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Hispanic link weekly report, July 6, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 6, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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JUl 6 1987
Making The News This Week
Puerto Rico Governor Rafael Hernandez Col6n orders the islands Justice Department to prepare a report on the possTbf^ extraditiont)f Indiana University basketball coach Bobby Knight, who was convicted in absentia for assaulting a police officer there iff f979: IndianaGov: Bobby Orr replied that he will fight an extradition l^^urstTpi^me Court”... Texas Gov. Bill Clements signs a bill that would allow Mexican nationals to pay in-state fees at several universities along" the Texas-Mexico border... The California Assembly,on a vote of 73-0, sends to the Senate a bill by Rep. Charles CalderSn (D-Alhambra) that would make it a felony on second offenseTor an immTjJFiitioif consultant to make false or misleading statements To a person* seeking legalization... Texas Rep. Paul Moreno(D-EI Paso) submits
a resolution to the state House calling for the creation of a committee to consider impeaching Gov. Bill Clements. The resolution was spurred by Clements^ reputed involvement in making illegal payments to football players at Southern Methodist University while he was " chairman of SWlTs Board of Governors. . . Democratic National Chairman Paul Kirk disqualifies San Juan Mayor BaltasarCorrada deTRIofrom participating in the Democratic Party’s 1988 presidential nomioatibfl process Kirk pointed to Corrada’s support for Vice President George Bush. .. Naty Alvarado, from Hesperia, Calif., ^ties the.national record of nine handball championships. He won his latest title at the 30h U.S. Handball Association Championships in Baltimore. .7Lawrance, 18, Leonard, 18, Thomas, 17, and William SaTaC 15, become'the first four brothers in Boy Scout history to become EagTe Scouts on the same day. The Salases are from Fort WorthrTexas..
Vol. 5 No. 26
fa) HISPAN]£]JNK_WEEKLY^ETORTJ^
July 6, 1987
^NEA Unveils National Latino Education Project
Increased education standards coupled with inadequate support systems are adding to the national dropout problem and causing Hispanics and other minority students to slip further behind, concluded a National Education Association study issued June 26.
NEA President Mary FutrelI released the
Calif. Bilingual Act Expires
California’s bilingual education program officially expired June 30 without agreement on compromise legislation.
Proponents of a five-year extension of the state program, led by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), are meeting with critics, led by Assemblyman Frank Hill (R-Whittier), to fashion a compromise bill.
Dale Shimasaki, an education aide to Brown, said that the expiration of the previous legislation does not mean that bilingual programs in the state will end.
Shimasaki thinks that the Department of Education will probably advise local districts to continue their existing programs, since a compromise bill seems likely.
study, titled “... And Justice For All,” during the organization’s 125th annual convention in Los Angeles. The four-part report examined educational issues faced by minority students
The nation’s Hispanic population continues to lag behind all other groups educationally, according to N EA’s H ispanic Concerns Study Committee, appointed by Futrell in 1985.
“The clearest indication that public schooling is not working for all Hispanic students is a dropout rate that reaches crisis proportions of 50% or more in some cities,” said John Wilson, Hispanic committee chairman and NEA executive committee member.
Wilson, a special education teacher from North Carolina, added,“The important lessons we learned were that Hispanic education concerns go much beyond the issue of bilingual education. They span the full range of public schooling issues.”
More than 90 recommendations made by the Hispanic committee were adopted in May by the board of the 1.85 million-member association. To increase educational opportunities and support systems for Hispanics,
during â– The board agreed toirptiate school programs floniaise teacher expectations* for Hispanic students, decrease their dropout ratesend to convene a national forum on bilingual education needs and affirmative action principles for education personnel contracts.
Wilson told Weekly Report that NEA has budgeted $100,000 to begin addressing committee concerns. The 125-member board of directors, which includes three members of the Hispanic committee, will meet in September to set priorities.
Among the adopted recommendations are provisions for
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Latinos Unprepared for Future Jobs
Hispanics are expected to represent nearly 29% of the labor force growth of 21 million jobs during the 1986-2000 period, according to projections released June 25 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics However, the study found that Hispanics will not be well represented in the nation’s fastest-growing occupations and are overrepresented in slow-growing or declining jobs
The bureau’s “moderate” growth projection expects the total number of Hispanic workers to increase to 14,086,000 in the year 2000 from a 1986 total of8,076,000, a74% increase.
Fred Romero, executive director of the National SER Policy and Research Institute and a former Labor Department official, called the BLS projections “surprising,” adding that previous estimates of the growth of the Hispanic work force were considerably lower.
Romero said the job force expansion represents a “tremendous opportunity” for His-
• Financial contributions to organizations such as the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Council of La Raza, the National Association for Bilingual Education and the National Puerto Rican Coalition;
• Development of teaching guides and instructional materials on the contributions of Hispanics;
• Encouragement of local and state affiliates to develop strategies for securing funding for
continued on page 2
panics, but wonders whether the Hispanic community by itself can “create the human capital” needed to lower high unemployment rates. “We need more help from the federal government and the private sector,” he said.
Highly skilled jobs in service-producing industries are expected to account for almost all of the labor force increase. Since H ispanics are disproportionally represented among
LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS
(in thousands)
1986 2000 Change
Hispanic 8,076 14,086 74%
Black 12,684 16,334 29
White 101,801 116,701 15
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
workers with less education, the study warns that they will find less opportunity for good pay and advancement - Richard Sayre
U.S Denies Changed Status of Nicaraguans
Recent press reports that the Reagan administration would grant Nicaraguans special legal immigration status were erroneous, a top U.S. Justice Department official told Weekly Report June 30.
Pat Korten, deputy director of public affairs for the Justice Department, said, “There have been many rumors floating around but we have no formal plans to grant ‘ Extended Voluntary Deportation’ status to Nicaraguans.”
Korten said the department will continue its current policy toward Nicaraguan refugees “We have not been deporting any Nicaraguans who have a well-founded fear of persecution and we have been handling work-authorization requests on a case-by-case basis,” he said.


LULAC Elects Mordn, Draws Presidential Hopefuls
Oscar Mor&n was elected to a third one-year term as national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens during the group’s 58th annual convention in Corpus Christi, Texas, June 24-28. The convention drew more than 4,000 participants, including eight U.S. presidential candidates Featured speaker San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros called for a national meeting of Hispanic leaders to draft a common Hispanic agenda to confront the candidates Moran, a San Antonio insurance analyst, polled about 90% of the delegate vote when Andr6sTobar, a U.S. Department of Education program officer, conceded.
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"' IHS OTIYUllllon drew all seven Democratic presidential candidates and a lone Republican, U.S. Rep. Jack Kemp of New York.
U.S. Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.) said he would consider a Hispanic as his vice presidential running mate.
Asked if he would name a Hispanic to the Cabinet, Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis replied, “Sin duda- without a doubt.”
During his speech, the Rev. Jesse Jackson called for a Hispanic to replace recently resigned Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell.
A straw poll, designed to measure the support of convention delegates for the various candidates, showed the most support for i former Arizona governor Bruce Babbitt and Dukakis.
The poll had both receiving 24% of the 267 returned ballots. Jesse Jackson was third with 17%.
In other action, Mor6n called for the resignation of U.S. Immigration Commissioner Alan Nelson, charging that Hispanics have been made “scapegoats” of the new immigration law.
In two LULAC elections, Rafael Acosta of Houston defeated Frank Ortiz, also of Houston, becoming the national vice president for the Southwest, Ortiz conceded before the, final tally of the votes.
Jess Quintero, of Washington, D.C., won the Northeast vice presidency by acclamation when the incumbent, Andres Tobar, decided to run against Moran. All other officers were uncontested. - Julio Laboy
Lack of Latino Professors ‘Atrocious’
With few Hispanics and other minorities positioned to move into teaching at the college level, their nationwide underrepresentation will continue unless “extraordinary efforts” are made, concludes a report issued June 17 by the University of California system.
The study, “The University of California in the Twenty-First Century; Successful Approaches to Faculty Diversity,” cites overt discrimination, a lack of effective sponsorship and stress from trying to balance professional obligations with community ones as barriers'.
Calling the lack of Latino and other minority faculty “atrocious,” Joyce Justus, author of the study and director of educational relations for the UC system, said she found few programs across the United States geared to attracting minorities to teaching at the university level.
Increased recruitment of Hispanic and minority graduate students, said Justus, will be critical in the next two decades in light of
Alvarez Moves to DOL
Fred Alvarez took office July 1 as assistant secretary of labor for employment standards after being confirmed by the U.S. Senate June 19. Alvarez leaves the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where he was a commissioner for three years.
He heads the Labor Department’s largest agency, the Employment Standards Administration, with more than 4,000 employees and a $245 million budget.
Alvarez, 37, a native of New Mexico,told Weekly Report June 29 that his first priority will be to “engender enthusiasm” in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, a division of ESA to ensure that companies that receive federal contracts follow affirmative action guidelines.
the report’s prediction that 40% of the current college faculty will retire by the year 2000.
UC regents commissioned the study to assess how the system’s nine campuses compare in women and minority faculty with 15 comparable research institutions across the nation, including Harvard, the University of Michigan and Stanford. The report does not identify these schools by minority facultyhiring rank or breakdown by UC campus.
The highest percentages of tenured and non-tenured Hispanic and black faculty were found in the UC system. 'Of UCs5,926 tenured professors, 147, or 2.5%, were Hispanic and 53 Latinos, or 5%, were among the 1,066 untenured faculty.
“East Coast universities are aware of a number of institutions among historically black colleges where they can locate potential graduate students. Nobody has identified a similar place for Hispanics,” Justus said.
Feelings of isolation and of a responsibility for all Hispanic students on campus were expressed by Latino faculty interviewed by Justus. “On the flip side, Hispanic graduate students are happiest when there is a good cadre of Hispanic faculty and if so, those graduate students are more likely to be successful,” Justus said. - Melinda Machado
Penda9-Whitten Quits Post
Carol Pendas-Whitten resigned June30 as director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs.
OBEMLA assists students with limited English-proficiency and also serves as a conduit for federal grants to State and local agencies.
Pendas-Whitten, of Cuban ancestry, was appointed director by Education Secretary William Bennett in March 1985. She said she resigned to spend more time with her family.
NEA Lays Out Agenda for Hispanic Education
continued from page 1
bilingual programs and for school/business partnerships;
• Giving six local grants to affiliates to participate in Hispanic voter education drives and other projects within the Hispanic community; and
• Encouragement for the recruitment and retention of Hispanic teachers and the establishment of training programs to help college students pass preprofessional tests.
Norma Cantu, ah associate counsel for MALDEF, praised the NEA document “I’m convinced it shows a commitment,” she said.
The education association is working with MALDEF to develop an information brochure on the U.& English movement for NEA members.
Through visits to school districts in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., San Antonio and the Texas Rio Grande Valley, the study com- ,*J mittee found many Hispanics living in property- • poor school districts. It called on NEA members to lobby for equalization aid in such districts.
“Texas has been very remiss, specifically in aid for minority students, and part of the price we’re paying are these 40-50% dropout rates,” said James Vasquez, superintendent of the Edgewood Independent School District in San Antonio, one of that state’s poorest districts. He cited Texas as an example of a state which has instituted education reform without adequate funding.
H ispanic members of the committee include Elias Chapa, a middle school teacher from Ypsilanti, Mich.; Sara Flores, chair of the 150-member NEA Chicano-Hispano Caucus and a bilingual education teacher from Killeen, Texas; and Jos6 Correa, an elementary school teacher in Colorado Springs, Colo.
- Melinda Machado
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Frank Zuniga, guest columnist
TV and the Latino Child
The generation coming out of our high schools today is the first to know life with television as a constant presence. From the day they were born, television was there.
Have you ever wondered how their view of the world differs from the views of those of us who were not weaned on the electronic teat? Do those of you who are parents sense that you don’t have control, or even the major influence, in how your child’s mind is developed?
Let me share a hypothesis with you.
If your child is an average television viewer, he or she watches an average of six hours of television each day. That is 2,190 hours of television viewing a year - the television equivalent of the Chinese water torture.
On those rare occasions when television depicts Latino children or adults, it subjects those who watch it to negative images about who we are. Young Latinos are told by television over and over again that people of their heritage have added little of value to our society.
Along with selling the Latino child Big Macs and fajitas pitas, U.S. network television sells them a special identity, gang members, maids, whores, drug dealers and, on rare occasions, cops.
COUNT THE POSITIVE IMAGES
Count the positive Latino images you’ve seen on network television recently. Can you think of ten? Five? Two?
By age 15, boys and girls begin making their crucial career decisions. Should they go to college? What careers should they aspire to? Latino boys and girls reach this milestone having been subjected to an average of 25,000 hours of negative or non-existent television images of themselves.
So should it surprise us that our dropout rate hovers around 50%? Remember, the teachers and counselors who advise these students also have been subjected to the same images.
In those critical years when Latino children are searching for an identity, many, many of them are buying what the tube is selling them about themselves - just as you buy the products it advertises.
For years, Hispanics have been trying to convince the networks that a more balanced image of Latinos should be presented. They enjoyed a few small victories, seldom of lasting consequence. One was “Chico and the Man,” which grew out of advocacy pressure.
MORE TALK THAN SUBSTANCE
I n the last five years, I have devoted much of my free time to helping meld a group of media professionals into an organization called the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences. Through it I met many committed professionals from the Latino community who routinely rejected work on distorted, destructive film and television projects at no small cost or risk to their careers.
I have also met with many studio executives who professed to be open minded. Those meetings resulted in much more talk than substance.
Now I’m involved in yet another organization, the National Hispanic Media Coalition. It was formed less than a year ago by a number of concerned community groups. This spring, the coalition challenged, with some success, news coverage and employment patterns at KCBS-TV in Los Angeles. It also renewed a dormant dialogue with Universal Studios, a major manufacturer of the cultural images you see on TV today.
The group started in Southern California but has now networked into many states across the country. On July 18, some 60 individuals from Latino groups nationwide will meet in Washington, D.C., to map a national strategy.
We see our goal as reasonable and beneficial to everyone. All we want is for network television and the film industry to be fair and to give our children a chance.
(Frank Zuniga is a producer/director with 25 years experience in the film and television industry. He is the founding president of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences)
Sin pelos en la lengua
KNOCK, KNOCK: Oh dear. The U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Service is having a terrible time inducing undocumented workers to come out of hiding and participate in its legalization program. The first month, only 62,000 of a predicted high of 4 million eligibles responded to the call of INS Western regional commissioner Harold Ezell and other federates to surface.
This month, Fernando Oaxaca and the Justice Group, armed with a $10.7 million INS advertising contract and a Madison Avenue flair, join in the campaign in earnest
While I haven’t yet viewed any of Oaxaca’s public service announcements or commercials, I did have occasion to share in the wisdom of Washington-based writer/philosopher Douglas Martinez on what’s gone wrong so far.
Martinez feels that the slow start was the result of an INS decision to allow Ezell, who only recently was threatening to “clean and fry" any undocumented workers he caught to voice some commercials. Ezell does have sort of an Attila the Hun reputation.
“Using Ezell is akin to having Contra comandante Ernesto Bermtidez doing tourism commercials urging young Nicaraguans to spend their summer vacations frolicking in the Honduran highlands,” Martinez explained.
In an article he was preparing for syndication this week Martinez also suggested a few commercials of his own:
“One could employ Nancy Reagan lip-syncing the simple message,'Mi casa es su casa.' Her husband has been using that one to political advantage for years. If Nancy’s too busy with other causes, maybe we could get Charo, the cuchbcuchi entertainer, to do it” he said.
“Considering the high percentage of young males in the potential target market,” he concluded, stroking the stubble on his chin, “she might even be better.”
Noting possible consumer resistance to the$185 fee which INS has attached to legalization, he also suggested a deal, like health spas offer, encouraging folks to bring along a friend and“buy-one-membership-and-get-one-free.”
But his real favorite was a “swarm” commercial, the kind where mobs of people storm automotive showrooms and K-Mart stores to take advantage of special holiday sales.
“I’m scripting one,” he revealed, “that opens with a helicopter spotlight burning down on a swarm of undocumented workers scurrying across a ravine near the U.S.-Mexico border. The Border Patrol appears to be in hot pursuit
“But wait! In flawless Spanish, the voice-over inveigles,1 Amigos join your friends and neighbors who are rushing to their nearest legalization office to sign up for amnesty under this new limitedtime norteamericano immigration offer. Be the first on your block to get this valuabje document’
“As the commercial fades out,” Martinez said as he pounded his typewriter, “bullhorns from the helicopter are blaring,’Keep going straight. It’s only four more ravines and three more desolate stretches of desert to our spanking-new legalization office...’ ”
Oaxaca doesn’t know how lucky he is that Martinez didn’t choose to compete for that $10.7 million ad contract.
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting....
ALFREDO DURAN, former Florida state Democratic Party chairman, quoted in the June 7 Miami Herald on non-Hispanic whites? reluctance to share power with Latinos there:
"The group with influence does battle to the end before sharing power. It won't happen voluntarily. Ifs got to be made to happen. Blacks in Miami have been dealt with more as a matter of conscience, i Latins have been dealt with as a matter of necessity."
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 6,1987
3


COLLECTING
NEA REPORT: For information on the availability of . . And Justice for All,” a four-part report on Hispanic and other minority students, write: NEA, Human and Civil Rights Office, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7200.
MINORITY COLLEGE FACULTY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: “The University of California in the Twenty-First Century: Successful Approaches to Faculty Diversity” is a study of the affirmative action program within the University of California system and 15 other universities, including Columbia, Duke, Stanford and the State University of New York A free copy is available by writing to: Educational Relations, Office of the President, 319 University Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 643-6759.
LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics^ final report on employment projections for the year 2000 will be released in September. The issue of BLS’s 100-page Monthly Labor Review will include three articles on those projections. Single copies are $4.50. Place your order in mid-September with the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS: The Institute for Public Education recently issued a 216-page study which details the reasons given by parents to send their children to independent schools and offers a demographic breakdown of the families of these Latino, black and other minority students. For a copy of the study, “Dare to Choose: Parental Choice at Independent Neighborhood Schools,” or its 38-page executive summary, send $25 or $4.50 to the institute at: P.O. Box 42571, Washington, D.C. 20015 (202) 745-0500.
CHILDREN TV-VIEWING GUIDE: “TV Tips for Parents: Using Television to Help Your Child Learn” is a 20-page guide by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting on how parents can use TV as an effective teaching tool. The guide is available in English and Spanish. For a copy, send a self-addressed envelope with 39$ postage to: CPB, Box 33039, Washington, D.C. 20033(202)955-5100. (Indicate Spanish or English version.)
CONNECTING
SVREP OPENS CALIF. OFFICE
The Southwest Voter Registration Education Project opened a Southern California office recently as part of its stepped-up effort to organize the state’s Latino voters.
The San Antonio, Texas-based group intends to spend $1 million to register up to 500,000 additional Hispanic voters in California over the next four years.
The office is at 170 South Madison, #5, Pasadena, Calif. 91101 (818) 792-7614. Its field director is Richard Martinez.
LATINO CONTRIBUTIONS STUDIED
Research is presently being carried out by more than 100 educators, historians, newspaper editors and community leaders to challenge historical and contemporary textbook omissions of events involving Hispanic contributions to the United States.
The goal of the Hispanic Contributions Project directed by the superintendent in the south central area for Dade County public schools, Frank de Varona, is to publish a textbook on Hispanics who have helped shape this nation.
The book, covering the year 1565 to the present, will be distributed free to teachers of American history and publishers of history textbooks. Initial plans call for printing 5,000 copies.
Estimated cost of the project is $40,000 - $50,000. It is being funded by donations from corporate supporters, schools and private donors.
For further information, contact Eddie Rivas at (305) 376-1355.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
The University of California Consortium on Mexico and the United States granted $7,750 in seed money to the University of California, Riverside, to begin work on a documentary film on the life of late UC Riverside Chancellor Tomas Rivera Rivera was a national leader in Hispanic education... The National Hispanic University in Oakland, Calif., graduated 24 students during the university’s second commencement exercises June 20...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
RODRIGO ROJAS TRIBUTE Washington, D.C. July 6-10 In commemoration of the first anniversary of the death of Rodrigo Rojas, a 19-year-old D.C. resident who was killed in Chile by government troops, there will be an exhibit of his photographs and a declaration by Mayor Marion Barry proclaiming Rodrigo Rojas Week
Jorge Burgos (202) 328-7652
MOVIE SCREENING Washington, D.C. July 8
The Washington, D.C., premiere of “La Bamba” will benefit the local chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences The screening will feature the film’s writer/director Luis Valdez. “La Bamba” is based on the meteoric career of rock singer Ritchie Valens, who died in a plane accident.
Jose Sanz (202) 463-0486
AYUDA BENEFIT RECEPTION Washington, D.C. July 8
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus and the board of directors of AYUDA are sponsoring the fifth annual reception to benefit the bilingual legal-services agency.
Rebecca Cusic (202) 387-4848 4
U.S., MEXICO PRESS BRIEFING La Jolla, Calif. July 9,10
U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Charles Pilliod will be among the speakers at the seventh annual briefing session for professional journalists sponsored by the Center for U.S. - Mexican Studies. The session will cover such topics as 1987-88 Mexican presidential succession, drug traffic and U.S.-Mexican trade issues.
Graciela Platero (619) 534-4503
CALIFORNIA G.I. FORUM CONVENTION Anaheim, Calif. July 9-12
The California chapters of the American G.I. Forum will host their 30th annual state convention. Archbishop Roger Mahoney of Los Angeles will address the Friday luncheon and there will be a Saturday dinner and coronation dance for Miss American G.I. Forum of California 1987.
Richard Calva (818) 994-9338
HISPANIC MINISTRY WORKSHOP Washington, D.C. July 11
“Hispanic Youth, Lay Leadership and Vocations” is one of a series of workshops on Hispanic ministry sponsored by the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, the Education for Parish Service program and Trinity College.
Jackie Wakeling (202) 362-7752
BALTIMORE FESTIVAL LATINO Baltimore, Md. July 11,12
The East Baltimore Latin Organization is sponsoring the eighth annual festival celebrating Hispanic culture
July 6,1987
with food and crafts.
Jose Ruiz (301) 396-9378
LA RAZA CONFERENCE Chicago, July 12-15
“La Familia Hispana: Our Future, Our Strength” is the theme of the National Council of La Raza’s annual conference, which will explore the traditional ties binding Hispanic families and how they can be strengthened. Workshops on the future of bilingual education, civil rights aspects of housing, immigration and the U.S. English movement will be featured. Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600
COMING SOON
CONTRACTORS/BUSINESS EXPOSITION
U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Small Business
Administration
El Paso, Texas July 15-18
Carla Hopkins (214) 767-7631
HISPANIC ENGINEERS BANQUET Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles July 18 J. R. Herrera (415) 973-5680
NICARAGUAN INDEPENDENCE CELEBRATION July 19th Celebration Committee Washington, D.C. July 19 Bret Ballade (202) 223-2328
HISPANIC BAND MUSIC Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. July 19 Gabriela Frings (202) 357-2627
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GENERAL EXECUTIVE - PUBLIC RELATIONS UNIVISA CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS
Candidate will be responsible for the implementation of daily public relations activities, including:
• press release development distribution and follow-up
• media relations
• liaison with assigned department/com-pany head(s)
• brochure writing
• development of support collateral, as needed
Individual must demonstrate excellent written and oral communication skills, and be highly organized Ability to work independently and provide creative solutions to problems is desirable. Proficiency in Spanish is helpful, although not a requirement Minimum of three years public relations experience required.
Reports to the Director of Corporate Communications. Salary: Commensurate with experience. Send resume and letter to: Emma Carrasco Corporate Communications UNIVISA, INC.
9200 Sunset Blvd, Suite 1100 Los Angeles, Calif. 90069
ASSOCIATE PRODUCER ENFOQUE NACIONAL
Work on production team of weekly Spanish-language newsmagazine, produced for National Public Radio by KPBS-FM in San Diego. Assist with story development Receive and edit tapes and phone feeds. Work on final assembly and feeds of program. Must be familiar with radio broadcast production techniques and equipment Ability to communicate ideas clearly in written and verbal form. Fluent in Spanish and English. Dedicated to excellence. Degree or equivalent in Journalism, Political Science, or Broadcast preferred. Salary in the low to mid 20s, commensurate with experience. Excellent benefit package. Apply directly to: San Diego State University, Employment Office, 3rd Floor-Administration Bldg., San Diego, Calif. 92182. Applications deadline: July 20,1987.
KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA/title IX employer,
LEGISLATIVE INTERN
National Hispanic Civil Rights organization seeks Legislative Intern for Sacramento Office to identify and research key state policy issues affecting Hispanics.
This person will work with other Hispanic advocacy groups and coordinate legislative efforts on major legislation concerning the Hispanic community. Writing assignments include drafting letters of support on behalf of Senate and Assembly bills and quarterly status reports.
Requirements: legal training or graduate school equivalence in social science, political science, public administration or public policy, familiarity with the state legislative process and key Hispanic issues and preferably bilingual in Spanish and English.
Send resume with references and a writing sample to E. Richard Larson, Vice President for Legal Programs, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th FI., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by July 24.
PRESIDENT
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
Nominations and applications for qualified and interested candidates are sought for President of the University of Texas at El Paso.
U.T. El Paso, established in 1913 as the Texas State School of Minesand Metallurgy, isthe third largest general academic component in The University of Texas System, a university system comprised of 14 academic and health-related components. The institution offers a wide range of baccalaureate and master's degree programs, and a doctoral offering in Geological Sciences, with additional doctoral offerings in Psychology, Education, Engineering, and Chemistry under active consideration. The degree programs are offered through six colleges: Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Nursing and Allied Health and Science. U.T. El Paso has developed numerous programs reflective of its border location, including units such as the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, the Bureau of Business and Economic Research, and a consortium with universities in Mexico for research and exchange of ideas in areas of mutual concern.
The institution enrolls about 14,000 students, with 14% of that number as graduate students. More than 80% of the students are from the immediate area, 51 % are Hispanic, and a slight majority women. Located in one of the most rapidly growing cities in Texas, with over 1.4 million people in the metropolitan area(650,000 in El Paso and800,000 in the sister city of Ciudad Ju&rez, Mexico), and with the rapid economic and population growth being driven by the expanding twin plant manufacturing operations of many U.S. and multinational firms, the future of this older but still developing institution is bright.
The president is the chief administrative officer of the University and reports to the Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs of The University of Texas System. Candidates for the presidency should possess an earned doctorate, have demonstrated leadership and administrative ability, have achieved distinction in at least one academic or professional area, have exhibited a commitment to excellence in teaching and research and possess the ability to communicate the mission and needs of the University to faculty, students, alumni and other constituencies.
Applications will be accepted until July31,1987. After that date the Advisory Committee may request and consider credentials from candidates nominated from responsible sources. All nominations and applications with supporting materials should be addressed to:
James P. Duncan, Chairman Advisory Committee for the Selection of a President The University of Texas System 601 Colorado Street Austin, Texas 78701
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PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408. ... ......-
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Arts & Entertainment
SCRIPTS ON STAGE: Plays by six emerging writers will receive staged readings this week as part of the second Hispanic Playwrights Projects being held in Southern California’s South Coast Repertory July 6-12.
Scripts by Jos6 Rivera, Ana Maria Simo and Alfred Lopez, all New Yorkers, and by El Paso’s Estella Portillo Trambley, New Haven, Conn.’s Bernardo Solano, and Sam Garcia, a New Yorker now residing in Los Angeles, will have a workshop/rehearsal during the weeklong event.
Rivera, Simo and Trambley will each have a director, dramaturge and professional cast for four days to develop their respective works - The Promise, Passion and Blacklight- which will receive public readings at the theater in Costa Mesa.
The other three playwrights will share a director, dramaturge and cast for one-day workshop/rehearsals before a private reading for HPP participants.
Other related events include a free public seminar on July 9 with ! Maria Irene Fornes, director of the playwrights? unit at New York’s INTAR Theatre, and 15-minute prereading seminars by humanities scholars on specific cultural aspects of each play.
Fornes is the event's project dramaturge and serves as artistic adviser along with Rub&n Sierra, artistic director of Seattle’s Group Theatre, historian Jorge Huerta, Jose Luis Valenzuela, resident director with the Los Angeles Theater Center, and Raul Moncada, from San Diego’s Teatro Meta
Jose Cruz Gonzalez is director of the Hispanic Playwrights Project, which receives funding from the Pacific Telesis Foundation and the California Council for the Humanities.
In other theater news, Los Angeles’ Bilingual Foundation of the Arts presents the “Flamenco operetta” Lorca: Child of the Moon, based on the works of the Spanish poet and playwright Federico Garcia Lorca, July 7 to 12. . . New York’s Repertorio Espahol company continues its season July 11 to 12 with performances of Las damas modernas de Guanabacoa, La zarzuela and La fiaca... And on July 14 Steven Bauer, a Cuban actor, joins the cast of the critically-received Bent playing at the Coast Playhouse in West Hollywood...
ONE LINERS: Singer Jos^ Feliciano and composer Lalo Schiffrin join Celia Cruz (as reported here last week) among the 21 performers recently selected by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce for a star on the \Naik of Fame... AndJulio lglesias(who already has a star on the W.O.F.) says that the song My Love is the best he’s heard by Stevie Wonder; the Iglesias/Wonder duet appears in forthcoming albums by both artists... _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TIMES SYNDICATE SIGNS LINK: The Los Angeles Times Syndicate, which includes among its 83 features the editorial cartoons of Paul Conrad and columnists Henry Kissinger, Art Buchwald and Erma Bombeck, has contracted to handle marketing and distribution of Hispanic Link News Service’s three-a-week column service.
The service was inaugurated in February 1980 to add a Hispanic dimension to U.S. newspapers’ opinion pages. Presently, about 200 newspapers, including 93 dailies in the Gannett newspaper chain, receive the columns. Approximately 40 newspapers take the service in Spanish or bilingually.
Douglas Mayberry, vice president and director of sales for the Times’ syndicate, says that it plans to offer more of its current
features in Spanish in the near future and that the syndicate will be working with Hispanic Link to develop additional features, in both Spanish and English, of special interest to U.S. Hispanics in the months ahead.
Hispanic Link, based in Washington, D.C., is a family-held corporation directed by Charles and Sebastiana Ericksen and their son, Hector Ericksen-Mendoza.
NETWORK EXPANDS: Telemundo, a New York-based Spanish-language television network which was formed last year, has expanded into the San Francisco and Houston areas.
It bought the stock of National Television Group Inc., which holds the license of San Jose, Calif., station KSTS-TV. The station presently broadcasts business news in the San Francisco Bay area It will convert to Spanish-language broadcasting Nov. 1.
It also acquired the right to buy Channel 28 in Galveston, Texas, in the Houston area,
and will build a full-power station there which it projects having on the air by January.
The purchases will give Telemundo stations or affiliates in seven of the nation’s eight major Hispanic markets. It currently has stations in New York, Miami, Los Angeles and Puerto Rico and an affiliate in the Chicago/Milwaukee area. The lone market of the eight where it is absent is San Antonio.
OF NOTE: Rafael Prieto, who applied for legalization last month under the ’86 immigration bill, has been demoted by his employer, the New York Spanish-language daily Noticias del Mundo, from assistant editor to reporter.
The demotion reportedly was related to his legalization application and the resultant publicity. New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez wrote a column on Prieto’s experiences as an undocumented immigrant which was run in Weekly Report two weeks
a9°' - Charlie Ericksen
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JUL 6 1987 Making The News This Week a resolution to the state House calling for the creation of a committee to consider impeaching Gov. Bill Clements. The resolution was spurred by Clements' reputed involvement in making illegal payments Puerto Rico Governor Rafael Hernandez Col6n orders the island's to football players at Southern Methodist University while he was Justice Department to prepare a report on the " c h airmi:tn ' o f SMtYs' Board of Governors. . . Democratic National Indiana University basketball coach Bobby Knight, who was convicted Chairman Paui" Kirk' disqualifies San Juan Mayor Baltasar Corrada in absentia for assaulting a police officer there irt Hr'l'9 : 'lntlianli"Go'V: dei'Rio from particfpating in the Democratic Party's 1988 presidential Bobby Orr replied that he will fight an extraditit>n rci' o u r Strprmne "'no m(nMlog p ' r g cesS: Kirk pointed to Corrada's support for Vice Cpurt." ... Texas Gov. Bill Clements signs a pill that President George aush. . . Naty Alvarado, from Hesperia, Calif., Mexican nationals to pay in-state fees at several "tiestile :i:ial ionai of nine handball championships. He won his the Texas-Mexico border ... The California Assem bly, on a vote of73, latest title at the 37T h U.S . Handball Association Championships in sends to the Senate a bill by Rep. Charles Calliero n (O:Aihambl'a) Bal t i more ... 18, Leonard, 18, Thomas, 17, and William that would make it a felony on second offense ' for a n i mmigration SaTas: , 5, becomi' tthe first four brothers in Boy Scout history to consultant to make false or misleading staterne nts 'fo a "'pe'rson become 'Eagle ScoU'ts on the same day . The Sa lases are from Fort seeking legalization ... Texas Rep . Paul Moreno( D-El Paso) submits Worth r Texas. . . • Vol. 5 No. 26 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL JulyS, 1987 .. inadequate support systems are adding to the organization's 125th annual convention fcf''l'aise teacher explfctationS'for-Hisparnc the national dropout problem and causing Hispanics and other minority students to slip further behind , concluded a National Education Association study issued June 26. NEA President Mary Futrell released the Calif. ' Bilingual Act Expires California's bilingual education program officially expired June 30 without agreement on compromise legislation. Proponents of a five-year extension of the state program, led by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), are meeting with critics, led by Assemblyman Frank Hill (R Whittie.,, to fashion a compromise bill . Dale Shimasaki , an education aide to Brown, said that the expiration of the previous legis lation does not mean that bilingual programs in the state will end . Shimasaki thinks that the Department of Education will probably advise local districts to continue their existing programs, since a compromise bill seems likely. in Los Angeles. The four part report examined educational issues faced by minority students. The nation's Hispanic population continues to lag behind all other groups educationally, according to NEA's Hispanic Concerns Study Committee, appointed by Futrell in 1985. " The clearest indication that public schooling is not working for all Hispanic students is a dropout rate that reaches crisis proportions of 50% or more in some cities," said John Wilson, Hispanic committee chairman and NEA executive committee member . Wilson , a special education teacher from North Carolina, added, "The important lessons we learned were that Hispanic education con cerns go much beyond the issue of bilingual education . They span the full range of public schooling issues." More than 90 recommendations made by the Hispanic committee were adopted in May by the board of the 1 .85 million-member association . To increase educational op portunities and support systems for Hispanics, Latinos Unprepared for. Future Jobs l.. Hispanics are expected to represent nearly 29% of the labor force growth of 21 million jobs during the 1986 period, according to projections released June 2 5 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, the study found that Hispanics will not be well represented in the nation's fastestgrowi ng occupations and are overrepresented in slow-growing or de clining jobs. The bureau's " moderate" growth projection expects the total number of Hispanic workers to increase to 14,086,000 in the year 2000 from a 1986 total of 8,076 , 000, a 7 4% increase . Fred Romero, executive director of the National SEA Policy and Research Institute and a former Labor Department official , called the BLS projections " surprising," adding that previous estimates of the growth of the His panic work force were considerably lower. Romero said the job force expansion re presents a "tremendous opportunity'' for Hispanics, but wonders whether the Hispanic community by itself can "create the human capital" needed to lower high unemployment rates. "We need more help from the federal government and the private sector," he said. Highly skilled jobs in service-producing industries are expected to account for almost all of the labor force increase . Since Hispanics are disproportionally represented among LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS (in thousands) Hispanic Black White 1986 2000 8,076 14,086 12,684 16,334 101 , 801 116, 701 Sou rce : Bure a u of Labor Statistics Change 74% 29 15 workers with less education, the study warns that they will find less opportunity for good pay and advancement. -:Richard Sayre • st'udents, tlecrease their dr-opout-rates and to coAvene a national fortJm education needs and affirmative action principles for education personnel contracts. Wilson told Weekly Report that NEA has budgeted $1 00,000 to begin addressing com mittee concerns. The 125-member board of directors, which includes three members of the Hispanic committee , will meet in September to set priorities . Among the adopted recommendations are provisions for. • Financial contributions to organizations such as the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Council of La Raza, the National Association for Bilin gual Education and the National Puerto Rican Coalition ; • Development of teaching guides and instructional materials on the contributions of Hispanics; • Encouragement of local and state affiliates to develop strategies for securing funding for continu9 d o n page 2 U.S. Denies Changed Status of Nicaraguans Recent press reports that the Reagan administration would grant Nicaraguans special legal immigration status were errone ous , a top U.S. Justice Department offi cial told Weekly Report June 30. Pat Korten, deputy director of public affairs for the Justice Department, said , " There have been many rumors floating around but we have no formal plans to grant 'Extended Voluntary Deportation' status toN icaraguans." Korten said the department will continue its current policy toward Nicaraguan refugees. "We have not been deporting any Nicaraguans who have a well-founded fear of persecution and we have been handling work authori zation requests on a case-by-case basis," he said .

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LULAC Elects Moran, Draws Presidential Hopefuls Oscar Moran was elected to a third onewjll be the maWr contribution of thjs effort" A straw poll, designed to measure the year term as national president of the League eros sajg. support of convention delegates fort he various of United Latin American Citizens during the The summit will domestic issues candidates, showed the most support for group's 58th annual convention in Corpus sQ"ch as eaucairon anCI the Engusl;oglv mgyf" 1 former Arizona governor Bruce Babbitt and Christi, Texas, June 24-28. The convention hp said Dukakis. drew more than 4,000 participants, including A similar summjt jg the workc1 11 I!! s: itA The poll had both receiving24% ofthe267 eight U.S. presidential candidates. Featured s• •pport will iP"Oh•e a broad coaljtjgg returned ballots. Jesse Jackson was third speaker San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros tino interest groups and ma be held in with 17%. called for a national meeting of Hispanic Chica o accor m o a orney and forme In other action, Moran called for the resigleaders to draft a common Hispanic agenda Nat:ona President Au en onilla of nation of U.S. Immigration Commissioner to confront the candidates. Corpus Chnst:. Alan Nelson, charging that Hispanics have Moran, a San Antonio insurance analyst, I ne cOHVlHfflon drew all seven Democratic been made "scapegoats" of the new impolled about 90% of the delegate vote when presidential candidates and a lone Republican, migration law. Andres Tobar, a U.S. Department of Education U.S. Rep. Jack Kemp of New York. In two LULAC elections, Rafael Acosta of program officer, conceded. U.S. Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.) said he HoustondefeatedFrankOrtiz,alsoofHouston, would consider a Hispanic as his vice presibecoming the national vice president for the _dential c dential running mate . Southwest, Ortiz conceded before the, final Asked if he would name a Hispanic to the tally of the votes. • Cabinet, Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis Jess Quintero, of Washington, D .C., won ? replied, "Sin dud a-without a doubt." the Northeast vice presidency by acclamation i During his speech, the Rev. Jesse Jackson when the incumbent, Andres Tobar, decided called for a Hispanic to replace recently to run against Moran. All other officers were resigned Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell. uncontested. -Julio Laboy Lack of Latino Professors 'Atrocious' N EA Lays Out Agenda for Hispanic Education With few Hispanics and other minorities positioned to move into teaching at the college level , their nationwide underrepresentation will continue unless "extraordinary efforts" are made, concludes a report issued June 17 by the University of California system. The study, "The University of California in the Twenty-First Century: Successful Ap proaches to Faculty Diversity," cites overt discrimination, a lack of effective sponsorship and stress from trying to balance professional obligations with community ones as barriers1 • Calling the lack of Latino and other minority faculty "atrocious," Joyce Justus, author of the study and director of educational relations for the UC system, said she found few programs across the United States geared to attracting minorities to teaching at the university level. Increased recruitment of Hispanic and minority graduate students, said Justus, will be critical in the next two decades in light of 2 Alvarez Moves to DOL Fred Alvarez took office July 1 as assistant secretary of labor for employment standards after being confirmed by the U.S. Senate June 19. Alvarez leaves the Equal Employ ment Opportunity Commission, where he was a commissioner for three years. He heads the Labor Department's largest agency, the Employment Standards Admini& tration, with more than 4,000 employees and a $245 million budget. Alvarez, 37, a native of New Mexico; , told Weekly Report June 29 that his first priority will be to "engender enthusiasm" in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Pro. grams, a division of ESA, to ensure that companies that receive federal contracts follow affirmative action guidelines. the report's prediction that 40% of the current college faculty will retire by the year 2000. UC regents commissioned the study to assess how the system's nine campuses compare in women and minority faculty with 15 comparable research institutions across the nation, including Harvard, the University of Michigan and Stanford. The report does not identify these schools by minority faculty hiring rank or breakdown by UC campus. The highest percentages of tenured and non-tenured His panic and black faculty were found in the UC system. -Qt UCs5,926 tenured professors, 147, or2.5%, were Hispanic and 53 Latinos, or 5%, were among the 1,066 untenured facl!lty. "East Coast universities are aware of a number of institutions among historically black colleges where they can locate potential graduate students. Nobody has identified a similar place for Hispanics," Justus said . Feelings of isolation and of a responsibility for all Hispanic students on campus were expressed by Latino faculty interviewed by Justus. "On the flip side, Hispanic graduate students are happiest when there is a good cadre of Hispanic faculty and if so, those graduate students are more likely to be suc cessful," Justus said. -Melinda Machado Penda&Whitten Quits Post Carol Pendas-Whitten resigned June30 as director of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs. OBEMLA assists students with limited English-proficiency and also serves as a conduit for federal grants to state and local agencies. Pendas-Whitten, of Cuban ancestry, was appointed director by Education Secretary William Bennett in March 1985. She said she resigned to spend more time with her family . continued from page 1 bilingual programs and for school/business partnerships; • Giving six local grants to affiliates to participate in Hispanic voter education dri ves and other projects within the Hispan i c com munity; and • Encouragement for the recruitment and retention of Hispanic teachers and the establish ment of training programs to help college students pass preprofessional tests. Norma Cantu, ari associate counsel for MALDEF, praised the NEA document. "I'm convinced it shows a commitment," she said. The education association is working with MALDEF to develop an information brochure on the U.S. English movementfor N EA members. Through visits to school districts in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., San Antonio and the Texas Rio Grande Valley, the study com" ' mittee found many Hispanics living in property• i poor school districts. It called on NEA mem bers to lobby for equalization aid in such districts. "Texas has been very remiss, specifically in aid for minority students, and part of the price we're paying are these 40-50% dropout rates," said James Vasquez, superintendent of the Edgewood Independent School District in San Antonio, one of that state's poorest districts. He cited Texas as an example of a state which has instituted education reform without adequate funding. Hispanic members of the committee include Elias Chapa, a middle school teacher from Ypsilanti, Mich.; Sara Flores, chair of the 150member NEA Chicano-Hispano Caucus and a bilingual education teacher from Killeen, Texas; and Jose Correa, an elementary school teacher in Colorado Springs, Colo. -Melinda Machado Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Frank Zuniga, guest columnist Sin pelos en Ia lengua TV and the Latino Child The generation coming out of our high schools today is the KNOCK, KNOCK: Oh dear . The U.S. Immigration& Naturalization first to know life with television as a constant presence. From Service is having a terrible time inducing undocumented workers the day they were born, television was there. to come out of hiding and participate in its legalization program. The Have you ever wondered how their view of the world differs from first month, only 62,000 of a predicted high of 4 million eligibles the views of those of us who were not weaned on the electronic teat? responded to the call of INS Western regional commissioner Do those of you who are parents sense that you don't have control, or Harold Ezell and other federales to surface. even the major influence, in how your chilcfs mind is developed? This month, Fernando Oaxaca and the Justice Group, armed. Let me share a hypothesis with you. with a $10.7 million INS advertising contract and a Madison If your child is an average television viewer, Avenue flair, join in the campaign in earnest he or she watches an average of six hours of While I haven't yet viewed any of Oaxaca's public service television each day . That is 2,190 hours of announcements or commercials, I did have occasion to share in television viewing a year the television the wisdom of Washington-based writer/philosopher Douglas equivalent of the Chinese water torture. Martinez on whafs gone wrong so far. ' On those rare occasions when television Martinez feels that the slow start was the result of an INS depicts Latino children or adults, it subjects decision to allow Ezell, who only recently was threatening to those who watch it to negative images about "clean and fry'' any undocumented workers he caught, to voice who we are . Young Latinos are told by tel& some commercials. Ezell does have sort of an Attlla the Hun vision over and over again that people of reputation. their heritage have added little of value to our society . "Using Ezell is akin to having Contra comandante Ernesto Along with selling the Latino child Big Macs and fajitas pitas, U.S. Bermudez doing tourism commercials urging young Nicaraguans network television sells them a special identity: gang members, to spend their summer vacations frolicking in the Honduran maids , whores, drug dealers and, on rare occasions, cops . highlands," Martinez explained. COUNT THE POSITIVE 1 MAGES In an article he was preparing for syndication this week, Martinez Count the positive Latino images you've seen on network television also suggested a few commercials of his own: recently. Can you think of ten? Five? Two? "One could employ Nancy Reagan lip-syncing the simple By age 15, boys and girls begin making their crucial career message, 'Mi casa es su cas a' Her husband has been using that decisions. Should they go to college? What careers should they one to political advantage for years . If Nancy's too busy with other aspire to? Latino boys and girls reach this milestone having been causes , maybe we could get Charo, the cuchi-cuchi entertainer, subjected to an average of 25,000 hours of negative or non-existent 'to do it." he said . television images of themselves. "Considering the high percentage of young males in the potential So should it surprise us that our dropout rate hovers around target market," he concluded, stroking the stubble on his chin, 50%? Remember, the teachers and counselors who advise these "she might even be better. " students also have been subjected to the same images. Noting possible consumer resistance to the $185 fee which INS In those critical years when Latino children are searching for an has attached to legalization, he also suggested a deal, like health identity, many , many of them are buying what the tube is selling them spas offer, encouraging folks to bring along a friend and"buy-oneabout themselves-just as you buy the products it advertises . membership-and-get-one-free." For years, Hispanics have been trying to convince the networks But his real favorite was a "swarm" commercial, the kind where that a more balanced image of Latinos should be presented. They mobs of people storm automotive showrooms and KMart stores enjoyed a few small victories, seldom of lasting consequence. One to take advantage of special holiday sales. was "Chico and the Man, " which grew out of advocacy pressure. "I'm scripting one," he revealed , "that opens with a helicopter MORE TALK THAN SUBSTANCE spotlight burning down on a swarm of undocumented workers In the last five years, I have devoted much of my free time to helping scurrying across a ravine near the U.S.Mexico border. The Border meld a group of media professionals into an organization called the Patrol appears to be in hot pursuit. Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences . Through it 1 met "But wait! In flawless Spanish, the voice-over inveigles, 'Amigos, many committed professionals from the Latino community who join your friends and neighbors who are rushing to their nearest routinely rejected work on distorted, destructive film and television legalization office to sign up for amnesty under this new limitedprojects at no small cost or risk to their careers. time norteamerica no immigration offer. Be the first on your block I have also met with many studio executives who professed to be to get this valuable document.' open minded. Those meetings resulted in much more talk than "As the commercial fades out," Martinez said as he pounded his substance . typewriter, "bullhorns from the helicopter are blaring, 'Keep going Now I'm involved in yet another organization, the National Hispanic straight. lfs only four more ravines and three more desolate Media Coalition. It was formed less than a year ago by a number of stretches of desert to our spanking-new legalization office .. : " concerned community groups. This spring, the coalition challenged, Oaxaca doesn't know how lucky he is that Martinez didn't with some success, news coverage and employment patterns at choose to compete for that $10.7 million ad contract. KCB& TV in Los Angeles . It also renewed a dormant dialogue witti Kay Barbaro Universal Studios, a major manufacturer of the cultural images you Alllll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llll!llllli••lll•l see on TV today. Quoting. . • • The group started in Southern California but has now networked ! into many states across the country. On July 18, some 60 individuals from Latino groups nationwide will meet in Washington, D.C., to map a national strategy . ALFREDO DURAN, former Florida state Democratic Party chairman, We see our goal as reasonable and beneficial to everyone. All we quoted in the June 7 Miami Herald on non-Hispanic whites' reluctance want is for network television and the film industry to be fair and to to share power with Latinos there: give our children a chance. 1'The group with influence does battle to the end before sharing (Frank Zufliga is a producer/director with 25 years experience in the power. It won't happen voluntarily. It's got to be made to happen. film and television industry. He is the founding president of the Blacks in Miami have been dealt with more as a matter of conscience. Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences.) , Latins have been dealt with as a matter of necessity." Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 6, 1987 3

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COLLECTING NEA REPORT: For information on the availability of " . . . And Justice for All , " a four-part report on Hispanic and other minority students, write: NEA, Human and Civil Rights Office, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 822-7200. MINORITY COLLEGE FACUL TV AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: "The University of California in the Twenty-First Century: Successful App roaches to Faculty D i versity' ' is a study of the affirmative action program within the University of California system and 15 other universities, including Columbia, Duke , Stanford and the State Univers i ty of New York. A free copy is available by writing to: Educational Relations, Office of the President, 319 University Hall, University of California , Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 643-6759. LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' f inal report on employment projections for the year 2000 w i ll be released in September. The issue of BLS's 1 00-page Monthly Labor Review will include three articles on those projections. Single copies are $4.50 . Place your order in mid-September with the Sup_erintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402. INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS: The Institute for Public Education recently issued a 216-page study which details the reasons given by parents to send their children to independent schools and offers a demographic breakdown of the families of these Latino, black and _ other minority students. For a copy of the study, "Dare to Choose: Parental Choice at Independent Neighborhood Schools." or i t s 38-page executive summary, send $25 or $4.50 to the institute at: P . O . Box 42571, Washington, D .C. 20015 (202) 745-0500. CHILDREN TV-VIEWING GUIDE: "TV Tips for Parents : Using Televis i on to Help Your Child Learn" is a 20-page guide by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting on how parents can use TV as an effective teaching tool . The guide is available in Engl i sh and Spanish . For a copy, send a self-addressed envelope with 39 postage to: CPB, Box 33039, Washington, D .C. 20033 (202) 955 00. (Indicate Spanish or English version . ) CONNECTING SVREP OPENS CALIF. OFFICE The Southwest Voter Registration Education Project opened a Southern California office recently as part of its stepped-up effort to organize the state's Latino voters . The San Antonio, Texas-based group intends to spend$1 million to register up to 500,000 additional Hispanic voters in California over the next four years. The office is at 170 South Madison, #5, Pasadena , Calif . 91101 (818) 792-7614. Its field director is Richard Martinez. LATINO CONTRIBUTIONS STUDIED Research is presently being carried out by more than 1 00 educators, historians newspaper editors and community leaders to challenge historical contemporary textbook omissions of events involving Hispanic contributions to the United States. The goal of the Hispanic Contributions Project , directed by t h _ e superintendent in the south central area for Dade County public schools , Frank de Varona, is to publish a textbook on H ispanics who have helped shape this nation. The book , covering the year 1565 to the present, will be distributed free to teachers of Ameri can h i story and publishers of history textbooks. Initial plans call for printing 5,000 copies. Estimated cost of the project is $40,000 $50,000. It is be i ng funded by donations from corporate supporters, schools and private donors . For further information , contact Eddie Rivas at (305) 376-1355. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The University of California Consortium on Mexico and the United States granted $7,750 in seed money t o the University of California, Riverside, to begin work on a documentary film on the life of late UC Riverside Chancellor Tomas Rivera . Rivera was a national leader i n Hispanic education ... The National Hispanic University in Oakland , Calif., graduated 24 students during the university's second com mencement exercises June 20 ... Calendar U .S., MEXICO PRESS BRIEFING La Jolla, Calif . July 9 , 10 w1th food and c r a fts. Jose Ruiz(301) 396-93 7 8 THIS WEEK RODRIGO ROJAS TRIBUTE Washington, D . C . July 6-10 In commemoration of the first anniversary of the death of Rodrigo Rojas , a 19year-old D . C . res ident who was killed in Chile by government troops, there will be an e x hibit of his photographs and a dec laration by Mayor Marion Barry pro claiming Rodrigo Rojas Week. Jorge Burgos (202) 328 MOVIE SCREENING Washington, D .C. July 8 The Washington, D . C., pre miere of " La Samba" will benefit the localchapterofthe Hispani c Academy of Media Arts and Sciences. The screening will feature the film ' s writer/director Luis Valdez . " La Samba " is based on the meteoric career of rock singer Rit chie Valens, who died in a plane accident. Jose Sanz (202) 463-0486 AYUDA BENEFIT RECEPTION Washington, D . C . July 8 The Congressional Hispanic Caucus and the board of directors of A YUDA are sponsoring the f1fth annual reception to benefit the bilingual legal services agency. Rebecca Cusi c (202) 387-4848 4 U . S . Ambassad o r to Mex ico Charles Pilliod will be among the speakers at the seventh annual briefing session for professional journalists sponsored by the Center for U.S. Mexican Studies. The session will cover such topics as 1987-88 Mexican presidential succession , drug traffic and U . S .-Mex i c an trade issues. Graciela Platero (619) 534-4503 CALIFORNIA G. I. FORUM CONVENTION Anaheim , Calif . July 9-12 The California chapters of the American G . I . Forum will host their 30th annual state convention. Amh bishop Roger Mahoney of Los Angeles will address the Friday luncheon and there will be a Saturday dinner and coronation dance for Miss American G. I . For u m of California 1987. Richard Calva (818) 994-9338 HISPANIC MINISTRY WORKSHOP Washington, D . C . July 11 "Hispanic Youth , Lay Leadership and Vocations" is one of a series of workshops on Hispanic ministry sponsored by the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, the Education for Parish Service program and Trinity College. Jackie Wakeling (202) 362-7752 BALTIMORE FESTIVAL LATINO Baltimore, Md. July 11, 12 The East Baltimore Latin Organization is sponsoring the eighth annual festival celebrating Hispanic culture July 6, 1987 LA RAZA CONFERE. NCE Chi c ago , J ul y 12 1 5 " L a Familia Hispana: Our Future, Our Strength" i s the theme of the National Council of La Raza ' s annual conferen c e , which will e x plore the tradit i onal ties binding Hispanic famili e s and how they can b e strengthened. Workshops on the future of bilingual education , civil rights a s p ec ts of hou s ing, i mmigra t i o n and the U . S . English movement will be featured. Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600 COMING SOON CONTRACTORS/BUSINESS EXPOSITION U . S . Hispanic Chamber o f Commerce , Small Business Administration El Paso , Te x as July 15 18 Carla Hopkins(214) 767-7631 HISPANIC ENGINEERS BANQUET So ciety of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles July 18 J . R. Herrera (415) 973-5680 NICARAGUAN INDEPENDENCE CELEBRATION July 19th Celebration Committee Washington , D .C. July 19 Bret Sallade (202) 223-2328 HISPANIC BAND MUSIC Smithsonian Institution Washington, D . C . July 19 Gabriela Frings (202) 357 1-jispani c Link Weekly

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GENERAL EXECUTIVE-PUBLIC RELATIONS UNIVISA CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS Candidate will be responsible for the im plementation of daily public relations activities, including: • press release development, distribution and follow-up • media relations • liaison with assigned department/com pany h ead( s) • brochure writing • development of support collateral, as needed Individual must demonstrate excellent written and oral communication skills , and be highly organized Ability to work independently and provide creative solutions to problems is ' desirable. Proficiency in Spanish is helpful , although not a requirement Minimum of three years public relations e x perience required . Reports to the Director of Corporate Com munications. Salary: Commensurate with experience . Send resume and letter to: Emma Carrasco Corporate Communications UNIVISA, INC . 9200 S u nse t Blvd., Suite 1100 L o s Angeles, Calif . 90069 A SSOCIATE PRODUCER ENFOQUE NACIONAL Work on production team of weekly Spanish l anguage neWsmagazine, produced for National Public Radio by KPB&FM in San Diego. Assist with story development Receive and edit tapes and phone feeds. Work on final assembly and feeds of program . Must be familiar with radio broadcast production techniques and equipment Ability to communicate ideas clearly in written and verbal form. Fluent in Spanish and English . Dedicated to exceiiEmce . Degree or equivalent in Journalism, Political Science, or Broadcast preferred . Salary in the low to mid 20s, com mensurate with experience. Excellent benefit package. Apply directly to: San Diego State University, Employment Office , 3rd Floor Administration Bldg . , San Diego, Calif . 92182. Applications deadline : July 20, 1987. KPB& TV/FM is an EEO/ AA/title IX employer. . LEGISLATIVE INTERN National Hispanic Civil Rights organization seeks Legislative Intern for Sacramento Office to identify and research key state policy issues affecting Hispanics. This person will work with . other Hispanic advocacy groups and c . oordinate legislative efforts on major legislation concerning the His panic community. Writing assignments include drafting letters of support on behalf of Senate and Assembly bills and quarterly status reports. Requirements: legal training or graduate school equivalence in social science , political science, public j!dministration or public policy, familiarity with the state legislative process and key Hispanic issues and preferably bilingual in Span i sh and English . Send resume with references and a writing s.ample to E. Richard Larson , Vice President for Legal Programs, MALDEF , 634 S . Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Ange les, Calif . 90014 by July 24. Hi s p a ni c Lin k Weekly Report PRESIDENT THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO Nominations and applications for qualified and interested candidates are sought for President of the University of Texas at El Paso . U.T. El Paso, established in 1913 as the Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy, is the third largest general academic component in The University of Texas System, a university system comprised of 14 academic and health-related components . The institution offers a wide range of baccalaureate and maste(s degree programs , and a doctoral offering in Geological Sciences, with additional doctoral offerings in Psychology , Education, Eng i neering , and Chemistry under a c tive consideration. The degree programs are offered through six colleges : Business Administration , Education , Engineering , Liberal Arts, Nursing and Allied Health and Science . U .T. El Paso has developed nume r ous programs reflective of its border location , including units such as the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, the Bureau of Business and Economic Research , and a consortium with universities in Mexico for research and exchange of ideas in areas of mutual concern. The instituti on enrolls about 14,000 students , with 14% of that number as graduate students . More than 80% of the students are from the immediate area, 51% are Hispanic, and a slight major ity women . Located in one of the most rapidly growing cities in Texas, with over1 . 4 million peopl e in the metro politan area(650,000 in El Pasoand800,000 in the sister city of Ciudad Juarez , Mexico) , and with the rapid economic and population growth being driven by the expanding twin plant manufacturing operations of many U . S . and multinational firms , the future of this older but still developing institution is bright. The president is the chief administrative officer of the University and reports to the E x ecutive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs ofThe UniversityofTexas System . Candidates for the presidency should possess an earned doctorate, have demonstrated leadership and administrative ability , have achieved distinction in at least one academic or professional area, have exhibited a commitment to e x cellence in teaching and research and possess the ability to communicate the mission and needs of the University to faculty , students, alumni and other constituencies . Applications will be accepted until July 31, 1987. After tha t date the Advisory Committee may request and consider credenti als from candidates nominated from responsible sources . All nominations and applications with supporting materials should be addressed to : James P . Duncan , Chairman Advisory Committee for the Selection of a President The University of Texas System 60 1 Colorado Street Austin, Texas 78701 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER MARKETING MANAGER Marketing Manager responsible for develop ing a Fortune 500 company's national Hispanic Market. Boston location. Salary mid to high 50's. Send resume to: L. Mays Jane C. Edmonds & Associates Inc . 4 Copley Place, Suite 580 Boston , Mass . 02116 (617) 437-9840 PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md. , govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The California Associat ion for Bilingual Edu1 cation seeks an executive director. Locai-CA i Metro area . Contact CABE, 926 J St. , Suite I , 810, Sacramento, CA 95814. (916} 447-3986 EOE GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, WashingiOI'\ D . C . , provides: • Design • Illustration • Type setting e layout e silkscreen and • Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202} 483. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city , state & z i p code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip-----------Area Code & Phone _______ _ I 5

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Arts & Entertainment Fornes is the evenfs project dramaturge and serves as artistic adviser along with Ruben Sierra, artistic director of Seattle's Group Theatre , historian Jorge Huerta, Jose Luis Valenzuela, resident director with the Los Angeles Theater Center, and Raul Moncada, from San Diego's Teatro Meta SCRIPTS ON STAGE: Plays by six emerging writers will receive staged readings this week as part of the second Hispan i c Playwrights Projects being held in Southern California ' s South Coast Repertory July 6-12. Scripts by Jose Rivera , Ana Maria Simo and Alfred Lopez, all New Yorke .rs, and by El Paso's Estella Portillo Tramoley, New Haven , Conn. s Bernardo Solano , and Sam Garcia , a New Yorker now residing in Los Angeles, will have a workshop/rehearsal during the weeklong event. Jose Cruz Gonzalez is director of the Hispanic Playwrights Project , which receives funding from the Pacific Telesis Foundation and the California Council for the Humanities. Rivera, Simo and Trambley will each have a d irector, dramaturge and professional cast for four days to develop their respective works The Promise , Passion and Blacklight-which will receive public readings at the theater in Costa Mesa . In other theater news, Los Angeles' Bilingual Foundation of the Arts presents the "Flamenco operetta" Lorca: Child of the Moon, based on the works of the Spanish poet and playwright Federico Garcia Lorca , July 7 to 12. . . New York's Repertorio Espanol company continues its season July 11 to 1 2 with performances of Las damas modernasde Guanabacoa, La zarzuelaa. nd La fiaca . .. And onJuly14 Steven Bauer , a Cuban actor, joins the cast of the criticallyreceived Bent playing at the Coast Playhouse in West Hollywood ... The other three playwrights w i ll share a director, dramaturge and cas t for one-day workshop/rehearsals before a pri vate reading for HPP participants . ONE LINERS: Singer Jose Feliciano and composer Lalo Schiffrin join Celia Cruz (as reported here last week) among the 21 performers recently selected by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce for a star on the Walk of Fame .. . And Julio lglesias(who already has a star on the W.O. F.) says that the song My Love is the best he ' s heard by Stevie Wonder; the Iglesias/Wonder duet appears in forthcoming albums by both artists ... _Antonio Mejias-Rentas Other related events include a free public seminar on July 9 with ' Maria Irene Fornes, director of the playwrights ' unit at New York's INTAR Theatre, and 15minute prereading seminars by human i ties scholars on specific cultural aspects of each play. Media Report TIMES SYNDICATE SIGNS LINK: The Los Angeles Times Syndicate, which includes among its 83 features the editorial cartoons of Paul Conrad and columnists Henry Kissinger, Art Buchwald and Erma Bombecl<, has contracted to handle marketing and dis tribution of Hispanic Link News Service's three-a-week column service . The service was inaugurated in February 1980 to add a Hispanic dimens i on to U . S . newspapers' opinion pages. Presently, about 200 newspapers, including 93 dailies in the Gannett newspaper chain, receive the columns. Approximately40 newspapers take the service in Spanish or bilingually . Douglas Mayberry, vice president and di rector of sales for the Times' syndicate, says that it plans to offer more of its current HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a n a t io nal pu b li ca ti o n o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-Q737 Publish er. Hector Er icksen-Me ndoza Editor. F e li x Perez R e p o rting: C ha r li e Ericksen , Antoni o Mejias R e n t a s , Melinda M ac h a do. Jul io L abo y , R ic h a rd Say r e . Grap hics/Pr o du c ti o n : C arlos Arr ie n , Zoila Elias . No portion o f His p anic Week l y R epo r t m ay be r eprodu ce d o r b r oa dcast in any f o r m with o ut a d vance permi ss ion. Annual subscription (50 I s sues} $96.00 Trial subscription (13 Issues} $26 . CO RP O R ATE C LA SS IF I ED: Ad r ates 75 cents per word . Disp lay ads a re $35 pe r column inch . Ads placed b y Tuesday w ill run i n Weekl y Repor ts m ai l ed Fr iday of sa m e week. Multiple us e r a tes o n req uest. 6 features in Spanish in the near future and that the syndicate will be working with His panic Link to develop additional features, in both Spanish and English, of special interest to U . S . Hispanics in the months ahead . Hispanic Link, based in Washington , D .C., is a family-held corporation directed by Charles and Sebastiana Ericksen and their son, Hector EricksenMendoza. NETWORK EXPANDS: Te/emundo, a New York-based Spanish-language television net worl< which was formed last year, has expanded into the San Francisco and Houston areas. It bought the stock of National Television Group Inc., which holds the license of San Jose , Calif., station KST8-TV. The station presently broadcasts business news in the San Francisco Bay area It will convert to Spanish-language broadcasting Nov. 1. It also acquired the right to buy Channel 28 in Galveston, Texas , in the Houston area, and will build a full-power station there which it projects having on the air by January. The purchases will give Telemundo stations or affiliates in seven of the nation's eight major Hispanic marl