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Hispanic link weekly report, August 10, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 10, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros says he will consider seeking the Democratic gubernatorial nomination of Texas... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Valerie Reynoso of Sacramento as deputy director of the state Employment Department... The New York City Board of Elections invalidates the petition of state Sen. Israel Ruiz to enter the Sept. 15 primary ballot in the race for presidency of the Bronx. The invalidation, judged so because of insufficient signatures, leaves interim President Fernando Ferrer in a two-man race where he is the heavy favorite. . . The board of directors of the California Health Federation, a statewide association of primary health care clinics, appoints Francisco Castilldn as its
executive director... J.R. Hagan, the man who led the paramilitary patrol at the Arizona-Mexico border that held .16^updocumented aliens at gunpoint for 90 minutes in JuIAJhB1| flgyfc guilty to a federal firearms charge in a plea bargairrcfear. .^Maria Rivera, a standout basketball guard at the University* oi seeks a
restraining order from a U.S. District Coi^yBejeirJthe'o.S. women’s basketball team in the Pan American Games. Rivera was earlier ruled ineligible when the international federation overseeing amateur basketball decided she played for the team of another nation -Puerto Rico... The U.S. Department of Education announces the appointment of Alicia Coro, director of the department’s Office of Civil Rights, to head the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs...
Vo I. 5 No.
«j>) HISPANIC LINK WEEKLXREPORT
Hispanics in Poverty: 5.1 Million
Congressional Caucus Plans Pacific Rim Visit
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus and the Latin Business Foundation of Los Angeles will be initiating a series of good will and educational missions to Taiwan and Japan when a special delegation representing both groups arrives in the Pacific Rim Aug. 15.
The delegation is made up of 41 persons, including U.S. Congressmen Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas), Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), Jaime Fuster(D- Puerto Rico), Former Ambassador Abelardo Valdez, Harold Martinez, president of the Latin Business Foundation, and G. Jayregui, president of the Latin Business Association.
The trip, prompted in part by Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone’s remarks last September questioning the intelligence levels of U.S. Hispanics and blacks, will be made to“ promote better understanding” between the U.S. Hispanic community and Japan, according to Torres. The delegation will visit Japan Aug. 22-29 after a stopover in Taiwan Aug. 15-22.
“This is a good-will mission to establish a friendly relationship dealing with cultural misinterpretations,” Arturo Vega, a spokesperson for Torres, told Weekly Report.
The trip is privately funded.
Census Adjustment Asked
While the number of Hispanics living in poverty dropped from 5.2 million in 1985 to 5.1 million in 1986, the number of poor Hispanic families increased by 11,000, according to 1986 U.S. Census Bureau figures released July 30.
The bureau’s current population survey shows an overall decrease in the national poverty rate. The number and percentages of persons living in poverty in 1986 were:
Number* Percentage
Whites 22.2 11.1%
Blacks 9.0 31.1
Hispanics** 5.1 27.3
Overall 32.3 13.6
* Numbers in millions. ** Hispanics may be of any race.
In 1985, the Hispanic poverty rate was 29%. The 1986 poverty rate among Hispanics was not statistically different from the 1983 rate of 28% but well above the 22% rate in 1978.
Poverty level for a family of four is set at $11,203. Seven million families - or 11% of all families- were poor in 1986. These included
1.085.000 Hispanic families, compared with
1.074.000 the previous year.
More than half of all poor families - 3.6 P million - were headed by women. Hispanics, at 51%, had the highest poverty rate among the female-run households For whites, it was 28%, blacks, 50%. The overall rate for women was 34%.
While the poverty rate fell in 1986, the “poverty-gap” - the amount by which incomes of the poor fell below the poverty line -increased. According to Robert Greenstein, director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the gap between the rich and the middle class and the rich and the poor has reached its widest point in 40 years
Poor families had incomes that fell to an
continued on page 2
FEMALE - HEADED HOUSEHOLDS: POVERTY RATES 1986 1985
1986 No. * 1986 Rate 1985 No. 1985 Ra
All Families 3,613 34.6% 3,474 34.0%
White 2,041 28.2 1,950 21A
Black 1,488 50.1 1,452 50.5
Hispanic** 528 51.2 521 53.1
Source: U.S Census Bureau. March 1987 Current Population Survey.
* Numbers in thousands. ** Hispanics are included in the black and white races.
More Hispanic Bank Officers Sought
The mayors of Los Angeles Chicago, New York and Kansas City, Mo., called on the U.S. Census Bureau July 23 to use statistical adjustments in the 1990 cenjsus to avoid undercounting Hispanics and blacks
The mayors asserted that many minority residents of large U.S. cities were overlooked in the 1980 census. They said, in a joint statement, that the undercount costs the cities millions of dollars in federal and state aid distributed on the basis of population. They also said it costs the undercounted areas increased representation in Congress and state legislatures. Congressional and state districts are drawn according to the census count.
The Census Bureau estimates that 10.3% of the Hispanic residents of major U.S. cities were not counted in 1980.
Despite accounting for a third of the city’s businesses and 53% of its population, Hispanics in San Antonio make up3% of members of boards of directors at banks there, found a survey conducted by the San Antonio Mexican Chamber of Commerce.
The survey, the final results of which are to be released in mid-September, noted that among the 849 board members, 26 were Spanish surnamed and half of these were Mexican nationals San Antonio has 75 banks Ramiro Cavazos, executive director of the chamber of commerce, said the lack of Hispanic members on the bank boards impedes the expansion and start up of Hispanic-owned businesses “We’re not asking for preferential
treatment All we ask is that Hispanic business-persons be given the same support” as other entrepreneurs, he said.
The survey further found that 121, or 10%, of the 1,192 senior officers at the banks were Spanish surnamed.
Cavazos said San Antonio has approximately
30,000 businesses 10,000 of which are Hispanic owned. He added that roughly 2,500 Hispanic business are started there every year. San Antonio has 600,000 Latinos
A more comprehensive survey will be sent to the city's top 10 banks next week, said Cavazos The chamber's ultimate goal is to have two Hispanic board members installed at each.


_zb_____________________________________________________
Latino Voter Eligibility Grows 25% Between ’84 - ’86
More than 1.4 m’illion Hispanics became eligible to vote betfweep the 1984 and 1986 elections and thet-'figwcqdis expected to increase between 500,000 and 700,000 before the 1988 presidential election, according to the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
Using U.S. Census Bureau figures, a NALEO study released July30 finds a 24.8% increase in the Hispanic voting-age population between 1984 and 1986. The national average voting-age population grew 2.3% in that period.
Based on 1986 election data, the study shows the significance of the Hispanic vote in individual states by analyzing the percentage of Hispanic voters needed for a 1% shift in the total statewide vote.
“In a close presidential election in 1988, the Hispanic community has the potential of truly being the swing vote,” said NALEO
Director Harry Pachon. “In Texas, it took only 7% of the H ispanic vote in 1986 to make a one percentage point difference in statewide election results.”
LATINO VOTERS - 1986 SEVEN KEY STATES
State Voters 1% Shift Fact*
Ariz. 89,192 12%
Calif. 730,618 12
Colo. 75,842 16
Fla. 279,449 15
N.M. 167,963 3 4/
N.Y. 283,609 20
Texas 637,515 7
Source: National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials * Percentage of Hispanic voters needed for 1% shift in statewide vote.
Nationwide, there were 11.8 million voting-age Latinos in 1986, or 6.8% of all eligible voters. Of those 7.9 million who were eligible to vote, 4.2 million were registered. Hispanics accounted for 3.8% of all registered voters that year, with 67% of their registered voters going to the polls.
“The presence of a large number of legal immigrants who are not citizens in the Hispanic community is still overlooked by many political analysts as a factor in low voter turnout in the Hispanic community,” Pachdn said.
Because of the youthfulness of the Hispanic community, a disproportionately large percentage of Latinos will reach voting age throughout the next decade. More than one-third-or 3.9 million-of the Latino voting-age population were not citizens in 1986.
- Melinda Machado
I
Poverty Straps Latino Youth, Elderly
continued from page 1
average of $4,394 below the poverty line in 1986. The proportion of families among the “poorest of the poor,” or those with incomes of less than $5,600 fora family of four, reached its highest level in more than 10 years, Green-stein said.
Some 39% of all people who were poor in 1986 -12.7 million- had incomes below half the poverty line.
There were no significant changes in poverty rates among children under six years of age. For Hispanic children the rate was 40.7%. It was 45.6% for blacks and 17.7% for whites.
Among the elderly, 65 years and older, the
INS Ordered to Pay Boy
A U.S. District Court judge in San Diego awarded July 30 $579,000 to a 14-year-old Tijuana, Mexico, boy and his mother for a gunshot wound the youth received near San Ysidro, Calif., from a U.S. border patrolman in 1985.
Judge Judith Keep awarded the damages to Humberto Carrillo Estrada, 12 years old at the time of the incident, and his mother, Maria Elena Estrada.
Attorneys for Estrada, Carlos Alcala and Marco Lopez of California, asked for $3 million in damages in the lawsuit. The U.S. government had offered to settle for $50,000.
The shooting occurred when two U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service agents took Estrada’s older brother Eduardo into custody at the border as he was attempting to climb a fence back into Mexico. The agent who fired the shot said he did so because he feared for the life of the two arresting patrolmen, who reportedly were the targets of hurled rocks. The younger Estrada admitted to trying to pry loose a stone but said he did not throw any. Estrada was shot in the back once by a.357 Magnum handgun.
national poverty rate was 12.4%. Hispanic elderly had a 22.5% poverty rate, down from 24% in 1985. The rate for white elderly was 10.7%, for blacks, 31%.
Carmela Lacayo, president of the Los Angeles-based Asociacidn Nacional Pro-Personas Mayores, said her organization’s national studies have shown Puerto Rican Hispanic elderly to be the poorest among Latinos, followed by Mexican-Americans and Central Americans. She added Hispanic figures can be misleading because Cubans, as a whole, have higher incomes. _ Meljnda Machado
Asencio Elected Chairman
The 12-member commission appointed by Congress to study the “push factors” and other conditions that prompt undocumented aliens to come to the United States elected former Ambassador Diego Asencio as its chairman last month. The commission has four other prominent Latino members.
The bipartisan body, called the Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, will travel to the countries of origin of the undocumented aliens, including El Salvador, Mexico and Nicaragua, to conduct fact-finding missions. Created under a provision of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, it will subm it its findings to Congress i n three years. It was inaugurated June 23.
“The charge of the commission is very broad. We will look into social, economic and political conditions,” pne of its members, former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya, said.
The three other Hispanic members are California state Sen. Art Torres, Donna Alvarado, director of ACTjQN, a federal anti-poverty volunteer agency, and Edward Rivera, the executive director of the Sacramento-based International Technical Service.
The commission has been funded at$217,000 until the end of this fiscal year, in October. It will be housed in a congressional office building.
MALDEF’s Directors Agree to Oppose Bork
The board of directors of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund voted unanimously Aug. 1 to oppose the nomination of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork while the Hispanic National Bar Association’s directors decided to postpone taking a position.
Borks opinions on affirmative action programs, civil rights and voting rights and his conservative ideology have moved many Hispanic groups, including the Puerto Rican Legal Defense Fund, to oppose his nomination.
Despite a poll of HNBA directors which showed the majority against Bork, President William Mendez said the board voted to delay taking a stand until its judiciary screening committee reports in early September.
“There was a spirited discussion that we initially responded on a political level and that was not appropriate for a bar association,” Mendez told Weekly Report. He added that if HNBA challenges the nomination, it will be based upon Borks qualifications.
“LULAC is opposed to the nomination,” said League of United Latin American Citizens President Oscar Mor&n during a July 31 press conference in Washington, D.C. Following, a meeting with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Joseph Biden (D-Del.), Morin predicted the Senate would reject the nomination.
LULAC plans to lobby senators, as well as conduct a public information campaign. MALDEF is also preparing an informational campaign with possible editorial pieces and Senate testimony on Borks record.
A policy stating that in the future MALDEF staff review Supeme Court nominations for the purpose of supporting, opposing or abstaining on that nomination, was adopted by the board.
Senate Judiciary hearings on Bork, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, are expected to begin in mid-September.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE SUBMISSIONS: The National Association for Bilingual Education seeks proposals for papers, symposiums and workshops for its 1988 national conference. The deadline for submissions is Aug. 15. Send materials to: Dr. Sylvia Pena, NABE Program Co-Chair, College of Education, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 749-7407.
ASYLUM RATES: “Asylum: Approval Rates for Selected Applicants? is a nine-page report by the U.S. General Accounting Office on the approval rates for asylum seekers for El Salvador, Nicaragua, Poland, and Iran. For a free copy, write to: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
HISPANIC HEALTH RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: The Hispanic Health Research Consortium, a project undertaken by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations (COSSHMO) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, seeks researchers to analyze data from the national Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The deadline is Sept. 15. For more information and applications, write: Hispanic Health Research Consortium, COSSMHO, 103015th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
BANK DIRECTORS IN SAN ANTONIO: For a copy of the San Antonio Mexican Chamber of Commerce’s survey results on the number of Hispanic members on bank boards of directors there, contact SAMCC, 110 Broadway, Suite 50, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 225-0462. The cost of the report, to be released in mid-September, has not been determined.
POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES: “Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the United States” is a 42-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau which details poverty by racial and ethnic group. To order (specify Series P-60, Advance Report), contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (The price had not been set at press time.)
MIGRATION COMMISSION: The Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development can be contacted at CSIMCED, Canon House Office Building, Room 517, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-2380.
CONNECTING
HEALTH PROJECT INITIATED
Project Alivio, a collaborative health care program with Chicago’s Latino Institute as one of its main participants, is conducting research and seeking information for development of the project.
Project Alivio, to be kicked off by early 1988, will provide health care services, address issues of access to health care, lack of insurance coverage and health promotion to approximately 125,000 Latinos.
The project’s estimated cost is $2 million. Partial funding has been made available by a $893,200 grant from Chicago Community Trust.
The institute is interested in references to statistical information on Hispanic health nationwide and wishes to identify existing health centers founded on the basis of community input. Please send any information to: Orestes Aguillon, Project Alivio Research Coordinator, Latino Institute, 228 South Wabash, 6th Floor, Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 663-3603.
MVREP MOVES TO CHICAGO
The Midwest Voter Registration Education Project moved its office Aug. 1 from Columbus, Ohio, to Chicago. MVREP also announced recently that it will extend its registration efforts into North and South Dakota, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut. MVREP worked in 10 states previously.
In Chicago, the group is presently working out of the offices of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund at 343 S. Dearborn,Suite910,Chicago, III. 60604(312)427-8683. Ithopesto move into its own office by late summer.
LATINO ENTREPRENEURS HONORED
The Texas Association of Mexican-American Chambers of Commerce awarded its businesswoman and businessman of the year awards at its annual convention in Houston July 30 - Aug 1. The event attracted more than 1,200participants.
Carmen Orta of the Houston Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Americom Tele-Resources, and Roger Robles of the Midland Hispanic Chamber of Commerce received the awards.
Manuel Carrasco, also of the Midland Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, was the recipient of the TAMACC local member-of-the-year award.
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LANGUAGE MINORITY CONFERENCE Austin, Texas Aug. 13-14
“Educating Exceptional Language Minority Students? is the theme of a conference sponsored by the Bilingual Special Education Training Programs, the Handicapped Minority Research Institute on Language Proficiency and the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. The reasons Hispanics are more likely than other students to be placed in learning disabled programs will be one of the topics addressed. There will also be workshops on language disorders, teaching English as a Second Language and assessing curricula for these students.
Robert Tindol (512) 471 -3151.
FESTIVAL LATINO PLAY San Francisco Aug. 13-16 La Cuadra de Sevilla of Spain, a theater troupe, will perform during the second annual Festival Latino sponsored by the Festival Latino Committee in association with the New York Shakespeare Festival. A series of Latino films, plays and music will run in San Francisco and Oakland through Aug. 30. Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS
CHICANA FASHION SHOW Denver Aug. 15
The “Chic Chicana” fashion show is the finale of a summer education program on modeling, marketing and self-image building for high school students. Sponsored by the Vannoy Talent Agency, the city's agency for Human Rightsand Community Relations and Mervyn Department Stores, the show’s board of directors gives more than $3,000 in scholarships to current and past Chic Chicana participants. Beverly Martinez (303) 740-2810
COMING SOON
EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM League of United Latin American Citizens, Montgomery County, Md.
Arlington, Va. Aug. 17 Carlos Guill&n (301) 299-8836
FOURTH ANNUAL HISPANIC FESTIVAL Hispanic Women’s Network Wichita, Kansas Aug. 22 Martha Sanchez (316) 267-4201
HISPANIC ARTS, CULTURE IN RADIO KUVO Radio Denver Aug. 26-28 Florence Hernandez (303) 934-5880
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION National Puerto Rican Forum New York Aug. 27
Aug. 10,1987
Lourdes Colon (212) 685-2311
URBAN FELLOWS CONFERENCE National Urban Fellows Chicago Aug. 27-30 Antonio Delgado (312) 744-9567
TORRES FUNDRAISER Friends of Sen. Art Torres Los Angeles Aug. 29 Lisa Baca (213) 384-9811
HISPANIC ALCOHOLISM CONVENTION South Florida Alcoholics Anonymous Hispanic Groups Miami Sept 4-6 Juan M. (305) 643-2522
SPOTLIGHT
SMALL BUSINESS EXPO: Small-business owners seeking new markets may attend the Business Expo’87 at Rio HondoCommunity College in Whittier, Calif. Two seminars, one on “The Immigration Control Act - Employer Sanctions and the Small Business” and another on “ Marketing Your Company Successfully,” will be held. More than 20 corporations, including Honeywell, Lockheed, Hughes Aircraft Bechtel and General Dynamics, will be represented along with federal, state and local government agencies. The exposition is being sponsored by the office of U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), a member of the House Small Business Committee. For more information, call Bob Alcock at (202) 225-5256
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


George McDougall, guest columnist
Costly Ambivalence
Is Puerto Rico a part of the United States? Are Puerto Ricans “Americans”? Should we care?
Pose those questions around the nation and the replies to each will fluctuate widely: yes, no, maybe, sort of, don’t know.
The correct answers are yes, yes and yes. Puerto Rico has been a U.S. possession for 89 years. Puerto Ricans have been U.S. citizens for 70 years. And we should care, because the island has more inhabitants than half of the 50 states - 3.2 million - and is regarded by the Pentagon as indispensable Caribbean Basin.
But if Puerto Rico has been part of the United States for nearly a century, the fact remains that ignorance about it is so pervasive as to extend even to the news media
Last January, reporting from San Juan on a disaster that took 97 lives, a CBS correspondent told Dan Rattler's nationwide television audience that surviving tourists had begun “returning to the United States.” Moments later, however, he described the Dupont Plaza blaze as“thesecond worst hotelfire in U.S, history.”
Within a single two-minute broadcast, Puerto Rico was placed both outside the United States and inside the United States NOT AN AMUSING ABERRATION
This Puerto Rico ignorance syndrome should not be dismissed as an amusing aberration. It greatly complicates the lives of millions of people. Nearly as many Puerto Ricans reside on the mainland as on the island, and all of them suffer when viewed by other U.S. citizens as “outsiders” or “foreigners”
Yet when it comes to clarifying the situation, Puerto Rico is often its own worst enemy. The island’s current anti-statehood government has published a textbook which teaches schoolchildren that Puerto Rico and the United States are two different countries
On the one hand, youngsters from the island have triumphed as “Americans” in Washington, D.C., at the National Spelling Bee and as Cherry Blossom Queen. On the other, local enthusiasm was undoubtedly greater when Miss Puerto Rico edged out Miss USA for the Miss Universe title, in 1970 and again in 1985.
During a National Press Club appearance this spring in Washington, Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n announced the formation of a“bilateraP’ blue-ribbon panel, to confront “the failure of our fellow citizens of this nation to acknowledge Puerto Rico’s role and potential.”
Barely a month later, however, the governor’s Justice Department was belligerently building new barriers to brotherhood.
IDENTITY DILEMMA FESTERS ON
On the eve of their departure for the Pan American Games at Indianapolis, Acting Justice Secretary Guillermo Mojica set the stage for a delegation of Puerto Rico athletes to be greeted there with undisguised hostility: he proposed to extradite the coach of Indiana University’s national championship basketball team!
(Bobby Knight has been convicted in absentia of misdemeanor assault of a police officer during the 1979 Pan American Games in Puerto Rico.)
Call it insular chauvinism or gratuitous “nationalism” or justified indignation. None of that excuses the stupidity of this deed. At the very least, extradition talk could have waited until the Indianapolis Games were over.
Meanwhile, the identity dilemma festers on, to the permanent detriment of every Puerto Rican who treasures his or her U.S. citizenship.
Statehood, and only statehood, will ultimately unscramble the puzzle.
to U.S. security in the
Sin pelos en la lengua
LAND OF THE RISING IQ: U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres is leading a delegation of 41 U.S. Hispanics on a good-will visit to Japan this month. Our Asian correspondent Kekulo Tanseco tells us that in order to impress Prime MinisterYasuhiro Nakasone, members of the mission have packed their verified SAT scores along with their passports and visas.
QUIZ TIME: That reminds me that school will be back in session in a few weeks. So let1 s gear up with a simple true-or-false quiz on the behavior of Hispanics in the Good 01’ U.S. of A:
True False
1. Coming primarily from nations with agricultural economies, many U.S. Latinos historically
have treated schooling casually.__________________________
2. Puerto Ricans, unlike the hard-driving Cuban immigrants, arrive as American citizens. And since they aren’t locked out of their homeland, they often don’t feel forced to make it on the
U.S. mainland. ______ _______
3. The isolation of Hispanics is self-willed rather
than imposed from without.________________________________
If you checked “yes” to all three questions, go to thehead of the class, you little darling. Your answers are all correct They are, if you believe the three pages of contorted prose on U.S. Latinos in the Aug. 10 edition of U.S. News & World Report On its cover is the question: “Hispanics: Moving in the Wrong Direction?”
It took eight of the magazine’s writers (including one Miami Latina, Luisa Yanez, who hopefully will disassociate herself with the final product) to pull the piece together.
The article did qualify that our isolation was“self-willed” only“to some extent.” There are a few of us, I guess it concedes, who might be willing to move from the South Bronx to Beverly Hills if we could charge the down payment on a home there to our K-Mart credit cards.
After talking about how“Hispanics treasure their ethnic enclaves,” the magazine attempts to prove it with a quote from Southwest Voter Registration Education Project president Willie Velasquez - obviously a mile out of context - that “My precincts are overwhelmingly Mexican, and I like it just fine.”
It also quotes the oft-quoted University of Chicago-based political scientist Gary Orfield that Latino students are now more segregated in our public schools than black students. “ Nothing in our history suggests we can run an effective separate-but-equal system of education. Yet now we are building another one,” he says.
Separate but EQUAL? Gary, have you ever seen the buildings, the textbooks, the libraries, the special equipment or the playgrounds in some of our South Texas or East Coast inner-city barrio schools? That’s what those equal-funding lawsuits are all about Please, please, tell us you were misquoted.
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting....
ARNOLDO TORRES, former League of United Latin American Citizens’ executive director now engaged in research on the suppression of non-English languages, commenting on the appointment of ex-White House aide Linda Chavez ps e-ecutive director of U.S. English:
“That’s too bad. I was hoping they’d select someone with whom I could debate the issue in Spanish.”
(George McDougall, a native of Chicago and resident of Puerto Rico for the past 16 years, is chairman of the Government Affairs Committee of the San Juan, Municipal Assembly. He was elected to the assembly in 1980 and again in 1984 on the ticket of the New Progressive Party.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
MARIA RIVERA, Puerto Rican basketball star whose request to play with the U.S. women’s Pan American Games basketball team was denied because she had played on the Puerto Rican “national” team (which disbanded), asked reporters:
“How do you change from being an American to an American?"
3
Aug. 10,1987


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GENERAL MANAGER - KUSC-FM
The University of Southern California invites nominations and applications for the position of General Manager of KUSC, the arts and information public radio service of USC, which also owns and operates affiliated stations KCPB/Thousand Oaks, KSCA/Santa Barbara and KPSH/Palm Springs.
The GM has overall responsibility for establishing artistic direction and maintaining stations’ legal, regulatory, and fiscal well-being; leading the program staff in creation, production, and acquisition of classical music and news programs of pre-eminent artistic and journalistic quality; determining and serving needs of stations’ listeners and subscribers; and continu ing the development of KUSC as a major production center for radio prog rams of local, regional, and national interest
Requires demonstrated qualities of vision, leadership, and organizational management skills; thorough understanding of the nature and purpose of public broadcasting; ability to relate to varied constituencies and individuals in the many communities served by KUSC; ability to develop and implement successful fundraising strategies; and, preferably, proven track record in developing and/or managing nationally prominent broadcast facility.
Address inquiries, nominations, and applications NLT Aug. 21,1987 to: John R. Curry, VP Budget/Planning; Chair, Search Committee; USC.ADM-150; Los Angeles, Cal if. 90089-5012. USC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
PROJECT DIRECTOR - CHICAGO
WRITING POSITION New Jersey
Writer to prepare Latin American Spanish teaching materials. Native fluency, excellent grammar required. Teaching, editing, or publishing experience helpful. Reply to: Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Attn: Corporate Classifieds.
WRITER
College Relations & Publications
Write press releases, newsletter, articles, eta, relating to academic research, student achievement and the arts at lively urban campus.
BA and 1-3 years experience required; journalism background preferred. Deadline is August 21,1987.
Send letter, resume and three nonreturnable writing samples to: Director of Personnel, Lehman College, The City University of New York, Bronx, New York 10468.
Salary$18,470-$24,303, excellent benefits. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
LABOR/IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY
Union seeking attorney for labor/ERISA/im-migration position. Bilingual Spanish required. Excellent benefits. Salary negotiable. Send resume to: ILGWU, 675 S. Parkview St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90057.
i| The following two positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College.
ADMISSIONS RECRUITER Asst, to HEO
Admission’s Office seeks entry level professional for enhanced enrollment management/ student services effort. Some evening and weekend work will be required. Min. 2 yrs. exp. in student personnel svs.; some | knowledge of financial aid pref. BA req. j Salary: $23,035/A.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #350 AND I SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY I 8/31/87.
BOOKKEEPER/SECRETARY College-based Early Childhood/Day Care Prog. BA req. with exp. with payroll, general ledger, withholding, FICA, etc. Exp. in child care program pref. $19,000 - $20,000/A.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY#G-166 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER FOR THIS NON-TAX LEVY POSITION BY8/31/87. Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers St, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED
The following position closes Thursday, August 20, 1987 at 5 pm.
EEO RECRUITMENT-OUTREACH SPECIALIST (Personnel Department)
Ann. #1805-8A- PER $25,883.52-$28,512.64 Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit targeted t opulations including minorities, women and disabled persons. Duties include identifying potential sources of applicants; developing and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials, community groups, eta; developing outreach plans, ads, brochures, etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis.
Minimum requirements: at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university in publia business or personnel administration or related field. Knowledge of outreach methods and recruitment sources Preferred requirements: Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following: A) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system; B) bilingual capabilities in one or more languages represented in the community.
All applicants must submit an Official County application form. Resumes, SF-171’s, etc., submitted without a completed Official Arlington County application form will NOT be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department by 5 p.m. on the closing date. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th Street Arlington, Va 22201 EOE M/F/H
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Assist in producing a nationally distributed Spanish language newscast Fluent in Spanish/ English and radio production experience. Contact Samuel Orozco, KSJV Radio BHingue, 1044 Fulton Mall, #413, Fresno, Calif. 93721 (209) 486-5174.
MALDEF, a national Civil Rights Hispanic
Organization, needs a college graduate with good English, writing, research and speaking skills for leadership training program. Must be familiar with Hispanic issues locally and nationwide. Send resume with references to: Enrique R. Valenzuela, National Director of Leadership Programs, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th FI., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 8/14/87. HISPANIC LINK subscribe to the nation’s WEEKLY REPORT EAN,C NEWSWEEKLY:
Org?»n»7ATiftn
YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE
ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING nty rip
THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY ^ ..... s □ Start 13-week trial subscription $26 NOW 6 PAGES D Start annual(50 weeks) subscription $96 NOW 1 2 FEATURES ° “ enclosed □ Bill me Headline story • National News Round- □ Bill my organization up • Calendar • Names Making News Maj| tQ. • Guest Column • Collecting • Con- Hispanic Unk News Service necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter- 142o n Street NW tainment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Washington, D.C. 20005 Pelos en la Lengua • Marketplace (202) 234-0737
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5


Arts& Entertainment
NOMINATION NEWS: For the third year in a row, a Latino has received an Emmy nomination in the “outstanding supporting actor in a drama series” category.
Jimmy Smits was nominated by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his role as attorney Victor Sifuentes in LA Law With 20 nods, the NBC series led the pack of nominees announced July 30 in Hollywood.
In 1985 and 1986, Edward James Olmos was nominated in the same category for his role as Lt Castillo on NBC’s Miami Vice.
Should Smits pick up an Emmy on September20 (the ceremony will be carried live on the Fox Broadcasting Company network), he will be the fourth Hispanic actor to do so in 10 years. Olmos won his Emmy in 1985. Rita Moreno won twice, in 1977 and 1978, and Ricardo Montalb&n received one in 1978.
No Hispanics were nominated in director or writer categories, and only Fred de Cordova was nominated as a producer. De Cordova is often nominated as executive producer of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.
Another perennial nominee, animator Bill Melendez, is being considered for an Emmy in the “outstanding animated program” category for his role as producer of the special Cathy, which aired on CBS.
A number of Hispanics were nominated in a variety of “craft categories” Winners of those Emmys will be announced Sept. 12.
TO HYPE LA BAMBA: Concerted marketing efforts in the Latino community have worked out for Columbia Pictures’ La Bamba, which led box-office sales in key markets during opening weekend.
Luis Valdez’s film grossed $461,000 in 26 Los Angeles theaters, topping sales charts for the weekend of July 24-26. La Bamba was also number one in the San Jose and Seattle/Tacoma markets and in third place in the New York and San Francisco markets
Its gross sales nationwide for the July24- Aug. 2 period were$14.4 million. It was third in the national charts for the weekend ending Aug. 2.
Spanish dubbed and subtitled prints in 77 theaters nationwide averaged higher sales ($5,300 per screen) than the 1,174 English prints ($4,086 per screen).
Tremendous hype surrounds the screen story of Chicano rock-and-roller Ritchie Valens. The MTV cable channel did an extensive promotional tie-in with contests, interviews and an “opening-night party” special. Videoclips featuring the music of Los Lobos are scheduled on MTV and its sister cable channel, VH-1.
Adding to the hype is a renewed interest in Valens’ music. Besides the Warner Bros./Slash soundtrack album, all three of Valens’ DeF Fi Records albums are available from Rhino Records, and Valens record producer Bob Keane is releasing a digital remix of the film’s title song. — Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
FAIRNESS DOCTRINE: Abolition of the “fairness doctrine” by the Federal Communications Commission Aug. 4 is likely to “advance the cause of those in Congress who are very concerned about it,” says former FCC Commissioner Henry Rivera He expects Congress to legislate rules similar to those the commission eliminated and to send them to President Reagan attached to legislation he’s not likely to veto, Rivera told Wc >kly Report
While Rivera was on the FCC, a vote on the issue was never called. Nor does he recollect Hispanics using the doctrine to challenge stations’ bias or coverage on Latino issues.
The most effective way for Latinos and others to influence what stations carry, he
said, remains for them to go to an offending station and say,“‘We’re not going to listen to your station anymore.’ That’s still what gets their attention.”
The action to drop the doctrine - which since 1949 has required television and radio stations to air both sides of stories involving major public issues - was unanimous by the four-member board.
On the panel, which presently has one vacancy, is Latina Patricia Diaz Dennis, whose nomination by President Reagan was confirmed by the Senate last June.
‘WETBACKS’ AND ECONOMICS: When a recent guest on the Public Broadcasting Service’s MacNeiFLehrer Newshour television program-carried by 276 stations and viewed by 12 million people nationally- made reference to “wetbacks” coming from Mexico to the United States, his use of the derogatory word went unchallenged by interviewer Robert
MacNeil.
Guest George Gilder, a financial writer, made the comment July 3 while discussing trade surpluses that “wetbacks, unlike economists, know which way to swim.”
The producer of the segment, Gordon Earl, told Weekly Report that wh ile the remark was “unfavorable,” he did not feel MacNeirs failure to question Gilder on his use of the word was a bad reflection on MacNeil or the program.
He said that sometimes the moderator will choose not to deviate from the show’s focus so that the program’s topic can be fully addressed.
Contacted by Weekly Report, Gilder denied that “wetback” is a derogatory word. “It js an easy way to describe people who are immigrating to the United States,” he said.
Calling himself a proponent of open borders, he added: “The more wetbacks in the United
States, the better.” . .. . .
- Julio Laboy
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
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Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias
No portion of Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
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Full Text

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. . . A.Making The News This Week I executive director ... J. R. Hagan, the man who led the paramilitary patrol at the Arizona-Mexico border that he.ld aliens at gunpoint for 90 minutes in I iP to a federal firearms charge in a plea . aria R1vera, a standout basketball guard at the ot. seeks a restraining order from a U.S. District women' s basketball team in the Pan American Games . Rivera was earlier ruled ineligible when the international federation overseeing amateur basketball decided she played for the team of another nation Puerto Rico ... The U.S. Department of Education announces the appointment of Alicia Coro, director of the departmenfs Office of Civil Rights , to head the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs ... San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros says he will consider seeking the Democratic gubernatorial nomination of Texas .. . California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Valerie Reynoso of Sacramento as deputy director of the state Employment Department. . . The New York City Board of Elections invalidates the petition of state Sen . Israel Rulz to enter the Sept. 15 primary ballot in the race for presidency of the Bronx. The invalidation, judged so because of insufficient signatures, leaves interim President Fernando Ferrer in a two-man race where he is the heavy favorite. . . The board of directors of the California Health Federation, a statewide association of primary health care clinics, appoints Francisco Casti116n as its VoLSNo.311 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Aug.10.1987 Congressional Caucus H spanics in Poverty: 5.1 Million Plans Pacific Rim Visit The Congressional Hispanic Caucus and the Latin Business Foundation of Los Angeles will be initiating a series of good will and educational missions to Taiwan and Japan when a special delegation representing both groups arrives in the Pacific Rim Aug . 15. The delegation is made up of 41 persons, including U.S. Congressmen Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), Albert Bustamante (DTexas), Solomon Ortiz (DTexas), Matthew Martinez (D-Calif .), Jaime Fuster(D-Puerto Rico), Former Ambas sador Abelardo Valdez, Harold Martinez, pre sident of the Latin Business F<;>undation, and G. Jayregui, president of the Latin Business Association. The trip, prompted in part by Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's remarks last September questioning the intelligence levels of U . S . Hispanics and blacks, will be made to" promote better understanding" bet ween the U.S. Hispanic community and Japan, according to Torres. The delegation will visit Japan Aug. 22-29 after a stopover in Taiwan Aug. 15-22. "This is a good-will mission to establish a friendly relationship dealing with cultural mis interpretations," Arturo Vega, a spokesperson for Torres , told Weekly Report . The trip is privately funded. Census Adjustment Asked The mayors of Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and Kansas City, Mo., called on the U . S . Census Bureau July 23 to use statistical adjustments in the 1990 cen.sus to avoid undercounting Hispanics and blacks. The mayors asserted that many minority residents of large U . S . cities were overlooked in the 1980 census. They said, in a joint statement, that the undercount costs the cities millions of dollars in federal and state aid distributed on the basis of population. They also said it costs the undercounted areas increased representation in Congress and state legislatures. Congressional and state districts are drawn according to the census count. The Census Bureau estimates that 10.3% of the Hispanic residents of major U.S . cities were not counted in 1980. While the number of Hispanics living in poverty dropped from 5 . 2 million in 1985 to 5 . 1 million in 1986, the number of poor His panic families increased by 11 , 000, according to 1986 U.S. Census Bureau figures released July 30. The bureau's current population survey shows an overall decrease in the national poverty rate . The number and percentages of persons living in poverty in 1986 were : Number" Percentage Whites Blacks Hispanics** Overall 22.2 11. 1% 9 . 0 31.1 5.1 27. 3 32.3 13. 6 • Numb ers in millions . ** Hispanics may be o . t any race. In 1985, the Hispanic poverty rate was 29% . The 1986 poverty rate among Hispanics was not statistically different from the 1983 rate of 28% but well above the 22% rate in 1978. Poverty level for a family of four is set at $11 ,203 . Seven million familiesor 11% of all familieswere poor in 1986. These included 1 ,085,000 Hispanic families, compared with 1 ,07 4 ,000 the previous year. More than half of all poor families 3.6 millionwere headed bywornen. Hispanics, at 51% , had the highest poverty rate among the female-run households. For whites, it was 28%, blacks, 50% : The overall rate for women was34%. While the poverty rate fell in 1986, the "poverty-gap"the amount by which incomes of the poor fell below the poverty line increased. According to Robert Greenstein, director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the gap between the rich and the middle class and the rich and the poor has reached its widest point in 40 years. Poor families had incomes that fell to an continued on page 2 FEMALE-HEADED HOUSEHOLDS: POVERTY RATES 1986 1985 1986 Na * 1986 Rate 1985 No . 3,474 1,950 1,452 1985 Rate 34. 0% 27.4 50.5 53.1 All Families 3,613 34. 6% White 2,041 28.2 Black 1 ,488 50. 1 Hispanic** 528 51.2 521 Source: US Census Bureau . March 1987 Current Population Survey. * Numbers in thousands. ** Hispanics are included in the black and white races. More Hispanic Bank Officers Sought Despite accounting for a third of the city's businesses and 53% of its population, His panics in San Antonio make up3% of members of boards of directors at banks there, found a survey conducted by the San Antonio Mexican Chamber of Commerce. The survey , the final results of which are to be released in mid-September, noted that among the 849 board members, 26 were Spanish surnamed and half of these were Mexican nationals. San Antonio has 7 5 banks. Ramiro Cavazos, execu_ tive director of the chamber of commerce, said the lack of His panic members on the bank boards impedes the expansion and start up of Hispanic-owned businesses. " We're not asking for preferential treatment. All we ask is that Hispanic business persons be given the same support" as other entrepreneurs, he said . The survey further found that 121 , or 1 0%, of the 1 ,192 senior officers at the banks were Spanish surnamed. Cavazos said San Antonio has approximately 30,000 businesses, 10,000 of which are His panic owned. He added that roughly 2,500 Hispanic business are started there every year. San Antonio has 600,000 Latinos. A more comprehensive survey will be sent to the city's top 10 banks next week, said Cavazos . The chamber's ultimate goal is to have two Hispanic board members installed at each.

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Latino Voter Eligibility Grows 25/o Between '84-'86 More than 1 ' .4 . million Hispanics became eligible b :/w . ep.,the 1984 and 1986 elections tHat figl!?r ' is expected to increase between 500,000 and 700,000 before the 1988 presidential election , accord ing to the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. Using U.S. Census Bureau figures, a NALEO Director Harry Pach6n . " In Texas , it took only?% of the Hispanic vote in 1986 to make a one percentage point difference in statewide elect i on results." LATINO VOTERS-1986 SEVEN KEY STATES study released July30 findsa24. 8% increase State Voters 1 % Shift in the Hispanic voting-age population between 1984 and 1 986. The national average voting age population grew 2.3% in that period . Based on 1986 election data , the study shows the significance of the Hispanic vote in individual states by analyzing the per centage of Hispanic voters needed for a 1% shift i n the total statewide vote . " In a close presidential electi on in 1988, the Hispanic community has the potential of truly being the swing vote," said NALEO Ariz. Calif. Colo. Fla. N .M. N.Y. Texas 89,192 730,618 75,842 279,449 167,963 283,609 637,515 Fact" 12% 12 16 15 3 ' " 20 ,'il' 7 Source : National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. • P ercentage of H i spanic voters needed for 1 % shift in stat ewide vote . Poverty Straps Latino Youth, Elderly f r om page 1 national poverty rate was 12 . 4% . Hispanic average of $4,394 below the poverty line i n elderly had a 22. 5% poverty rate , down from 1986. The proportion of families among the 24% in 1985. The rate for white elderly "poorest of the poor,". or those with incomes was 1 0.7%, for blacks , 31%. of less than $5,600 for a family of four, reached Carmela Lacayo, president of the Los Angeles its highest level in more than 10 years, based Asociaci6n Nacional Pro-Personas stein said . Mayores, said her organization's national studies Some 39% of all people who were poor in have shown Puerto Rican Hispanic elderly to 1986-12.7 millionhad incomes below half be the poorest among Latinos, followed by the poverty line. and Central Americans . There were no sign i ficant changes in poverty She added Hispanic figures can be misleading rates among children under six years of age . because Cubans, as a whole , have higher For Hispanic children the rate was 40.7%. It incomes. was 45.6% for blacks and 17.7% for whites. Melinda Machado 2 Among the elderly, 65 years and older, the Asencio Elected Chainnan INS Ordered to Pay Boy A U . S . District Court judge in San Diego awarded July 30 $579,000 to a 14-year-old Tijuana , Mexico, boy and his mother for a gunshot wound the youth received near San Ysidro, Calif. , from a U . S . border patrol man in 1985. -Judge Judith Keep awarded the damages to Humberto Carrillo Estrada, 12 years old at the time of the incident, and his mother, Maria Elena Estrada. Attorneys for Estrada, Carlos Alcala and Marco Lopez of California, asked for $3 million in damages in the lawsuit. The U . S . government had offered to settle for $50,000 . The shooting occurred when two U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service agents took Estrada ' s older brother Eduardo into custody at the border as he was attempt ing to climb a fence back into Mexico. The agent who fired the shot said he did so because he feared for the life of the two arresting patrolmen , who reportedly were the targets of hurled rocks . The younger Estrada admitted to trying to pry loose a stone but said he did not throw any . Estrada was shot in the back once bya.357 Magnum handgun . The 12-member commission appointed by Congress to study the "push factors" and other conditions that prompt undocumented aliens to come to the United States elected former Ambassador Diego Asencio as its chairman last month. The commission has four other prominent Latino members . The bipartisan body, called the Comm i ssion for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, will travel to the countries of origin of the undocumented aliens, including El Salvador , Mexico and Nicaragua, to conduct fact-finding missions. Created under a provision of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, it will submit its findings to Congress in three years. It was i naugurated June 23. " The charge of the commission is very broad . We will look into social , economic and political conditions," one of its members, former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya, said. The three other Hispanic members are California state Sen. Art Torres, Donna Alvarado , director of ACTIQN, a federal anti-poverty volunteer agency, and Edward Rivera , the executive director of the Sacramento-based International Techni c al Service . The commiss i on has beenfundedat$217 ,000 until the end of this fiscal year, in October. It will be housed in a congressional office building. Nationwide , there were 11. 8 m i llion vot ing age Latinos in 1986, or 6 . 8% of all e l igible voters. Of those 7.9 million who were eligible to vote , 4 . 2 million were registered . Hispanics accounted for 3 . 8% of all registered voters that year , with 67% of their registered voters going to the polls. " The presence of a large number of legal immigrants who are not citizens in the H is panic community is st i ll overlooked by many political analysts as a factor in low voter turnout in the Hispanic community, " Pach6n said. Because of the youthfulness of the His panic community, a disproportionately large percentage of Latinos will reach voting age throughout the next decade . More than one third-or 3 . 9 million-ofthe Latino voting-age population were not citizens in 1986. Melinda Machado MALDEF's Directors Agree to Oppose Bork The board of directors of the Mexican Ameri can Legal Defense and Educational Fund voted unanimously Aug . 1 to oppose the nomination of U.S. Supreme Court nominee , Robert Bork while the Hispanic National Bar Association ' s directors decided to postpone taking a position . Bork's opinions on affirmative acti on pro grams, civil rights and voting rights and his conservative ideology have moved many His. panic groups, including the Puerto Rican Legal Defense Fund, to oppose his nomination . Despite a poll of HNBA directors which showed the majority against Bork, President William Mendez said the board voted to delay taking a stand until its judiciary screening committee reports in early September. "There was a spirited discussion that we initially responded on a political level and that was not appropriate for a bar association , " Mendez told Weekly Report . He added that if HNBA challenges the nomination, it will be based upon Bork's qualifications . "LULAC is opposed to the nomination , " said League of United Latin American Citizens President Oscar Moran during a July 31 press conference in Washington, D.C. Following . a meeting with Senate Judiciary Comm ittee Chairman Joseph Biden (D-Del.), Moran pre dicted the Senate would reject the nomination . LULAC plans to lobby senators , as well as conduct a public information campaign. MALDEF is also preparing an informational campaign with possible editorial pieces and Senate testimony on Bork's record. A policy stating that in the future MALDEF staff rev iew Supeme Court nominations for the purpose of supporting, opposing or ing on that nomination was adopted by the board . Senate Judiciary hearings on Bork, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, are expected to begin in . mid September. Hispan ic Link W e e kly Report

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COLLECTING BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE SUBMISSIONS: The National Association for Bilingual Education seeks proposals for papers, symposiums and workshops for its 1988 national conference. The deadline for submissions is Aug. 15. Send materials to: Dr. Sylvia Pef1a, NABE Program Co-Chair, College of Education, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 749-7407. ASYLUM RATES: "Asylum : Approval Rates for Selected Applicants'' is a nine-page report by the U.S . General Accounting Office on the approval rates for asylum seekers for El Salvador, Nicaragua, Poland, and Iran . For a free copy, write to: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. HISPANIC HEALTH RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: The Hispanic Health Research Consortium, a project undertaken by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations (COSSHMO) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, seeks researchers to analyze data from the national Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The deadline is Sept. 15. For more information and applications, write: Hispanic Health Research Consortium, COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100. BANK DIRECTORS m SAN ANTONIO: For a copy ol the San Antonio Mexican Chamber of Commerce's survey results on the number of Hispanic members on bank boards of directors there, contact SAMCC , 110 Broadway, Suite 50, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 225-0462. The cost of the report, to be released in mid September, has not been determined. POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES: "Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the United States" is a 42-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau which details poverty by racial and ethnic group. To order (specify Series P-60, Advance Report), contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (The price had not been set at press time. ) . MIGRATION COMMISSION: The Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development can be contacted at CSIMCED, Canon House Office Building, Room 517, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-2380. CONNECTING HEALTH PROJECT INITIATED Project Alivio , a collaborative health care program with Chicago's Latino Institute as one of its main participants, is conducting research and seeking information for development of the project. Project Alivio, to be kicked off by early 1988, will provide health care services, address issues of access to health care, lack of insurance coverage and health promotion to approximately 125,000 Latinos. The projecrs estimated cost is$2 million. Partial funding has been made available by a $893,200 grant from Chicago CommunityTrust.. The institute is interested in references to statistical information on Hispanic health nationwide and wishes to identify existing health centers founded on the basis of community input. Please send any information to: Orestes Aguillon, Project Afivio Research Coordinator, Latino Institute, 228 South Wabash, 6th Floor, Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 663-3603. MVREP MOVES TO CHICAGO The Midwest Voter Registration Education Project moved its office Aug. 1 from Columbus, Ohio, to Chicago. MVREP also announced recently that it will extend its registration efforts into North and South Dakota, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut. MVREP worked in 1 0 states previously. In Chicago, the group is presently working out of the offices of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund at 343 S. Dearborn, Suite91 0, Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312)427-8683. It hopes to move into its own office by late summer. LATINO ENTREPRENEURS HONORED The Texas Association of MexicanAmerican Chambers of Commerce awarded its businesswoman and businessman of the year awards at its annual convention in Houston July 30Aug 1. The event attracted more than 1,200participants. Carmen Orta of the Houston Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Americom Tale-Resources, and Roger Robles of the Midland Hispanic Chamber of Commerce received the awards. Manuel Carrasco , also of the Midland Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. was the recipient of the TAMACC local member-of-the-year award. -Julio Laboy Calendar CHICANA FASHION SHOW Denver Aug . 15 Lourdes Colon (212) 685-2311 URBAN FELLOWS CONFERENCE National Urban Fellows THIS WEEK LANGUAGE MINORITY CONFERENCE Austin , Texas Aug. 13-14 "Educating Exceptional Language Minority Students" is the theme of a conference sponsored by the Bilingual Special Education Training Programs, the Handicapped Minority Research Institute on Lan guage Proficiency and the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. The reasons Hispanics are more likely than other students to be placed in learning disabled programs will be one of the topics addressed . There will also be workshops on language disorders, teaching English as a Second Language and assessing curricula for these students. Robert Tindol (512) 471-3151. FESTIVAL LATINO PLAY San Francisco Aug. 13-16 La Cuadra de Sevilla of Spain , a theater troupe, will perf orm during the second annual Festival Latino spo n sored by the F estival Latino Committee in as s ociat ion with the N e w York Shakespeare Festival. A s eri es of Latino film s , plays and music will run in San Fr a n c i sco a nd Oakland through Aug . 3 0 . Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS 4 The "Chic Chicana " fashion show is the finale of a summer education program on modeling, marketing and self-image building for high school students. Sponsored by the Vannoy Talent Agency, the city's agency for Human Rights and Community Relations and Mervyn Department Stores , the show's board of directors gives more than $3,000 in scholarships to current and past Chic Chicana participants. Beverly Martinez (303) 7 40-281 0 COMING SOON EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM League of United Latin American Citizens, Mont gomery County, Md. Arlington , Va. Aug. 1 7 Carlos Guillen (301) 299-8836 FOURTH ANNUAL HISPANIC FESTIVAL Hispanic Women ' s Network Wichita , Kansas Aug. 22 Martha Sanchez (316) 267-4201 HISPANIC ARTS, CUI:.TURE IN.RADIO KUVO Radio Denver Aug . 26-28 Florence Hernandez (303) 934-5880 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION National Puerto Rican Forum New York Aug. 27 Aug . 10, 1987 Chicago Aug. 27-30 Antonio Delgado (312) 7 44-9567 TORRES FUNDRAISER Friends of Sen. Art Torres Los Angeles Aug. 29 Lisa Baca (213) 384-9811 HISPANIC ALCOHOLISM CONVENTION South FloridaAicoholicsAnonymousHispanicGroups Miami Sept. 4-6 Juan M. (305) 643-2522 SPOTLIGHT SMALL BUSINESS EXPO: owners seeking new markets may attend the Business Expo'87 at Rio HondoCommunityCollege in Whittier, Calif . Two seminars, one on "The Immigration Control Act-Em pi oyer Sanctions and the Small Business" and another on " Marketing Your Company Success fully," will be held . More than 20 corporations, including Honeywell, Lockheed, Hughes Aircraft, Bechtel and General Dynamics, will be represented along with federal, state and local government agencies. The exposition is being sponsored by the office of U . S . Rep . Esteban Torres (D-Calif . ) , a member of the House Small Business Committee. For more infor mation , call Bob Alcock at (202) 225-5256 Hispani c Link Weekly R e p o rt

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George McDougall, guest columnist Costly Ambivalence .Is Puerto Rico a part of the United States? Are Puerto R1cans "Americans''? Should we care? Pose those questions around the nation and the replies to each will fluctuate widely: yes, no, maybe, sort of, don't know. The correct answers are yes, yes and yes. Puerto Rico has been a . possession for 89 years . Puerto Ricans have been U.S . c1t1zens for 70 years. And we should care, because the island has more inhabitants than half of the 50 states-3.2 million and is regarded by the Pentagon as indispensable to U .S. secu in the Caribbean Basin. But if Puerto Rico has been part of the United States for nearly a century, the fact remains that ignorance about it is so pervasive as to extend even to the news media Last January, reporting from San Juan on a disaster that took 97 lives , a CBS corre spondent told Dan Rather's nationwide television audience that surviving tourists had begun "returning to the United States." Moments later, however, he described the Dupont Plaza blaze as "the second worst hotel fire in U.S . history." Within a single two-minute broadcast, Puerto Rico was placed both outside the United States and inside the United States. NOT AN AMUSING ABERRATION This Puerto Rico ignorance syndrome should not be dismissed as an amusing aberration. It greatly complicates the lives of millions of people. Nearly as many Puerto Ricans reside on the mainland as on the island , and all of them suffer when viewed by other U.S . citizens as "outs. iders" or "foreigners." Yet when it comes to clarifying the situation, Puerto Rico is often its own worst enemy. The island's current anti-statehood government has published a textbook which teaches schoolchildren that Puerto Rico and the United States are two different countries. On the one hand, youngsters from the island have triumphed as "Americans" in Washington, D . C., at the National Spelling Bee and as Cherry Blossom Queen. On the other, local enthusiasm was un doubtedlygreaterwhen Miss Puerto Rico edged out Miss USA for the Miss Universe title, in 1970 and again in 1985. During a National Press Club appearance this spring in Washington, Gov . Rafael Hernandez Colon announced the formation of a "bilaterar blue-ribbon panel , to confront"the failure of our fellow citizens of this nation to acknowledge Puerto Rico's role and potential." Barely a month later, however, the governor's Justice Department was belligerently building new barriers to brotherhood. IDENTITY DILEMMA FESTERS ON On the eve of their departure for the Pan American Games at Indianapolis, Acting Justice Secretary Guillermo Mojica set the stage for a delegation of Puerto Rico athletes to be greeted there with undisguised hostility: he proposed to extradite the coach of Indiana University's national championship basketball team! (Bobby Knight has been convicted in absentia of misdemeanor assault of a police officer during the 1979 Pan American Games in Puerto Rico.) Call it insular chauvinism or gratuitous "nationalism" or justified indignation. None of that excuses the stupidity of this deed. At the very least , extradition talk could have waited until the Indianapolis Games were over. Meanwhile, the identity dilemma festers on, to the permanent detriment of every Puerto Rican who treasures his or her U.S. citizenship. Statehood, and only statehood, will ultimately unscramble the puzzle . (George McDougall, a native of Chicago and resident of Puerto Rico for the past 16 years, is chairman of the Government Affairs Committee of the San Juan, Municipal Assembly. He was elected to the assembly in 1980 and again in 1984 on the ticket of the New Progressive Party.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua LAND OF THE RISING IQ: U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres is leading a delegation of 41 U.S. Hispanics on a good-will visit to Japan this month. Our Asian correspondent Kekulo Tanseco tells us that in order to impress Prime MinisterYasuhiro Nakasone members of the mission have pa ;ked their verified SAT along with their passports and visas. QUIZ TIME: That reminds me that school will be back in session in a few weeks. So let's gear up with a simple true-or-false quiz on the behavior of Hispanics in the Good 01' U .S. of A : . 1 . Coming primarily from nations with agricultural economies, many U.S. Latinos historically have treated schooling casually . 2. Puerto Ricans, unlike the hard-driving Cuban immigrants, arrive as American citizens. And since they aren't locked out of their homeland, they often don't feel forced to make it on the U.S. mainland. 3. The isolation of Hispanics is self-willed rather than imposed from without. True False If you checked "yes" to all three questions, go to the .head of the class, you little darling. Your answers are all correct. They are , if you believe the three pages of contorted prose on U.S. Latinos in the Aug. 10 edition of U .S. News & World Report. On its cover is the question: "Hispanics: Moving in the Wrong Direction?" It took eight of the magazine's writers (including one Miami Latina, Luisa Yanez, who hopefully will disassociate herself with the final product) to pull the piece together. The article did qualify that our isolation was "self-willed" only"to some extent." There are a few of us, I guess it concedes, who might be willing to move from the South Bronx to Beverly Hills if we could charge the down payme;,t on a home there to our K-Mart credit cards. After talking about how" Hispanics treasure their ethnic enclaves" the magazine attempts to prove it with a quote from Voter Registration Education Project president Willie Velasquez obviously a mile out of context -that "My precincts are overwhelmingly Mexican, and I like it just fine." It also quotes the oft-quoted University of Chicago-based political scientist Gary Orfield that Latino students are now more segregated in our public schools than black students. "Nothing in our history suggests we can run an effective separate-but-equal system of education. Yet now we are building another one," he says. Separate but EQUAL? Gary, have you ever seen the buildings, !he textbooks, the libraries, the special equipment or the playgrounds m some of our South Texas or East Coast inner-city barrio schools? That's what those equal-funding lawsuits are all about. Please , plea se , tell us you were misquoted. -Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • • ARNOLDO TORRES, former League of United Latin American director now engaged in research on the suppresSIOn of non-English languages, comrrenting on the appointment of ex-White House aide Linda Chavez e"gcutive director of u.s. English: "That's too bad. I was hoping they'd select someone with whom 1 could debate the issue in Spanish." MARIA RIVERA, Puerto Rican basketball star whose request to play with the U.S . women ' s Pan American Games basketball team was denied because she had played on the Puerto Rican "national" team (which disbanded) , asked reporters: "How do you change from being an American to an American?" Hispanic Link Weekl y R e p ort Aug . 10, 1987 3

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GENERAL MANAGER-KUSC-FM The University of Southern California invites nominations and applications for the position of General Manager of KUSC , the arts and in f ormation public radio service of USC , which also owns and operates affiliated stations KCPB / Thousand Oaks, KSCNSanta Barbara and KPSH / Palm Springs. The GM has overall responsibil ity for. establishing artistic direction and maintaining stations ' legal, regulatory, and fiscal well being ; leading the program staff in creation, production , and acquisition of classical mus i c and news programs of pre-eminent artistic and journ a list i c quality; determining and serving needs of stations' listeners and subscribers; a nd continuing the development of KUSCas a major production center for radio programs of_ local , regional , and national interest. Requires demonstrated qualiti es of vis i on , leadership , and organizational management skills ; thorough understanding of the natlire and purpose of public broadcasting; ability to relate to varied constituencies and individuals in the many communities served by KUSC ; ability to develop and implement successful fundraising strategies; and , preferably, proven track record in developing and/or managing nationally prominent broadcast facility . Addres s inquiries, nominations, and applications NL T Aug. 21, 1987 to: John R . Curry, VP Budget/Planning; Chair, Sea•ch Committee; USC , ADM-150 ; Los Angeles , Calif. 90089-5012. USC is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. The following two positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College. ADMISSIONS RECRUITER Asst. to HEO Admission ' s Office seeks entry level pro fessional for enhanced enrollment manage ment/student services effort. Some evening and weekend work will be required . Min. 2 yrs . exp. in student personnel svs. ; some knowledge of financial aid pref. BA req. Salary; $23,035/ A . REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #350 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 8/31/87. BOOKKEEPER/SECRETARY College-based Early Childhood/Day Care PrOQ. BA req. with exp. with payroll , general ledger, wi t hholding, FICA. etc. Exp . in child care program pref. $19,000 $20,000/ A REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #G-166 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER FOR THIS NON-TAX LEVY POSITION BY8/31/87. Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Oi rector of Personnel Boro uph o f Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambe rs St. , New York , N . Y . 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY / AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED PROJECT DIRECTOR-CHICAGO MALDEF, a national Civil Rights Hispanic Organization, needs a college graduate with good English , writing, research and speaking skills for leadersh i p training program . Must be familiar with Hispanic issues locally and nation wide . Send resume with references to : Enrique R. Valenzuela , National D irector of Leadership Programs, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Angeles , Calif . 90014 by 8/14/87. Section missing from original WRITING POSITION New Jersey Writer to p r epare Latin American Spanish teaching materials. Native fluency, excellent grammar required . Teaching , editing , or publish ing experience helpful. Reply to : H i spanic Link News Service , 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20005. Attn : Corporate Classifieds. WRITER College Relations & Pubilcatlons Write press releases, newsletter, articles, etc., relating to academic research, student achieve ment, and the arts at lively urban campus. BA and 1-3 years experience required; ism background preferred . Deadline is August 21,1987. Send letter, resume and three nonreturnable writing samples to: Director of Lehman College , The City University of New York, Bronx, New York 10468. Salary$18,4 70-$24,303, excellent benefits. EQUAL OPF'ORTUNITY/AFARMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER LABOR/IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY Union seeking attorney for labor/ERISNim migration position . Bilingual Spanish required . Excellent benefits. Salary negotiable. Send resume to : ILGWU, 675 S . Parkview St. , Los Angeles, Calif . 90057. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • Con necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter tainment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Pelos en Ia Lengu . a • Marketplace The following position closes Thursday, August 20, 198 7 at 5 p.m . EEO RECRUITMENT-OUTREACH SPEC I.'\ LIST (Personnel Department) Ann . # 1805-8APER $25,883.52-$28,51 2.64 Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit tar geted opulations including minorities, women and disabled persons. Duties include identify ing potential sources of applicants ; developing and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials , com munity groups, etc. ; developing outreach plans, ads , brochures, etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide bas i s . Minimum requ i rements: at least two years experience in one or more tec hnical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelo(s degree from a recognized college or university in public, business or personnel administration or related field . Knowledge of outreach methods and recruitment sources. Preferred requirements: Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the followi ng : f!oi) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system ; B) bilingual capabilities in one or more languages re presented in the community. All applicants must submit an Official County application form . Resumes , SF-171 's, etc., submitted without a completed Official Arling ton County application form will NOT be accepted . Applications must be received into the Personnel Department by 5 p . m . on the closing date. To request applicat i on mater i al , please call (703) 558-2167 or TOO (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only) . ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N . 14th Street Arlington , Va 22201 EOE M/F/H PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Assist in producing a nationally d istributed Spanish language newscast Fluent in Spanish/ English and radio production experience. Contact Samuel Orozco, KSJV Radio Bilingiie, 1044 Fulton Mall , #413, Fresno , Calif . 93721 (209) 486-5174. SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address ------------City, state, zip -----------0 Start 13-week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks ) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed 0 Bill me 0 B i ll my organization Mail to: H i span i c Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737 5

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Arts & Entertainment NOMINATION NEWS: For the third year in a row, a Latino has received an Emmy nomination in the "outstanding supporting actor in a drama series " category. Jimmy Smits was nominated by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his role as attorney Victor Sifuentes in LA Law: With 20 nods, the NBC series led the pack of nominees announced July 30 in Hollywood. In 1985 and 1986, Edward James Olmos was nominated in the same category for his role as Lt. Castillo on NBC's Miami Vice . Should Smits pick up an Emmyon September20(theceremonywill be carried live on the Fox Broadcasting Company network) , he will be the fourth Hispanic actor to do so in 10 years . Olmos won his Emmy in 1985. Rita Moreno won twice, in 1977 and 1978, and Ricardo Montalban received one in 1978. No Hispanics were nominated in director or writer categories, and only Fred de Cordova was nominated as a producer. De Cordova is often nominated as executive producer of The Tonight Show Starring Jo.'mny Carson . Another perennial nominee, animator Bill Melendez, is being considered for an Emmy in the "outstanding animated program" category for his role as producer of the special Cathy, which aired on CBS. A number of Hispanics were nominated in a variety of "craft categories." Winners of those Emmys will be announced Sept. 12. TO HYPE LA SAMBA: Concerted marketing efforts in the Latino community have worked out for Columbia Pictures' La Bamba, which led box-office sales in key markets during opening weekend. Luis Valdez's film grossed $461,000 in 26 Los Angeles theaters, topping sales charts for the weekend of July 24-26. La Bamba was also number one in the San Jose and Seattle/Tacoma markets and in third place in the New York and San Francisco markets. Its gross sales nationwide for the Ju ly24Aug. 2 period were $14.4 million. It was third in the national charts for the weekend ending Aug. 2 . Spanish dubbed and subtitled prints in 77 theaters nationwide averaged higher sales ($5,300 per screen) than the 1,17 4 English prints ($4 ,086 per screen) . Tremendous hype surrounds the screen story of Chicano rock-and roller Ritchie Valens. The MTV cable channel did an extensive promotional tie-in with contests, interviews and an "opening-night party " special. Videoclips featuring the music of Los Lobos are scheduled on MTV and its sister cable channel, VH-1. Adding to the hype is a renewed interest in Valens ' music. Besides the Warner Bros./Slash soundtrack album, all three of Valens ' Dei Fi Records albums are available from Rhino Records, and Valens record producer Bob Keane is releasing a digital remix of the film's title song. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report said , remains for them to go to an offending station and say," ' We're not going to listen to your station anymore.' That's still what gets their attention." MacNeil. Guest George Gilder, a financial writer, made the comment July 3 while discussing trade surpluses that"wetbacks, unlike econo mists , know which way to swim." FAIRNESS DOCTRINE: Abolition of the "fairness doctrine" by the Federal Com munications Commission Aug. 4 is likely to "advance the cause of those in Congress who are very concerned about it," says former FCC Commissioner Henry Rivera He expects Congress to legislate rules similar to those the commission eliminated and to send them to President Reagan attached to legislation tie's not likely to veto, Rivera to!d ' " --'