literacy , financial resources available for skills training and productivity. Arthur Mapps (415) 540-6706 PROCUREMENT OPPORTUNITIES Hispanic Link Weekly Report The lbero-American Chamber of Commerce is hosting an exposition on government contract procurement in conjunction with a leadership conference. The "PROEXPO 87" will focus on business issues of concern to Hispanic entrepreneurs . Linda Mayo (202) 296-0335 GUAYABERA NIGHT New York June 5 The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy will celebrate the institute's fifth ann i versary with a cocktail reception under the theme "La Noche de las Guayaberas. " A guayabera is a lightweight shirt with bands of embroidery. Gerson Borrero (212) 546-1075 COMING SOON G. I. FORUM CONVENTION American G.l. Forum of Michigan Lansing , Mich. June11-13 Arturo Salas (517) 374-4250 LATINO CHILD POVERTY National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Washington, D.C. June 12 Sue Keiffer (202) .546-2536 June 1 , 1987 Hispanic Public Relations Association , California Association of Latins in Broadcasting Los Angeles June 12 Jay Rodriguez (818) 840-3842 DIGNITARIES BANQUET Puerto Rican Parade Committee of Chicago Chicago June 12 Martha Ramos (312) 292-1414 ANNUAL HISPANIC FESTIVAL Hispanic Festival Committee Takoma Park, Md. June 14 Aura Adams (301) 434-5902 SPOTLIGHT MINORITY ISSUES CONFERENCE: The 1987 National Association of Social Workers will sponsor 80 workshops on issues ranging from those con fronting Hispanic f!lmilies to political empowerment to the menta,lly ill Hispanic during a minority issues conference in Washington , D .C., on June 4-7 . The " Celebrating Our Strengths " conference will feature United Farm Workers of America President Cesar Chavez. Chavez will speak June 6 on UFWA's grape boycott. For more information , contact Octavia Roca at (301) 565-0333. 3

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Guillermo Martinez, guest columnist An Ethnic Civil War? The first impression hits you like a kick in the gut. In a May 18 article in The New Yorker magazine, David Rieff writes derisively about Miami Cubans and their relationships with black and white Miamians. He talks about Miami as"The Second Havana" with little knowledge, a good dose of arrogance and a not-so-light sprinkling of bigotry. He calls Cubans racists, saying that the 1980 Liberty City riots were as much against Cubans as against whites. He says that white Americans stew in their resentment of Cubans because they feel dispossessed in their own city. White Americans, he adds, "know" that this community would be medioc r e if it were not for the Cuban drive. In a piece that appeared a few days ea r l ier in The New York Review of Books, Joan Didion's first in a series of articles about M i ami harps on similar themes, though with more polish. Still, her venom comes through. Didion does a gross caricature of Cuban women , and it offends. 'PERFECTLY GROOMED MANGOES' "Cuban women place a more distinct emphasis on the hips and decolletage, more black, more veiling, a generalized flirtatiousness of style not then current in American cities." To Didion, volunteers for a Liga Contra el Cancer-League Against Cancerfundraiser are "a room full of perfectly groomed mangoes." Here are two outsiders who spend a few days in our community and attempt to pit Cubans against black and white Americans. They remind me of the commercial in which former St. Louis Cardinals football player Conrad Dobler sparks a fight between fans at a stadium by giving each a different reason why he likes Miller Light beer. Upon reading these two articles, I ached to point out their factual mistakes, their erroneous observations, their bigotry. For every insulting stereotype they used about Cubans, I wanted to respond with an equally despicable one about them. Those desires slowly way to a feeling that both Didion and Rieff, in their separate ways, have a point Ours indeed is a community divided. Many white and black Americans don't like Cubans very much and viscerally resent their success. Many Cubans don't like their American neighbors, either. Rieff and Didion saw Miami's warts-and there are many . But they did not see the efforts of many in this community to try and bring people of different backgrounds together. Rieff talks about blacks' resentment for Cubans but conveniently ignores that in the last city elections, a Cuban candidate for mayor got more black votes than did the black man who told him that the Liberty City riot was anti-Cuban. CHOOSING BETWEEN MOTHER AND WIFE Didion saw a cultural trait in how Cuban society women dress, and she made fun of it She did not note that many thousands of poor cancer patients are treated yearly with funds that these women raise. Sin pelos en Ia lengua KAY'S DICTIONARY: Words and phrases to live, love and lie by: SLEEPING GIANT: The Anglo press' favorite descriptive phrase for U.S . Hispanics. A major daily used it in a headline again the other day. If they would just check, they would find that the sleeping giant has had insomnia for years, complicated by dyspepsia from having to digest such a shallow stereotype so often. SLEEPING GIANT: A good definition for the Anglo press because of its dearth of coverage on the real Hispanic community. CHUMP: That, my Ivy League acquaintances tell me, is a Chicano Upwardly Mobile Professional . JOSE AND MARIA: They are among names announced last week by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for this year's approaching parade of East Coast hurricanes . But first come Arlene, Bret, Cindy, Dennis ... The West Coast's typhoons include Dora, Fernanda, Jova, Pilar and Ramon . OD/0, LADRON AND SIN: Casselrs Dictionary might list hate and thief for the first two, and Webster's might define the latter as moral depravity. But we identify them as popular Miami City Manager Cesar Odio, long-time Castro crony ldalberto ladr6n de Guevara, and the-Philippines' inappropriately named Cardinal Jaime Sin. Newsmakers all. Recent Weekly Report newsmakers include Fernando de Baca, embroiled (no pun intended) in the current Republican National Hispanic Assembly dispute, and Frank Calz6n, retiring chief of the Cuban American National Foundation. And Jose Rolg tells us that he knew a lady in Havana named Dolores Fuertes who married a suitor named Barriga, thus becoming Dolores Fuertes de Barriga. Such names, of course, are not unique to the Spanish language. The phone directory of any major city will provide a full share of such surnames as Crook, Lynch, Sweat and Fink. SUSHI: In Mexico, they have a word for it, says Jose Sim6n:,, bait MUY BIEN: Japanese baseball pitcher Masahlto Watanabe, on loan this season to Florida's Miami Marlins, was asked through an interpreter by a local reporter if he had learned any English words yet. Nodding affirmatively, Watanabe told the reporter: "Muy bien." BESO DE LA SEMANA: Kay's Kiss of the Week goes to the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, which scrapped its long-planned first annual meeting in Phoenix, Ariz., set for May 25, 26. It did so in protest to Arizona Gov. Evan Mecham's . decision to abolish the celebration of Martin Luther King Day. It's been rescheduled for Albuquerque on Sept 28, 29. And an abrazo to Angelo Falcon, liderofthe Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York. IPRP's fifth anniversary "Guayabera Night'' celebration offers a prize to "the best looking guayabera worn by a man or a woman." "I didn't know there were guayaberasforwomen," we called and innocently remarked. "There aren't," Falcon closed the conversation . Kay Barbaro She saw Cubans' pride in their heritage and their obsession with liberating Cuba But she failed to grasp the love that many of these same people have for their new country. A candidate for political office in Dade County once said that asking him which country he •••••••••••••••••••••••••• loved best was like asking him if he loved his mother more than his i wife: He was born to one and chose the other. Still we cannot discount what Didion and Rieff say. There is considerable bigotry, resentment and hatred in this community. Efforts have been made to bring groups together. A few worked. Many failed. Now we can sit back and watch Rieffs and Didion's words become prophetic. Or we can renew our efforts at working together to make ! this a better place for people of all races and nationalities. Unless we 1 make this a community with opportunity for all, it will become an i isolated community with opportunities for none. 1 (Guillermo Martinez is an editorial board member of The Miami Herald, Miami, Fla) Quoting. • • JUDITH ZAFFIRINI, elected last November as the first Mexican American woman to serve in Texas' state Senate, quoted in Clamor magazine (May 16) on that state's official English movement: "It seems to me that advocates of English-only are foolishly looking backward and limiting their growth. . . "Undoubtedly, at least some English-only advocates are reflecting their lack of understanding and appreciation of our culture and heritage. We should try to help them develop a more realistic insight into the real world, vintage 1987." 4 June 1, 1987 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASSISTANT DIRECTORS OF ADMISSIONS UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT Positions require interviewing prospective students , evaluating applications , planning special projects and traveling throughout the U .S. to promote the University of Vermont In addition , there is the opportunity for involvement in the recruitment and selection of minority students. Candidates must posses strong interpersonal skills and should enjoy relating to the public . An effective public speaking style and the ability to write clearly and cogently are essential. Some evening and weekend work required Bachelofs degree, minimum , Mastefs degree and/or ad missions related experience desirable . Openings will occur after July 1, 1987 . Submit resume and cover letter along with the names and telephone numbers of three references by June 15, 1987, to: Kathie S . Weibust, Associate Director of Admissions, 194 S. Prospect St, Burlington , Vermont 05401. An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE APPRENTICE $20,802.08 #52237 A FIR Trainee level position in the Emergency Medical Services Division of the Arlington County Fire Department. This is a new division within the department with responsibility for providing a full range of emergency services to the citizens of Arlington County . Employee learns and per forms emergency medical treatment duties , drives an ambulance, assists in provid i ng medical treatment completes and maintains reports and records and participates in drills and classes in fire operat i ons and medical procedures. Requires high school or equivalent and EMTCardiac (EMTC) certification by the Commonwealth of Virginia or EMTParamedic (EMTP) certification issued by the National Registry of Medical Technicians. Applicants must submit a copy of current certification with application . All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form . Resumes , SFs, etc. without a completed off i cial Arlington ap plicatio o :iorfil will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the P.ersonnel Department no la t er than July 2 , 1987' at 5:00 PM. To req 'tie's t material please call (703) 558 or(703) 284 (hearing impaired) . ARLINGTON COUNTY Department of Personnel 2100 14th St. North Arlington , Va. 22201 DIRECTOR, FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Hispanic Civil Rights Organization seeks Director to oversee financ i al, personnel , pur chasing, insurance and administrative functions. Requires M.A., 10 years financiaVadministrative experience (Multistate, nonprofit preferred) . Submit salary history, resume with references to Ms . A Hernandez , MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11 th Fl., Los Angeles , Calif . 90014 by May 22, 1987. PRODUCTION ENGINEER Radio News Service seeks fuiHime production engineer . Experience required . English/Spanish . Salary $1 6 ,000-$20,000 negotiable. Call KXCR FM, El Paso , Texas, at(915) 542. Position open immediate .ly. Hispanic Link Weekly Report o, .. l1llli! THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-foiiiLWAUKEE 'MILWAUCDII ASSISTANl TO THE CHANCELLOR FOR EQUAL OPPOHTUNITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee invites nominations and . applications for the position of Assistant to the Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Aff i rmative Action. The Assistant to the Chancellor serves as a member of the Chancellor's Cabinet and is responsible for the implementation of the University's equal opportunity and affirmative action policies and programs. Specific duties include: • Monitoring and auditing the University's hiring, promotions, and terminations for compliance with Federal, State and University of Wisconsin requirements. • Assisting in the faculty and staff recruitment process. e Investigating and seeking resolution of internal discrim i nation and sexual harassment complaints by faculty, staff and students . e Managing the staff and budget of the Equal Opportunity Office. Applicants must possess an earned graduate or professional degree . Substantial and progressively responsible administrative experience in the area of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action is required, preferably in an institution of higher education. The applicant must demonstrate ability to work and communicate effectively with diverse campus groups, administrators, students, faculty and staff in the context of a strong tradition of shared governance. Salary is competitive and negotiable depending on qualifications and experience. The University of WisconsinMilwaukee is a major metropolitan University which serves more than 25,000 students. UWM offers flexible programs that serve the needs of a racially and ethnically diverse student body . As one of the only two doctoral degree-granting schools in the UW system, UWM offers 46 master's and 17 doctoral programs in addition to its undergraduate programs. The campus is located on Milwaukee's residential East Side, several blocks from Lake Michigan. Nominations must be postmarked by . July 1, applications by July 1'5, 1987. Letters of applications must be accompanied by a current resume and the names of a minimum of three individuals who can address the potential performance of the candidate. Anticipated starting date is November 2, 1987. Address correspondence to: Professor Harold M. Rose, Chair Search and Screen Committee for Assistant to the Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Department of Geography, Room 342 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee P . O . Box413 Milwaukee, WI 53201 UWM is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer LEGISLATIVE CORRESPONDENT Halftime legislative correspondent position in Washington, D .C. Office of U . S . Rep . Henry B . Gonzalez 1 p.m . daily . Good writing and re search skills essential . Computer experience and ability to write Spanish preferred . Annual salary $11 , 000. Contact Gail Beagle (202) 225. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C, has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635LAND. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete arid attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mailpr phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the S&me week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Mult i ple use rates on request DISPLAY CLAS$1FIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by ___________ _..;. Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & ZiP-----.,.---Area Code & Phone--------5

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Arts & Entertainment made irregular appearances. Second-rated CBS returns Falcon Crest(with Lorenzo Lamas, Ana Alicia and Cesar Romero) from among 14 shows from 1986-87. Kay O'Brien, which featured Priscilla L6pez in a regular role, was canceled Two new shows wtth Hispanic actors and characters will be added to network TV primetime schedules in the fall. early in the season. Tour of Duty is among the network's nine new shows. Elizabeth Pei'\a stars in the title role of I Married Dora, a30-minute comedy about a widower(played by Daniel Hugh Kelly) who hires a Salvadoran nanny for his children (Juliette Lewis and Jason Horst). The Colbys, the only program with a Hispanic lead to start ABC's '86-87 schedule, will not return this fall. Still on the schedule is Ohara, an hourlong drama added midseason, with Richard Yniguez The sitcom, from Reeves Entertainment Group, will air Friday nights on ABC. in a starring role. I Married Dora is one of the network's eight new shows. Ram6n Franco and Miguel Nunez are part of the ensemble cast of Tour of Duty, an hourlong Vietnam War drama to air Thursdays on CBS. It is produced by Zev Braun Films and New World TV. A total of 66 series programs, excluding movies, news and sports , make up the networks' announced fall schedule. Two H ispanio-themed projects are among four documentary series to be coproduced with monies from the Public Television Programming Challenge Fund The three major English-language networks unveiled their fall schedules in mid-May. A total of five programs with lead Hispanic actors and/or characters return from the 1986-87 season to ABC, CBS and rated NBC. WGBH-TV in Boston will produce Mexico, a three-part series that will coincide with the inauguration of Mexico' s next president, and Columbus and the Age of Discovery, a seven-part series planned to commemorate the quincentennialthe500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' landing in the New World. NBC-TV, which adds only five new shows to its schedule, has no new shows with Hispanics. Returning, among 18 shows , are three with Latinos: Family Ties(with Tina Yothers), LA Law(Jimmy Smit\s) and Miami Vice (Saundra Santiago and Edward James Olmos). The Challenge Fund is a joint agreement between the Public Broadcasting Service and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Antonio Earlier this season NBC canceled The ATeam, which had added Eddie Velez to the cast, and Hill Street Blues, where Rene Enriquez Media Report SOAP BOX: Here's what some Hispanic opinion-makers are currently saying about the media: CARLOS FUENTES, Mexican author, ad dressing the opening session of the 36th International Press Institute's general assembly in Buenos Aires: "Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for the international media to deal with Latin America only in the name of disaster. Our countries, normally invisible, then appear under the headings of earthquake, debt and revolution. "A country such as El Salvador starts to exist from the instant that the great inter national TV chains mention it on a daily basis, but El Salvador was already there for five centuries, with its personality and culture. "It is the duty of cultural journalism to reHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias Rentas. Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre . , Graphics.'Production: Canos Anien , Zoila Elias. Yanira Cruz. No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without a.dvance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6. establish perspectives in the name of basic "If reporters know what is being said is accuracy. Our nations must be understood untrue, then they have a duty either to not as nations with a history, peoples with a report it or to report the whole truth. To do culture and bearers of problems of an unwhat they have done, to report only the attacks resolved past. If this is not understood, we as if they were true, is to mislead their entire might be deprived of a reasonable future ... " readership, and I think that was done over LAURA LOPEZ, Time magazine correand over again." spondent in Nicaragua, quoted by Editor & ELSEWHERE: The Hispanic Public Re-Publisher(May 23) at the same conference: lations Association and the California A• "There's a natural distrust(by Latin American sociation of Latins in Broadcasting will officials) of foreign correspondents because stage their 1Oth annual Latino Athlete of the they usually report only negative news." Year award luncheon at the Los Angeles She described Time's Latin American coverPress Club June 12 ... age : " If Washington pays attention, we pay Thompson Publishing Group has launched attention." , a new publication, Legalization Report, CRUZ REYNOSO, former California Supublished every other week, providing detailed preme Court justice who was beaten at the information on legalization developments of polls last November, in a Los Angeles Daily the immigration act. Journal interview, labeled the press"a willing Cost: $600 for 26 issues, $450 for nonpartner" in his defeat. profit subscribers. For more information, Accusing it of reporting "misleading'' attacks contact Caroi'Medernach at(202) 872-1766. and untruths about the court, he said : Charlie Ericksen 1987 Hispanic Link Weekly Report