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Hispanic link weekly report, June 22, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 22, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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JUN 2 3 1987
Making The News This Week
Representatives for the George Bush for President campaign announce Florida Gov. Bob Martinez will be one of five national co-chairmen for the vice president’s 1988 bid. . . Cardinal John O’Connor, archbishop of New York, presides over the Mass kicking off the 35th anniversary of New York City’s Fiesta de San Juan Bautista, a celebration recognizing the patron saint of San Juan, the capital of Puerto Rico... The California Senate reverses itself and votes to confirm Gov. George Deukmejian’s nomination of J. William Orozco to the Board of Governors of the Community College System... Chicago Mayor Harold Washington announces
that the city will launch an initiative jto protect the rights of immigrants in light of what Washington described as a “bad” immigration law... Dorothy Harris, president of the 106,000- member National Association of Social Workers, declares that the organization will support the United Farm Workers' table-grape boycott . . Maria Borraro, executive director of the non-profit Hispanic Health Council in Hartford, Conn., is named that city’s assistant city manager for human services. She must resign her position as one of two Puerto Ricans on the Hartford Board of Education... The National Foundation for the Advancement of the Arts selects Juan Alindato, a carnival mask maker from Puerto Rico, and Emilio and Senaida Romero, crafts makers and embroiderers from New Mexico, as two of the 13 recipients of the 1987 National Heritage Fellowships...

[*®5?!^fLatino Media Rap INS News Flow
Battle With 51% of Vote
Federico Peha, Denver’sfirst Hispanic mayor, was re-elected June 16. He gained 51% of the vote to 49% for attorney Donald Bain.
With all 497 precincts counted in the nonpartisan runoff election, Peha, a Democrat received 79,674 votes to Republican Bain’s 76,648 votes.
Pefta trailed Bain in the city's May 19 primary, 35% - 42%. Polls showed him behind by as many 22 points at the first of the month but had him moving slightly ahead a few days before the election.
“The Hispanic turnout, as well as the large black turnout was absolutely critical to the victory,” Tom Nussbaum, his campaign manager, told Weekly Report.
According to Pefta’s press secretary, Sharon Sherman, Pefta spent about $800,000 on the campaign compared to Bain’s $1 million.
In a City Council race runoff, Debbie Ortega was elected to the District 9 seat She beat out Mary Helen S&ndoval, polling 6,116 votes (62.6%) to Sdndovafs 3,651 votes (37.4%).
CANF Picks New Head
The Washington, D.C.i-based Cuban American National Foundation board of directors named Jos6 Antonio Font as the lobbying group’s executive director June 11 . following the May resignation of Frank Calz6n.
During that special Miami meeting, CANF Vice President Jos6 Luis Rodriguez retracted his resignation which he had submitted to foundation chairman Jorge Mas Canosa.
“After meeting with the board of directors and airing out my problems, I am convinced that I am a vital part of the organization as one of the founders and that it is in the best interest in the cause of a free Cuba and the foundation for me to remain,” the Palm Beach, Fla, businessman told Weekly Report
Font, founder of the Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C., said he will follow the agenda set by Calz6n. Under Calzdrfs leadership CANF succeeded in convincing the federal government to set up Radio Marti to broadcast into Cuba
Editors and executives of Spanish-language print and broadcast media around the nation are frustrated by the confusion and lack of information surrounding the federal immigration law, found a survey by Weekly Report.
They see themselves as having a greater responsibility than do the general media Their readers, viewers and listeners are among those most affected by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.
Their responsibility as informers is hampered by an ill-informed, overburdened and often unresponsive federal bureaucracy, they charge Many are forced to turn to social service agencies lawyers church-related organizations and Hispanic Civil rights groups for information.
Oscar Reyes, editor of El Pregonero, a Spanish-language weekly that serves the Washington, D.C., ares told Weekly Report that the Immigration and Naturalization Service repeatedly has been late in providing them with information. “We have reporters who are not proficient with the English language, so we also have to take the time to translate the INS forms" said Reyes “It seems absurd to me that the INS is not providing information in Spanish. The people affected are for the most part recent arrivals who have not had the opportunity to study English.”
El Pregonero has a paid circulation of 10,000 and three reporters
Hugo Morales executive director of KSJV-FM, a radio station in Fresno, Calif., said the station would not have been able to cover the law had it not been for several grants to gather information outside of INS. “We’re not relying on INS. It has been inefficient late with information and sometimes inaccurats" said Morales
KSJV, also known as Radio Biiingue, pro-
Latino Joblessness Drops
^ The Hispanic unemplbyment rate fell to 8.7% in May, a five-tenths of a point drop from April, according to figures released by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The Latino rats the lowest for this year and 1986, represents748,000 Hispanics who are reported to be out of work.
duced a four-part series earlier this year-two programs in Spanish and two in Englisn-that it provides free Morales said that roughly 40 public radio stations picked up the programs nationwide. The next live program is scheduled for July 4. Funding for the series came primarily from a $25,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The station has also received $100,000 from the Ford Foundation and $50,000 from the Rosenberg Foundation, part of which has gone to immigration programming.
Luis Fernandez, an assignment editor with Noticias del Mundo in New York City, agreed with Morales. "Generally, INS is not very cooperative with the Hispanic media
“We’re'always having problems in getting information from them,” he added.
Noticias del Mundo publishes Monday through Friday and has a circulation of 53,000.
INS Concedes Limitation
A spokesman for I NS conceded the agency is somewhat limited in its ability to handle requests from Spanish-language media He mentioned, however, a Justice Department contract with three advertising agencies, two Hispanic, that are producing Spanish- j and English-language public service announcements and ads. “Our contractor reports that with paid advertising they are reaching about 90% of Hispanic adults,” said the spokesman, Verne Jervis.
Jervis also noted that less than two months ago INS Commissioner Alan Nelson hired Luis Acle, a former White House public liaison, to meet with Hispanic media and organizations concerning the law. Acle, a Latino, was hired as a consultant',
INS has eight professionals on its public affairs staff- three in Washington, D.C., two in California and one each in Miami, Dallas and Vermont. The one in Dallas is the only one that speaks Spanish. The agency has not provided a translation of the regulations or legalization form.
Several media outlets have provided or plan to provide special programming or guides;
• In Chicago, “Noticentro44,”a nightly 30-minute television news show on station WSNS-Channel 44, provided nightly reports
continued on page 2


Calif. Bilingual Ed. Deadline Near, Compromise Seen
A five-year extension of California’s bilingual education program was approved June 10 by the state Senate Education Committee, less than three weeks before the current program expires June 30.
A similar bill passed the legislature last year and was vetoed by Gov. George Deuk-mejian. The governor is threatening to veto the current bill unless changes are made.
According to Benjamin L6pez, regional director in Sacramento for California Rural Legal Assistance and a lobbyist for the California Bilingual Community Coalition, the changes center around a request by Deuk-mejian for more“local flexibility’ in determining how the program will be administered. L6pez
claims that critics of the bill, drafted by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), want to see a more concentrated use of English in bilingual classrooms.
Peter Mehas, assistant to Deukmejian for education, said local flexibility will ensure that the state’s 1,028 school districts have more options in choosing programs. He suggested that the limited number of authorized bilingual programs causes compliance problems for small districts without teachers trained in a variety of languages.
The bill, expected to be passed by the full Legislature, gives local school boards an “experimental” option that allows them to implement new or innovative programs as
long as they have state approval. About 525,000 students are enrolled in California bilingual education programs.
L6pez said the bill’s proponents are now working on compromise language. He added that “we do not have the votes” to override a gubernatorial veto.
L6pez and Mehas told Weekly Report Deukmejian wants to sign a new bill before the authorization expires. If new legislation is not approved, the state program would continue but under less stringent federal law that gives local school boards greater discretion in implementing controversial teaching methods.
- Richard Sayre
Latino Press Say INS an Impediment
continued from page 1
in May covering different aspects of the law.
• El Herald, a daily newspaper in Miami with a week-day circulation of 75,000, runs a column once a week that answers questions from readers on the law. Angel Castillo, El Herald’s editor, said the paper will publish a pamphlet within two months that will be a collection of 100 of the columns
• La Opinidn, in Los Angeles, a daily newspaper with a circulation of78,000, disseminated this spring 100,000 copies of a booklet it inserted in the paper. Also, in conjunction with the Los Angeles Times La Opinidn published a 16-page bilingual magazine dealing with the law.
Very few of the media outlets reported an appreciable increase in advertising relating to immigration. All expressed a concern about individuals and businesses who offer services at exorbitant fees or promises that they cannot fulfill.
Antonia Hemdndez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, called on all Hispanic media earlierthis year not to accept advertising having to do with the immigration law. Two media, Los Angeles? La Opinidn and television station Channel 48 in Albuquerque, N.M., accepted the exhortation.
Weekly Report’s survey found that one of the primary concerns expressed to Hispanic media by readers, listeners and viewers was fear of INS. In their editorial positions, nearly all Spanish-language media have encouraged those who are eligible for legalization to cooperate with INS and begin processing their papers. An exception is the California bilingual weekly La Prensa, San Diego, Its editor, Daniel Muhoz Jr., told Weekly Report “Asking immigrants to trust INS is like going back to World War II and asking the Jews to turn their lives over to the Gestapo.”
- Felix Pdrez
Hispanic Firms Ring Up $10 Billion
The top 500 Hispanic-owned businesses led by Bacardi Imports and International Medical Centers rang up almost $10 billion in 1986 sales Hispanic Business\magazine reported in its June issue.
This is the fifth year Hispanic Business compiled the list
Overall sales for the 500 increased from $7.5 billion in 1984 to $8.7 billion in 1985, reaching $9.9 billion last year.
Eight of the top 10 were on the list in 1985. Newcomers were Handy Andy Supermarkets of San Antonio (No. 9) and First Federal Savings Bank of Santurce, Puerto Rico (Na 10). Five of the top 10 were based in Puerto Rico, led by Bacardi, which was founded in 1862.
“The average firms on the list were founded in the 1970s” said Steve Beals senior editor at the magazine
California contributed the most firms to the top 500, with 118. Florida followed with 102. Then came Texas 61; Puerto Rice 48; and New York, 34.
Last year Bacardi Imports? earnings dropped $50 million from the $4175 million the firm earned in 1985. IMC, a health maintenance firm based in Miami, was sold this year to a non-Hispanic firm, the Humana hospital groups after encountering many legal and financial difficulties
HISPANIC 500 COMPANIES
The Top Ten - 1986
Firm
Sales
Millions
$425
420
406
Bacardi Imports Miami •Inti. Medical Centers Miami Banco Popular de Puerto Rico San Juan Goya Food Inc., Seacaucus N.J.
V. Su&rez and Ca Inc., San Juan Bacardi Corp, San Juan Banco de Ponca San Juan Vanir Group, San Bernardino Calif.
Handy Andy Supermarkets San Antonio 1 at Fed. Savings Bank, Santurce, P.R.
* IMC was recently sou to the Humane hospital group Source: Hispanic Business magazine, June 1987.
INS Begins Reviewing Mariel Detainee Cases
The Immigration and Naturalization Service began June 15 reviewing records of about 4,000 Cuban refugees held at detention centers or federal prisons across the United States to decide if they should be released, according to Verne Jervis an INS spokesman.
INS Commissioner Alan Nelson approved the procedure in late May. The agency will use three two-man teams to screen those refugees being indefinitely held -
The detainees were among the 125,000 persons who arrived in the United States aboard the 1980 Mariel boatlift
The INS teams will travel to facilities in Miami, Oakdale, La., and Atlanta - where most of the prisoners are located.
A U.S. law says that aliens found guilty of a felony or a series of misdemeanors are “excludable," even if the acts were committed in their native country. The imprisoned refugees were set to be repatriated in 1985 but Cuba’s President Fidel Castro refused when the U.S. government began beaming Radio Marti broadcasts there that year.
Those released may be sent to halfway houses, to their families or to participate in special programs
Presently, the United States and Cuba are not negotiating the return of the refugees.
Alvarado Chosen by Board
Anthony Alvarado, the former New York City School chancellor who resigned his post under pending charges of misconduct, was hired June 12 as superintendent of a Manhattan school district.
Alvarado, 45, was given the nod after a 6-2 vote by the board of School District 2. He »was selected over 62 candidates for the
265-4-.$89,000-a-year job. The school district has 17,600 students and 32 schools.
Alvarado resigned in 1984 as chancellor of the natiorfs largest school system amid charges that he accepted more than $80,000 in loans from subordinates while he was a district superintendent and that he failed to report $128,000 in income on his tax returns.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Miguel Perez, guest columnist
Rafael Shares a Scoop
“Maestro, you’re not going to believe this. It would be a great story, but I can only tell you off the record.” The voice in my telephone was familiar, the nickname was accurate, but there was something wrong with this scoop. It was coming from a fellow journalist No one else calls me maestro, so it had to be my friend Rafael Prieto. I was never his teacher, but Colombians use that term very loosely. Rafael calls everyone maestro, and this time, about a month ago, he was calling to give me a tip.
I was skeptical at first because journalists seldom share a good story with their competitors. But I listened, and then I laughed uncontrollably. It was a great story that couldn’t be told - at least until now.
“I’m calling you from City Hall, where the mayor just named a committee to advise him on issues dealing with immigration,” Rafael said. “And guess what? I’m on it”
“But Rafael, how can you do that? Aren’t you an illegal alien?” “Yes, maestro, that’s the story. They named me without knowing.” Typical Koch. When he does something well, if s unintentional. This was one of the best appointments he ever made - finding someone who really has first-hand knowledge of the problems of illegal aliens-but it wasn’t because he is truly sensitive to their needs. He just didn’t know any better.
FOOLED OTHER OFFICIALS Rafael was appointed because he is the assistant editor at the Spanish-language daily Noticias del Munda He asked me not to be too harsh on the mayor. After all, this is not the first time he has fooled government officials.
Unlike most illegal aliens, who normally live in hiding, Rafael always figured that the more exposure he received, the less people would be likely to think he was illegal. And thus, he was able to assert himself, making significant contributions to U.S. Spanish-language news media, which would be in sad shape without many Latino journalists who have been living here illegally.
Even Rafael's U.S. entry was done in daring style. He flew to Mexico from his native Colombia, where he had been a journalist, and paid a legal U.S. resident $300 to give him a lift across the Mexican border. They drove from Tijuana to San Diego on a Sunday afternoon in January 1979. “They saw my white complexion and they didn’t ask me any questions. We drove right through,” he said.
They drove to Rafael's cousin’s house in Los Angeles. After eight months of doing odd jobs, from door-to-door surveys to selling hamburgers, he started working as a reporter for La Opinidn. He covered U.S. presidential elections, obtaining security clearance from the Secret Service.
INVITED TO WHITE HOUSE TWICE Later, as editor of the Los Angeles edition of Noticias, he was twice invited to White House news conferences, one with President Reagan and one with the infamous Lt. Col. Oliver North. Once he held an editorial board meeting with Harold Ezell, Western regional commissioner for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, making sure that all the journalists interviewing Ezell were illegals.
“I wasn’t doing it to make a fool out of him,” Rafael told me recently. “I wanted people who could ask the right questions.” When I first met Rafael in 1982 at a Latino journalists^ conference in San Diego, I couldn’t understand why he so adamantly refused to go to Tijuana with a group of us for dinner one night. Years later, he explained. “I would have loved having dinner with you that night, maestro, but I’m not stupid.”
This month, Rafael applied for amnesty and received, for the first time in eight years, official authorization from the U.S. government. Now he must prove he has been living here since Jan. 1,1982. What better proof than a 1980 Secret Service pass card? (Miguel Pdrez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
TODAY’S SPANISH LESSON: If for no other reason than to stop its reporters from maiming simple Spanish names, TVs20/20 news magazine should rehire Geraldo Rivera.
In a belated Wedtech expose the other night one reporter(they all look alike to me now) couldn’t even cope with such simple surnames as Cdrdenas and Zuniga
First came former Small Business Administration chief Mike Cftrdenas, who told veinte/veinte that he was fired, by the Casa Blanca i suspiciously t soon after refusing to give Wedtech an obscenely obese, undeserved military contract.
C&rdenas was repeatedly identified as car-DEEN-us.
Then ex-White House aide Henry ZtiRiga, who was on camera long enough to say that he saw no evil, heard no evil and spoke no evil, was butchered into zoo-NAY-guh.
Please, Geraldo, come back and roll your rrrrr’s for us.
TODAY’S HEALTH HINT: Moustaches may be good for your machismo but they’re bad for your batting average.
New York Mets’ star first-baseman Keith Hernandez shaved off his bigote June 10 after cultivating it for eight years. That afternoon he faced the rival Chicago Cubs bare-lipped and hit two home runs - the first time he’d accomplished such a feat since 1980.
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: President Reagan’s recent suggestion to Mikhail Gorbachev that he tear down the Berlin Wall brought no positive response. A recent proposal by INS Western Regional Commissioner Harold Ezell that a concrete wall be constructed near Otay Mesa, along the Mexico-California border, solicited no great huzzahs, either.
So, suggests reader Carlos Consafos, why not package the pair and wrap them in some Yankee ingenuity? Buy the Berlin Wall from the Russians, ship it to California and reassemble it on the mesa as a tourist attraction. (It could compete with the London Bridge, which has been in nearby Arizona since ’71.)
Consafos points out that if Ezell catches any nasty illegal aliens scribbling graffiti on his barrier, he could also arrest them for defacing government property.
CONFUSION OF THE DAY: A half-hour “sexually explicit” documentary on safe sex - which may or may not be shown on national TV- includes the President’s son Ron dangling a prophylactic on camera In a Newsweek interview published June 22, Ron also charges U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett with “pandering” to the right wing with his call for widespread AIDS testing.
The Newsweek account reports that on the show,“Panamanian salsa superstar Rub6n Blades dresses a banana in a condom.”
The Washington Post quotes Newsweek as reporting that Blades “appears dressed as a banana wearing a condom.”
There’s a difference, no, Chiquita?
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting. ..
MARTIN SHEEN, in a June 4 commentary in The Los Angeles Times on the homeless:
“Our modern society simply will not tolerate failure. Those among us who dare to fail are further doomed to removal from our midst, by whatever means necessary, lest their continual presence remind us of our common human frailties ..”
CLARENCE PAGE, black columnist writing in the June 14 Chicago Tribune:
"Four out of five drug users with AIDS are black or His panic... Yet black or Hispanic leaders have not jumped out in front to lead the fight against this deadly invasion.
"One reason: Blacks and Hispanics, in spite of the liberal political leaders they elect, can be just as conservative as Jerry Falwell in their view of gays and lesbians”
June 22,1987


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
IMMIGRATION LAW RADIO CASSETTES: Radio Bilmgue has made available four 30-minute programs, two in Spanish and two in English, dealing with the immigration law. The two English-language tapes cover discrimination in the workplace and employer sanctions; the Spanish-language ones explain qualifying and disqualifying factors for legalization. To order a cassette, send $2 and a self-addressed envelope to: Radio Bilingije, P.O. Box 12682, Fresno, Calif. 93778.
IMMIGRATION LAW BOOKLET: Gerardo L6pez, the reporter for the Los Angeles daily newspaper La Opinidn who wrote for the paper a Spanish-language immigration law booklet, recently released a 28-page update titled “Legalizacidn guia para la nueva leyde inmigraci6n.n The update includes a legislative history, a nationwide listing of Catholic agencies offering assistance for legalization, and farm worker and legalization provisions. For a copy, send $2 to L6pez at P.O.Box 2261, San Gabriel, Calif. 91788.
HISPANIC TOP 500 FIRMS: Hispanic Business magazine has published its fifth annual listing of Hispanic-operated firms ranked by 1986 sales. For a copy of the June 1987 issue, send $3.50 with your request to: Hispanic Business, 360 S. Hope Ave., Suite 100-C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105.
ESSAY CONTEST: “How Will The Americas Be In The Year 2001?” is the topic of the 1987 La Raza Writing Project sponsored by Americas 2001 magazine. The contest is open to all ages. Winners will be selected in five age groups. Essays may be written in English or Spanish and should be 3-5 typewritten pages. Send entries to: Americas 2001, c/o La Raza Writing Project, P.O. Box 4028, Terminal Annex, Los Angeles, Calif. 90051-2048. (213) 727-2046.
HISPANIC CATHOLIC PROFILE: “The Hispanic Catholic in the United States: A Sociocultural and Religious Profile” is a 230-page book detailing the results of a nationwide survey of Hispanic Catholics. For a copy of the book, send $12 to: Northeast Pastoral Center for Hispanics, 1011 First Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022 (212) 751-7045.
HACU PROJECT FUNDED
The Ford Foundation awarded a $49,036 planning grant to the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities for a project to examine the low rate of Hispanic high school graduates enrolling in community colleges, it was announced June 11.
The six-month project, Hispanic Student Success Program, will also address the high dropout rate of Latino students at these schools.
Those working on the project will meet with superintendents of school districts with large Hispanic enrollments, community leaders and organizations* college administrators and corporate representatives
HACU will submit a final proposal to several funding sources for the development of the pilot program.
MINORITY VOLUNTEERS WANTED
The W.K. Kellogg Foundation will award $1,387,064 to the United Way of America for a program to increase minority volunteer involvement and support to minority organizations, it announced June 1.
The program,Project Blueprint, is designed to involve United Way’s 2,300 affiliates nationally.
It will also establish a computerized information system to track programs and services available for minorities and the community.
DROPOUT BOOKLET IN WORKS
The National Hispanic Dropout Task Force, formed by the League of United Latin American Citizens’ national board of directors in March to address the 50% Latino dropout rate, is seeking recommendations for a booklet it plans to publish in October.
The booklet will include articles written by Hispanic professionals on each of the following areas of concern identified by the taskforce: school curriculum, teacher sensitivity, parental involvement, student performance, school boards of education and counseling.
Recommendations should be mailed to: Andres Tobar, Chairman, LULAC National Hispanic Dropout Task Force, P.O. Box 44082, Washington, D.C. 20026 (202) 347-1493.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LULAC NATIONAL CONVENTION Corpus Christi, Texas June 24*28 “The Path to Progress^’ is the theme of the 58th annual League of United Latin American Citizens’ national convention and trade fair. Seven Democratic contenders for the 1988 presidential race are expected to address the convention, as well as U.S. Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros. The organization will also hold its national elections.
Rub6n Bonilla (512) 882-8284
CELEBRATION OF TWO CONSTITUTIONS Philadelphia June 24-28
A celebration of the constitutions of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is being sponsored by the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women. The five-day convention will feature re-enactments, mock trials, films and dis* cussions on the history and effects of the constitutions An awards banquet featuring Rita Moreno, who is convention chairperson, will he held June 27. Marianne DeJesus (215) 247-8434.
RECOGNITION BANQUETS Miami June 25
The Latin Chamber of Commerce will welcome Federal Communications Commissioner Patricia
Diaz Dennis with a luncheon and honor outstanding women in the community with a dinner banquet U.S Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole will be the keynote speaker at the banquet Marfa Elena Toraho (305) 579-2180
MINORITY FINANCIAL CONFERENCE Chicago June 25-26
A National Conference for Minority Financial Institutions is being sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development The conference will discuss how bankers, insurance companies and savings and loan associations can participate in government-related housing finance programs. Robert Nipp(202) 755-6980
HISPANIC WOMEN’S NETWORK Miami June 25-27
The National Network of Hispanic Women is sponsoring its second annual roundtable for business and corporate leaders entitled “Leadership for America’s Future.” The conference will offer 40 workshops in the areas of entrepreneurship, management and a series for college women. Fred Alvarez, a member of the Equal Employment Op portunity Commission, and Federal Communications Commissioner Patricia Diaz Dennis will be among the speakers.
Celia Torres (213) 459-0141
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Los Angeles June 26
The Los Angeles region of American G.I. Forum will award 32 scholarships ranging from $500 to$6,000
June 22,1987
to graduating high school seniors during their 11 th
annual banquet
Ram6n Diaz (213) 695-6706
VETERANS AFFAIRS CONFERENCE San Juan, Puerto Rico June 27 A House Veterans Affairs subcommittee will hold hearings in Puerto Rico to review services provided to veterans in Puerto Rico by the Veterans Administration.
Marylin Garcia (809) 723-6333
HISPANIC CULTURE FEST Dallas June 27
A “Tex-Mex Salute to Hispanic Culfure” will raise money for the development of educational programs at the Anita Martinez Ballet Folkl6rico program. Beth Wilson (214) 871-3609
EDUCATION CONFERENCE Los Angeles June 27-28
“ Educational Excellence and Access for Every Studenf is the theme of the National Education Association’s joint conference on concerns of minorities and women. Bilingual education, illiteracy and affirmative action will be among the topics addressed. Vanessa Robinson (202) 822-7700
COMING SOON
LANGUAGE RIGHTS SEMINAR Northern California Language Rights Team Fresno, Calif. June 30 Eric Vega (916) 444-6760
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


UNITED WAY OF AMERICA Alexandria, Virginia
Seeks to fill positions for “Project Blueprint’ - a new program designed to increase minority involvement in United Way.
Associate Director- will desigreimplement plan for providing technical assistance to local United Ways in developing/strengthening respective minority involvement programs.
Communications Associate- will produce a variety of communication materials (i.e.,. newsletters, brochures, booklets, etc.) researched, designed and targeted toward specific audiences.
Sr. Research Associate - will develop, manage and guide the computerized information system component of Project Blueprint for purpose of helping local United Ways obtain pertinent community data for program planning
Administrative Secretary - will provide administrative and secretarial support to project staff.
Call Diana C. Torres at (703) 836-7100 ext. 43.1 or 522 for detailed job descriptions. Resumes needed by June 26,1987.
MANAGER OF RESEARCH & EVALUATION Kent County, Michigan Duties: Developing and implementing procedures for determining the effectiveness and efficiency of service delivered by the Kent County CMH Board.
A master's degree in human service, social science, behavioral science, or related field. Specific training in evaluation and research methods and in human services administration. Work experience using computer systems for data management and statistical analysis, experience in developing and implementing evaluation designs in actual human service settings, and experience in delivery of human services.
All applications for County employment must be made on the County application form Kent County Personnel Department Room 205, County Administration Bldg.
300 Monroe, NW Grand Rapids, Mich. 49503 (616)774-3513
PUBLICITY & ADVERTISING Lehman Centerforthe Performing Arts seeks individual to take charge of Publicity and Advertising. Responsible for all press relations and publicity, including writing of press releases, program editing advertising layout coordinating of public relations events Strong organizational, writing and editing skills Plan budget and administer marketing campaign for Center's series and individual events Supervise group sales B.A. degree plus 3 years experience in performing arts promotion. Position available on or around July 1,1987. Salary range to $22,000, commensurate with experience Excellent fringe benefits Send resume ta
Managing Director Lehman Center for the Performing Arts Inc.
Bedford Park Blvd. West Bronx, N.Y. 10468
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Indiana University
We invite nominations and applications for the position of Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Indiana University, Bloomington, to assume office on or before July 1,1988. The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest and most extensive academic unit in Bloomington, the major campus of the university. The College comprises 40 academic departments and 20 interdisciplinary programs. Doctoral degrees are offered in 49 areas many of which are ranked among the best in the nation. The College has a full-time faculty of more than 750, a current undergraduate major enrollment of 7,100, and a graduate enrollment of 2,800 through the Graduate School. The College also interacts with other academic units on the Bloomington campus.
The Dean is the chief administrator of the College and reports directly to the Vice President of the Bloomington campus The Dean is responsible for the instructional programs of the college, the development and enhancement of College faculty strengths and the formulation and execution of College budgetary policies The Dean has a unique opportunity to shape undergraduate and graduate education and to foster research on the Bloomington campus. The Dean at I ndiana University enjoys more than the typical amount of autonomy.
Candidates for the Deanship should be able to demonstrate a commitment to and an understanding of all aspects of the educational enterprise. They should have a record of outstanding scholarship and successful administrative performance. We seek a creative, dynamic, and innovative leader who is dedicated to excellence.
In keeping with its commitment to affirmative action, Indiana University particularly seeks information about, or an expression of interest from, minority or women candidates. Applications and nominations received by August 15,1987, are assured of consideration.
Please direct nominations and inquiries to:
James C. Craig
Search and Screen Committee Department of Psychology Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind. 47405 (812) 335-3926
MARKETING MANAGER Marketing Manager responsible for developing a Fortune 500 company s national Hispanic Market Boston location. Salary mid to high 50’s. Send resume to:
L Mays
Jane C. Edmonds & Associates Inc.
4 Copley Place, Suite 580 Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 437-9840
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The California Association for Bilingual Education seeks an executive director. Local-CA Metro area. Contact CABE, 926 J St., Suite 810, Sacramento, CA 95814.
(916) 447-3986 EOE
BILINGUAL COUNSELORS Washington, D.C.
The Division of Bilingual Education of the D.C. Public Schools is seeking bilingual counselors to work in the schools. Candidates must be eligible for certification, residents (or willing to become residents) of the District, bilingual in English and Spanish, and have an understanding of the cultural and social characteristics of the Central American community. For more information, call Dr. Hugo C. Galindo at (202) 282-0174.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis Call (301) 251 -2252.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
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Arts & Entertainment
ART FOR THE GAMES: A series of art events commemorate the staging of this summer's 10th Pan American Games, to be held Aug. 7 to 23 in Indianapolis.
The first major thematic Latin American exhibition to be held in this country since 1966 opens this week at the Indianapolis Museum of Art as part of the city’s Pan American Arts Festival.
Works by 29 artists from three successive generations make up the exhibit, titled The Art of the Fantastic: Latin America 1920-198 7. Some 110 pieces by the artists- representing 10 Latin American nations-will be on view in Indianapolis June 27 to Sept 13.
The Art of the Fantastic’s touring schedule includes dates in New York (Oct 10 to Dec. 6), Miami (January to March) and Mexico City (March to May).
Another traveling event related to the Games continues its schedule this week in Chicago. Pan Am Mania, an exhibit and demonstration by six Latin American artisans, with music and entertainment, will be
at North Riverside Park June 24-27.
Pan Am Mania continues its tour through July in St. Louis, Kansas City, Mo., Dallas, Austin, San Antonio and El Paso.
Back in Indianapolis- the second U.S. city to host the pre-Olympic Games - the Pan American Arts Festival continues through August. Highlights to come include:
• Chamber Music Festival (July) Musical programs from the Americas at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
• Music of the Americas (July 11) Outdoor concert with Chilean folk singer Paula Monsalve, at the I.M.A.
• Costa Rican Landscapes by Echeveria{July 17 to Aug. 25), at the city’s Community Center for the Arts.
• Fiesta '87 (Aug. 1) Day of activities celebrating Hispanic culture in central Indiana, at the downtown Hispano-American Center.
ONE LINERS: John “Jellybean” Benitez,, considered the first club DJ to “hit” as a performer, has completed his second album, Just Visiting the Planet... And La Sonora Ponceha inaugurates the Salsa Meets Jazz series at the Hollywood Palace, June 23-24...
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
CLIO AWARDS: Enthusiastic Hispanic response to a special “Hispanic markets" category in the annual national Clio awards competition bodes well for future Latino participation.
A Hispanic category was included for the first time in Clio’s 28-year history this month. It drew 26 entries in the radio category, 53 in television and just one in print.
The winners, announced!Junel 2 and 15, were:
Radio: Bermudez & Associates, Los Angeles, for a Mountain Bell ad, “Sisters”
Television: Foote, Cone and Belding/Moir productions, New York, fora Pepsi commercial, “Drummer.”
No award was given in print
However, Clio vice-president Nancy Ross told Weekly Report that the ’88 Clios would probably be expanded into more divisions per category (e.g, cosmetics automotive, etc) because of what she termed a “very, very
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor FAIIx PArez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre.
Graphic^Production Carlos Arden, Zoila Elias Yanira Cruz.
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good response” to Clio’s initial invitation to Hispanic agency participation.
MUNDO LATINO: Univision is trimming its morning variety and interview show, Mundo Latino, from 3 1/2 hours back to its original 11/2 hours effective July 6. The program will run from 9:30 -11 am. instead of 7:30 -11.
Mundo Latino will continue live from Mexico City, but will no longer include its live segments from Miami or its recorded segments from Los Angeles. The 7:30 - 9:30 slot will be filled with an exercise show and novelas
Approximately 30 staff members are affected in Miami, with about 20 more impacted in Los Angelea How many of them can or will be retained by Univision through transfer to other productions isn’t yet certain, spokeswoman Maiti Saralegui told Weekly Report.
The move was made because of low early-morning ratings and high production costa she said.
READER’SSHELF: TheJune8 Newsweek offered a two-page report on poverty in Texas' lower Rio Grande Valley. . . Intercambios Fernandas, converting from newsletter format to slick magazine with its spring issue, profiles
six successful Latinaa cubanas RemGdios Diaz-Oliver, Nancy Mdrquez and Rita Rodriguez; puertorriquehas Diana Torres and Marisa Reyes; and ohicana Lena Guerrero...
IN MOTION: Jos& Rios, news assignment manager with Los Angeles’ KCBS-TV, has been promoted to assistant news director there... Bill Torrea assistant news editor at the Santa Fe New Mexican, has been named its news editor...
Ray Blanco, manager of station relations and New Jersey affairs for New York-based WCBS-TV, won a Sigma Delta Chi award as director of production on a “War on Crack-New Jersey Schools” series which aired last September and October. Built in were community outreach activities and a special video for schools..
ELSEWHERE: Univlsion reported a46% increase in gross revenues for January-May '87 over last year’s billings . .
The New York Daily News settled a landmark federal discrimination case brought by four black editorial employees out-of-court on June 10 for a reported $3.1 million...
- Charlie Ericksen
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JUN 2 3 1987 Making The News This Week that the city will launch an initiative protect the rights of immigrants in light of what Washington described as a "bad' immigration law ... Dorothy Harris, president of the 1 06,ooomember National Association Representatives for the George Bush for President campaign announce Florida Gov. Bob Martinez will be one of five national co chairmen for the vice presidenfs 1988 bid. . . Cardinal John O'Connor, archbishop of New York, presides over the Mass kicking off the 35th anniversary of New York City's Fiesta de San Juan Bautista, a celebration recognizing the patron saint of San Juan, the capital of Puerto Rico. . . The California Senate reverses itself and votes to confirm Gov. George Deukmejlan's nomination of J. William Orozco to the Board of Governors of the Community College System... Chicago Mayor Harold Washington announces of Social Workers, declares that the organization will support the United Farm Workers' table-grape boycott. . . Marla Borrero, executive director of the non-profit Hispanic Health Council in Hartford, Conn., is named that city's assistant city manager for human services. She must resign her position as one of two Puerto Ricans on the Hartford Board of Education... The National Foundation for the Advancement of the Arts selects Juan Allndato, a carnival mask maker from Puerto Rico, and Emilio and Senalda Romero, crafts makers and embroiderers from New Mexico, as two of the 13 recipients of the 1987 National Heritage Fellowships. .. Vol5No.241 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 22, 198r Peiia Wins Re-election Battle With 51 /o of Vote Federico Pena, Denver's first Hispanic mayor, was re-elected June 16. He gained 51% of the vote to 49% for attorney Donald Bain. With all497 precincts counted in the non partisan runoff election, Pena, a Democrat, received 79,674 votes to Republican Bain's 76,648 votes. Pena trailed Bain in the city's May 19 primary, 35%-42%. Polls showed him behind by as many 22 points at the first of the month but had him moving slightly ahead a few days before the election. "The Hispanic turnout, as well as the large black turnout, was . absolutely critical to the victory," Tom Nussbaum, his campaign man ager, told Weekly Report. According to Pena's press secretary, Sharon Sherman, Pena spent about $800,000 on the campaign compared to Bain's $1 million. In a City Council race runoff, Debbie Ortega was elected to the District 9 seat She beat out Mary Helen Sandoval, polling 6,116 votes (62.6%) to Sandovafs 3,651 votes (37.4%). CANF Picks New Head The Washington, D.C.!-based Cuban American National Foundation board of directors named Jose Antonio Font as the lobbying group's executive director June 11, following the May resignation of Frank Calz6n. During that' special Miami meeting, CANF Vice President Jose Luis Rodriguez retracted his resignation which he had submitted to foundation chairman Jorge Mas Cariosa . "After meeting with the board of directors and airing out my problems, I am convinced that 1 am a vital part of the organization as one of the founders arid that it is in the best interest in the cause -of a free Cuba and the foundation for me to remain," the Palm Beach, Fla, businessman to _ ld Weekly Report. Font, founder of lt?,ero-Am. erican Ctiamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C., , said .he will follow the agenda by Calz6r1. Under Calz6n' s leadership CAN F succeeded in convincing the federal government to set up Radio Marti to ' broadcast into Cuba '. . Latino Media Rap INS News Flow Editors and executives of Spanish-language print and broadcast media around the nation are frustrated by the confusion and lack of information surrounding the federal immigration law, found a survey by Weekly Report. They see themselves as having a greater responsibility than do the general media Their readers, viewers and listeners are among those most affected by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Their responsibility as informers is hampered by an ill-informed, overburdened and often unresponsive federal bureaucracy, they charge. Many are forced to turn to social service agencies, lawyers, church-related organizations and Hispanic civil rights groups for information. Oscar Reyes, editor of El Pregonero, a Spanish-language weekly that serves the Washington, D.C., area, told Weekly Report that the Immigration and Naturalization Service repeatedly has been late in providing them with information. "We have reporters who are not proficient with the English language, so we also have to take the time to translate the INS forms," said Reyes. "It seems absurd to me that the INS is not providing information in Spanish. The people affected are for the most part recent arrivals who have not had the opportunity to study English." El Pregonero has a paid circulation of 10,000 and three reporters. Hugo Morales, executive director of I KSJV FM, a radio station in Fresno, Calif., said the station would not have been able to cover the law had it not been for several grants to gather information outside of INS. "We're not relying on INS. It has been inefficient, late with information and sometimes inaccurate," said Morales. KSJV, also known as Bilingiie, proLatino JobleSSness DrOps Hispanic un , empl6yment fell to ,., in May, a five-tenths of a pointdropfrom April, according to figu,res . releilsed by the U :S. Department of Labot's of Labor Statistics. The Latino rate, the lowest for this year and 1986, represents748,000 Hispanics who are reported to be out of work. duced a four-part series earlier this yeartwo programs in Spanish and two in Englishthat it provides free. Morales said that roughly 40 public radio stations picked up the programs nationwide. The next live program is scheduled for July 4. Funding for the series came pri marily from a $25,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The station has also received $1 00,000 from the Ford Foundation and $50,000 from the Rosenberg Foundation, part of which has gone to immigration pro gramming. Luis Fernandez, an assignment editor with Noticias del Mundo in New York City, agreed with Morales. "Generally, INS is not very cooperative with the Hispanic media "We're always having problems in getting information from them," he added Noticias del Mundo publishes Monday through Friday and has a circulation of 53,000. INS Concedes Limitation A spokesman for INS conceded the agency is somewhat limited in its ability to handle requests from Spanish-language media He mentioned, however, a Justice Department contract with three advertising agencies, two Hispanic, that are producing Spanislf' and English-language public service announce ments and ads. "Our contractor reports that with paid advertising they are reaching about 90% of Hispanic adults," said the spokesman, Verne Jervis. Jervis also noted that less than two months ago INS Commissioner Alan Nelson hired Luis Acle, a former White House public liaison, to meet with Hispanic media and organizations concerning the law. Acle, a Latino, was hired as a INS has eight professionals on its public affairs staffthree in Washington, D.C., two in California and one each in Miami, Oallas and Vermont. The one in Dallas is the only one that speaks Spanish. The agency has not provided a translation of the regulations or legalization form . Several media outlets have provided or plan to provide special programming or guides: • In Cl'\icago, "Noticentro44,"a nightly3Q minute television news show on station WSN&Channel 44, provided nightly reports continued on page 2

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Calif. Bilingual Ed. Deadline Near, Compromise Seen A five-year extension of California's bilingual education program was approved J'une 1 0 by the state Senate Education Committee, less than three weeks before the current program expires June 30. A similar bill passed the legislature last year and was vetoed by Gov. George Deuk mejian. The governor is threatening to veto the current bill unless changes are made. According to Benjamin L6pez, regional director in Sacramento for California Rural Legal Assistance and a lobbyist for the Cali fornia Bilingual Community Coalition, the changes center around a request by Deuk mejian for more "local flexibility'' in determining how the program will be administered L6pez claims that critics of the bill, drafted by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), want to see a more concentrated use of English in bilingual classrooms. Peter Mehas, assistant to Deukmejian for education, said local flexibility will ensure that the state's 1 ,028 school districts have more options in choosing programs. He gested that the limited number of authorized bilingual programs causes compliance pro blems for small districts without teachers trained in a variety of languages . The bill, expected to be passed by the full Legislature, gives local school boards an "experimentar• option that allows them to implement new or innovative programs as long as they have state approval. About 525,000 students are enrolled in California bilingual education programs. L6pez said the bilrs proponents are now working on compromise language. He added that "we do not have the votes" to override a gubernatorial veto. L6pez and Mehas told Weekly Report Deukmejian wants to sign a new bill before the authorization expires. If new legislation is not approved, the state program would continue but under less stringent federal law that gives local school boards greater discretion in implementing controversial teaching methods. Richard Sayre Latino Press Say INS an Impediment INS Begins Reviewing Mariel Detainee Cases continued from page 1 in May covering different aspects of the law. • El Herald, a daily newspaper in Miami with a week-day circulation of 75,000, runs a column once a week that answers questions from readers on the law. Angel Castillo, El Herald's editor, said the paper will publish a pamphlet within two months that will be a collection of 1 00 of the columns. • La Opini6n, in Los Angeles, a daily news paper with a circulation of 78,000, disseminated this spring 100,000 copies of a booklet it inserted in the paper. Also, in conjunction with the Los Angeles Times, La Opini6n pub lished a 16-page bilingual magazine dealing with the law. Very few of the media outlets reported an appreciable ' increase in advertising relating to immigration. All expressed a concern about individuals and businesses who offer services at exorbitant fees or promises that they cannot fulfill. Antonia Hernandez, president oft he Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, called on all Hispanic media earlier this year not to accept advertising having to do with the immigration law. Two media, Los Angeles' La Opini6n and television station Channel 48 in Albuquerque, N.M . ; accepted the exhortation . Weekly Report's survey found that one of the primary concerns expressed to Hispanic media by readers, listeners and viewers was fear of INS. In their editorial positions, nearly all Spanish-language media have encouraged those who are eligible for legalization to cooperate with INS and begin processing their papers. An exception is the California bilingual weekly La Prensa, San Diego, Its editor, Daniel Mui'loz Jr., told Weekly Report: "Asking immigrants to trust INS is like going back to World War II and asking the Jews to turn their lives over to the Gestapo." -Felix Perez The Immigration and Naturalization Service began June 15 reviewing records of about 4,000 Cuban refugees held at detention cen ters or federal prisons across the United States to decide if they should be released, according to Verne Jervis, an INS spokesman. INS Commissioner Alan Nelson approved the procedure in late May. The agency will use three two-man teams to screen those refugees being indefinitely held . The detainees were among the 125,000 persons who arrived in the United States aboard the 1980 Mariel boatlift The INS teams will travel to facilities in Miami, Oakdale, La, and Atlanta where most of the prisoners are located. Hispanic Firms Ring Up $10 Billion A U.S. law says that aliens found guilty of a felony or a series of misdemeanors are "ex cludable," even if the acts were committed in their native country. The imprisoned refugees were set to be repatriated in 1985 but Cuba's President Fidel Castro refused when the U . S . government began beaming Radio Marti broad casts there that year. The top 500 Hispanic-owned businesses. led by Bacardi Imports and lnternationa. Medical Centers, rang up almost $1 0 billion in 1986 sales, Hispanic Business \ magtizine reported in its June issue. This is the fifth year Hispanic Business compiled the list Overall sales for the 500 increased from $7.5 billion in 1984 to $8.7 billion in 1985, reaching $9.9 billion last year. Eight of the top 1 0 were on the list in 1985. Newcomers were Handy Andy Super markets of San Antonio (No. 9) and First Federal Savings Bank of Santurce, Puerto Rico (No. 1 0). Five of the top 1 0 were based in Puerto Rico, led by Bacardl, which was founded in 1862. "The average firms on the list were founded in the 1970s," said Steve Beale, senior editor at the magazine. California contributed the most firms to the top 500, with 118. Florida followed with 102. Then came Texas, 61; Puerto Rico, 48; and New York, 34. 2 Last year Bacardll mports' earnings dropped $50 million from the $41715 million the firm earned in 1985. IMC, a health maintenance firm based in Miami, was sold this year to a non-Hispanic firm, the Humans hospital group, after encountering many legal and financial difficulties. HISPANIC 500 COMPANIES Those released may be sent to halfway houses, to their families or to participate in special programs. Presently, the United States and Cuba are not negotiating the return of the refugees . Alvarado Chosen by Board Anthony Alvarado, the former New York City School chancellor who resigned his post under pending charges of misconduct, was The Top Ten-1986 Firm Sales hired June 12 as superintendent of a Manhattan Bacardl Imports, Miami *Inti. Medical Centers, Miami Banco Popular de Puerto Rico, San Juan Goya Food Inc., Seacaucus, N.J. V. Suflrez and Co. Inc., San Juan Bacardl Corp. San Juan Banco de Ponce, San Juan Vanir Group, San Bernardino, Calif. Handy Andy Supermarkets, San Antonio Millions school district. $425 Alvarado, 45, was given the nod after a 6-2 420 vote by the board of School District 2. He 406 t ' was selected over 62 candidates for the 265: ;.&...$89,0QO-a-year job. The school district has 260 i 1 7,600 students and 32 schools. Alvarado resigned in 1984 as chancellor of 180 the nation's largest school system amid charges 170 that he accepted more than $80,000 in loans 1st Fed Savings Bank; Santurce, P.R. 139 from subordinates while he was a district . superintendent and that he failed to report $128,000 in income on his tax returns. *IMC was -ntlysoJd to the Humane hospital group. Souroe: Hispanic Business magazine, June 198 7. AIIIPiinic Link Weekly Report

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Miguel Perez, guest columnist Rafael Shares a Scoop "Maestro, you're not going to believe this. It would be a great story, but I can only tell you off the record." The voice in my telephone was familiar, the nickname was accurate, but there was something wrong with this scoop. It was coming from a fellow journalist. No one else calls me maestro, so it had be my friend Rafael Prieto . I was never his teacher, but Colombians use that term very loosely . Rafael calls everyone maestro, and this time, about a month ago, he was calling to give me a tip. I was skeptical at first because journalists seldom share a good story with their com petitors. But I listened, and then I laughed uncontrollably. It was a great story that couldn't be toldat least until now. "I'm calling you from City Hall, where the mayor just named a committee to advise him on issues dealing _ with immigration," Rafa _ el said. "And guess what? I'm on it." "But Rafael , how can you do that? Aren't you an illegal alien?" "Yes, maestro, thafs the story. They named me without knowing . " Typical Koch. When he does something well, ifs unintentional. This was one of the best appointments he ever made-finding someone who really has first-hand knowledge of the problems of illegal aliens-_ but it wasn't because he is truly sensitive to their needs . He just didn ' t know any better. FOOLED OTHER OFFICIALS Rafael was appointed because he is the assistant editor at the daily Noticias del Mundo. He asked me not to be too harsh on the mayor . After all, this is notthe firsttime he has fooled government officials. Unlike most illegal aliens, who normally live in hiding, Rafael always figured that the more exposure he received, the less people would be likely to think he was illegal. And thus, he was able to assert himself, making significant contributions to U.S. Spanish-language news media, which would be in sad shape without many Latino journalists who have been living here illegally. Even Rafaers U.S. entry was done in daring style . He flew to Mexico from his native Colombia, where he had been a journalist, and paid a legal U .S. resident $300 to give him a lift across the Mexican border. They drove from Tijuana to San Diego on a Sunday afternoon in January 1979. "They saw my white complexion and they didn't ask me any questions. We drove right through," he said. They drove to Rafaers cousin's house in Los Angeles. After eight months of doing qdd jobs, from door-to-door surveys to selling hamburgers , he started working as a reporter for La Opini6n. He covered U.S . presidential elections, obtaining security clearance from the Secret Service. INVITED TO WHITE HOUSE TWICE Later, as editor of the Los Angeles edition of Noticias, he was twice invited to White House news conferences, one with President Reagan and one with the infamous Lt. Col. Oliver North. Once he held an editorial board meeting with Harold Ezell, Western regional commissioner for the U.S . Immigration and Naturalization Service, making sure that all the journalists interviewing Ezell were illegals. "I wasn't doing it to make a fool out of him," Rafael told me recently . " I wanted people who could ask the right questions." When 1 first met Rafael in 1982 at a Latino journalists' conference in San Diego, 1 couldn' t understand why he so adamantly refused to go to Tijuana with a group of us for dinner one night. Years later, he explained . "I would have loved having dinner with you that mght, maestro, but I'm not stupid." This month, Rafael applied for amnesty and received, for the first time in eight years, official authorization from the U .S. government. Now he must prove he has been living here since Jan. 1, 1982. What better proof than a 1980 Secret Service pass card? (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Sin pelos en Ia /engua TODAY'S SPANISH LESSON: If for no other reason than to stop its reporters from maiming simple Spanish names, TVs20/20 news magazine should rehire Geraldo Rivera. In a belated Wedtech expose the other night, one reporter(they all look alike to me now) couldn' t even cope with such simple surnames as Cardenas and Zufliga First came former Small Business Administration chief Mike C6rdenas, who told veinte/veinte that he was fired , by .the Cas a_ Blanca :suspiciously ; soon after refusing to give Wedtech an obscenely obese, undeserved military contract. Cardenas was repeatedly identified as car-DEEN-us. Then ex-White House aide Henry Zufliga, who was on camera long enough to say that he saw no evil, heard no evil and spoke no evil , was butchered into zoo-NAY-guh. Please, Geraldo, come back and roll your rrrrr's for us. TODAY'S HEALTH HINT: Moustaches may be good for your machismo but they're bad for your batting average. New York Mets' star first-baseman Keith Hem6ndez shaved off his bigote June 10 after cultivating it for _ eight years. That afternoon he faced the rival Chicago Cubs bare-lipped and hit two home runs-the first time he'd accomplished such a feat since 1980. THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: President Reagan's recent sug gestion to Mikhail Gorbachev that he tear down the Berlin Wall brought no positive response. A recent proposal by INS Western Regional Commissioner Harold Ezell that a concrete wall be constructed near Otay Mesa, along the Mexico-California border, solicited no great huzzahs, either. So, suggests reader Carlos Consafos, why not package the pair and wrap them in some Yankee ingenuity? Buy the Berlin Wall from the Russians, ship it to California and reassemble it on the mesa as a tourist attraction. (It could compete with the London Bridge, which has been in nearby Arizona since '71.) Consafos points out that if Ezell catches any nasty illegal aliens scribbling graffiti on his barrier , he could also arrest them for defacing government property. CONFUSION OF THE DAY: A half-hour "sexually explicif' documentary on safe sex-which may or may not be shown on national TVincludes the Presidenfs son Ron dangling a prophy lactic on camera. In a Newsweek interview published June 22, Ron also charges U.S . Secretary of Education William Bennett with "pandering" to the right wing with his call for widespread AIDS testing. The Newsweek account reports that on the show, " Panamanian salsa superstar Ruben Blades dresses a banana in a condom." The Washington Post quotes Newsweek as reporting that Blades "appears dressed as a banana wearing a condom. " There's a difference, no, Chiquita_? Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • MARTIN SHEEN, in a June 4 commentary in The Los Angeles Times on the homeless : "Our modern society simply will not tolerate failure. Those among us who dare to fail are further doomed to removal from our midst by whatever means necessary, lest their continual presence remind us of our common human frailties. .. " CLARENCE PAGE, black columnist writing in the June 14 Chicago Tribune: "Four out of five drug users with AIDS are black or Hispanic. .. Yet black or Hispanic leaders have not jumped out in front to lead the fight against this deadly invasion. "One reason: Blacks and Hispanics, in spite of the liberal political leaders they elect can be just as conservative as Jerry Falwell in their view of gays and lesbians." Hispanic Link Weekly Report June 22, 1987 3

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COLLECTING IMMIGRATION LAW RADIO CASSETTES: Radio Bil i ngue has made available four 3D-minute programs, two in Spani sh and two in English , dealing with the immigration law . The two English-language tapes cover discrimination in the workplace and employer sanctions; the Spanish-language ones explain qualifying and d i squalifying factors for legalization. To order a cassette, send $2 and a self addressed envelope to: Radio Bilingue , P .O. Box 12682, Fresno , Calif . 93778. IMMIGRATION LAW BOOKLET: Gerardo L6pez , the reporter for the Los Angeles daily newspaper La Opini6n who wrote for the paper a Spanish-language immigration law booklet, recently released a 28page update titled " Legalizaci6n guia para Ia nueva ley de inmigraci6n. " The update includes a legislative history, a nationwide listing of Catholic agencies offering assistance for legalization, and farm worker and legalization provisions . For a copy, send $2 to L6pez at P .O. Box 2261 , San Gabriel, Calif. 91788. HISPANIC TOP 500 FIRMS: Hispanic Business magazine has published its fifth annual listing of Hispanic-operated firms ranked by 1986 sales. For a copy of the June 1987 issue , send $3.50 with your request to: Hispan i c Business , 360 S . Hope Ave., Suite 1 00-C, Santa Barbara , Calif . 931 05. ESSAY CONTEST: "How W i ll The Americas Be In The Year 2001?" is the topic of the 1987 La Raza Writing Project sponsored by Americas 2001 magazine . The contest is open to all ages. Win ners will be selected in five age groups. Essays may be written in English or Spanish and should be 3-5 typewritten pages . Send entries to: Americas 2001, c/o La Raza Writing Project, P.O. Box 4028, Terminal Annex, Los Angeles, Calif . 90051-2048. (213) 7272046. HISPANIC CATHOLIC PROFILE: " The H i spanic Catholic in the United States: A Sociocultural and Religious Profi l e " is a 230-page book detailing the results of a nationwide survey of Hispanic Catholics. For a copy of the book, send $12 to: Northeast Pastoral Center for Hispanics, 1011 First Ave., New York, N . Y . 10022 (212) 751-7045 . . CONNECTING HACU PROJECT FUNDED The Ford Foundation awarded a $49,036 planning grant to the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities for a project to examine the low rate of Hispanic high school graduates enrolling in community colleges, it was announced June 11. The six-month project, Hispan i c Student Success Program, will also address the high dropout rate of Latino students at these schools. Those working on the .project will meet with superintendents of school districts with large Hispanic enrollments, community leaders and organizations, college administrators and corporate representatives. HACU will submit a final proposal to several funding sources for the development of the pilot program. MINORITY VOLUNTEERS WANTED The W . K Kellogg Foundation will award $1,387,064 to the United Way of Americ;:t for a program to increase minority volunteer involve men t and support to minority organizations, it announced June 1. The program , Project Blueprint, is designed to involve Un ited Way's 2,300 affiliates nationally . It will also establish a computerized i nformation system to track programs and services available for minorities and the community. DROPOUT BOOKLET IN WORKS The National Hispanic Dropout Task Force, formed by the League of United Latin American Citizens' national board of directors in March to address the 50% Latino dropout rate, is seeking recom mendations for a booklet it plans to publish in October. The booklet will include articles written by Hispanic professionals on each oft he following areas of concern identified by the task force: school curriculum, teacher sensitivity , parental involvement , studen t performance , school boards of education and counseling . Recommendations should be mailed to: Andres Tobar , Chairman , LULAC National Hispanic Dropout Task Force , P . O . Box 44082, Washington , D .C. 20026 (202) 347-1493. Calendar Diaz Dennis w i th a luncheon and honor outstanding women in the community with a dinner banquet U .S. Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole will be the keynote speaker at the banquet. to graduating high school seniors during the i r 11 th annual banq u et. Ram6n Diaz (213) 695 VETERANS AFFAIRS CONFERENCE San Juan , Puerto Rico June 27 THIS WEEK LULAC NATIONAL CONVENTION Corpus Christi, Texas June 24-28 " The Path to Progress " is the theme of the 58th annuar League of United Latin American C i tizens ' national convention and trade fair . Seven Democratic contenders for the 1 988 presidential race are ex pected to address the conventi on, as well as U .S. Sen . Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros. The organization will also hold its national elections. Ruben Bonilla (512) 882-8284 CELEBRATION OF TWO CONSTITUTIONS Philadelphia June 24-28 A celebration of the constitutions of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is being sponsored by the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women . The five-day convention will feature re-enactments , mock trials, films and dis cussions on the history and effects of the constitutions. An awards banquet, featuring R i ta Moreno, who is convention chairperson, will he held June 27 . Marianne DeJesus (215) 247-8434. RECOGNITION BANQUETS M i ami June 25 The Lati n Chamber of Commerce will welcome Federal Communications Commiss ioner Patricia 4 . Maria Elena Toraiio (305) 579-2180 MINORITY FINANCIAL CONFERENCE Chicago June 25-26 A National Conference for Minority tutions i s being sponsored by the U . S . Department of Housing and Urban Development The conference will discuss how bankers , insurance companies and savings and loan associations can participate in government-related housing finance programs . Robert Nipp (202) 7556980 HISPANIC WOMEN'S NETWORK Miam i June 25 The National Network of Hispanic Women is spon soring its second annual roundtable for business and corporate leaders entitled " Leadership for America ' s Future." The conference w ill offer 40 workshops in the areas of entrepreneurship , man agement and a series for college women. Fred Alvarez, a member of the Equal Employment Op portunity Comm i ssion, and Federal Commun i cations Commissioner Patr icia Diaz Dennis will be among the speakers . Celia Torres (213) 459 141 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Los Angeles June 26 The Los Angeles region of American G . I. Forum will award32 scholarships ranging from $500 to$6,000 June 22 , 1987 A House Veterans Affairs subcommittee will hold hearings in Puerto R ico to review services provided to veterans in Puerto Rico by the Veterans stration . Marylin Garcia (809) 7236333 . HISPANIC CULTURE FEST Dallas June 27 A " TexMex Salute to Hispanic Cul!ure" will raise money fo r the development of educational programs at the Anita Martinez Ballet Folkl6rico program . Beth Wilson (214) 871 EDUCATION CONFERENCE Los Angeles June 27 "Educational Excellence and Access for Every Studenf' is the theme of the National Education Association ' s joint conference on concerns of minorities and women . Bilingual educat i on, illiteracy and affirmative action will be among the topics addressed . Vanessa Robinson (202) 822 COMING SOON LANGUAGE RIGHTS SEMINAR Northern California Language Rights Team Fresno , Calif June 30 Eric Vega (916) 444 Hispan i c Link Weekly Report

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UNITED WAY OF AMERICA Alexandria, Virginia Seeks to fill positions for " Project Blueprinf' -a new program designed to increase minority involvement in United Way. Associate Directorwill desig!Vimplement plan for providing technical assistance to local United Ways in developing/strengthen i ng respective minority involvement programs. Communications Associatewill produce a variety of communication materials (i.e . , newsletters, brochures, booklets, etc . ) re searched, designed and targeted toward specific audiences . Sr. Research Associate will develop , manage and guide the computerized infor mation system component of Project Blueprint for purpose of helping local United Ways obtain pertinent community data for program planning . Administrative Secretary-will provide administrative and secretarial support to pro ject staff . Call Diana C . Torres at(703) 836 00 ext . 43. 1 or 522 for detailed job descriptions . Resumes needed by June 26, 1987. MANAGER OF RESEARCH & EVALUATION Kent County, Michigan Duties: Developing and implementing pro cedures for determining the effectiveness and efficiency of service delivered by the Kent County CMH Board . A mastefs degree in human service, social science, behavioral science, or related field Specific training in evaluation and research methods and in human services administration . Work experience using computer systems for data managemen ' t and statistical analysis, ex perience in developing and implementing evalu ation designs in actual human service settings, and experience in delivery of human services. All applications for County employment must be made on the County application form Kent county Personnel Department Room 205, County Administration Bldg. 300 Monroe, NW Grand Rapids, Mich . 49503 (616) 774 PUBLICITY & ADVERTISING Lehman Center for the Performing Arts seeks individual to take charge of Publicity and Adver tising. Responsible for all press relations and publicity , including writing of press releases, program editing, advertising layout, coordinating of public relations events. Strong writing and editing skills. Plan budget and ad minister marketing campaign forCentefs series and individual events. Supervise group sales. B .A. degree plus 3 years experience in per forming arts promotion . Position available on oraroundJuly1,1987. Salaryrangeto$22,000, commensurate with experience. Excellent fringe benefits. Send resume to: Managing Director Lehman Center for the Performing Arts Inc. Bedford Park Blvd. West Bronx, N .Y. 1 0468 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER Hispanic Link Weekly Report CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Indiana University We invite nominations and applications fort he position of Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Indiana University , Bloomington, to assume office on or before July 1, 1988. The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest and most extensive academic unit in Bloomington , the major campus of the university . The College comprises 40 academic departments and 20 interdisciplinary programs. Doctoral degrees are offered in49 areas , many of which are ranked among the best in the nation . The College has a fuiHimefaculty of more than 750, a current undergraduate major enrollment of 7 , 1 00, and a graduate enrollment of 2,800 through the Graduate School. The College also interacts with other academic units on the Bloomington campus . The Dean is the chief administrator of the College and reports directly to the Vice President of the Bloomington campus. The Dean is responsible for the instructional programs of the college , the development and enhancement of College faculty strengths, and the formulation and execution of College budgetary policies. The Dean has a unique opportunity to shape undergraduate and graduate education and to foster research on the Bloomington campus. The Dean at Indiana University enjoys more than the typical amount of autonomy . Candidates for the Deanship should be able to demonstrate a commitment to and an understanding of all aspects of the educational enterprise . They should have a record of outstanding scholarship and successful administrative performance. We seek a creative, dynamic, and innovative leader who is dedicated to excellence . In keeping with its commitment to affirmative action, Indiana University particularly seeks information about, or an expression of interest from , minority or women candidates. plications and nominations received by August 15 , 1987, are assured of consideration Please direct nominations and inquiries to: James C . Craig Search and Screen Committee Department of Psychology Indiana University Bloomington, Ind. 47405 (81 :2) 335 MARKETING MANAGER Marketing Manager respons i ble for ing a Fortune 500 company's national Hispanic Markel Boston location . Salary mid to high 50's. Send resume to: L. Mays Jane C . Edmonds & Associates Inc. 4 Copley Place , Suite 580 Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 437-9840 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The California Association for Bilingual Edu cation seeks an executive director. Metro area . Contact CASE, 926 J $1., Suite 810, Sacramento, CA 95814. (916) 447-3986 EOE BILINGUAL COUNSELORS Washington, D.C. The Division of Bilingual Education of the D.C. Public Schools is seeking bilingual couneelora to work in the schools. Candidates must be eligible for certification, residents (or willing to become residents) of the District, bilingual in English and Spanish, and have an understanding of the cultural and social characteristics of the Central American community . For more infor mation, call Dr. Hugo C . Galindo at (202) 282 0174. ENTRY LEVEL POSITiONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street-------------City, State & Zip----------Area Code & Phone _______ _

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Arts & Entertainment at North Riverside Park June 24-27. Pan Am Mania continues its tour through July in St. Louis, Kansas City, Mo., Dallas, Austin , San Antonio and El Paso. ART FOR THE GAMES: A series of art events commemorate the staging of this summer's 1Oth Pan American Games, to be held Aug. 7 to 23 in Indianapolis. Back in Indianapolisthe second U . S . city to host the pre-Olympic Games-the Pan American Arts Festival continues through August. Highlights to come include: The first major thematic Latin American exhibition to be held in this country since 1966 opens this week at the Indianapolis Museum of Art as part of the city's Pan American Arts Festival . e Chamber Music Festival (July) Musical programs from the Americas at the Indianapolis Museum of Art . Works by 29 artists from three successive generations make up the exhibit, titled The Art of the Fantastic: Latin America 1920-198 7 . Some 11 0 pieces by the artists-representing 10 Latin American nationswill be on view in Indianapolis June 27 to Sept. 13. e Music of the Americas (July 11) Outdoor concert with Chilean folk singer Paula Monsalve, at the I.M.A e Costa Rican Landscapes by Echeveria (July 17 to Aug . 25), at the city's Community Center for the Arts. • Fiesta '87 (Aug . 1) Day of activities celebrating Hispanic culture in central Indiana, at the downtown Hispano-American Center. The Art of the Fantastic ' s touring schedule includes dates in New York (Oct. 10 to Dec. 6) , Miami (January to March) and Mexico City (March to May). Another traveling event related to the Games continues its schedule this week in Chicago . Pan Am Mania, an exhibit and demonstration by six Latin American artisans, with music and entertainment, will be ONE LINERS: John "Jellybean" Benitez, , considered the first club OJ to "hif' as a performer, has completed his second album, Just Visiting the Planet. . . And La Sonora Poncena inaugurates the Salsa Meets Jazz series at the Hollywood Palace, June 23-24 ... I Media Report CLIO AWARDS: Enthusiastic Hispanic response to a special "Hispanic markets" category in the annual national Clio awards competition bodes well for future Latino par ticipation. A Hispanic category was included for the first time in Clio's 28-year history this month. It drew 26 entries in the radio category, 53 in television and just one in print. The winners, announced 1June12 and 15, were: "-dlo: Bermudez& Associates, Los Angeles, for a Mountain Bell ad, "Sisters." Television: Foote , Cone and Belding/Moir productions, New York, for a Pepsi commercial , "Orummer." No award was given in print. However, Clio vice-president Nancy Ross told Weekly Report that the sa Clios would probably . be expanded into more divisions per category (e.g., cosmetics, automotive , etc.) because of what she termed a "very, very HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link N4LWS Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234..0280 or 234..0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez . Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias Rentas, Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre . , Carlos Arrien. Zoila Elias, Yanira Cruz. ''No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced J>r broadcast in any form without advance permissiOn. ; Annual subscription (50 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 75 cents per word • ' •" are $35 per c olumn in c h . Ads placed by run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same use rates on request. 6 good response" to Clio's initial invitation to Hispanic agency participation . MUNDO LATINO: Unlvlslon is trimming its morning variety and interview show, Mundo Latino, from 3 1/2 hours back to its original 1 1/2 hours effective JulyS . The program will run from 9:3011 am. instead of 7:3011. Mundo Latino will continue live from Mexico City, but will no longer include its live segments from Miami or its recorded segments from Los Angeles. The 7 :30 9 :30 slot will be filled with an exercise show and nove/as. Approximately 30 staff members are affected in Miami, with about 20 more impacted in Los Angeles. How many of them can or will be retained by Univision through transfer to other productions isn't yet certain , spokeswoman Maiti Saralegui told Weekly Report . The move was made because of low early morning ratings and high production costs, she said READER'S SHELF: TheJune8 Newsweek offered a two-page report on poverty in Texas' lower Rio Grande Valley. . . lntercambios Femen/les, converting from newsletter format to slick magazine with its spring issue, profiles -Antonio Mejias-Rentas . six successful Latinas, cubanas Remedios Diaz-Oiiver, Nancy Marquez and Rita Rodri guez; puertorriquenas Diana Torres and Marisa Reyes; and ohicana Lena Guerrero ... IN MOTION: Jose Rios, news assignment manager with Los Angeles ' KCB8TV, has been promoted to assistant news director there... Bill Torres, assistant news editor at the Santa Fe New Mexican, has been named its news editor ... Ray Blanco, manager of station relations and New Jersey affairs for New York-based WCBS.TV, won a Sigma Delta Chi award as director of production on a "War on CrackNew Jersey Schools " series which aired last September and October. Built in were com munity outreach activities and a special video for schools. .. ELSEWHERE: Unlvlslon reported a 46% increase in gross revenues for January-May '87 over last year's billings. .. The New York Dally News settled a land mark federal discrimination case brought by four black editorial employees out-of-court on June 1 0 for a reported $3.1 million ... Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Weekly Report