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Hispanic link weekly report, June 29, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 29, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Richard Romero of Long Beach and Henry Barela of West Covina as municipal court judges for the East Los Angeles Judicial District... Texas state Rep. Dan Morales(D-San Antonio) is named one of the state’s seven top legislators by the Dallas Morning News. Texas has 181 state legislators.. Don C6rdova, former president of the Hispanic Bar Association and a Denver lawyer for22 years, assumes the position of president of the Denver Bar Association... The Utah Jazz, a professional basketball team, selects Puerto Rican Jos6 Ortiz as the 15th pick in the first round of the National Basketball Association’s annual draft. Ortiz, a
6-foot-10-inch 225-pounder who t&^gon State, has
played only two years of college basketball... Juana Leija receives a 10-year probated sentence from a Tejcas State di&r-jct court judge after pleading no contest to murdeeaHd plena‘capital murder charges. Leija, claiming her actions were precipitated by the physical and emotional abuse of her husband, threw six of her seven children into Houston’s muddy Buffalo Bayou April 18, 1986. Two of the children died. The day after the conviction, Leija filed for divorce and custody of the children... Lisa V6lez, the popular lead singer of the pop band Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam, bids $1.5 million for the remains of Britain’s “Elephant Man” John Merrick. Michael Jackson had earlier unsuccessfully bid $1 million for the bones of the deformed Merrick, who died in 1890...

Salvadorans Organize Nationally
The U.S. Salvadoran community is now attempting to organize nationally in defense of half a million “stateless” countrymen - the biggest losers in the passage of the 1986 Simpson-Rodino immigration bill.
A new and expanding umbrella organization, the Central American Refugee Network, or CARNET, will meet for the second time July 4-5 in Washington, D.C., to develop a unified strategy to represent the interests of Salvadorans and other Central Americans now residing in the United States.
CARNET was founded in February when 34 organizations that furnish legal, social and educational services to Central American refugees- the vast majority from El Salvador - sent representatives from as far away as Boston to the first meeting in Los Angeles.
Roberto Alfaro, one of seven CARNET coordinators and director of El Rescate,which provides social and legal assistance to refugees in Los Angeles, says that the network will lobby Congress to build support for the Moakley-DeConcini bill. That legislation, named for sponsors Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.) and Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.), suspends for two years the deportation of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans while the U.S. General Accounting Office can conduct a study into the reasons for the high levels of migration of Central Americans to the United States. CARNET wants to see that Guatemalans also are protected by the bill.
CARNET will monitor the treatment of re-
Los Angeles County residents, including half of the Latinos polled, believe there are too many immigrants in the county, according to results of a Los Angeles Times poll released June 21.
Across the county, 62% said the influx of immigrants is too high. Hispanics, by a 3-to-2 margin, say Latino influence and values have changed Los Angeles for the better.
The newspaper polled 2,055 Los Angeles County residents by telephone between June 13 and June 17. Of those, 923 respondents lived in the city of Los Angelea
fugees across the country and may bring lawsuits on their behalf. The network also plans an education campaign to teach refugees their rights in this country and to inform the U.S. public about the concerns of Central Americans who are here. It will not furnish social services That remains the responsibility of its 34 member organizations.
Salvadoran Embassy officials in Washington believe that only 40% of the estimated800,000 to 900,000 Salvadorans in the United States are legal residents or eligible to legalize their status under the’86 immigration law. To be eligible, they must prove that they arrived before Jan. 1, 1982, and have lived here continuously since then.
One embassy official, Alfredo Mili&n, says that the majority of Salvadoran refugees in the United States are unskilled peasants who left the country's eastern and northern provinces in the early ’80s during the worst of the violence.
Another CARNET coordinator, Linton Joaquin, describes the organization’s focus as “helping those immigrants who don’t qualify for legalization to deal with life in this country as unrecognized refugees.” Joaquin, who directs the service agency Carecen in Los Angeles, sees the immigration law as having “a devastating impact on the refugee community.” They can’t work here and they can’t go home, he says.
Reports of refugees being illegally fired,
continued on page 2
Of white residents polled, 66% said there were too many immigrants; 55% of blacks agreed. Almost 40% of the whites surveyed saw Latinos detracting from the quality of life in Los Angeles, while 33% of blacks believed that.
Race and geographic boundaries seemed to divide the poll. Sixty-one percent of blacks and 43% of Hispanics listed crime as the biggest problem, while 32% of whites agreed.
Growth and traffic issues were of most concern to whites, 61% of whom advocated slower development in contrast to faster growth desired by blacks (64%) and Latinos (58%).
Official Language Bills Initiated in 37 States
Thirty-seven state legislatures have considered English-only legislation in 1987, more than twice the 1986 total, according to a June 17 update of an April Weekly Report survey. The update was compiled by reporter Jim Crawford for the publication Education Week.
Bills or constitutional amendments are newly pending in Alabama, Michigan and Wisconsin. Petition drives to put the issue on the 1988 ballot as constitutional amendments have been organized recently in Arizona and Colorado.
A Weekly Report survey published April 20 found that 31 state legislatures were embroiled in the language controversy. Since then, legislation has been withdrawn or now is considered unlikely to see further action in Nevada, Oregon and West Virginia
Connecticut, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota and New York have all defeated English-only legislation since the Weekly Report survey.
English is the official language in 12 statea Arkansas, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Carolina passed official-English laws in 1987.
Sena Sainthood Weighed
Father Junlpero Serra, a Spanish priest who founded nine Franciscan missions along the California coast from 1767 to 1784, is being considered this month for sainthood by the Roman Catholic Church.
. Serra will be elevated to the second of three steps to sainthood, known as beatification, if a subcommittee of five physicians appointed by the church determines that there is no medical explanation for the healing of a U.S. nun who prayed forSerra’s help more than 25 years ago. A favorable decision by the subcommittee will send the case to nine theologians who then will judge whether the cure constituted a miracle Serra was named “venerable,” the first of the three beatification steps, in 1985.
Supporters of Serra’s sainthood hope that beatification will be forwarded to Pope John Paul II before he visits California in September.
L.A. Complaint: ‘Too Many Immigrants’


N.Y.C. Hispanic Poor Increase While City Prospers
Poverty rates among New York City His-panics are continuing to rise despite a period of economic prosperity in the city, says a report issued June 11.
“Poverty In New York City; 1980-1985” shows that Hispanic poverty rates went from 35.7% in 1979 to 42.9% in 1984. For Puerto Ricans, who make up the largest subgroup, the 1984 rate was 48%.
The report examines public assistance, Medicaid, public housing and food stamps and shows that “many poor people in New York City have, somehow, been missed,” according to author Terry Rosenburg, director of the population studies unit of the Community Service Society, which issued the report.
Using the federally defined level of poverty for a family of four - $10,609 - the report found that 1984 New York Hispanic family income was close to that level at $13,280. White families earned an average of $31,000 and blacks $17,344.
Of all poor New York families, only 58%, or 220,000, received some form of public assistance in 1984. Only 19.5% or 75,000 poor families lived in public housing, Rosenburg said.
Rosenburg told Weekly Report that three trends contributed to the Hispanic poverty increase.
NEW YORK CITY POVERTY
1979 1984
Number* Rate Number* Rate
White 550 12.9%
Black 520 29.5
Hispanic** 498 35.7 All Groups 1,391 20.2
1,015 20.1% 650 32.7 781 42.9 1,735 23.5
* In thousands
** Hispanics also counted in black and white categories.
Source: “Poverty in New York City: 1980-1985" by Population Studies Unit, Community Service Society of New York.
Primarily, many manufacturing jobs were lost while new employment opportunities required higher levels of education^ Most of the lost jobs affected Hispanic women, she said.
Rosenburg described teenage pregnancy as becoming almost“epidemic” in New York. “Of all groups, Hispanic young women between the ages of 14 and 16 are more likely to become pregnant.”
She also blamed cuts in federal assistance programs, such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children.
Hispanic female-headed families increased from 76,270 in 1979 to 122,731 in 1984. The 1984 poverty rate for single Latina households was 80%, the highest of all groups.
Using data from the March 1985 Current Population Survey and from the 1980 Census, the report shows that in 1984 there were 539,561 poor Puerto Ricans, more than twice as many as other Hispanics.
- Melinda Machado
U.S. Salvadorans Establish CARNET
continued from page 1
exploited and shaken down by employers for “hiring fees” are commonplace among relief organizations
Canada is no longer an alternative refuge for those in the United States. Officials there became alarmed when thousands sought asylum late last year and early this year. Before, that government allowed asylum-seekers to stay in Canada until their scheduled hearings Now petitioners cannot enter the country until'their, hearing dates
Currently, CARNET has no independent staff, offices or budget Queries about the
Bottler Drowning Probed
FBI agents are expected to complete their investigation by June 29 concerning the Involvement of;two U.S. Border Patrol agents in the June 8 drowning of a Mexican national crossing the Rio Grande from Juctrez, Mexico, into El Paso, Texas, on a rubber raft
According to witnesses, the agents ignored the pleas of 25-year-old Armando Valenzuela and pulled on a rope attached to the raft, causing it to tip over. The Juarez man, who could not swim, drowned while three other men on the craft swam to the Mexican side of the river.
“The attitude of the border patrol was very callous/’said attorney John Garcia, district director of the League of United Latin American Citizens.
Garcia called on U.S. Rep. Ron Coleman (D-Texas) to request a congressional investigation of the matter.
Coleman expects to meet with Garcia and other LULAC members following the release of the report. An internal inquiry by the border patrol cleared the agents, who have not been identified, of any wrongdoing.
organization are channeled to Joaquin and Alfaro. The seven coordinators plan initiatives and pass information to its 34 members, using money from their own organizations’ budgets. At the Washington meeting, they will try to streamline CARNETs decisionmaking process and make policy implementation more effective.
TEN CITIES REPRESENTED
Reflecting the geographic dispersion of Salvadoran immigrants, CARNET includes eight organizations from Los Angeles, seven from Washington, D.C., six from San Francisco, three each from Chicago and New York City, and two each from Boston and Houston. There is one affiliate each from Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz| and Santa Cruz, Calif.
Member organizations are supported in large part by church groups. The Southern California Ecumenical Council founded El Rescate in 1981 to serve Los Angeles? growing refugee population. Carecen, with offices in New York, San Francisco, Houston and Washington, D.C., receives support from Catholic religious orders and Lutheran, Methodist, Episcopalian and Presbyterian churches and groups. Two members of CARNET are part of the Sanctuary movement. Eight others are connected with church organizations or named in memory of the Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, murdered by suspected right-wing gunmen as he celebrated Mass in San Salvador in March 1980.
Most share a disdain for U.S. policy in El Salvador, claiming that U.S. support for the government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte prolongs the war that is at the root of their problems. These groups call for Duarte to renew long-stalled negotiations with rebel forces
- Richard Sayre
Dadd’s Superintendent Offered $125,000 Pay
Incoming Dade County School Superintendent Joseph Femdndez negotiated a$125,000-a-year contract with the chairman of the school board June 18. The contract makes Fern&ndez and Nathan Quiftones, the chancellor of New York City public schools who also makes $125,000, two of the four highest paid superintendents in the nation.
The full Dade County school board was expected to approve Fernandez’s contract June 24.
Leonard Britton, who preceded Fernandez in Miami, will be the only superintendent earning more than the two. He will make $134,000 in his new position as superintendent of the Los Angeles schools.-
Collegians Join Job Force
Forty-four percent of the Latino college students who graduated from high school in 1986 were in the labor force in October of that year, compared with 29% for blacks and 50% for whites according to a report released June9 by U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
In October 1986, there were 75,000 of those Hispanic college students 33,000 were in the labor force - employed or actively seeking work. Of those who were in the labor force, 91% were holding jobs The percentages of black and white college students who were in the labor force and employed were 80.5% and 87.4%, respectively.
The report also noted that 64.5% of all 1986 Hispanic high school graduates, 53.9% of black and 65.5% of white were in the civilian labor force.
Overall, 169,000 Latinos graduated from high school in 1986 and 127,000 Hispanic high school students dropped out between October 1985 and October 1986.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Richard Salvatierra, guest columnist
The Fires of Racism
As the U.S. government moves ahead to implement the landmark immigration reform legislation enacted by Congress last year, it is a good time to pause and reflect. One aspect of this process is quite disturbing.
Concurrent with the efforts that have been made in recent years to bring about immigration reform, there have surfaced extremist views on the kind of immigration the United States should settle for in the future. In the last couple of years in particular, there have been numerous individuals and a few organizations proclaiming, in effect, that future newcomers to this country should all be white and preferably, as before, from Northern and Western Europe.
The proponents of this idea display a siege mentality. For them, the ideals inherent in the growth history of the United States -ethnic diversity, helping the huddled masses- must now be tossed out the window. These concepts have become dangerous, they bluntly tell us, because of individuals whose color and cultures are different.
THIRD WORLD CALLED GREATEST THREAT
John Lukacs, who teaches history at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia, offers this monograph: “The still extant freedoms of Americans are inseparable from their English-speaking roots... The progeny of our present immigrants may be absorbed within the vast spaces of this country. Yet it is at least possible that their absorption could not only mean a drastic mutation in the very composition of the American people but also a fatal weakening of their culture and civilization.”
Lukacs argues that the greatest potential threat to the United States is not posed by the Soviet Union “but by the so-called Third World.”
A fellow named Brent Nelson - a Ph.D. - has written a piece for the American Immigration Control Foundation in which he says assimilation has been a myth, even in the case “of Germans and Irish,” and that an inescapable conclusion is that massive Third World immigration will make permanent, undesirable changes in life in this country.
A husband and wife team of sociologists, Glaister and Evelyn Elmer, say that the melting pot ideal “worked reasonably well in practice as long as most immigrants came from Northeast Europe.” However, they don’t like the way things have been changing.
“Both black and Hispanic minorities are having increasing success in electing their own to federal, state and local offices in areas where they predominate. . . (They) also make extensive use of pressure tactics... (an example being) affirmative action,” they say.
‘TRIUMPH OF MEXICAN IRREDENTISM’
There is a small book titled “The Immigration Time Bomb,” written by a couple of other Ph.Ds., which dwells on the United States being invaded by waves of Third World people. The authors, Palmer Stacy and Wayne Lutton, generally attribute to illegal immigrants much of the blame for drugs, crime, welfare fraud and so on.
These and other writers today are fanning the fires of racism.
Nelson in particular speaks about “the coming triumph of Mexican irredentism,” saying that it is just a matter of time before all of the Southwest might be back in the hands of Mexico.
What aggravates matters for the restrictionists is that the original fountains for “desired” immigrants, Northern and Western Europe, have been replaced by the “less desired” sources out of Asia and the Western Hemisphere. The “national origins?’ concept for immigration is being supplanted by Walt Whitman’s “nation of nations” ideal.
It will be most unfortunate if the extremists on this issue gain ground with their ideas. Such ideas not only are intrinsically wrong and immoral, but they cause great harm within our own society and to our overseas interests.
(Richard Salvatierra, of Tucson, Ariz, is a retired U.S. foreign service officer.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
BEN WHO? When you run for president of the United States, you’d think the papers could at least spell your name right.
Ben Ferndndez finally showed up at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., June 22 to announce his candidacy for the Republican nomination.
In a three-paragraph article attributed to being gathered “from Times news services and staff reports,” the Washington Times spelled the Los Angeles economist’s name “Semandez” throughout
STRANGE STRAWBERRY-BEDFELLOWS: Oregon farm bureau officials and farmers there have been complaining this month that as much as a third of the state’s 80-million-pound strawberry crop may rot because the new immigration law is discouraging needed Mexican farm laborers from applying for work there.
As the peak harvest season for many crops approaches, similar concerns are being expressed everywhere.
Two prominent Westerners have teamed to challenge these claims.
Charges one: “Growers have been so hooked on the opiate of illegal aliens for so many years that they don’t want to take the cure.”
The other, claiming that the shortage is “manufactured” by the farmers, choruses that the growers “have used trucks with megaphones in Mexico to try to get workers without much success. If they made a similar effort in Fresno, they could fill all their jobs quickly.”
The unlikely duo: INS Western Regional Commissioner Harold Ezell, with quote No. 1, and the United Farm Workers’ VP Dolores Huerta, with quote No. 2, both used in a June 21 New York Times story.
Actually, both quotes are consistent with Ezell’s and Huerta’s past positions.
MORE CONFUSION: Last week, the caption under Weekly Report’s back page picture of Harold Ezell and his mystery interviewer referred you to Sin Pelos. It should have referred you to Miguel P6re^s guest column, which explained that the newsman was the undocumented (and now amnesty-seeking) Rafael Prieto, a Noticias del Mundo editor.
You probably figured that out by yourself anyway.
PENA-PEOPLE’S SWEET TOOTH: While Denver Mayor Federico Pena’s real re-election victory margin June 16 was a narrow 51%-49%, an election day cookie poll conducted by a bakery there had him an easy winner.
The bakery offered Pefta cookies, with blue and white icing, and Bain cookies, for his opponent Donald Bain, with red and white icing, in trays side-by-side.
It sold 60 Peha cookies and 40 Bain cookies.
We are waiting for an analysis by Southwest Voter Registration Education Project jefe Willie Velasquez.
JOCK TALK: Mervyn Fernandez, who dropped out of San Jose State In California before spending five superstar! years as a receiver in the Canadian Football League, will join Tom Flores’ Los Angeles Raiders this fall.
Asked recently by a Los Angeles reporter about how he expects to adjust to the shift in scenery, the 27-year-old Fernandez explained: “I guess ifII be like working for IBM and going to Apple.”
You can take the boy out of the Silicon Valley, but you can’t take
the Silicon Valley out of the boy. „ - ■
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting....
OSCAR MORAN, national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, commenting on LULACs Hispanic dropout initiative: "Many schools don't even know there's a problem, much less have a solution.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
June 29,1987
3


COLLECTING
IMMIGRATION LAW GUIDE: The Washington, D.C., Mayor’s Office on Latino Affairs recently released a 35-page booklet, “Immigration, Naturalization, Citizenship,” summarizing the changes in immigration law brought about by the Simpson-Rodino immigration law. Available free to organizations providing services to immigrants, the booklet is in Spanish and English. To order, write to: OLA, Reeves Municipal Center, 2000 14th St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 939-8765.
DROPOUT STUDY PROPOSALS: The Hispanic Policy Development Project is offering approximately 10 awards, ranging from $8,000 to $12,000, for project proposals relating to the dropout rate and achievement levels of Hispanic secondary school students. The submission deadline is July 15. For more information, contact Carmen Ramos at HPDP, 250 Park Ave. South, Suite 5000A, New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 529-9323.
HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK POSTER: “Hispanics: a proud history... enhancing America’s future” is the theme on a 16” x 22” poster recognizing Hispanic Heritage Week - Sept. 13-19. The poster features four vertical bands of color, with a Medal ofValorand a profile of a bust of a Spanish conquistador in the foreground. To order, send $3.50, plus $1.50 for postage and handling, to: ROD Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105 (818) 799-1795. (Add 6% sales tax in California)
POVERTYIN NEW YORK CITY: “Poverty in New York City: 1980-1985” is a 45-page study by Community Service Society detailing the growing number of impoverished Latinos and blacks in that city, particularly among female-headed families To order, send $6 to: CSS, Department of Public Affairs, Office of Information, 105 E. 22 nd St., New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 614-5415.
EXAM PREPARATION BOOKS IN SPANISH: "Examen de equivalence de la escuela superior en espahol"and “Preparacion para el examen de cartero” are new publications - on preparing for the General Equivalency Diploma and the postal examination, respectively-fromARCO. The first book is 629 pages; the second, 202 pages. Each costs $8.95. To order, write to: Prentice Hall Press, Order Dept., 200 ENGLISH-ONLY UPDATE: Education Week magazine provide7r> state-by-state update of attempts to make English their official language in its June 17 issue. To obtain a copy, send $3 to: Back Llssues, Education Week, 1255 23rd St NW, Suite 775, Washington, VCj20037 (202) 466-5190.
CONNECTING
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FORMED
A group of Orange County, Calif., Latinos held a luncheon June 18 to kick off the new Orange County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
The group plans to serve as a liaison between advertisers and corporations and the county’s growing Latino community.
Latinos number334,300 or about 15% of the county’s population.
SPANISH ADS ON AIDS RELEASED
The release of a new series of radio and television public service announcements on AIDS, with 11 radio spots in Spanish, was announced June 19 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Fourof the 11 spots will cover whether or not people are overreacting to AIDS, how contagious AIDS really is, AIDS and minorities, and where to get help.
Media outlets interested in running the 30- to 60-second announcements should contact Frank Goodwin at (202) 245-7047.
MEDICAL REFERRAL SERVICE TO START
The Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute in New York announced the first nationwide Hispanic In-Patient Program for Latinos in need of medical attention and referrals. The program begins July 1.
The program is geared to making a hospital stay less stressful for Spanish-speaking patients. Among other things, it will provide forms and other paperwork in Spanish and Spanish-speaking personnel.
In addition, a 24-hour hotline-1 -800-237-5462 - will be staffed by Spanish-speaking operators. Operators will refer callers to Spanishspeaking doctors of all disciplines throughout the country. SELF-ESTEEM PROJECT TESTED
The“You’re‘Souper’TheWay You Are” program, a project aimed at increasing the self-esteem of primary school students, has been testing its Spanish-language version in New York City throughout June.
The program, sponsored by Campbell Soup Co., offers children writing contests, booklets, special classroom activities and a teaching kit. It is being used in the city’s bilingual education classes.
If it is successful, Campbell will expand the program,“\Eres‘souper' •t^lcomo eresl,” to five other predominantly Hispanic markets.
Tfl&ee interested in receiving the free English or Spanish versions of the JYou’re Souper” teaching unit may write: “Campbelfs You’re ‘Souper,’ ” 500 Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60611. Specify English or Spanish. Direct questions to Sue Gengler at (312) 836-7106.
Calendar
U.S., MEXICO PRESS SYMPOSIUM
Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies La Jolla, Calif. July 9, 10 Gabriel Szekely (619)534-4503
THIS WEEK
LANGUAGE RIGHTS Fresno, Calif. June 30
The Northern California Language Rights Legal Team is sponsoring a training session on language rights and review of bilingual services, voting and education rights. The team is composed of organizations such as California Rural Legal Assistance, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union.
Eric Vega (916) 444-6760
COMING SOON
AYUDA BENEFIT RECEPTION AYUDA Inc.
Washington, D.C. July 8 Rebecca Cusic (202) 387-4848
STATE G.I. FORUM CONVENTION California American G.l. Forum Anaheim, Calif. July 9-12 Richard Calva (818) 994-9338
BALTIMORE LATINO FESTIVAL East Baltimore Latin Organization Baltimore July 11, 12 Jos6 Ruiz (301) 396-9378
HISPANIC MUSIC CELEBRATION Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. July 12,19, 26 and Aug. 2 Gabriela Frings (202) 357-2627
CONTRACTORS/BUSINESS EXPOSITION
U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Small Business
Administration
El Paso, Texas July 15-18
Carla Hopkins (214) 767-7631
HISPANIC ENGINEERS BANQUET Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles July 18 J. R. Herrera (415) 973-5680
IMMIGRATION RIGHTS PROJECT Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Washington, D.C. July 23 Carolyn Waller (202) 682-5900
SPOTLIGHT
LA FAMILIA HISPANA: The National Council of La Raza's annual conference will explore the traditional ties binding Hispanic families and how they can be strengthened. The theme of the four-day conference, to be held July 12-15 in Chicago, is “La Familia Hispana: Our Future, Our Strength.” Workshops will focus on the future of bilingual education, civil rights aspects on housing, immigration and education and the U.S. English movement. Hispanic health and demographics will also be addressed. For more information, contact Mariaiba Martinez (202) 628-9600.
4
June 29,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


LEGISLATIVE INTERN
National Hispanic Civil Rights organization seeks Legislative Intern for Sacramento Office to identify and research key state policy issues affecting Hispanics.
This person will work with other Hispanic advocacy groups and coordinate legislative efforts on major legislation concerning the Hispanic community. Writing assignments include drafting letters of support on behalf of Senate and Assembly bills and quarterly status reports.
Requirements: legal training or graduate school equivalence in social science, political science, public administration or public policy, familiarity with the state legislative process and key Hispanic issues and preferably bilingual in Spanish and English.
Send resume with references and a writing sample to E. Richard Larson, Vice President for Legal Programs, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th FI., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by July 24, 1987.
EXECUTIVES, PROFESSIONALS
Hispanic-owned executive search firm seeks resumes from managers; engineers, including electrical and environmental; scientists; for corporations from coast to coast Please submit resume to Maes Associates Inc., P.O. Box 16222, H.L, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87506 (505) 4/1-7600.
MARKETING MANAGER
Marketing Manager responsible for developing a Fortune 500 company's national Hispanic Market Boston location. Salary mid to high 50’s. Send resume to:
L. Mays
Jane C. Edmonds & Associates Inc.
4 Copley Place, Suite 580 Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 437-9840
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
UNITED WAY OF AMERICA Alexandria, Virginia
Seeks to fill positions for “Project Blueprint" - a new program designed to increase minority involvement in United Way.
Associate Director- will desigrVimplement plan for providing technical assistance to local United Ways in developing/strengthening respective minority involvement programs.
Communications Associate- will produce a variety of communication materials (i.e., newsletters, brochures, booklets, etc.) researched, designed and targeted toward specific audiences.
Sr. Research Associate - will develop, manage and guide the computerized information system component of Project Blueprint for purpose of helping local United Ways obtain pertinent community data for program planning.
Administrative Secretary - will provide administrative and secretarial support to project staff.
Call Diana C. Torres at (703) 836-7100 ext. 431 or 522 for detailed job descriptions. Resumes needed by June 26,1987.
The following positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College. DIRECTOR OF CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS HE Assoc. - Substitute Manage Continuing Ed. Office. Coordinates planning, operationalizes activities, prepares milestone schedules, maintains budget, monitors accounts, prepares statistical reports; supervises area and grant project coordinators and staff. MA/MS, good organizational skills; supervisory and grants mgt. exp.; knowledge of computers; min. 5 yrs. hands-on exp. in higher ed. Bilingual: Engy Span, or EngyChinese a +. Salary: $37,000 - $40,403/A Vac #345. Send resume with cover letter by 7/23/87.
COORDINATOR OF TUITION PROGRAMS (HE Asst)
Principal administratorforall tuition-based programs incl. course development, printing and dissemination of brochures, registrations, cancellations, bursaring, hiring, space arrangements, teacher observation and evaluation. Work schedule: 11 - 7pm, Tue. - Fri.; Sat 8:30-4:30pm. MA/MS, good org. skills, successful record of program dev., admin, and teacher supervision. Bilingual: EngySpan. or EngyChinese a +. Salary $25,000-$32,000/A Vac. #346. Send resume with cover letter by 7/23/87.
HEALTH EDUCATION Teaching position available September 1, 1987. Candidate should possess creative ability in teaching and in course and curriculum development. Ph.D. and administrative exp. pref. Salary and rank commensurate with exp. Good benefits Refer to a BMCC vacancy #347 and send resume with cover letter by 8/17/87.
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The California Association for Bilingual Education seeks an executive director. Local-CA Metro area Contact CABE, 926 J St., Suite 810, Sacramento, CA 95814.
(916) 447-3986 EOE
GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. has the following openings available:
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT (DALLAS)
Join the staff of a national organization and provide consultation and technical assistance in the total management function at various locations.
Expertise should include broad management experience (identify needs and solve problems), knowledge of management systems, fund development and financial operations. Background in not-for-profit agency with national affiliation preferred. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills required. Bilingual Spanish an asset Travel approximately 40-60%. Salary to mid-$30’s. Send resume to: Janice Jacobs, Employment Specialist
ASSISTANT CONTROLLER/DIRECTOR FINANCIAL OPERATIONS (NEW YORK CITY)
We are seeking an experienced professional to direct the treasury, audit, accounting, insurance, budgeting and financial analysis functions. You would be involved in both long- and short-term planning and various other responsibilities. Candidates for the position should have at Ieast5 years accounting/ finance management experience plus supervisory experience. Advanced degree or CPA preferred. Send resume with salary history and/or requirements toe Therese P. Vanecek, Manager, Employment Services.
SALES REPRESENTATIVES (2) (DETROIT AND INDIANAPOLIS TERRITORIES)
Use your retail buying and/or sales background to join our national sales force in the promotion and merchandising of uniforms and equipment to retail stores and other outlets in the assigned territories. Candidates must have a car and be willing to travel approximately 50% (weekdays). Salary mid $20’s. Send resume to: Janice Jacobs, Employment Specialist.
We offer excellent benefits, including 3 weeks vacation. For immediate consideration please send resume to individual indicated, stating opening desired:
GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A 830 Third Avenue New York, N.Y. t0022 AA/EOE M/F/H/V
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts& Entertainment
ONE LONE IMAGE: The NBC television series LA Law received the only Imagen Award given at the event"s third annual presentation held in Beverly Hills, Calif., June 17.
“A lack of positive Hispanic roles convinced us to eliminate from consideration several entries that were clearly well-intentioned and prepared with impressive technical and artistic skill,” Columbia Pictures President and selection panel member David Picker read from a prepared statement during the awards luncheon. The luncheon was emceed by Luis Avalos.
“Sadly, they consistently limited Hispanics to stereotype roles: illegal aliens, street-smart kids (and) long-suffering mamacitas," the statement continued.
Thirteen television entries were submitted forconsideration forthe award, given by the National Conference of Christians and Jews’ Hispanic Media Image Task Force. There were no entries in film categories
LA Law is produced by 20th Century-Fox Television. The 1987 imagen is shared by Jimmy Smits, who plays attorney Victor Sifuentes, and the show’s executive producer Steven Bochco.
Smits, a New York-born actor of Puerto Rican and Surinamean ancestry, is currently featured in the film The Believers with Martin Sheen and Puerto Rican actress Carla Pinza.
A STAR FOR CELIA: The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce has voted to grant salsera Celia Cruz a star on the city’s Walk of Fame, responding to a letter-writing campaign by free-lance entertainment writer Winnie Sanchez.
Cruz joins a dozen or so Hispanics - Desi Arnaz, Lupe V6lez and Julio Iglesia among them - with their names among the more than 1,800 dedicated stars along Hollywood’s best-known sidewalk.
No date has been set for the Walk of Fame ceremony, but, according to Sanchez, the event will take place on oraround Sept. 25, when la guarachera de Cuba is scheduled to perform at Los Angeles’ Greek Theater.
Cruz is the topic of a biographical documentary currently being filmed by the British Broadcasting Corp.
ONE LINERS: The University of California Consortium on Mexico & the United States has acquired the31 -hour video documentary Los que hicieron nuestro cine, the first item in the group’s Chicano Films Archives to be housed at the UC Riverside campus... And entries will be accepted through Sept. 19 for the Cine Festival 1987, to be held Nov. 6 through 15 in San Antonio... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
OUR HISTORY, CULTURE, PEOPLE: Following isa listing of recent books which focus on Hispanics:
ANGLOS AND MEXICANS IN THE MAKING OF TEXAS, 1836-1986, by David Montejano (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713) 400 pp., $12.95 paperback.
Montejano reconstructs the history of Mexican-Anglo relations in the state, tracing them through four periodsand interpreting them in terms of the rise and fall of class societies.
BOSS RULE IN SOUTH TEXAS: THE PROGRESSIVE ERA, by Evan Anders (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box7819, Austin, Texas 78713)335 pp, $10.95 paperback.
The book examines the leading role of four men, including Manuel Guerra, in the politics
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of South Texas in the first decades of this century.
IGNORED VOICES: PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND THE LATINO COMMUNITY, edited by Rodolfo O. de la Garza (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713) 224 pp, $12.95 paperback A compilation of papers by national pollsters, scholars and Latino elected officials, this book deals with the polling of Hispanics. It questions why national surveys often do not include Latinos and the political and social consequences.
MEXICANO RESISTANCE IN THE SOUTHWEST: THE SACRED RIGHTS OF SELF-PRESERVATION, by Robert J. Rosenbaum (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713)253 pp,$9.95 paperback This book details the protest and violent resistance of Mexican residents in the United States against U.S. encroachment and domination in Texas, New Mexico and California.
Rosenbaum’s book counteracts common stereotypes of the passivity of Mexican American history.
PUERTO RICAN AMERICANS: THE MEANING OF MIGRATION TO THE MAINLAND, by Joseph P. Fitzpatrick (Prentice-Hall Inc, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 07632) 199 pp, $16.67 paperback The author gives a descriptive and analytical overview of Puerto Rican life on the island and in the United States, concentrating on the New York community.
OUTLAWS IN THE PROMISED LAND: MEXICAN IMMIGRANT WORKERS AND AMERICA’S FUTURE, by James D. Cockcroft (Grove Press Inc, 920 Broadway, New York N.Y. 10010) 256 pp, $10.95 paperback Cockcroft contests the belief that Mexican immigrants are “stealing” U.S. jobs, citing facts to show that they are victims of the U.S. economy and are exploited workers.
- Melinda Machado
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week 6-foot-1 0-inch 225-pounder who State: has played only two years of college basketball.!". Joana Leija rece1ves a 1 0-year probated sentence from a court judge after pleading no contest to murdoo &Hill capital murder charges. Leija, claiming her actions were precipitated by the physical and emotional abuse of her husband, threw six of her seven children into Houston's muddy Buffalo Bayou April 18, 1986. Two of the children died. The day after the conviction, Leija filed for divorce and custody of the children ... Lisa Velez, the popular lead singer of the pop band Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam, bids $1.5 million for the remains of Britain's" Elephant Man" John Merrick. Michael Jackson had earlier unsuccessfully bid $1 million for the bones of the deformed Merrick, who died in 1890 ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Richard Romero of Long Beach and Henry Barela of West Covina as municipal court judges for the East Los Angeles Judicial District. .. Texas state Rep. Dan Morales(D-San Antonio) is named one of the state's seven top legislators by the Dallas Morning News. Texas has 181 state legislators. .. Don C6rdova, former president of the Hispanic Bar Association and a Denver lawyerfor22 years, assumes the position of president of the Denver Bar Association ... The Utah Jazz, a professional basketball team, selects Puerto Rican Jose Ortiz as the 15th pick in the first round of the National Basketball Association's annual draft. Ortiz, a VolSNo.•Sil HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Salvadorans Organize La_nguage Bills ln1t1ated 1n 37 States The U.S. Salvadoran community is now attempting to organize nationally in defense of half a million "stateless" countrymen-the biggest losers in the passage of the 1986 Simpson-Rodino immigration bill. A new and expanding umbrella organization, the Central American Refugee Network, or CARNET ,will meet for the second time July45 in Washington, D.C., to develop a unified strategy to represent the interests of Salva dorans and other Central Americans now re siding in the United States. GARNET was founded in Februarywhen34 organizations that furnish legal, social and educational services to Central American refugees-the vast majority from El Salvador sent representatives from as far away as Boston to the first meeting in Los Angeles. Roberto Alfaro, one of seven GARNET co ordinators and director of El Rescate,which provides social and legal assistance to re fugees in Los Angeles, says that the network will lobby Congress to build support for the Moakley-DeConcini bill. That legislation, named for sponsors Rep. Joe Moakley (D Mass.) and Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) , suspends for two years the deportation of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans while the U.S. General Accounting Office can conduct a study into the reasons for the high levels of migration of Central Americans to the United States. GARNET wants to see that Guate malans also are protected by the bill . GARNET will monitor the treatment of refugees across the country and may bring lawsuits on their be h al f . The network also plans an ed u cati on c amp aign to te ach refugees their rights i n this country and to inform the U.S. publi c abou t the concerns of Central Americans who are here. It will not furnish social services That remains t he responsibility of its 34 member organizations . Salvadoran Embassy officials in Washington believe that only 40% of the estimated800,000 to 900,000 Salvadorans in the United States are legal residents or eligible to legalize their sta t us \Jnder the '86 immigrat ion law . To be eligible, they must prove that they arrived before Jan. 1, 1982, and have l i ved here continuously since then. One embassy official, Alfredo Milian, says that the majority of Salvadoran refugees in the United States are unskilled peasants who left the country's eastern and northern provinces in the early '80s during the worst of the violence . Another GARNET coordinator, Linton Joa quin, describes the organization's focus as "helping those immigrants who don't qualify for legalization to deal with life in this country as unrecognized refugees." Joaquin, who directs the service agency Carecen in Los Angeles, sees the immigration law as having "a devastating impact on the refugee com munity." They can't work here and they can't go home, he says. Reports of refugees being illegally fired, continued on page 2 L.A. Complaint: 'Too Many Immigrants' Los Angeles County residents, including half of the Latinos polled, believe there are too many immigrants in the county, according to results of a Los Angeles Times poll released June 21. Across the county, 62% said the influx of immigrants is too high. Hispanics, by a 3to-2 margin, say Latino influence and values have changed Los Angeles for the better. The newspaper polled 2,055 Los Angeles County residents by telephone between June 13 and June 17. Of those, 923 respondents lived in the city of Los Angeles. Of white residents polled, 66% said there were too many immigrants; 55% of blacks agreed. Almost 40% of the whites surveyed saw Latinos detracting from the quality of life in Los Angeles, while 33% of blacks believed that. Race and geographic boundaries seemed to divide the poll. Sixty-one percent of blacks and 43% of Hispanics listed crime as the biggest problem, while 32% of whites agreed. Growth and traffic issues were of most concern to whites, 61% of whom advocated slower development in contrast to faster growth desired by blacks (64%) and Latinos (58%). Thirty-seven state legislatures have con sidered English-only legislation in 1987, more than twice the 1986 total, according to a June 17 update of an April Weekly Report survey. The update was compiled by reporter Jim Crawford for the publication Education Week . Bills or constitutional amendments are newly pending in Alabama, Michigan and Wisconsin. Petition drives to put the issue on the 1988 ballot as constitu tio nal amendments have been organized recently in Arizona and Colorado. A Weekly Report survey published April20 found that 31 state legislatures were embroiled in the language controversy . Since then, legis lation has been withdrawn or now is considered unlikely to see further action in Nevada, Oregon and West Virginia Connecticut, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota and New York have all defeated English-only legislation since the Weekly Report survey. English is the official language in 12 states. Arkansas, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Carolina passed official-English laws in 1987. Sena Sainthood Weighed Father Junipero Serra, a Span . ish priest who founded nine Franciscan missions along the California coast from 1767 to 1784, is being considered this month for sainthood by the Roman Catholic Church. . Serra will be elevated to the second of three steps to sainthood, known as beatifi cation, if a subcommittee of five physicians appointed by the church determines that there is no medical explanation for the healing of a U.S. nun who prayed for Serra's help more than 25 years ago. A favorable decision by the subcommittee will send the case to nine theologians who then will judge whether the cure constituted a miracle. Serra was named "venerable," the first of the three beatification steps, in 1985. Supporters of Serra's sainthood hope that beatification will be forwarded to Pope John Paul II before he visits California in September.

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N.Y. C. Hispanic Poor Increase While City Prospers Poverty rates among New York City His panics are continuing to rise despite a period of economic prosperity in the city, says a report issued June 11. "Poverty In New York City: 1980-1985" shows that His panic poverty rates went from 35. 7% in 1979 to 42.9% in 1984. For Puerto Ricans; who make up the largest subgroup, the 1984 rate was 48%. The report examines public assistance, Medicaid, public housing and food stamps and shows that "many poor people in New York City have, somehow, been missed," according to author Terry Rosenburg, director of the population studies unit of the Com munity Service Society, which issued the report. Using the federally defined level of poverty for a family of four-$10,609 -the report found that 1984 New York Hispanic family income was close to that level at $13, 280. White families earned an average of $31 ,000 and blacks $17,344. Of all poor New York families, only 58%, or 220,000, received some form of public assis tance in 1984. Only 19.5% or 75,000 poor families lived in public housing , Rosenburg said. Rosenburg told Weekly Report that three trends contributed to the Hispanic poverty increase. NEW YORK CITY POVERTY 1979 1984 Number* Rate Number* Rate 550 520 498 White Black Hispanic** All Groups 1,391 • In thousands 12. 9% 29. 5 35.7 20. 2 1,015 20. 1% 650 32.7 781 42. 9 1,735 23. 5 •• Hispanics also counted in black and white categories. Source: " Poverty in New York City: 1980-1985 " by Population Studies Unit, Community Service Society of New York . U.S. Salvadorans Establish CARNET continued from page 1 exploited and shaken down by employers for "hiring fees" are commonplace among re. lief organizations . ' Canada is no longer an alternative refuge for those in the United States . Officials there became alarmed when thousands sought asylum late last year and early this year. Before , that government allowed asylum seekers to stay in Canada until their scheduled hearings. Now petitioners cannot enter the country until ' their, hearing dates. Currently, GARNET has no independent staff, offices or budget. Queries about the Border Drowning Probed FBI agents are expected to complete their investigation by June 29 concerning the involvement of ; two U . S . Border Patrol agents in theJuneB d r owning of a Mexi can national crossing the Rio Grande from Juarez, Mex i co, into El Paso, Texas , on a rubber raft. According to witnesses, the agents ignored the pleas of 25-year-old Armando Valenzuela and pulled on a rope attached to the raft, causing it to tip over. The Juarez man, who could not swim , drowned while three other men on the craft swam to the Mexican side of the river . "The attitude of the border patrol was very callous," said attorney John Garcia, district director of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Garcia called on U.S. Rep . Ron Coleman (D-Texas) to request a congressional inves tigation of the matter . 2 Coleman expects to meet with Garcia and other LULAC members following the release of the report . An internal inquiry by the border patrol cleared the agents, who have not been identified , of any wrongdoing. organization are channeled to Joaquin and Alfaro. The seven coordinators plan initiatives and pass information to its 34 members, using money from their own organizations' budgets. At the Washington meeting, they will try to streamline GARNETs decision making process and make policy implementation more effective . TEN CITIES REPRESENTED Reflecting the geographic dispersion of Salvadoran immigrants, GARNET includes eight organizations from Los Angeles, seven from Washington, D .C., six from San Francisco, three each from Chicago and New York City, and two each from Boston and Houston. There is one affiliate each from Phoen i x and Tucson , Ariz . , and Santa Cruz , Calif . Member organizations are supported in large part by church groups. The Southern California Ecumenical Council founded El Rescate in 1981 to serve Los Angeles' growing refugee population . Carecen , with offices in New York, San Francisco , Houston and Wash ington , D.C., receives support from Catholic religious orders and Lutheran , Methodist, Episcopalian and Presbyterian churches and groups . Two members of CARN ET are part of the Sanctuary movement. Eight others are connected with church organizations or named in memory of the Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, murdered by suspected right wing gunmen as he celebrated Mass in San Salvador in March 1980. Most share a disdain for U .S. policy in El Salvador, claiming that U.S. support for the government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte prolongs the war that is at the root of their problems. These groups call for Duarte to renew long-stalled negotiations with rebel forces. Richard Sayre Primarily, many manufacturing jobs were lost while new employment opportunities required higher levels of education, Most of the lost jobs affected Hispanic women, she said. Rosenburg described teenage pregnancy as becoming almost"epidemic" in New York. "Of all groups, Hispanic young women be tween the ages of 14 and 16 are more likely to become pregnant." She also blamed cuts i n federal assistance programs, such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children . Hispanic female-headed families increased from 76,270 in 1979 to 122,731 in 1984. The 1984 poverty rate for single Latina households was 80%, the highest of all groups. Using data from the March 1985 Current Population Survey and from the 1 980 Census, the report shows that in 1984 there were 539,561 poor Puerto Ricans, more than twice .as many as other Hispanics. Melinda Machado Dade's Superintendent Offered $125,000 Pay Incoming Dade County School Superintend ent Joseph Fernandez negotiated a$125,000a-year contract with the chairman of the school board June 18. The contract makes Fernandez and Nathan Quinones , the chancellor of New York City publ ic schools, who also makes $125,000, two of the four highest paid superintendents in the nation . The full Dade County school board was expected to approve Fernandez's contract June 24. Leonard Britton, who preceded Fernandez in Miami, will be the only superintendent earning more than the two. He will make $134,000 in his new position as superintend ent of the Los Angeles schools . . Collegians Join Job Force Forty-four percent of the Latino college students who graduated from high school in 1986 were in the labor force in October of that year, compared with 29% for blacks and 50% for whites, according to a report released June 9 by U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics . In October 1986, there were 75,000 of those Hispanic college students; 33,000 were in the labor force employed or actively seeking work. Of those who were in the labor force, 91% were holding jobs. The percentages of black and white college students who were in the labqr force and employed were 80. 5% and 87.4% , respectively . The report also noted that 64.5% of all 1986 Hispanic high school graduates, 53.9% of black and 65. 5% of white were in the civilian labor force . Overall , 169,000 Latinos graduated from high school in 1986 and 127,000 Hispanic high school students dropped out between October 1985 and October 1986. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Richard Salvatierra, guest columnist The Fires of Racism As the U.S . government moves ahead to implement the landmark imm i gration reform legislation enacted by Congress last year, i t i s a good time to pause and reflect. One aspect of th i s process is quite disturbing. Concurrent with the efforts that have been made in recent years to bring about imm i gration reform , there have surfaced extremist views on the k i nd of immigration the United States should settle for in the future . In the last couple of years in particular, there have been numerous i ndividuals and a few or ganizations proclaim i ng , in effect , that future newcomers to this country should all be white and preferably , as before , from Northern and Western Europe . The proponents of this idea display a s iege mentality . For them, the ideals inherent in the growth h i story of the United States -ethnic diversity, helping the huddled masses-must now be tossed out the window. These concepts have become dangerous , they bluntly tell us , because of individuals whose color and cultures are d i fferent. THIRD WORLD CALLED GREATEST THREAT John Lukacs, who teaches history at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia, offers this monograph : "The still extant freedoms of Americans are inseparable from their English-speaking roots ... The progeny of our present immigrants may be absorbed within the vast spaces of this country. Yet it is at least possible that their absorption could not only mean a drastic mutation in the very composition of the American people but also a fatal weakening of their culture and civilization . " Lukacs argues that the greatest potential threat to the United States is not posed by the Soviet Union "but by the so-called Third World." A fellow named Brent Nelson-a Ph .D.-has written a piece for the American Immigration Control Foundation in which he says assimilation has been a myth, even in the case "of Germans and Irish , " and that an inescapable conclusion is that massive Third World immigration will make permanent, undesirable changes in life in this country. A husband and wife team of sociologists, Glaister and Evelyn Elmer , say that the melting pot ideal "worked reasonably well in practice as long as most immigrants came from Northeast Europe . " However, they don't like the way things have been changing. " Both black and Hispanic minorities are having increasing success in electing their own to federal, state and local offices in areas where they predominate. . . (They) also make extensive use of pressure tactics . . . (an example being) affirmative action," they say . 'TRIUMPH OF MEXICAN IRREDENTISM' There is a small book titled " The Immigration Time Bomb," written by a couple of other Ph.Ds. , which dwells on the United States being invaded by waves of Th ird World people. The authors, Palmer Stacy and Wayne Lutton, generally attribute to illegal immigrants much of the blame for drugs, crime , welfare fraud and so on . These and other writers today are fanning the fires of racism . Nelson in particular speaks about "the coming triumph of Mexican irredentism ," saying that it is just a matter of time before all of the Southwest might be back in the hands of Mexico. What aggravates matters for the restrictionists is that the original fountains for "desired" immigrants , Northern and Western Europe , Sin pelos en Ia lengua BEN WHO? When you run for president of the United States, you'd think the papers could at least spell your name right. Ben Fernandez finally showed up at the National Press Club in Washington , D . C., June 22 to announce his candidacy for the Republican nomination, In a three-paragraph article attributed to being gathered "from Times news services and staff reports," the Washington Times spelled the Los Angeles economisfs name "Semandez'' throughout STRANGE STRAWBERRY-BEDFELLOWS: Oregon farm bureau officials and farmers there have been complaining this month that as much as a third of the state's80millionpound strawberry crop may rot because the new immigration law is discouraging needed Mexican farm laborers from applying for work there . As the peak harvest season for many crops approaches, similar concerns are being expressed everywhere. Two prominent Westerners have teamed to challenge these claims . Charges one: " Growers have been so hooked on the opiate of ill eg al aliens for so many years that they don ' t want to take the cure . " The other, claiming that the shortage is " manufactured'' by the farmers, choruses that the growers" have used trucks with mega phones in Mexico to try to get workers without much success. If they made a similar effort in Fresno, they could fill all their jobs quickly. " The unlikely duo: INS Western Regional Commissioner Harold Ezell, with quote No . 1 , and the United Farm Workers ' VP Dolores Huerta, with quote No . 2, both used in a June 21 New York Times story . Actually , both quotes are consistent with Ezell's and Huerta' s past positions. MORE CONFUSION: Last week, the caption under Weekly Reporfs back page picture of Harold Ezell and his mystery interviewer referred you to Sin Pelos. It should have referred you to Miguel Perez's guest column , which explained that the newsman was the undocumented(and now amnesty-seeking) Rafael PrletQ, a Noticias del Mundo editor. You probably figured that out by yourself anyway . PENAPEOPLE'S SWEET TOOTH: Wh ile Denver Mayor Federico Pel'la ' s real re-election victory margin June 16 was a narrow 51 %%, an election day cookie poll conducted by a bakery there had him an easy winner. The bakery offered Pen a cookies, with blue and white icing, and Bain cookies, for his opponent Donald Baln, with red and white icing, in trays side-by-side. It sold 60 Pena cookies and 40 Bain cookies. We are waiting for an analysis by Southwest Voter Registration Education Project jete Willie Velasquez. JOCK TALK: Mervyn Fernandez, who dropped out of San Jose State In California before spending five superstar as a receiver in the Canadian Football League, will join Tom Flores' Los Angeles Raiders this fall . Asked recently by a Los Angeles reporter about how he expects to adjust to the shift in scenery, the 27-yearold Fernandez explained : " I guess ifll be like working for IBM and going to Apple . " You can take the boy out of the Silicon Valley , but you can ' t take -the Silicon Valley out of the boy . Kay Barbaro have been replaced by the " less desirecf' sources out of Asia and the 11111••••••••••••••••••••••• Western Hemisphere . The " national origins'' concept for immigration is being supplanted by Walt Whitman ' s " nation of nations" ideal . It will be most unfortunate if the extremists on this issue gain ground wi t h thei r ideas. Such ideas not only are intrinsically wrong and immoral , but they cause great harm within our own society and to our overseas interests. (Richard Salvatierra, of Tucson, Ariz., is a retired U . S . fore i gn service officer.) Quoting. • • • OSCAR MORAN, national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, commenting on LULACs Hispanic dropout initiative: "Many schools don't even know there's a problem , much less have a solution. " Hispanic Lin k Weekly Report June 29, 1987 3 I

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COLLECTING CONNECTING IMMIGRATION LAW GUIDE: The Washington, D.C., Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs recently released a 35-page booklet, "Immigration, 1---------------------------' Naturalization, Citizenship," summarizing the changes in immigration CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FORMED law brought about by the SimpsonRodino immigration law. Available A group of Orange County, Calif. , Latinos held a luncheon June 18 free to organizations providing services to immigrants, the booklet is to kick off the new Orange County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. in Spanish and English. To order, write to: OLA, Reeves Municipal The group plans to serve as a liaison between advertisers and Center, 2000 14th St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D .C. 20009 (202) corporations and the county's growing Latino community. 939-8765. Latinos number 334,300 or about 15% of the county's population. DROPOUTSTUDYPROPOSALS: TheHispanicPolicyDevelopment SPANISH ADS ON AIDS RELEASED Project is offering approximately 10 awards, ranging from $8,000 to The release of a new series of radio and television puhlic service $12,000, for project proposals relating to the dropout rate and announcements on AIDS, with 11 radio spots in Spanish , was achievement levels of Hispanic secondary school students. The announced June 19 by the u.s. Department of Health and Human submission deadline is July 15. For more information, contact Carmen Services. Ramos at HPDP, 250 Park Ave . South, Suite 5000A, New York, N.Y . Four of the 11 spotswillcoverwhetherornot people are overreacting 10003 (212) 529-9323. to AIDS, how contagious AIDS really is , AIDS and minorities, and where to get help . HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK POSTER: "Hispanics: a proud Media outlets interested in running the 30to 60-second announcehistory ... enhancing America's future" is the theme oo a 16" x 22" ments should contact Frank Goodwin at (202) 245-7047. poster recognizing Hispanic Heritage Week-Sept. 13-19. The 0 START posterfeaturesfourvertical bands of color, with a Medal of Valor and MEDICAL REFERRAL SERVICE T a profile of a bust of a Spanish conquistador in the foreground. To The Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute in New York order, send $3.50, plus $1.50 for postage and handling, to: ROD announced the first nationwide Hispanic In-Patient Program for Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105 (818) 799-Latinos in need of medical attention and referrals . The program 1795. (Add 6% sales tax in California . ) begins July 1. The program is geared to making a hospital stay less stressful for POVERTY IN NEW YORK CITY: "Poverty in New York City: 1980Spanish-speaking patients. Among other things, it will provide forms 1985" is a 45-page study by Community Service Society detailing and other paperwork in Spanish and Spanish-speaking personnel. the growing number of impoverished Latinos and blacks in that city, In addition, a 24-hour hotline-1-800-237-5462-will be staffed by particularly among female-headed families. To order, send $6 to: Spanish-speaking operators. Operators will refer callers to SpanishCSS, Department of Public Affairs, Office of Information, 105 E. 22nd speaking doctors of all disciplines throughout the country. St., New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 614-5415. SELF-ESTEEM PROJECT TESTED EXAM PREPARATION BOOKS IN SPANISH: "Ex amen de equivaThe "You're 'Sou per' The Way You Are" program, a project aimed at /encia de /a escue/a superior en espaflo/"and "Preparaci6n para el increasing the self-esteem of primary school students, has been examen de cartero" are new publications on preparing for the testing its Spanish-language version in New York City throughout General Equivalency Diploma and the postal examination, respectivelyJune. from ARCO . The first book is 629 pages; the second, 202 pages . Each The program, sponsored by Campbell Soup Co., offers children costs $8.9 write to: Prentice Hall Press, Order Dept., 200 writing contests, booklets, special classroom activities and a teaching Q a ppan Road, Old Tappan, . . 67-5937. kit. It is being used in the city's bilingual education classes. If it is successful , Campbell will expand the program, "i Eres 'sou per' ENGLISH-ONLY UPDATE: Education Week magazine provide como eres!," to five other predominantly Hispanic markets. state-by-state update of attempts to make English their official e interested in receiving the free English or Spanish versions language in its June 17 issue. To obtain a copy, send $3 to: Back of the You're Souper'' teaching unit may write: "Campbelrs You're Issues, Education Week, 1255 23rd St. NW, Suite 775, Washmgton, 'Sou r,'" 500 Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60611. Specify English or . 20037 (202) 466-5190. ish . Direct questions to Sue Gengler at (312) 836-7106. Calendar THIS WEEK LANGUAGE RIGHTS Fresno, Calif . June 30 The Northern California Language Rights Legal Team is sponsoring a training session on language rights and review of bilingual services , voting and education rights. The team is composed of organi zations such as California Rural Legal Assistance, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union . Eric Vega (916) 444-6760 COMING SOON AYUDA BENEFIT RECEPTION AYUDA Inc. Washington, D.C. July 8 Rebecca Cusic (202) 387 4 U.S., MEXICO PRESS SYMPOSIUM Center for U . S .-Mexican Studies La Jolla, Calif . July 9, 1 0 Gabriel Szekely (619) 534-4503 STATE G. I. FORUM CONVENTION California American G . I. Forum Anaheim , Calif. July 9 Richard Calva (818) 994-9338 BALTIMORE LATINO FESTIVAL East Baltimore Latin Organization Baltimore July 11, 12 Jose Ruiz (301) 396-9378 HISPANIC MUSIC CELEBRATION Smithsonian Institution Washington , D . C . July 12 , 19, 26 and Aug. 2 Gabriela Frings (202) 3572627 CONTRACTORS/BUSINESS EXPOSITION U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce . Small Business Administration El Paso, Texas July 15 Carla Hopkins (214) 767 7631 June 29, 1987 HISPANIC ENGINEERS BANQUET Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles July 18 J. R. Herrera (415) 973-5680 IMMIGRATION RIGHTS PROJECT Washington Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Washington , D.C. July 23 Carolyn Waller (202) 682-5900 SPOTLIGHT LA FAMILIA HISPANA: The National Council of La Raza'sannual conference will explore the traditional ties binding Hispanic families and how they can be strengthened . The theme of the four-day conference. to be held July 12 15 in Chicago, is "La Familia Hispana : Our Future , Our Strength . " Workshops will focus on the future of bilingual education, civil rights aspects on housing , immigration and education and the U . S . English movement. Hispanic health and demographics will also be addressed. For more information, contact: Marialba Martinez(202) 6289600. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. has the following openings available: LEGISLATIVE INTERN National Hispanic Civil Rights organization seeks Legislative I ntem for Sacramento Office to identify and research key state policy issues affecting Hispanics. This person will work with other Hispanic advocacy groups and coordinate legislative efforts on major legislation concerning the His panic community . Writing as.signments include drafting letters of support on behalf of Senate and Assembly bills and quarterly status reports. Requirements: legal training or graduate school equivalence in social science , political science , publ i c administration or public policy , familiarity with the state legislat i ve process and key Hispanic issues and preferably bilingual in Spanish and English . Send resume with references and a writing sample to E . Richard Larson, Vice President for Legal Programs, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Angeles , Calif. 90014 by July 24 , 1987. EXECUTIVES, PROFESSIONALS Hispanic-owned executive search firm seeks resumes from managers; engineers, including electrical and environmental; scientists ; for corporations from coast to coast Please submit resume to Maes Associates Inc., P .O. Bo x 16222, H .L., Santa Fe , New Mexico 87506 (505) 411-7600. MARKETING MANAGER Marketing Manager responsible for develop ing a Fortune500 company's national Hispanic Market Boston location . Salary mid to high 50's. Send resume to: L. Mays Jane C . Edmonds & Associates Inc . 4 Copley Place , Suite 580 Boston , Mass. 02116 (617) 437 PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govem ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. UNITED WAY OF AMERICA Alexandria, VIrginia Seeks to fill positions for"Project Blueprinf -a new program designed to increase minority involvement in United Way. Associate Director-will design/implement plan for providing technical as.sistance to local United Ways in developinwstrengthening respective minority involvement programs . Communications Associatewill produce a variety of communication materials (i.e .•. newsletters , brochures, booklets, etc. ) re searched, designed and targeted toward specific audiences. Sr. Research .Associate will develop, manage and guide the computerized infor mation system component of Project Blueprint for purpose of helping local United Ways obtain pertinent community data for program planning . Administrative Secretarywill provide administrative and secretarial support to pro ject staff . Call Diana C . Torresat(703)836 ext . 431 or 522 for detailed job descriptions. Resumes needed by June 26, 1987. Hispanic Link Weekly Report The following positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College. DIRECTOR OF CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS HE Assoc.-Substitute Manage Continuing Ed. Office . Coordinates planning , operationalizes activities, prepares milestone schedules, maintains budget, monitors accounts, prepares statistical re ports; supervises area and grant project co ordinators and staff . MNMS, good zational skills ; supervisory and grants mgt. exp . ; knowledge of computers; min. 5 yrs. hands-on exp. in higher ed. Bilingual : Eng./ Span . or Eng./Chinese a+. Salary: $37,000 -$40,403/A Vac #345. Send resume with cover letter by 7/23/87. COORDINATOR OF TUITION PROGRAMS (HE Asst) Pr i ncipal administratorfor all tuitioll"based programs incl. course development , printing and dissemination of brochures, registrations, cancellations, bursaring, hiring , space arrange ments , teacher observation and evaluation . Work schedule : 11 -7 pm , Tue . -Fri.; Sat. 8 :30-4:30pm. MNMS, good org . skills , suc cessful record of program dev . , admin. and teacher supervision. Bilinguat. Eng./Span . or Eng./ Chinese a+. Salary. $25 ,000-$32,000/ A Vac . #346. Send resume with cove r letter by 7/23/87. HEALTH EDUCATION Teaching position available September 1, 1987. Candidate should possess creative ability in teaching and in course and curriculum development. Ph.D. and administrative exp . pref. Salary and rank commensurate with exp. Good benefits. Refer to a BMCC vacancy #347 and send resume with cover letter by 8/17/87. Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy , Director o f Per s onnel Borough of Manhattan Community College / CUNY 199 Chambers Street . New York, N . Y . 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT (DALLAS) Join the staff of a national organization and provide consultation and technical assistance in the total management function at various locations. Expertise should include broad management experience (identify needs and solve problems), knowledge of management systems, fund development and financial operations. Back ground in not-for-profit agency with national affil i ation preferred . Excellent communication and interpersonal skills required . Bilingual Spanish an asset. Travel approximately40 60% . Salary to mid-$30's. Send resume to: Janice Jacobs, Employment Specialist. ASSISTANT CONTROLLER/DIRECTOR FINANCIAL OPERATIONS (NEW YORK CITY) We are seeking an experienced professional to direct the treasury , audit, accounting, ill" surance , budgeting and financial analysis functions . You would be involved in both long and short-term planning and various other responsibilities . Candidates for the position should have at least 5 yearsaccountinw finance management e x perience plus super visoryexperience . Advanced degree or CPA preferred . Send resume with salary history and/or requirements to : Therese P . Vanecek, Manager , Employment Services . SALES REPRESENTAl'IVES (2) (DETROIT AND INDIANAPOLIS TERRITORIES) Use your retail buying and/or sales back ground to join our national sales force in the promotion and merchandising of uniforms and equipment to retail stores and other outlets in the as.signed territories . Candidates must have a car and be willing to travel approximately 50% (weekdays) . Salary mid $20's. Send resume to: Janice Jacobs, Employment Specialist. We offer excellent benefits, including 3 weeks vacation For immediate consideration please send resume to individual indicated, stating opening desired : The California Association for Bilingual Edl.l' cation seeks an executive director. Metro area . Contact CASE , 926 J St. , Suite 810, Sacramento, CA 95814. GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. 830 Third Avenue New York, N . Y . 10022 ANEOE M/F/H!V (916) 447 EOE DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street __________________________ ___ City, State & Zip-----------Area Code & Phone _________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment Smits, a New York-born actor of Puerto Rican and Surinamean ancestry, is currently featured in the film The Believers with Martin Sheen and Puerto Rican actress Carla Pinza. ONE LONE IMAGE: The NBC television series LA Law received the only Imagen Award given at the event's third annual presentation held in Beverly Hills, Calif., June 17. A STAR FOR CELIA: The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce has voted to grant sa/sera Celia Cruz a star on the city's Walk of Fame, responding to a letter-writing campaign by free-lance entertainment "A lack of positive Hispanic roles convinced us to eliminate from consideration several entries that were clearly well-intentioned and prepared with impressive technical and artistic skill," Columbia Pictures President and selection panel member David Picker read from a prepared statement during the awards luncheon. The luncheon was emceed by Luis Avalos. writer Winnie Sanchez. Cruz joins a dozen or so Hispanics-Desi Arnaz, Lupe Velez and Julio Iglesia among them-with their names among the more than 1,800 dedicated stars along Holiywoods best-known sidewalk. No date has been set for the Walk of Fame ceremony, but, according to Sanchez, the event will take place on or around Sept. 25, when Ia guarachera de Cuba is scheduled to perform at Los Angeles' Greek Theater. "Sadly, they consistently limited Hispanics to stereotype roles: illegal aliens, street-smart kids (and) long-suffering mamacitas," the statement continued. Thirteen television entries were submitted for consideration fort he award, given by the National Conference of Christians and Jews' Hispanic Media Image Task Force. There were no entries in film categories. Cruz is the topic of a biographical documentary currently being filmed by the British Broadcasting Corp. LA Law is produced by 20th Century-Fox Television." The 1987 Imagen is shared by Jimmy Smits, who plays attorney Victor Sifuentes, and the show's executive producer Steven Bochco. ONE LINERS: The University of California Consortium on Mexico & the United States has acquired the31-hourvideodocumentary Los que hicieron nuestro cine, the first item in the group's Chicano Films Archives to be housed at the UC Riverside campus ... And entries will be accepted through Sept. 19 for the Cine Festiva/1987, to be held Nov. 6 through 15 in San Antonio.. . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report OUR HISTORY, CULTURE, PEOPLE: Fol lowing is a listing of recent books which focus on Hispanics: ANGLOS AND MEXICANS IN THE MAKING OF TEXAS, 1836-1986, by David Montejano (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713) 400 pp., $12.95 paper back. Montejano reconstructs the history of Mex ican-Anglo relations in the state, tracing them through four periods and interpreting them in terms of the rise and fall of class societies. BOSS RULE IN SOUTH TEXAS: THE PROGRESSIVE ERA, by Evan Anders (Uni versity of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713) 335 pp., $10.95 paperback. The book examines the leading role of four men, including Manuel Guerra, in the politics HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy. Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias. No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 of South Texas in the first decades of this century. IGNORED VOICES: PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND THE LATINO COMMUNITY, edited by Rodolfo 0. de Ia Garza (University of Texas Press, P . O . Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713) 224 pp . , $1 2 .95 paperback. A compilation of papers by national pollsters, scholars and Latino elected officials, this book deals with the polling of Hispanics . It questions why national surveys often do not include Latinos and the political and social consequences. MEX/CANO RESISTANCE IN THE SOUTH WEST: THE SACRED RIGHTS OF SELF PRESERVATION, by Robert J. Rosenbaum (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713)253 pp.,$9.95 paperback. This book details the protest and violent resistance of Mexican residents in the United States against U.S. encroachment and domi nation in Texas, New Mexico and California. Rosenbaum's book counteracts common stereotypes of the passivity of Mexican Ame rican history. PUERTO RICAN AMERICANS: THE MEANING OF MIGRATION TO THE MAIN LAND, by Joseph P . Fitzpatrick (Prentice Hall Inc., Engle w ood Cliffs, N.J . 07632) 199 pp . , $16.67 paperback . The author gives a descriptive and analytical overview of Puerto Rican life on the island and in the United States, concentrating on the New York community. OUTLAWS IN THE PROMISED LAND: MEXICAN IMMIGRANT WORKERS AND AMERIC A' S FUTURE, by James D. Cockcroft (Grove Press Inc., 920 Broadway, New York, N .Y. 10010) 256 pp . , $10.95 paperback. Cockcroft contests the belief that Mexican immigrants are "stealing" U.S. jobs, c"iting facts to show that they are victims of the U.S. economy and are exploited workers. Melinda Machado went condo back in 200 B.c.'' Hispanic Link Weekly Report '