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Hispanic link weekly report, July 27, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 27, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Chon Gutierrez, the state’s undersecretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, to the directorship of the California State Lottery.. .Among the six U.S. servicemen who died in the July 15 helicopter wreck in San Salvador are Army officers 1st Lt. Gregory Paredes, 24, of Illinois, and Lt. Col. Joseph Luj£n,41,ofTexas. Theplanecrashed in bad weather... Robert Gaffias, the dean of the School of Fine Arts at the University of California atlrvinb, resigns. His resignation from the $83,000-a-year post becomes effective Jan. 1... A San DiegoCounty Superior Court jury acquits former county Registrar of Voters Ray
Ortiz of 27 counts of grand theft, misappropriation ofpublic funds and fa|s%ing public: records, | Presidpm Rfifj|W jmW| hisJlIrped congratulations to the in I uct i o'nfce re rh on y or Wan cyVo pe lintel h e Ladies Professional Golf Association Hall of Fame. Loptofiff becpmes the second-youngest player to be i nd uctert liA j2& ©u prasm jssaj* by California state Senate President, fro remT^avjd Roberti of pH Contreras from the state Coastal Commission draws harsh crifiQisrri from state Hispanic activists, who charge that the firing was politically motivated... Nelson Martinez, a 51 -year-old real estate agent from Los Angeles, becomes July 17 the first U.?. citizen to undergo radical and seemingly successful brain surgbry io treat Parkinson’s disease, a neurological disorder characterized by loss of muscle control and extreme fatigue. The surgery was performed in Mexico City... 1
HISPANICUNKWEEKLYREPORT^^^^
Spanish Proposed for All Pupils
The demand for bilingual employees in the nation’s third largest Hispanic market, Dade County, Fla, has prompted public school board member Bill Turner to propose mandatory Spanish language classes.
In early July, Turner, the only black on the seven-member board, suggested that making Spanish mandatory would help blacks and whites compete for jobs in the county, which has 869,000 Hispanics, or43% of the residents Dade County includes the city of Miami.
Unemployment rates for black youths (16-25) in the city is over 50%, said John Bennett, executive director of one of Miami’s summer youth employment centers.
While Turner's suggestion included no specific recommendations, the board and Superintendent Joseph Fern&ndez are giving it serious consideration. The issue may surface at a July 27 public hearing on a tentative budget for the system’s 1987-88 school year.
A similar proposal in 1978 was defeated on a 5-1 vote.
Currently, the county's 242,048 students do not need a foreign language to graduate from high school. Spanish language classes are offered as optional courses at the elementary and high school levels.
As of June 1987, there were 102,369 Hispanics (42%) enrolled in the county's schools. There were 79,638 blacks(33%), 57,200 whites (24%) and less than 3,000 Asian students.
“If the question was to vote yes or no to
make Spanish a high school graduation requirement, I think I would vote no,” said board member Rosa Castro Feinberg, one of two Hispanics on the board and a former Spanish teacher.
Adding Spanish to an already-crowded course schedule could prevent students from choosing other electives, Castro Feinberg said, adding she has reservations about forcing pupils to study a language they have no interest in and possibly preventing them from studying another, such as French, German or Japanese.
She said she would work to institute foreign language instruction in kindergarten and first grade.
The director of Florida International University’s Center for Multilingual, Multicultural Studies, Rodolfo Cortina, also recommended students begin second-language classes in early elementary grades so students can “grow up with the language versus taking two years in high school, which is very late and very little.
“It’s a worthwhile cause but it is problematic and controversial,” he said about the mandatory Spanish proposal.
Jose Cardenas, director of the Intercultural Development Research Association, based in San Antonio, Texas, which provides information about the equality of educational opportunity, said he is not aware of any other school system considering such a resolution.
continued on page 2
Revival Likely for Calif. Bilingual Ed.
Gov. George Deukmejian is expected to allow legislation reviving California’s bilingual education program to become law, according to a Latino lawyer who was a principal negotiator for the acceptance of the compromise bill.
Attorney Benjamin Lopez, a lobbyist for the California Bilingual Community Coalition, told Weekly Report that Deukmejian expressed some satisfaction with amendments in the bill.
Sponsored by State Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), the bill passed the Assembly July 15 by a 41 -30 vote after clearing the Senate, 24-1, on July 13.
California’s bilingual education program expired June 30.
Brown’s bill includes three significant amendments the governor reportedly favors. One requires schools to get written parental consent before placing a student in bilingual education classes.
Another gives local school districts more options in choosing bilingual teaching methods, including English immersion.
The other increases teacher supply to meet demand. It allows teachers not fluent in a student’s native language to teach with the assistance of a bilingual aide.
The governor has until July 27 to sign or veto the bill. If he does neither, it automatically becomes law.
Bills Halting Deportation Advance in Congress
Legislation to suspend the deportation of about 700,000 undocumented Nicaraguans and Salvadorans in the United States was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee July 15.
The bill, sponsored by Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.), passed by a 9-2 vote and is expected to reach the Senate floor after the congressional Labor Day recess.
A similar bill by Rep: John Joseph Moakley (D-Mass.) was approved by the House Judiciary Committee, 20-15, June 30. It is expected to be voted on by the full House July 28.
The two bills call for halting the deportations of Nicaraguans and Salvadorans for two years. During the two-year period, the U.S. General Accounting Office will conduct a study of the human rights situation in both countries. It will determine whether it is safe for the refugees to return.
The Senate vote follows U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese’s July 8 order that Nicaraguans “with a well-founded fear of persecution” from the Sandinista government will be allowed to stay in the United States
Last year, refugee status was granted to 85% of the Nicaraguans who applied, but only to3% of the Salvadorans
Dade Language Vote Set
The Florida Metro Dade Commission voted unanimously July 21 to put to a referendum the fate of the county's seven-year-old anti-bilin-gualism ordinance.
Commissioner Jorge Valdes withdrew his earlier effort to have the ni ne- member com mission vote on it directly when he realized he did not have support from his colleagues
The ordinance, which was passed by a 60-40 margin in 1980, will be voted on by county residents March 8,1988.
Valdes stressed that he believes English is the county's and nation’s official language. He added, however, that “the ordinance has created ill feelings in the community and should be repealed so that we can concentrate on more important things - like social services.”
Dade’s ordinance forbids the county from spending public money to conduct official business in any language other than English.


Lawsuit Against FBI Given Class-Action Status
A U.S. District Court judge in El Paso, Texas, ruled July 16 that a multimillion dollar discrimination lawsuit against the FBI by the agency’s highest-ranking Hispanic agent warranted class-action status. The ruling clears the way for more than 350 Latino agents nationally to become plaintiffs in the case.
Judge Lucius Bunton ruled that the suit filed by agent Bernardo P6rez Jan. 14 met class-action requirements. The FBI has until Aug. 15 to submit to the court a list of all its
Hispanic agents. Those not seeking redress have until Sept. 18 to inform the court
Jos6 Silva, counsel for P6rez, told Weekly Report “Legally this is a big, big step for us, because it gives us legitimacy.
“We convinced the court that this case is not only about Matt(P6rez) but all Hispanics in the top law enforcement agency in the country.”
P6rez, the fourth-highest-ranking official in the FBI, charged that he and other H ispanics were disproportionately assigned to dangerous
stations with little opportunity for advancement The 47-year-old P6rez has been with the agency for24 years and currently serves as the assistant special agent in charge of the FBI office in El Paso.
Perez’s lawsuit asks that he be promoted to head the El Paso office. The suit also seeks back pay and benefits along with $5 million in punitive damages.
Four percent, or 373, of the FBI’s 9,232 agents are Hispanic. The agency declined to comment _ pgijX Perez
Dade Schools Eye Required Spanish
continued from page 1
In the. Los Angeles schools, where 83 languages are spoken, Hispanics make up 55.7% of the600,000 student population. While the Los Angeles Unified School District does have a two-year foreign language requirement it has not considered making Spanish lessons mandatory.
The issue has not been brought up in San Antonio’s 15 independent school districts. That city is approximately 50% Hispanic.
“In Chicago, New York and even Los Angeles, Hispanic businesses remain as a marginal enterprise to the mainstream business world. This is not true in Miami,” Cortina said.
In its 1985 and 1987 reports on the South Florida Latin Market, Strategy Research Corporation surveyed both Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the Dade County area on the importance of their children learning to read and write Spanish.
The Miami-based SRC noted that the number of non- H ispan ics who view the im portance of Spanish as very important or somewhat important increased from 63.3% in 1985 to 653% two years later. In 1985,13.7% of the non-Hispanics said it was not at all important
for children to learn Spanish. That number fell to 6.5% this year.
MiamPs proximity to Latin America is the reason much business must be conducted in Spanish, said XiomaraCasado, director of the Dade County Office of Latino Affairs South Florida has developed into a large international trade center with more foreign banks than New York, SRC reported.
“Hispanic business is a connection to the Latin American market and a certain type of tourism. Therefore, schools and universities preparing people for these labor markets are better advised, to provide a language skill,” Cortina said.
Not only do employers want Spanish fluency, they also want their employees to speak “perfect English,” said Deborah Kern, office managerforTRC Temporary Services in Miami.
- Melinda Machado
Death Threats in LA. Cause Official Concern
A$10,000 reward was announced July22 by Los Angeles MayorTom Bradley for information leading to the arrests of individuals or groups sending death threats to members of the Salvadoran community.
Threats by death squads were first reported July 6 by Marta Alicia Rivera, 24. She said she was abducted by two men with Salvadoran accents, interrogated, tortured and raped.
The FBI announced that it opened an investigation into the “possibility of terrorist activity” against Salvadorans in Los Angeles. The announcement, July 17, came hours after Father Luis Olivares, pastor of Los Angeles? largest Latino parish, received a letter similar to those sent to priests killed by death squads in El Salvador.
There are an estimated 300,000 Salvadorans living in Los Angeles.
INS Predicts Two Million Applicants
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service expects to receive about 2 million applications under the one-year legalization provision of the federal immigration law, said INS Commis-
Case Against Ex-Mayor Is Dismissed
A Pima County, Ariz., Superior Court judge dismissed July 14 a case against prominent Arizonan Alberto Rodriguez involving the shooting death of a Mexican citizen in that country in 1955.
Judge Alice Truman wrote: “The court finds no reasonable cause to believe that the offense has been committed within the jurisdiction of the state of Arizona...”
Rodriguez, 60, told Weekly Report the complaint against him by state Attorney General Bob Corbin was based on an“avalan-che of lies, half-truths and innuendoes.” He charged that the investigation was in large part a tool to discredit the administration of Gov. Bob Mecham, who has come under sharp national criticism for rescinding the previous governor’s order declaring a Martin Luther King holiday.
Mecham withdrew his nomination of Rodriguez to head the Department of Liquor
Licenses and Control when the investigation arose this April.
Corbin’s first-degree-murder complaint centered around the death of Sacramento Peralta 32 years ago while Rodriguez was a police officer in the city of Douglas. Peralta, a convicted burglar, was chased into Sonora Mexico, by Rodriguez and another officer after a stakeout to capture him failed. Rodriguez said he did nothing wrong when he fired the two fatal shots
An elderly Mexican national woman testified at the proceedings that she heard Peralta plead for his life. The other officer later said the shooting was understandable due to heightened emotions surrounding a chase.
Rodriguez, a retired Army colonel and former mayor of Douglas, said he is seeking a clarification of JudgeTruman’sdismissal. Heclaims there were no grounds for the murder charge, irrespective of the jurisdictional finding.
sioner Alan Nelson July 20. Previously, INS had used the estimate of 1-to-3.9 million.
The INS has received 305,419 applications since May 5.
Complaints about legalization, however, may spur the Congressional Hispanic Caucus to introduce legislation calling for, among other things, anextensiono.fself-certjfication beyond Sept 1.
Self-certification, indicated by a worker on the INS I-9 form, informs an employer that the worker applied for legalization.
The caucus has been seeking for more than a month a meeting with Nelson. Absent a compromise after the congressional Labor Day recess, which begins Aug. 1, the caucus will introduce the legislation, said Rep. Bob Garcia (D-N.Y.).
Inadequate funding, little public information and the failure to develop a policy on family unity have contributed to the small number of applicants for legalization, according to Garcia.
“We are in need of a multilingual public information program,” said Garcia.
Richard Norton, INS associate commissioner for examinations, told Weekly Report that INS still has no application forms available in Spanish or in any language other than English and that INS never considered printing them in other languages. - Julio Laboy
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Miguel Perez, guest columnist
Dinner with Marta
We are good friends because we share many ideas, but the ideas we don’t share make us wonder how we can remain such good friends.
She talks about art and culture and I nod my head.
I lecture endlessly about the role of the media and she wants to hear more, even when I have nothing more to say.
But when it comes to foreign policy, especially toward my native Cuba, my friend Marta becomes my enemy.
“I’m free any night except Sunday,” she says to me, “because Sunday I’m going to celebrate the anniversary of the July 26 (Cuban) Revolution.”
“Please don’t insult me,” I tell her.
“Why is that an insult?” she asks.
“Because you would be insulted if I went to a celebration of the anniversary of the U.S. colonization of Puerto Rico. If you find the U.S. presence in Puerto Rico reprehensible, imagine how I feel about the Soviet colonization of Cuba.”
“There is no comparison,” Marta says. “If s like apples and oranges.”
Although I wouldn’t celebrate the colonization of either island, I tell Marta, I would think that given a choice, most people would prefer being a colony of the United States.
CUBAN REVOLUTIONARY SAFARI
But Marta certainly doesn’t think so. She has gone to Cuba five times in the last eight years. I say she has been on all the government* controlled guided tours that are given to naive foreigners who go there seeking the romanticism of a revolution. She says she has been allowed to travel on her own. And these trips, she says, make her more qualified to talk about Cuba than I, who have not been there in more than 20 years.
I tell her I was born there and that I stayed long enough to witness how the false promise of freedom swung Cuba from a right-wing dictatorship to a communist regime.
She tells me that a few years ago she came very close to moving to Cuba. “I may not have been able to return, and I didn’t want to leave my relatives forever. But I would have been delighted to live in Cuba.”
“You were happy in Cuba because you were on an adventurous vacation, a Cuban Revolutionary Safari, and you knew you were coming back to your American comforts,” I tell her. “But when they finally said, ‘Here’s the revolution, love it or leave it,’ you left it. Now you are like so many other Americans, a long-distance revolutionary.”
AM I LIBERAL OR CONSERVATIVE?
Marta doesn’t appreciate that “And what are you?” she fires back. “You are liberal one day and conservative the next.” She and other liberal Latinos see a conflict in my being liberal and critical of President Reagan on domestic policies while being conservative and supportive of the president on foreign policy.
I see no conflict at all. I tell them that you are what your life makes you. My life has shown me the ruthlessness of a right-wing dictatorship the repression of a communist regime, the struggles of American immigrants and the economic, social and even violent discrimination suffered by minorities.
“My life, as a Puerto Rican, has made me very rebellious because those social injustices have hit too close to home,” she says “No system is perfect. But I have witnessed so much social injustice here that I have the impression that a system like Cuba’s is more socially just”
When we stick to the arts and the media, our conversation can be quite charming. But when we talk about Cuba, even in a quiet restaurant I raise my voice and wave my arms and she flexes her vocal cords and talks through her teeth.
We become the main attraction.
Sin pelos en la lengua
FIGHTING WORDS: New York and Miami seem to have this hate/hate relationship going between them. The July 19 New YorkTimeslMagazine cover shows a pair of fair-skinned'“Miami-Vice” types looming over a pair of swarthy, sprawled drug-dealer types, and it asks its readers: “Can Miami Save Itself? - A City Beset by Drugs and Violence.”
The answer, in nine pages of text and pictures, includes this quote by an anonymous “liberal Anglo professional”:
“The Cubans have shamelessly exploited their role in the international game of politics, the cold war. My personal bitterness is that the Cubans are fascists and they are promoting fascism in my democratic country and in my city. They don’t believe in free speech. They believe in strong-arming. They are bullies Individually,
I never met a Cuban I didn’t like. But collectively I can’t stand them because of their politics”
Individually they’re OK- collectively, I can’t stand them? Thaf s what a friend of mine says about the New York Yankees
FOUR-LETTER WORDS: When Los Angeles attorney Herman Sillas was appointed director of the California Department of Motor Vehicles back in 1976, he invited the public to a huge open-house celebration at the departments headquarters in Sacramenta And in honor of their first-ever Latino leader, DMV employees painted and spread banners in English and Spanish on the walls of their hallways to identify the department’s various divisions
For the computer division, there was the sign COMPUTADORA. Because of its size, it was split into three sections, welcoming all Spanish-speaking visitors: COM PUTA DORA
A Chicago Tribune columnist reports this month that Mayor Harold Washington’s Office of Special Events may have just topped that She writes
“The logo for Chicago’s 150th birthday- which is plastered on city brochures - features five ‘i’s* that look like birthday candles The graphic design, however, splits ‘Chicago’ into two parts ‘ChiMP followed by ‘cago.’ The last part is getting a double-take from Hispanics. ‘Cago’ translated literally means ..”
The Trib columnist spells it out May I just refer any non-Spanish-readers to the verb cagar in Cassell’s dictionary?
UNSPOKEN WORDS: Montgomery County, Md., police recently answered a disturbance call at a Spanish-speaking household in the Washington suburb of Silver Spring. It took them about 10 minutes to calm things down to their satisfaction. Then they left
A woman in the apartment immediately called the police again and was able to reach one of the six Hispanic officers on the county’s 800-member force. The first police crew- she explained patiently- had failed to take away the burglary suspect the family had captured.
Another crew was dispatched and the suspect was porfin taken into custody.
PEDDLERS’ WORDS: Tijuana, in Baja California, was the site of the recent Mex-Fest’87 rockconcert, which attracted hundreds of aficionadosirom San Diego and elsewhere in Southern California Dolores de Oldos, who was there, reports that many of the souvenir stands displayed signs advising their customers: “No Aceptamos Pesos."
MYSTERIOUS WORDS: Elias Chapa, a member of the National Education Association’s Hispanic Concerns Study Committee which prepared NEA’s lengthy list of Latino educational imperatives last month, recounts the tale of the mysterious note his grandmother Julia received from a school in Michigan when she moved her 11 children there from San Antonio many years ago.
The note, written in English, was pinned to the blouse of one of Julia’s daughters Able neither to speak nor read English, Grandma Julia finally got an older child to translate the important message for her.
What did it say? “When speaking to your daughter at home,
please use English only.” IfB
- Kay B&rbaro
(Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) â– â– â– â–  Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 27,1987
3


COLLECTING
SOUTH FLORIDA MARKET STUDY: “The 1987 South Florida Latin Market” is a 101 -page study by Strategy Research Corp. which surveys the consumer behavior of Hispanics in that area. Included is a market profile, language patterns, product usage and leisure-time activities For a copy, send $35, plus$3.27 for shipping and handling, to: SRC, 100 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33125 (305) 649-5400.
WORKERS AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES: The AFL-CIO has recently published a 16-page, Spanish-language pamphlet on the right of employees to be informed on the toxicity of chemicals they come in contact with in their work place. Single copies are available free from: Dept, of Occupational Safety, Health and Social Security, AFL-CIO, 815 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 637-5210. Multiple orders cost $20 per 100 copies.
HISPANIC LITERATURE CATALOG: Arte Publico Press offers free its 1987 catalog. The 28-page catalog includes some of the most recent literary works by Latinos, especially those by Hispanas. For a copy, write: APP, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun-429 AH, Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 749-4768.
ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES OUTREACH: The National Endowment for the Humanities is actively seeking Hispanics and Hispanic organizations to apply for support grants and funding for projects in areas such as language, history, history of the arts and literature. NEH offers several such grants with differing deadlines and periods of funding. For more information and applications, write: Carl Dolan, Access to Excellence Coordinator, NEH, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Room 302, Washington, D C. 20506 (202) 786-0384.
IMPRISONMENT IN CUBA: The Cuban-American National Foundation recently released a 36-page booklet titled"4Political Imprisonment in Cuba.” The booklet, based on a report from Amnesty International, discusses the lack of due process afforded Cuban political prisohers. For a free copy of the report, write to the foundation at .1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 265-2822.
CONNECTING
HEALTH PROJECT PLANNED
The League of United Latin American Citizens is planning a series of daylong events, starting in October, to promote its efforts to make health a higher priority among Hispanics.
The events, a part of LU LAC’s Health Is Progress Program, will be hosted by different LULAC councils across the nation. They will include seminars on disease-prevention education and cross cultural training for non-Hispanic health professionals. LULAC is also having printed, in English and Spanish, bumper stickers which read‘‘Health Is Progress.”
The program will use public service announcements by singers Julio Iglesias, Fermm Iglesias and boxer Paul Gonzales The $250,000 project is being supported by grants from several corporations, including NutraSweet.
For additional information, contact Norma Rivera, the national health program director, at LULAC, 900 First St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.
LATINOS SOUGHT FOR NURSING
The California Nurses Association began July 6 a media campaign targeted toward Hispanic high school students on opportunities in nursing, according to Patti Rodriguez, the program’s coordinator.
“Hispanics in California are the most underrepresented minority in the field of nursing,” Rodriguez told Weekly Report.
The association’s program will consist of 30-second television and radio public service announcements in Spanish and English. A toll-free telephone number for questioning and counseling will also be available. The first announcements are expected to air in January 1988. For information contact Rodriguez at (415) 864-4141.
The program was made possible by a $50,000 state grant awarded to CNA in April. Rodriguez suggested that persons outside of California with an interest in nursing contact their state nursing association.
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
BUSINESS LUNCHEON SERIES Washington, D.C. July 27
Antonio Colorado, head of Puerto Rico’s “Operation Bootstrap,” will address the Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce during a luncheon. Colorado will discuss investment opportunities in Puerto Rico.
Linda Mayo (202) 296-0335
CHIC AN A/LATINA WORKSHOP Davis, Calif. July 27-30
Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social, based at the Chicano Studies Program at the University of California at Davis, will present its second annual workshop aimed at assisting scholarship development for Chicanas in higher education and to meet with Mexican scholars interested in Latina studies. Adaljiza Sosa Riddell (916) 752-2421
GIFTED CHILDREN CONFERENCE Chicago July 30-Aug. 1
“The Gifted Child, The Family and The Community’ is the theme of a conference sponsored by the American Association for Gifted Children - Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted. Sessions will address the needs of gifted minority children.
Elaine Waugh (513) 873-3490
IMAGE RECEPTION Washington, D.C. July 31 4
' The Adolph Coors Company is sponsoring a reception in honor of Manuel Olivarez, the recently elected president of National Image, an organization geared to the employment of Hispanics.
Elia Mendoza (202) 523-6545
AIDS EDUCATION CONFERENCE Columbia, S.C. July 31-Aug. 1 Workshops on AIDS education prog rams for minority communities and for IV drug abusers will be part of the First I ntemational Conference on Al DS Education. Francisco Sy (803) 777-CARE
MALDEF FIESTA Pasadena, Calif. Aug. 2
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund conducts its annual fund-raising fiesta, featuring a barbecue and entertainment. â– 
! Joe Ortiz (213) 629-2512 ext 122
j MARI AC HI MUSIC Washington, D.C. Aug. 2
| “Mariachi Los Amigos” will perform as part of the : ethnic band music program sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History.
Gabriela Frings(202) 357-2627
HISPANIC THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE St. Paul, Minn. Aug. 2-9
The School of Divinity at the College of St. Thomas is hosting a Hispanic Theological Pastoral Institute to help meet the ministry needs of the Latino community. Jos& Carrera (612) 291-4480
COMING SOON
July 27,1987
AMERICAN G.I. FORUM CONVENTION American G.I. Forum Seattle Aug. 3-8
Reynaldo Candia (800) 433-0868
WORLD LATIN FAIR World Latin Fair Committee Miami Aug. 7-9
Romeo Sifuentes (305) 284-0450 FESTIVAL LATINO Festival Latino Committee San Francisco Aug. 7-30 Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS
CARIBBEAN CULTURE CARNIVAL The Caribbean Cultural Center New York Aug. 9 Kristen Simone (212) 307-7420
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION: The 12th annual Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce convention will address“A Challenge ForGrowth” as its conference theme. Made up of 30 chambers, the convention will feature a trade show and exhibition, including a delegation of Mexican businesses seeking contact with U.S. firms. The convention will be in Houston from July 30 to Aug. 1. Featured speakers include Texas Gov, Bill Clements, F6lix Olmedo, general director of Mexico’s Banco Nacional de Comercio Exterior and AT&T Vice Chairman Randy Tobias. For more information, contact Jorge Colorado at (713) 224-5322.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DEAN
School of Education California State College, Bakersfield
California State College, Bakersfield (CSB) invites applications and nominations for the positions of Dean of the School of Education. CSB was founded in 1968 and is the youngest of the nineteen campuses in the California State University System. The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of 700,000 people who live primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. CSB enrolls about 43,000 students in baccalaureate and master's degree programs.
The College is com posed of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Business& Public Administration. The School of Education offers credential programs required in the State of California for service as elementary and secondary school teachers, counselors, and administrators. The School also offers a bachelor of science degree in physical education and a Master of Arts in Education allowing for concentrations in Bilingual/Bicultural Education, Counseling and Personnel Services, Curriculum and Instruction, Early Childhood Education, Educational Administration, Reading and Special Education. Education students are served by approximately thirty faculty in the School.
The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Education in the areas of teaching, academic planning research, and service. Responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Dean represents the School to the College; external professional constituencies; local, state, and national agencies; and the community.
Qualifications include; (1) an earned doctorate and a record of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment; (2) appropriate administrative experience leading to the dean’s level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with faculty, students, other administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the Southern San Joaquin Valley.
The appointment is expected to be announced by April30,1988, and it will begin by July 1, 1988. Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Nominations, or letters of application with resume and names of at least four references, should be sent to:
Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Education c/o Vice President for Academic Affairs California S'rate College, Bakersfield 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
For maximum consideration, deadline for receipt of application materials is December 1, 1987. CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer actively seeking qualified candidates from underrepresented groups.
CONTRACTS
SUPERVISORY CONTRACT SPECIALIST
GM-1102-14 Ana 87-88 Closes: 8/17/87
Salary from $45,763 to $59,488 depending on qualifications.
Qualifications required:
• All facets of negotiated procurement
• Experience in supervising multimillion $ contracts operation.
• Comprehensive knowledge of Federal Acquisition Regs.
The FOOD & NUTRITION SERVICE offers great bonuses: vacation/sick leave, retirement health & life insurance benefits Conveniently located in suburban Virginia at Route7 & I-395.
Must submit SF171, Application for Employ-merit (no resumes) (include technical& managerial experience) to:
FOOD & NUTRITION SERVICE, USDA Personnel Divisioa Room 809 3101 Park Center Drive Alexandria, Va 22302 (703) 756-3351
EEO EMPLOYER-US CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design # Illustration • Typesetting • layout # silkscreen and • Stats El Barrio Graphics 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
LIBRARIAN I - REFERENCE (Department of Libraries) ANNOUNCEMENT NUMBER7112-8A-LIB SALARY RANGE: $20,531.68 - $22,595.04 MAJOR DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
This professional library work in the Central Library will involve:
• Providing reference and advisory assistance to the public through general reference desk.
• Assuming responsibility for a major reference activity such as assisting on-line reference, vertical file collection or intertibrary loans.
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ZGS Television Productions based in Washington, D.C., is looking for an associate producer to work on the National News Magazine America aired by UNIVISION.
Knowledge of television production and good Spanish writing skills are required.
Send resume, Demo tape and/or a sample of your writing to: Jos6 J. Sanz, Producer, ZGS Television Productions 1726 N St. NW, Suite 704, Washington, D.C. 20036 or call (202) 463-0486.
LABOR/IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY Union seeking attorney for labor/ERISA/im-migration position. Bilingual Spanish required. Excellent benefits Salary negotiable. Send resume to: ILGWU, 675 S. Parkview St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90057.
TH E CATHOLIC U NIVERSITY of Washington, D.C, has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call | (202) 635-LAND.
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Arts & Entertainment
’* THEATER FROM COAST TO COAST: A recently announced grant-will fund Hispanic theater projects at one of the nation’s most distinguished repertory companies.
San Diego's Old Globe Theatre is the recipient of a multipurpose $280,000 Ford Foundation grant that will fund the company’s Tpatro Meta through October 1989.
Programs funded - which will be administered by Raul Moncada-will include the professional development of Hispanic actors, directors and designers, community outreach and audience development. In the planning are a Spanish Classics Street Theatre Festival with the University of California, San Diego and Southwestern College and a 1989 intercollegiate Hispanic Theatre Festival.
Another Southern California theater company with a Hispanic program has received funding for three summer theater training workshops in community centers.
A three-year $90,000 grant from'Target Stores will fund the South Coast Repertory’s Neighborhood Conservatory, which will offer two kweeks of free theater classes for youngsters at four Orange County,
s ....................................
Calif., community centers
Included in the program are classes at Santa Ana’s El Salvador Center, taught by Jos§ Cruz Gonzalez, director of SCR’s Hispanic Playwrights Project Six new works by Latino playwrights were read this month as part of the 1987 HPP.
In New York, plans were unveiled recently for the city’s 11 th Festival Latino, Aug. 1 to 23, with a shift in emphasis from quantity tb quality.
This year’s festival will provide longer runs for fewer plays Among offerings are Carlos Morton’s Pancho Diablo, with Fernando Allende’s New York stage debut, and a production of Mario Vargas Llosa’s Sehorita of Tacna starring Norma Aleandro.
The festival, produced since 1984 by Joseph Papp and the New York Shakespeare Festival, will include a free Concert for Peace and Friendship, with singers from Cuba and Puerto Rico, and a Latin American film festival.
ONE LINERS: The Telemundo group of Spanish-language stations began broadcasting the outdoor concert series Domingos Alegres this month. The show began airing last year on Univision... And the “new” Xavier Cugat Orchestra, conducted by Ada Cavallo, performs at the New Jersey State Fair, in Cherry Hill, July 31...
- Antonio Mejia-Rentasi
Media Report
COVER STORIES: The lead story in the Sunday, July 19, Washington Post Magazine, “Informer- FrankVarelli vs. the FBI,” is on the “political transformation” of the El Salvador native, who this year has begun talking in Washington about Salvadoran death squads and FBI plots to harass dissenters .. The New York Times Magazine’s cover piece on the same date looks with a very critical eye at Miami and its Latin influence: “Can Miami Save Itself? - A City Beset by Drugs and Violence.”
MALDEF COVERAGE: The July 5 Albuquerque Journal devoted nearly two full pages of coverage to former Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund board chairman Eric Serna’s battle to regain his leadership post with the group.
Serna, chairman of the New Mexico Corporations Commission, led an unsuccessful attempt earlier this year to replace Antonia Hernandez, MALDEF president and general counsel, with former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya.
The articles, written by reporter Dick Lyneis, frame the dispute as one which pits Serna and his allies against “non-Hispanics from East Coast foundations and law firms” which Serna charges wield undue influence within MALDEF, using Hernandez as “their tool.”
It includes a brief interview with Californian Hernandez, who counters, “I am my own person.” She adds, “I’m very disheartened that people who purport to be leaders would succumb to the level of debate” that she^ characterizes her opponents as engaging in.
NEW DATES: A 20-member steering committee for the forming National Hispanic Media Coalition has agreed to hold a broader-based planning meeting in Los Angeles in late September. Representatives from media
and community organizations in California, Texas, Illinois, Colorado, New Jersey, New York and Washington, D.C., joined in a daylong organizing effort led by Los Angeles attorney Armando Dur6n in Washington July 18... The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has moved its first professional meeting of Mexican and U.S. Hispanic journalists in Ixtapa, Mexico, from September to Oct. 22-24.
ON THE MOVE: Ronald Ortiz left his position as publisher of New Jersey's Vineland Times Journal to join Gannett Offset in Arlington, Va., as its director for sales development.. Jose Berrios departed Time Inc. in New York where he served as director of affirmative action, to become director of personnel and equal opportunity programs for Gannett Co. Inc. in Arlington... Chris Nevil left KAMA-AM in El Paso, Texas, where he was general sales manager, to rejoin Caballero Spanish Media as vice presidenl/general sales manager for its West Coast office in Los Angeles...
- Charlie Ericksen
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r One needs no school to be a fool It’s simple. The reason we need to mandate Spanish in Dade Public Schools is so that you politicians will have a language to outlaw when the children grow up.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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,ThiJ .. . . . . . --. . ' ' ' '' congratulations to Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Chon Ladies Profession1;11 Golf of the states undersecretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional the second-youngest player to be Agency, to the directorship of the California State Lotteiy . . . • Among . California state Senate f:>'ro Rb.berti. o ( ,(Jil ' . . . . . ' . 1 l • ' : ' • . .. ' . •" ..• . ..,: .: ' ' f • . , . the six U .S. servicemen who died in the July 15 hel icopter wreck in Contreras from the state Coast?IComiT)issio.ri San Salvador are Army officers 1st. Lt. Gregory Paredes, 24, of . from state Hispanic activists, whbd'large tt1cit the fi'l-lrig was ,i:>. oliti . cally Illinois , and Lt Col. Joseph Lujan, 41 'ofTex as . The plane crashed in motivated .. : Nelson Martinez, a 51-yearcild rea'i est_ ate from bad weather . .. Ro_bert Gar'fias, the dean of the School of Fine Arts at . Los Angeles , becomes July 1 it he first ' U . $ ,citizen tb u i1der_g6 the University of California at Irvine, resigns. His resignation from the and seemingly successful brain surcierv to trei:!t Piukinson's d isease_ , $83,000-ayear post becomes effective Jari . 1 ... A San Diego County a neurological disorder characterized by loss _ of muscle controJ and Superior Court jury acquits former county Registra r of Voters Ray extreme fatigue. The surgery was in Mexic;:o <:;ity. ,' . Spanish Proposed for All Pupils The demand for bilingual employees in the make Spanish a high school graduati on reAdvance In Congress nation's third largest Hispanic market , Dade quirement, 1 think 1 would vote no," said board Legislation to suspend the deportation of County, Fla, has prompted public school member Rosa Castro Feinberg, one of two about 700,000 undocumented Nicaraguans board member BiiiTurnerto propose mandatory Hispanics on the board and a former Spanish and Salvadorans in the United States was Spanish language classes. teacher. approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee In early July, Turner, the only black on the Adding Spanish to an already-crowded course July 15. seven-member board, suggested that making schedule could prevent students from choosing The bill, sponsored by Sen. Dennis DeConcini Spanish mandatory would help blacks and other electives , Castro Feinberg said, adding (D-Ariz.), passed by a 9 vote and is expected whites compete for jobs in the county, which she has reservations about forcing pupils to to reach the Senatefloorafterthecongressional has 869,000 Hispanics, or43% ofthe residents study a language they have no interest in and Labor Day recess Dade County includes the city of Miami. possiblypreventingthemfromstudyinganother , A similar bill by Rep. John Joseph Moakley Unemployment rates for black youths (16 such as French , German or Japanese. (D-Mass) was approved by the House Judiciary 25) in the city is over 50% , said John Bennett, She said she would work to institute foreign Committee , 20, June 30. It is expected to executive director of one of Miami's summer language instruction in kindergarten and first be voted on by the full House July 28 . youth employment centers. grade . The two bills call for halting the deportations While Turner's suggestion included no The director of Florida International Univer of Nicaraguans and Salvadorans for two years specific recommendations, the board and sity's Center for Multilingual, Multicultural During the two-year period, the U.S . General Superintendent Joseph Fernandez are giving Studies, Rodolfo Cortina , also recommended Accounting Office will conduct a study of the it serious consideration. The issue may surface students begin second-language classes in human rights situation in both countries It will at a July 27 public hearing on a tentative early elementary grades so students can determine whether it is safe for the refugees to budget for the system's 1987 school year . "grow up with the language versus taking two return. A similar proposal in 1978 was defeated on years in high school , which is very late and The Senate vote follows U.S. Attorney General a 5 vote . very little . Edwin Meese's July 8 order that Nicaraguans Currently, the county's 242,048 students "lfs a worthwhile cause but it is problematic "with a wei Hounded fear of persecution" from do not need a foreign language to graduate and controversial," he said about the mandatory the Sandinista government will be allowed to from high school. Span i sh language classes Spanish proposal. stay in the United States are offered as optional courses at the elemen-Jose Cardenas, director of the Intercultural Last year, refugee status was granted to85% tary and high school levels. Development Research Association, based of the Nicaraguans who applied, butonlyto3% As of June 1987, there were 102,369 His in San Antonio, Texas, which provides infor of the Salvadorans panics (42%) enrolled in the county's schools mation about the equality of educational op There were 79,638 blacks(33%) , 57,200 whites portunity, said he is not aware of any other (24%) and less than 3 ,000 Asian students. school system considering such a resolution . "If the question was to vote yes or no to co ntinued on page 2 Revival Likely for Calif. Bilingual Ed. Gov. George Deukmejian is expected to allow legislation reviving California's bilingual edu cation program to become law , according to a Latino lawyer who was a principal negotiator for the acceptance of the compromise bill . Attorney Benjamin Lopez, a lobbyist for the California Bilingual Community Coalition , told Weekly Report that Deukmejian expressed some satisfaction with amendments in the bill. Sponsored by State Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) , the bill passed the AssemblyJuly15 bya41 vote after clearing the Senate, 24 , on July 13. California's bilingual education program ex pired June 30. Brown's bill includes three significant amend ments the governor reportedly favors. One requires schools to get written parental consent before placing a student in bilingual education classes Another gives local school districts more options in choosing bilingual teaching methods, including English immersion. The other increases teacher supply to meet demand. It allows teachers not fluent in a studenfs native language to teach with the assistance of a bilingual aide . The governor has until July27 to sign or veto the bill. If he does neither, it automatically becomes law. Dade Language Vote Set The Florida Metro Dade Commission voted unanimously July21 to put to a referendum the fate of the county's seven-year-old anti-bilin gualism ordinance . Commissioner Jorge Valdes withdrew his earlier effort to have the nine-membercommis sion vote on it directly when he realized he did not have support from h i s colleagues The ordinance, which was passed by a 60 margin in 1980, will be voted on by county residents March 8, 1988. Valdes stressed that he believes English is the county's and nation's official language. He added, however, that "the ordinance has created ill feelings in the community and should be repea led so that we can concentrate on more important thingslike social services." Dade's ordinance forbids the county from spending public money to conduct official busi ness in any language other than English .

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Lawsuit Against FBI Given Class-Action Status A U.S. District Court judge in El Paso, Texas, ruled July 16 that a multimillion dollar discrimination lawsuit against the FBI by the agency's highest-ranking Hispanic agent warranted class-action status. The ruling clears the way for more than 350 Latino agents nationally to become plaintiffs in the case. Judge Lucius Bunton ruled that the suit filed by agent Bernardo Perez Jan. 14 met class-action requirements. The FBI has until Aug. 15 to submit to the court a list of all its Hispanic agents . Those not seeking redress have until Sept. 18 to inform the court. Jose Silva, for Perez, told Weekly Report, "Legally this is a big, big step for us, because it gives us legitimacy. "We convinced the court that this case is not only about Matt( Perez) but all Hispanics in the top law enforcement agency in the country." Perez, the fourth-highest-ranking official in the FBI, charged that he and other Hispanics were disproportionately assigned to dangerous Dade Schools Eye Required Spanish continued from page 1 In the. Los Angeles schools, where 83 lan guages are spoken, Hispanics make up 55.7% of the600,000 student population. While the Los Angeles Unified School District does have a two-year foreign language requirement, it has not considered making Spanish lessons mandatory. The issue has not been brought up in San Antonio's 15 independent school districts. That city is approximately 50% Hispanic. "In Chicago, NewYorkand even Los Angeles, Hispanic businesses remain as a marginal enterprise to the mainstream business world. This is not true in Miami," Cortina said. for children to learn Spanish. That number fell to 6.5% this year. Miami's proximity to Latin America is the reason much business must be conducted in Spanish, said Xiomara Casado, director of the Dade County Office of Latino Affairs. South Florida has developed into a large international trade center with more foreign banks than New York, SRC reported. "Hispanic business is a connection to the Latin American market and a certain type of tourism. Therefore, schools and universities preparing people for these labor markets are better advised to provide a language skill," Cortina said. Not only do employers want Spanish fluency, they also want their employees to speak "perfect English," said Deborah Kern, office managerforTRC Temporary Services in Miami. Melinda Machado stations with little opportunity for advance ment The 47-yearold Perez has been with the agencyfor24 years and currently serves as the assistant special agent in charge of the FBI office in El Paso. Perez's lawsuit asks that he be promoted to head the El Paso office. The suit also seeks back pay and benefits along with $5 million in punitive damages. Four percent, or 373, of the FBI's 9,232 agents are Hispanic. The agency declined to comment Felix Perez Death Threats in LA. Cause Official Concern A$1 0,000 reward wasannouncedJuly22 by Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley for information leading to the arrests of individuals or groups sending death threats to members of the Salva doran community. Threats by death squads were first reported July 6 by Marta Alicia Rivera, 24. She said she was abducted by two men with Salvadoran accents, interrogated, tortured and raped. The FBI announced that it opened an invest f. gation into the "possibility of terrorist activitY" against Salvadorans in Los Angeles. The an nouncement, July 17, came hours after Father Luis Olivares, pastor of Los Angeles' largest Latino parish, received a letter similar to those sent to priests killed by death squads in El Salvador. There are an estimated 300,000 Salvadorans living in Los Angeles . In its 1985 and 1987 reports on the South Florida Latin Market, Strategy Research Corporation surveyed both Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the Dade County area on the importance of their children learning to read and write Spanish. The Miami-based SRC noted that the number of nonHispanics who view the importance of Spanish as very important or somewhat im portant increased from 63.3% in 1985 to 65.3% two years later. In 1985, 13. 7% of the non Hispanics said it was not at all important INS Predicts Two Million Applicants 2 The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Ser vice expects to receive about 2 million applications under the one-year legalization provision of the federal immigration law, said INS CommisCase Against Ex-Mayor Is Dismissed A Pima County , Ariz., Superior Court judge dismissed July 14 a case against prominent Arizonan Alberto Rodriguez involving the shooting death of a Mexican citizen in that country in 1955. Judge Alice Truman wrote: "The court finds no reasonable cause to believe that the offense has been committed within the jurisdiction of the state of Arizona ... " Rodriguez, 60, told Weekly Report the complaint against him by state Attorney General Bob Corbin was based on an " avalan che of lies, half-truths and i nnuendoes . " He charged that the investigation was in large part a tool to discredit the administration of Gov. Bob Mecham, who has come under sharp national criticism for rescinding the previous governor's order declaring a Martin Luther King holiday. Mecham withdrew his nomination of Ro driguez to head the Department of Liquor Licenses and Control when the investigation arose this April. Corbin's first-degree-murder complaint centered around the death of Sacramento Peralta32 years ago while Rodriguez was a police officer in the city of Douglas . Peralta, a convicted burglar , was chased into Sonora, Mexico, by Rodriguez and another officer after a stakeout to capture him failed . Rodri guez said he did nothing wrong when he fired the two fatal shots. An elderly Mexican national woman testified at the proceedings that she heard Peralta plead for his life . The other officer later said the shooting was understandable due to heightened emotions surrounding a chase. Rodriguez, a retired A r my colonel and former mayor of Douglas , said he is seeking a clarifi cation of Judge Truman ' s dismissal . He claims there were no grounds for the murder charge, irrespective of the jurisdictional finding . sioner Alan Nelson July 20. Previously, INS had used the estimate of 1-to-3 . 9 million . The INS has _ received 305,419 applications since May 5. Complaints about legalization, however, may spur the Congressional Hispanic Caucus to introduce legislation calling for, among other things, art e _ xtensiQn of self-certjfjcation beyond Sept 1 . Self-certification, indicated by a worker on the INS 1-9 form, informs an employer that the worker applied for legalization . The caucus has been seeking for more than a month a meeting with Nelson. Absent a compromise after the congressional Labor Day recess, which begins Aug. 1, the caucus will introduce the legislation, said Rep. Bob Garcia (D-N.Y.). Inadequate funding, little public information and the failure to develop a policy on family unity have contributed to the small number of applicants for legalization , according to Garcia. "We are in need of a multilingual pub lic information program," said Garcia . Richard Norton , INS associate commissioner for examinations, told Weekly Report that INS still has no application forms available in Span ish or in any language other than English and that INS never considered printi ng them in other languages. Julio Laboy Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Miguel Perez, guest columnist Dinner with Marta We are good friends because we share many ideas, but the ideas we don't share make us wonder how we can remain such good friends. She talks about art and culture and I nod my head. I lecture endlessly about the role of the media and she wants to hear more, even when I have nothing more to say . But when it comes to foreign policy, especia Cuba, my friend Marta becomes my enemy. "I'm free any night except Sunday," she says to me, "because Sunday I'm going to celebrate the anniversary of the July 26 (Cuban) Revolution." "Please don't insult me," I tell her . "Why is that an insult?" she asks. "Because you would be insulted if I went to a celebration of the anniversary of the U.S. colonization of Puerto Rico . If you find the U.S. presence in Puerto Rico reprehensible, J.._,._""""""...,. imagine how I feel about the Soviet colonization of "There is no comparison," Marta says. "lfs like apples and oranges." Although I wouldn't celebrate the colonization of either island, I tell Marta, I would think that given a choice, most people would prefer being a colony of the United States. CUBAN REVOLUTIONARY SAFARI But Marta certainly doesn't think so. She has gone to Cuba five times in the last eight years. I say she has been on all the government controlled guided tours that are given to naive foreigners who go there seeking the romanticism of a revolution. She says she has been allowed to travel on her own. And these trips, she says, make her more qualified to talk about Cuba than I, who have not been there in more than 20 years. 1 tell her I was born there and that I stayed long enough to witness how the false pro.mise of freedom swung Cuba from a right-wing dictatorship to a communist regime. She tells me that a few years ago she came very close to moving to Cuba. "I may not have been able to return, and I didn't want to leave my relatives forever. But I would have been delighted to live in Cuba." "You were happy in Cuba because you were on an adventurous vacation, a Cuban Revolutionary Safari, and you knew you were coming back to your American comforts," ltell her. "But when they finally said, 'Here's the revolution, love it or leave it,' you left it. Now you are like so many other Americans, a long-distance revolutionary." AM I LIBERAL OR CONSERVATIVE? Marta doesn't appreciate that. "And what are you?" she fires back. "You are liberal one day and conservative the next." She and other liberal Latinos see a conflict in my being liberal and critical of President Reagan on domestic policies while being conservative and supportive of the president on foreign policy. 1 see no conflict at all. I tell them that you are what your life makes you. My life has shown me the ruthlessness of a right-wing dictatorship, the repression of a communist regime, the struggles of American immigrants and the economic, social and even violent discrimination suffered by minorities. "My life, as a Puerto Rican, has made me very rebellious because those social injustices have hit too close to home,'' she says. "No system is perfect. But I have witnessed so much social injustice here that 1 have the impression that a system like Cuba's is more socially just." When we stick to the arts and the media, our conversation can be quite charming. But when we talk about Cuba, even in a quiet restaurant, 1 raise my voice and wave my arms and she flexes her vocal cords and talks through her teeth. We become the main attraction. (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua FIGHTING WORDS: New York and Miami seem to have this hate/hate relationship going between them. The July 19 New YorkTimes \ Magazine cover shows a pair of fair-skinned ' " Miami Vice" types looming over a pair of swarthy, sprawled drug-dealer types, and it asks its readers: "Can Miami Save Itself?A City Beset by Drugs and Violence." The answer, in nine pages of text and pictures, includes this quote by an anonymous "liberal Anglo professional": "The Cubans have shamelessly exploited their role in the international game of politics, the cold war. My personal bitterness is that the Cubans are fascists and they are promoting fascism in my democratic country and in my city. They don't believe in free speech . They believe in strong-arming. They are bullies. Individually, I never met a Cuban I didn't like . But collectively I can't stand them because of their politics." Individually they're OK-collectively, I can't stand them? Thafs what a friend of mine says about the New York Yankees. FOUR-LETTER WORDS: When Los Angeles attorney Herman Sillas was appointed director of the California Department of Motor Vehicles back in 1976, he invited the public to a huge open house celebration at the departmenfs headquarters in Sacramento. And in honor of their first-ever Latino leader, DMV employees painted and spread banners in English and Spanish on the walls of their hallways to identify the departmenfs various divisions. For the computer division, there was the sign COM PUT ADORA. Because of its size, it was split into three sections, welcoming all Spanish-speaking visitors: COM PUTA DORA A Chicago Tribune columnist reports this month that Mayor Harold Washington's Office of Special Events may have just topped that She writes: "The logo for Chicago's 150th birthday-which is plastered on city brochures-features five 'i's' that look like birthday candles. The graphic design, however, splits 'Chicago' into two parts: 'Chllllr followed by 'cago.' The last part is getting a double-take from Hispanics. 'Cago' translated literally means. .. " The Trib columnist spells it out May I just refer any non-Spanish readers to the verb eagar in Cassell's dictionary? UNSPOKEN WORDS: Montgomery County, Md., police recently answered a disturbance call at a Spanish-speaking household in the Washington suburb of Silver Spring. It took them about 10 minutes to calm things down to their satisfaction. Then they left A woman in the apartment immediately called the police again and was able to reach one of the six Hispanic officers on the county's800-memberforce. The first police crew-she explained patiently-had failed to take away the burglary suspect the family had captured. Another crew was dispatched and the suspect was por fin taken into custody. PEDDLERS' WORDS: Tijuana, in Baja California, was the site of the recent MexFest '87 rock concert, which attracted hundreds of aficionadosrrom San Diego and elsewhere in Southern California Dolores de Oldos, who was there, reports that many of the souvenir stands displayed signs advising their customers: "No Aceptamos Pesos." MYSTERIOUS WORDS: Elias Chapa, a member of the National Education Association's Hispanic Concerns Study Committee which prepared NEA's lengthy list of Latino educational imperatives last month, recounts the tale of the mysterious note his grandmother Julia received from a school in Michigan when she moved her 11 children there from San Antonio many years ago. The note, written in English, was pinned to the blouse of one of Julia's daughters. Able neither to speak nor read English, Grandma Julia finally got an older child to translate the important message for her. What did it sa"{? "When speaking to your daughter at home, please use English only." Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 27, 1987 3

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COLLECTING SOUTH FLORIDA MARKET STUDY: "The 1987 South Florida Latin Markef' is a 1 01-page study by Strategy Research Corp. which surveys the consumer behavior of His panics in that area. Included is a market profile, language patterns, product usage and leisure-time activities. For a copy, send $35, plus$3.27 for shipping and handling, to: SRC, 100 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami , Fla . 33125 (305) 649-5400. WORKERS AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES: The AFL-CIO has recently published a 16-page, Spanish-language pamphlet on the right of employees to be informed on the toxicity of chemicals they come in contact with in their work place . Single copies are available free from: Dept. of Occupational Safety, Health and Social Security, AFL CIO, 815 16th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20006 (202) 637-5210. Multiple orders cost $20 per 100 copies. HISPANIC LITERATURE CATALOG: Arte Publico Press offers free its 1987 catalog. The 28-page catalog includes some of the most recent literary works by Latinos, especially those by H ispanas. For a copy, write: APP, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun-429 AH, Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 749-4768. ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES OUTREACH: The National Endowment for the Humanities is actively seeking Hispanics and Hispanic organizations to apply for support grants and funding for 'projects in areas such as language, history, history of the arts and literature. N EH offers several such grants with differing deadlines and periods of funding. For more information and applications, write: . Car! Dolan, Access to Excellenc!3 Coordinator, NEH , 11 00 Pennsylvania Ave . NW, Room 302, Washington, D .C. 20506 (202) 786-0384. IMPRISONMENT IN CUBA: The American National dation recently released a 36-page booklet titled" Political Imprison ment in Cuba." The booklet, based on a report from Amnesty Inter national, discusses the lack of due process afforded Cuban political prisoners. For a free copy of the report, write to the foundation at . 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C . 20003 0 (202) 265-2822. CONNECTING HEALTH PROJECT PLANNED The League of United Latin American Citizens is planning a series of daylong events, starting in October, to promote its efforts to make health a higher priority among Hispanics. The events, a part of LULAC's Health Is Progress Program, will be hosted by different LULAC councils across the nation. They will include seminars on disease-prevention education and cross cultural training for non-Hispanic health professionals. LULAC is also having printed, in English and Spanish, bumper stickers which read "Health Is Progress. " The program will use public service announcements by singers Julio Iglesias, Fermin Iglesias and boxer Paul Gonzales. The $250,000 project is being supported by grants from several corporations, including NutraSweet. For additional information, contact Norma Rivera , the national health program director, at: LULAC, 900 First St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20001. LATINOS SOUGHT FOR NURSING The California Nurses Association began July6 a media campaign targeted toward Hispanic high school students on opportunities in nursing, according to Patti Rodriguez, the program ' s coordinator. "Hispanics in California are the most underrepresented minority in the field of nursing," 'Rodriguez told Weekly Report. The association' . s program will consist of 30-second television and radio public service announcements in Spanish and English. A toll free telephone number for questioning and counseling will also be available . The first announcements are expected to air in January 1988. For information contact Rodriguez at (415) 864-4141. The program was made possible by a $50,000 state grant awarded to CNA in April. Rodriquez suggested that persons outside of California with an interest in nursing contact their state nursi ng association. -Julio Laboy Calendar The Adolph Coors Company is sponsoring a reception in honor of Manuel Oliverez, the recently elected president of National Image, an organization geared to the employment of Hispanics. AMERICAN G. I. FORUM CONVENTION American G.l. Forum Seattle Aug . 3-8 Reynaldo Candia (800) 433-0868 WEEK BUSINESS LUNCHEON SERIES Washington, D . C . July 27 Antonio Colorado , head of Puerto Rico's " Operation Bootstrap," will address the lbero-American Chamber of Commerce during a luncheon Colorado will discuss investment opportunities in Puerto Rico. Linda Mayo (202) 296-0335 CHICANA/LATINA WORKSHOP Davis , Calif. July 27-30 Mujeres Activas en Letras yCambio Social, based at the Chicano Studies Program at the University of California at Davis, will present its second annual workshop aimed at assisting scholarship develop ment for Chicanas in higher education and to meet with Mexican scholars interested in Latina studies . Adaljiza Sosa Riddell (916) 752-2421 GIFTED CHILDREN CONFERENCE Chicago July 30-Aug. 1 "The Gifted Child, The Family and The Community" is the theme of a conference sponsored by the American Association for Gifted ChildrenSupporting Emotional Needs of Gifted . Sessions will address the needs of gifted minority children . Elaine Waugh (513) 873-3490 IMAGE RECEPTION Washington, D .C. July 31 4 Elia Mendoza (202) 523-6545 AIDS EDUCATION CONFERENCE Columbia, S .C. July 31-Aug . 1 Workshops on AIDS education programs for minority communities and for IV drug abusers will be part of the First International Conference on AIDS Education . Francisco Sy (803) 777-CARE MALDEF FIESTA Pasadena, Calif. Aug. 2 The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educa tional Fund conducts its annual fund-raising fiesta, featuring a barbecue and entertainment. : Joe Ortiz (213) 629-2512 ext. 1 22 I MARIACHI MUSIC Washington, D . C . Aug . 2 "Mariachi Los Amigos " will perform as part of the ethnic band music program sponsored by the Smith sonian Institution's National Museum of American History. Gabriela Frings (202) 357-2627 HISPANIC THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE St. Paul, Minn . Aug . 2-9 -;"he School of Divinity at the College of St. Thomas is hosting a Hispanic Theological Pastoral Institute to help meet the ministry needs of the Latino community. Jose Carrera (612) 291-4480 COMING SOON July 27, 1987 WORLD LATIN FAIR World Latin Fair Committee Miami Aug . 7-9 Romeo Sifuentes (305) 284-0450 FESTIVAL LATINO Festival Latino Committee San Francisco Aug . 7-30 Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS CARIBBEAN CULTURE CARNIVAL The Caribbean Cultural Center New York Aug . 9 Kristen Simone (212) 307-7420 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION: The 12th annual Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce con vention will address " A Challenge For Growth " as . its confeJence theme . Made up of 30 chambers, the convention will feature a trade show and exhibition, including a delegation of Mexican businesses seek ing contact with U . S . firms. The convention will be in Houston from July30 to Aug. 1 . Featured speakers include Texas Gov . Bill Clements , Felix Olmedo, general director of Mexico's Banco Nacional de Comercio Exterior and AT&T Vice Chairman Randy Tobias. For more information, contact Jorge Colorado at (713) 224-5322. Hispani c Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS CONTRACTS SUPERVISORY CONTRACT SPECIALIST GM-1102 Ann. 87 Closes: 8/17/87 Salary: from $45,763 to $59 ,488 depending on Qualifications. Qualifications required: • All facets of negotiated procurement. • Experience in supervising multimillion$ contracts operation . • Comprehensive knowledge of Federal Acquisition Regs. The FOOD & NUTRITION SERVICE offers great bonuses: vacation/sick leave, retiremenV health & life insurance benefits. Conveniently located in suburban Virginia at Route 7 & 1 . Must submit SF-171 , Application for Employ ment(no resumes) (include technical& mana gerial experience) to : FOOD & NUTRITION SERVICE, USDA Personnel Division, Room 809 3101 Park Center Drive Alexandria, Va 22302 (703) 756 3351 EEO EMPLOYER-US CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D .C., provides: • Design e Illustration • Type setting • layout • silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483. LIBRARIAN IREFERENCE (Department of Libraries) ANNOUNCEMENT NUMBER7112A-LIB SALARY RANGE: $20,531 .68-$22,595.04 MAJOR DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES : This professional library work in the Central Library will involve: • Providing reference and advisory assis tance to the public through general reference desk. • Assuming responsibility for a major re ference activity such as assisting on-line reference , vertical file collection or interlibrary loans. e Establishing and maintaining effective working relationships with the general public . QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS : • Master of Library Science degree from an ALA accredited library school OR • Librarian's certificate from the Virginia State Board for the Certification of Librarians. SOME BENEFITS INCLUDE : • Health insurance e Transportation subsidy • Tuition reimbursement • Vacation and sick leave e Credit union TO REQUEST APPLICATION MATERIALS : Call (703) 558167 (hearing impaired only call TDD (703) 284) weekdays between 8 :0 0 a .m. and 5:00 p .m. Completed County application f orm must be received by the Arlington County P e rsonnel Department no later than 5 :00 p . m., August 27, 1987. ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 North 14th Street Arlington, Virginia 22201 ARLINGTON COUNTY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER H is pani c link Weekly Rep o rt DEAN School of Education California State College, Bakersfield California State College, Bakersfield (CSB) invites applications and nominations for the positions of Dean of the School of Education . CSB was founded in 1968 and is the youngest of the nineteen campuses in the California State University System . The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of 700,000 people who live primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. CSB enrolls about 43,000 students in baccalaureate and maste(s degree programs. The College is composed of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Business& Public Administration . The School of Education offers credential programs required in the State of California for service as elementary and secondary school teachers, counselors, and administrators. The School also offers a bachelor of science degree in physical education and a Master of Arts in Education allowing for concentrations in BilinguaVBicultural Education , Counseling and Personnel Services, Curriculum and Instruction , Early Childhood Education, Educational Administration, Reading, . and Special Education. Education students are served by approximately thirty faculty in the School. The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Education in the areas of teaching, academic planning, research , and service. Responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Dean represents the School to the College; external professional constituencies; local , state, and national agencies; and the community. Qualifications include: (1) an earned doctorate and a record of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment; (2) appropriate administrative experience leading to the dean's level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with jaculty, students, other administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the Southern San Joaquin Valley . The appointment is expected to be announced by Apri130, 1988, and it will begin by July 1, 1988. Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Nominations, or letters of application with resume and names of at least four references , should be sent to: Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Education c/o VIce President for Academic Affairs California S'cate College, Bakersfield 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311 For maximum consideration, deadline for receipt of application materials is December 1, 1987. CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer actively seeking qualified candidates from underrepresented groups. ASSOCIATE PRODUCER ZGS Television Productions, based in Washington, D . C., is looking for an associate producer to work on the National News Magazine America aired by UNIVISION . Knowledge of television production and good Spanish writing skills are required . Send resume , Demo tape and/or a sample of your writing to: Jose J . Sanz, Producer , ZGS Television Productions, 1726 N St. NW, Suite 704, Washington , D . C . 20036 or call (202) 463 i 0486. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • Con necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter talnment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua • Marketplace LABOR/IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY Union seeking attorney for labor/ERISNirn migration position. Bilingual Spanish required. Excellent benefits. Salary negotiable. Send resume to : ILGWU, 675 S . Parkview St. , Los Angeles , Calif. 90057. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D . C , has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for pos i tions at the University . Call (202) 635LAND. SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address ------------City, state, zip ---------0 Start 13week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed 0 Bill me 0 B i ll my organization Mail to: Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234 5

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A : rts & "Entertainment Calif., community centers: ':'.--'' . Includedin the program are classes at Santa Ana's El Salvador Center, taught by Jose Cruz Gonzalez, director of SCR's Hispanic Playwrights Project. Six new works by Latino playwrights were read this month as part of the 1987 H PP. .. , THEATER FROM COAST TO COAST: A recently announced grant-:will fund Hispanic theater projects at one of the nation's most distinguished repertory companies. In New York, plans were unveiled recently for the city' . s '11th Festival Latino, Aug. 1 to 23, with a shift ih emphasis from quantity to quality. San 'Diego's Old Globe Theatre is the recipient of a multipurpose $280,000 Ford Foundation grant that will fund the company's Teatro Meta through October 1989. This year's festival will provide longer runs for fewer plays. Among offerings are Carlos Morton's Pancho Diablo, with Fernando Allende's New York stage debut, and a production of Mario Vargas Llosa's Senorita of Tacna starring Norma Aleandro. PrOgrams funded-which will be administered by Raul Moncada wiU include the professional development of Hispanic actors , directors and designers, community outreach and audience development. In the planning are a Spanish Classics Street Theatre Festival with the Unive rsity of California, San Diego and Southwestern College and a 1989 intercollegiate Hispanic Theatre Festival. Another Southern California theater. company with a Hispanic program has received funding for three summer theater training wor!