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Hispanic link weekly report, August 17, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 17, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
A Vatican spokesman announces that Pope John Paul II will not beatify Father Junlpero Serra, the 18th century priest who founded nine Franciscan missions along the California coast, during his visit to California next month. Beatification is the second of three steps toward sainthood... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Sacramento school teacher Cecilia Jimenez to the California Commission on Educational Equality. The commission evaluates the educational and fiscal techniques of the state’s K-12 system... New York City Council President Andrew Stein asks the city's board of education to evaluate the performance of city Schools Chancellor Nathan Quiftones for possible replacement Stein was angered at
the recent failure of a summer school dropout prevention/jobs program... Teacher Maria Gonzftlez, 49, is named to fill a vacant seat on the nine-member Hartford, Conn., City Council. The seat has been vacant since Nancy Meltndez Burch resigned in March. Gonzalez must run to retain the seat in November.. . Javier Nava becomes Aug. 10 the first Chicago-area resident to gain approval for the federal legalization program... Jaime Ernesto Ramirez, an 18-year-old, files a $10 million lawsuit against two former Huntington Park, Calif., police officers, charging that they tortured him with jolts from a stun gun. Ramirez says the incident occurred last November when he was sitting in the back of a police car with his hands cuffed behind him. The officers were later dismissed and charged with felonious assault...
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Latino Groups Huddling on ’88 National Agenda
Hispanic leaders and organizations across the nation are marshaling their forces and laying the groundworkfora national Hispanic agenda to be presented to candidates for the 1988 presidential election.
These organizations and ad hoc coalitions, which will attempt to incorporate Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban and other Latino group concerns, will be meeting from mid-October through April 1988. Two major sessions are planned for Washington, D.C., and one for Chicago. Delegates will network, frame the agenda issues and set dates for their public release.
Although there are no formal plans to merge the three agendas, several participants have indicated the desirability of doing so. They readily admit, however, that no single document can likely address the concerns of all Hispanic groups, particularly on foreign policy issues.
Representatives from most organizations agree that the agenda should focus on domestic issues such as education, immigration and English-only legislation.
Among meetings that have taken place or are planned:
• On Aug. 11, a New York delegation of Hispanic leaders, organizations and politicians met in New York City to sharpen their version of an agenda they have been working on for
'Hallmark Cards Inc and First Chicago Venture Capital finalized their purchase Aug. 6 of 10 Spanish-language television stations formerly owned by the Spanish International Communications Corporation.
The two companies are also buying KDTV in San Francisco from Bahia de San Francisco Television Company. Costforthe11 stations is more than $300 million.
“We feel a long-term commitment to a Spanish-language format,” said Hallmark Director of Communications Nancy Matheny, adding that the Federal Communications Commission will only allow a two-year cap on Spanish-language programming decisions. FCC approved the sale of the 10 stations in June after a January ruling that ownership by Mexican media mogul Emilio Azc6rraga violated a U.S. law limiting roreign ownership of radio
several weeks The group was brought together by former U.S. Congressman Herman Badillo.
• On Oct 16-18, the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project will meet with invited Hispanic politicians and leaders to write its agenda during its annual leadership conference in Chicago.
• On Oct 19-20, the League of United Latin American Citizens and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will meet with the New York delegation and possibly other regional groups in Washington to merge the agendas with one being drafted by LULAC.
• On April 18-20,1988, the National Hispanic Leadership Conference led by Pablo Sedillo, director of the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs of the U.S. Catholic Conference, and Raul Yzaguirre,. president of the National Council of La Raza, will prepare a refined agenda to present to those candidates still in the race. The NHLC has prepared similar agendas for the last three presidential elections
Oscar Mor4n, president of LULAC, was quick to point out that the summit his organization was taking a lead role in was not being framed solely by Hispanic politicians “We will cast as wide a net as possible. We will get leaders from education, religion, the political sector, the corporate sector and the community,” he said.
and television stations to 20%.
“Our mission is to be the foremost Spanish-language communications company in the United States, improving the quality of life and economic well-being of U.S. Hispanics through mass media information, education and entertainment,” said Irvine Hockaday Jr., president of Hallmark. Hallmark now has a 75% controlling interest in the stations Many Hispanic leaders and interested Latino investors unsuccessfully tried to block the sale, fearing the stations would convert to English-language broadcasta Five major stations included in the sale are WXTVin New York, Los Angeles’ KM EX, KFTV in,Fresno, Calif., WLTV in Miami and KWEX in San Antonio. Denver, Philadelphia, Austin, Texas, Hartford, Conn., and Bakersfield, Calif., are sites of the group’s five low-power stationa
MVREP has scheduled its agenda summit to coincide with its annual leadership conference. Headed by Juan Andrade, MVREP has also invited a cross section of Latino groups and leaders from diverse fielda Included are Congressman Esteban Torres, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucua Denver Mayor Federico Pefta, Los Angeles Councilwoman Gloria Molina, Miami Mayor Xavier Su&rez and Chicago Alderman Luis Gutierrez. Also invited were such groups as
continued on page 2
Legislator Seeks INS Probe of Ezell Talk
Comments by U.S. immigration official Harold Ezell that recent Salvadoran death-x squad threats in Los Angeles were part of an “orchestrated P.R. campaign” to promote legislation halting the deportation of Salvadorans from the United States have prompted U.S. Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.) to request a formal investigation of Ezell.
Moakley called for the probe in an Aug. 5 letter to Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Alan Nelson. He charged that Ezell, the western regional commissioner, was either privy to information of a crime and jeopardized ongoing investigations by police and the FBI or, “without any evidence, he has presented as fact the wildest of speculation, with the obvious intent of improperly influencing the vote of the House on matters pending before it.”
A Mexican American priest, Father Luis Olivares, the office of the Guatemalan Consulate, Central American refugees and Solidarity movement workers have been recipients of “Escuadrdn de la Muerte” death threats in Los Angeles.
Moakley s legislation would halt deportation of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans for two years while Congress studies human rights abuses in those countries. It passed the House in July and still faces a Senate vote.
Nelson, on vacation, has not issued any comment Moakley has threatened to launch his own investigation depending on INS’ response.
Hallmark Finalizes SICC Purchase


L.A. Teachers Union Vote Favors English Immersion
The 22,000-member United Teachers Los Angeles union voted Aug.. 7 to support the immersion method of bilingual education, overturning a seven-year union policy in support of transitional bilingual education, which allows the use of a student’s native language.
“It’s our position, but we are not going to launch attacks on bilingual education,” UTLA President Wayne Johnson said after vote results were counted Aug. 12. Johnson interpreted the vote as a reaction to the Los Angeles Unified School District’s policy which requires many teachers to join the bilingual program under a “waivei" system, in which they have seven years to become fluent. Spanish is usually the required language.
Several teachers formed the Learning English Advocates Drive to support English-immersion classes for all limited-English
students and to limit Spanish-language instruction. They forced a referendum which passed on a vote of 5,346 to 1,499.
UTLA’s Chicano Education Committee prepared a counter-referendum supporting the district’s current use of transitional bilingual education programs. It was defeated, 2,831 to 3,944.
CEC member and former chair Mark Over-street said, “These English-only groups wanted it(the proposal) so they can use it in lobbying the legislature to get the state to move in the same direction.”
Johnson added, “It’s really a political issue and they’ve brought it to school campuses in California. I don’t think our kids will benefit from it, our organization isn’tgoing to benefit from it and I don’t think our teachers will, either.”
On July 24, California Gov. George Deuk-
mejian vetoed a bilingual education extension bill. While the state will continue to provide funds for bilingual education, each district will be responsible for setting its own guidelines. Previously, a bilingual teacher was required for any class in which 10 or more students did not speak English.
More than half of Los Angeles school districfs560,000 students are Hispanic and the district has more pupils in bilingual programs than any other district in the United States.
“A lot of teachers have a misunderstanding of bilingual education, its methods and theories,” Overstreet said, adding many teachers voted to support immersion because of the district’s requirements for bilingual certificatioa
“There was a lot of resentment,” Johnson said. “The children are the victims of this war” - Melinda Machado
Three National Agendas Shaping Up FLOC Negotiates Pact
for Ohio Farm Workers
continued from page 1
the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, LULAC, NCLR, the National Puerto Rican Forum and the Miami-based Cuban American National Council.
Tony Bonilla, head of another “National Hispanic Leadership Conference,” incorporated in Texas, said his group also expects to be working with Andrade.
A national Hispanic agenda first received wide publicity at LULAC’s June convention in Corpus Christi, Texas. The concept was broached by Cisneros. Eight presidential aspirants attended the conference. Most enthusiastically embraced the idea
Moran said the agenda to be intiated at the October Washington summit will be ready before the first presidential primaries in March 1988. He added that the candidates would not be placed in a “quandary” if presented with more than one agenda. “If anything, the agendas will enhance each other. The candidates will hear a very loud and clear voice.”
Mary Brunette, the deputy press secretary for candidate Jack Kemp(R-N.Y.), told Weekly Report that she was sure Kemp would meet with Hispanic leaders to try to incorporate some of their concerns into his platform. Representatives from other Republican and Democratic candidate^ camps have indicated similar interest to Latino political and organizational leaders.
While several Latino leaders surveyed by Weekly Report felt that composing a national H ispanic agenda was difficult at best, they all agreed that the effort was worthwhile and
Jobless Rate Falls Again
The Hispanic unemployment rate dropped to 7.9% in July from 8.5% in June, the fourth consecutive month of decline, according to figures released Aug 7 by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The number of jobless Latinos fell from 722,000 to 667,000 last month.
2
manageable.
Elvira Castillo, director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said despite some regional, economic and political differences among Latinos, “as an ideal, the agenda can be done.”
Mordn commented, “We may not include everybody but many people will be surprised when they see the wide representation at the summit in Washington.”
The two dozen New York Hispanic leaders who met Aug. 11 agreed to meet again in two to three weeks to finalize their proposed agenda and mail it to area organizations and leaders.
NCLR President Yzaguirre said that the April National Hispanic Leadership Conference already includes such groups as the National Puerto Rican Coalition, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, LULAC and CANC. He expects about 20 groups to participate.
He said that other organizations, including the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, were soon to be invited-
By then, he said, “Hopefully the field will have narrowed to one or two candidates from each party. Therefore, we will have a much better, more in-depth dialogue with whomever emerges.” - Julio Laboy and Felix Perez
The Farm Labor Organizing Committee, based in Toledo, Ohio, signed Aug. 6 a three-year contract with Vlasic Foods Inc. and24 of its Ohio vegetable growers, raising the number of state cucumber pickers and growers covered by FLOC collective bargaining agreements to more than half. Vlasic itself has 64 growers in Ohio.
FLOC’s contract increases wages 4% and provides pay bonuses for about 650 migrant workers presently covered by the contract. There are approximately50,000 migrant workers in the-upper midwest. During the five-week cucumber harvest season, they earn about $250 - $300 a week.
The contract covers wages, housing and health care.
“The cost for signing contracts is not coming out of the growers’ pockets,” Mary Templin, FLOC office manager, told Weekly Report. “The money is being paid by the companies. Incentives in the plan will benefit the growers.”
The contract is the fourth that the union has negotiated with growers and processors since early 1986. In total, the contracts cover about 2,700 workers and 78 growers of cucumbers and tomatoes in Ohio and Michigan.
L.A. Aids City Worker Legalization
Los Angeles MayorTom Bradley announced Aug. 5 a program to help undocumented city employees apply for legalization under the federal immigration law.
Bradley was“concerned that they (employees) should be provided information in an orderly basis,” a spokesman said.
Nearly 17% of Los Angelesf 42,092 employees are Hispanic.
The city program will allow employees to receive immediate written documentation of their work history on a confidential basis.
Richard Alarcon, president of the Los Angeles
City Employees Chicano Association, told Weekly Report that although the number of undocumented Hispanic city employees was probably small, he hoped that the program would serve as a model for other employers and municipalities.
Minority employee associations, particularly those that represent Hispanics and Asians, will provide referral services. The Los Angeles office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will advise the employee associations on how best to structure the program.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Miguel Perez, guest columnist
The Secret Agenda
At first, they wanted a commitment of complete silence. I was not to divulge any information obtained from a meeting in which a group of New York Latinos were secretly drafting -without informing or consulting their community-a“national Hispanic agenda.” The agenda was to be used to pressure presidential candidates to address Latino issues in 1988.
When I entered a conference room in lower Manhattan on the morning of July 28, former U.S. Congressman Herman Badillo, now a crony of Mario Cuomo, read me the rules.
For someone who went there as a journalist the rules were unacceptable, especially since through my own sources I had already obtained the document they were reviewing. But they agreed to let me stay so long as I agreed not to write about the specifics of their discussions
Don’t worry, you didn’t miss much. Although the document has a lot of potential, the meeting was a tedious discussion to revise the agenda’s language. The idea of drafting a national Latino agenda is a great one. I wrote my own in my New York Daily News column in 1984 when the presidential candidates were ignoring Latino issues.
WHAT IF AGENDA HADN’T BEEN LEAKED?
Even in a mere column, though, I had the sense to ask for community input for preparing my agenda, and I drafted it with letters from readers.
If the draft of this new agenda had not been leaked, Badillo’s handpicked committee would have kept it a secret for who knows how long. Perhaps until they go to Washington in October to negotiate with other Latinos from around the country on behalf of a community they haven’t even consulted.
Of the meeting, one explained, “It’s not secret It’s private.”
They say the group is still expanding, but they have not sought an open forum with all Latino leaders in the city. They tell you that other groups of Latinos, especially the Cubans from Florida and the Chicanos from the Southwest, will have their input when all of the groups meet in Washington. But if Dominicans, Colombians and other Latinos don't get some input in New York where will they get it?
At the Badillo meeting, the people who stood out were the people who weren't there. Even if the group doesn’t have the time to take their agenda to public hearings, as they claim, you would think that they would have included representatives from many community-based organizations that have closer ties with the people in the barrios.
IMPOSSIBLE TO AVOID STIGMA
But here they were, Badillo’s old vanguard, an elitist group of Puerto Ricans, voting on every item on their agenda as if they each had their own constituency.
However, although a few work for Mario Cuomo, not all of them are government hacks and political opportunists Some of them were there because they sincerely believe that working on a Latino agenda is better than not doing anything at all. Unfortunately, with Badillo leading the troops it will become impossible for them to avoid the stigma, right or wrong, that this is a Badillo agenda
Although they have set off on the wrong course, they still have time to set the sails straight by bringing in the grass roots leadership, from Puerto Rican to all other Latinos, which has been excluded.
Some members of the group have vested interests and others clearly have good intentions They tell you that they are doing it in private with a small number of people because they can accomplish more that way. They tell you that they are “trying to do a good thing.”
But that was the pretext used by many of our Latin ancestors when they led or conformed to totalitarian regimes. When they decide for the people in secret meetings even dictators say they are “trying to do a good thing."
(Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
ARE YOU ALIVE? Look out of the window. Is there still a world out there? Trees dripping acid dew? Barking dogs? Grouchy Anglo neighbors who complain when we party late? If so, Jose Arguel les was wrong.
Dr. Arguelles an art historian and stargazer who resides in Boulder, Colo., has been predicting that Sunday, Aug. 16, would ' “'<»iprid1 or at least the beginning of the end, for us all. He
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and the general public. __ ___
Tenochtitl&n, the Aztec capital, came at the completion of a 5? year cycle. And the ninth 52-year cycle since Cortes’ arrival ended on Sunday.
Arguelles the Times explained, gives special significance to the number nine because, in the olden days there were nine levels of the underworld through which the dead had to descend.
Oh, what a beautiful morning! Sunday passed without so much as a poof. Considering Dr. Arguelles’ alternative, acid dew, barking dogs and grouchy neighbors aren’t so bad after all.
OBSERVING, TEXAS-STYLE: Eduardo Pelta, former president of the League of United Latin American Citizens and current board chairman of the LULAC Foundation, isn’t as happy as we are.
He is upset with the coverage of LULACs recent convention in the biweekly Texas Observer, a publication which has never been noted for its objectivity in reporting on the Latino role in the Lone Star state.
Observer writer Louis Dubose took LULACs leadership to task in its July 17 edition, challenging, “They cannot rail against Reagan and (Texas Gov. William) Clements, then elect a conservative Republican like Oscar Morin to lead their organization. . . LULAC, though always a middle class and assimilationist organization, played an important part in the demise of Jim Crow, particularly in Texas. But to be relevant again, even in the twilight of the Age of Reagan, they will have toabandontheirM ugwump Mejicanismo. / Ya basta! The nation's largest Hispanic organization needs new leadership and a unified agenda”
Fired back Pena in a lengthy letter which may or may not see the light of day:
“What is it about an Observer job that makes any gringo jackass think he’s become a Patrdn (who can) arrogantly lay down the conditions that must be met if LULAC is to become ‘relevant again.’...
“Mor&n was re-elected to an unprecedented third term by 90% of the delegates at a convention attended by more people than the Observer has paid subscribers.._ Kay ^r^aro
Quoting....
MARIO VASQUEZ RANA,, Mexican media mogul who bought United Press International a year ago, commenting to a Scripps Howard reporter on his efforts to make the long-ailing U.S. news agency profitable:
“I love my country. I was born in aThird World country, butlhavethe mental capacity to be from any country in the world. There are Third World countries, but not Third World men."
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Aug. 17,1987
3


COLLECTING
HISPANIC AGENDAS: The National Council of La Raza has available at no cost the last three Hispanic agendas prepared by the National Hispanic Leadership Conference and presented to past presidential candidates. Contact Raul Yzaguirre of the National Council of La Raza. (See address below.)
AGENDA PARTICIPATORS: The following is a list of the some | key members of the organizations and coalitions forming Hispantel political agendas: ____________________ corners current use
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ENGINEERING MENTOR PROGRAMS: Westinghouse Electric Corp. offers two programs, Spokesperson and Ambassador, to Hispanic and black middle and secondary school students interested in learning about engineering careers and the educational steps necessary for one. The programs provide Westinghouse senior engineers to I speak at schools. To receive a free information packet catered to Hispanics on engineering and technical careers, call 1-800-245-4474. For further information, write to: Corporate Contributions & Community Affairs, Westinghouse Corp., Westinghouse Building, Six Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 (412) 642-3017.
STATISTICS ON YOUTH: “American Youth: A Statistical Snapshot” is a 33-page report detailing a myriad of characteristics on youths, including Latinos, ranging from 16 to 24 years of age. For a free copy, write to: William % Grant Foundation Commission on Youth and America’s Future, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 1001, Washington, D.C. 20036-5541.
CONNECTING
REAGAN HONORS PUERTO RICANS
The National Puerto Rican Coalition recognized 10 prominent Puerto Ricans Aug. 6 fortheir achievements in the continental United States and for providing Puerto Ricans, especially youth, with positive role models.
Seven recipients were honored at a White House ceremony with President Reagan. Pictured with Reagan on page 6 are, from left to right: Diego Hern&ndez, vice admiral and commander of the U.S. Navy’s 3rd Fleet; Nathan Quiftones, New York City public schools chancellor; Efren Ramirez, psychiatrist; NPRC president Louis Nunez; Reagan; Rita Moreno, actress; Rafael Pagan, CEO of Pag&n International, a public policy consulting firm; Sister Isolina Ferr6, community activist and youth advocate; and Jose Cabranes, federal judge for the District of Connecticut.
Those not present to receive their awards were: Juan “Chi Chi” Rodriguez, professional golfer; Marta Casals Istomin, artistic director of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts; and Jos6 Ferrer, actor.
DEADLINE EXTENDED
La Casa de Don Pedro's Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, a series of seminars and workshops designed to help young, professional Hispanics in New Jersey improve their management and leadership skills and gain appointments to local and statewide policy-making boards and commissions, has extended its application deadline to Aug. 21.
The program, funded in main part by the Ford Foundation for $150,000, will begin Sept. 1 and last 15 weeks.
For more information, contact Marco Navarro at (201) 624-4567.
$59.3 MILLION GOES TO FARM WORKERS
The U.S. Department of Labor will grant $59.3 million between now and June 30, 1988, for training and employment services and housing administrative assistance for migrant and seasonal farm workers and their families, it has announced.
Fifty-three organizations in 48 states and Puerto Rico will receive funds to provide training and employment services to economically disadvantaged workers and their families.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
INTELUGENCE/EDUCATIO N CONFERENCE Arlington, Va. Aug. 17
‘The Right to be Intelligent” is a conference sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens of Montgomery County, Md., and several school and community organizations in the Washington, D.C., rnetropolitan area. Venezuela’s first Ministerforthe Development of Human Intelligence Luis Alberto Machado and Warren Simmons of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Bilingual Education will be speaking.
Carlos Guillen (301) 299-8836
FESTIVAL LATINO San Francisco Aug. 19-23
Rajatabia, a Venezuelan theater company, will perform during the second annual Festival Latino sponsored by the Festival Latino Committee in association with the New York Shakespeare Festival. Latino films, plays and music will run in San Francisco and Oakland through Aug. 30.
Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE Milwaukee Aug. 20-21
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson will headline a statewide conference on Hispanic economic development sponsored by the Milwaukee Area Technical College and the Hispianic Chamber of Commerce of Wisconsin. The conference will include 12 workshops on Hispanic economic development, including affirmative action, employer needs and immigration reform. Darrin Pack (414) 278-6623
ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM Miami Aug. 20-22
The Coalition of Minority Women in Business is sponsoring an entrepreneurship program titled “Business Opportunities: Putting All the Pieces Together.” The program, which will be held in several cities, offers an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network and exhibit new products and services. Workshops on international business, home-based business, franchising, marketing and other topics will be held.
Silvia Rodriguez (202) 328-9001
FOURTH ANNUAL HISPANIC FESTIVAL Wichita, Kan. Aug. 22
The Hispanic Women’s Network, made up of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Central American and other Latinas, is sponsoring a Hispanic festival to promote the diversity of cultures in Wichita. The festival is a fundraiser for the group’s scholarship and emergency assistance programs.
Martha Sanchez (316) 267-4201
COMING SOON
HISPANIC ARTS, CULTURE IN RADIO KUVO Radio Denver Aug. 26-28 Florence Hernandez (303) 934-5880
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION National Puerto Rican Forum New York Aug. 27 Lourdes Col6n (212) 685-2311
URBAN FELLOWS CONFERENCE National Urban Fellows Chicago Aug. 27-30 Antonio Delgado (312) 744-9567
TORRES FUNDRAISER Friends of Sen. Art Torres Los Angeles Aug. 29 Lisa Baca (213) 384-9811
SMALL BUSINESS EXPO
Small Business Administration and U.S. Rep. Esteban
Torres
Whittier, Calif. Sept. 2 Bob Alcock (202) 225-5256
HISPANIC ALCOHOLISM CONVENTION South Florida Alcoholics Anonymous Hispanic Groups Miami Sept. 4-6 Juan M. (305) 643-2522
Aug. 17,1987
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GENERAL MANAGER - KUSC-FM
The University of Southern California invites nominations and applications for the position of General Manager of KUSC, the arts and information public radio service of USC, which also owns and operates affiliated stations KCPB/Thousand Oaks, KSCA/Santa Barbara and KPSH/Palm Springs.
The GM has overall responsibility for establishing artistic direction and maintaining stations’ legal, regulatory, and fiscal well-being; leading the program staff in creation, production, and acquisition of classical music and news programs of pre-eminent artistic and journalistic quality; determining and serving needs of stations’ listeners and subscribers; and continuing the development of KUSC as a major production center for radio prog rams of local, regional, and national interest
Requires demonstrated qualities of vision, leadership, and organizational management skills; thorough understanding of the nature and purpose of public broadcasting; ability to relate to varied constituencies and individuals in the many communities served by KUSC; ability to develop and implement successful fundraising strategies; and, preferably, proven track record in developing and/or managing nationally prominent broadcast facility.
Address inquiries, nominations, and applications NLT Aug. 21,1987 to: John R. Curry, VP Budget/Planning; Chair, Search Committee; USC, ADM-150; Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-5012. USC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
The following position closes Thursday, August 20, 1987 at 5 pm.
EEO RECRUITMENT-OUTREACH SPECIALIST (Personnel Department)
Ann. #1805-8A-PER $25,883.52-$28,512.64 Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit targeted populations including minorities, women and disabled persona Duties include identifying potential sources of applicants; developing and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials, community groups, etcx; developing outreach plana ads, brochurea etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis.
Minimum requirementa at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelor’s degree from a recognized college or university in public, business or personnel administration or related field. Knowledge of outreach methods and recruitment sourcea Preferred requirements: Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following: A) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system; B) bilingual capabilities in one or more languages represented in the community.
All applicants must submit an Official County application form. Resumes, SF-171’s, etc., submitted without a completed Official Arlington County application form will NOT be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department by 5 p.m. on the closing date. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th Street Arlington, Va 22201 EOE M/F/H
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Assist in producing a nationally distributed Spanish language newscast Fluent in Spanish/ English and radio production experience. Contact Samuel Orozco, KSJV Radio Bilingue, 1044 Fulton’Mall, #413, Fresno, Calif. 93721 (209) 486-5174.
NEWS ANCHOR - WSNS-TV, Chicago Channel 44, Chicago’s Number 1 Spanish language television station, is looking for an anchor for its ten o’clock newscast, Noticentro. You must be bilingual (Spanish/English) and have had prior television experience.
Please send your resume, picture and sample tape to: ,rene Bermudez
WSNS-TV
430 W. Grant Place Chicago, Illinois 60614 The deadline for submitting your materials is Monday, August 31.
FINANCIAL AID COUNSELOR (Asst to HEO-Substitute)
General financial aid counseling requiring current knowledge of all Federal/State financial aid regulations; serves as liaison to other administrative offices on related issues. BA, min. 2 yrs. exp. req., Master’s pref. Excellent written and verbal communication skills Fluency in French or Chinese desirable. Salary: $23,035/A REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #351 ANDSEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 9/11/87 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy
Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED
RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARYsought by MALDEF. Type 45 wpm. Good grammar and organization required. Good benefits Near subway. Send resume to: MALDEF, 1430 K St NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C. 20005.
WRITER/EDITOR VAC #70496 $22,458 - $29,199 Participates in development and production of nationally distributed print recorded, braille, and broadcast media information materials Plans, researches, coordinates, writes, edits proofreads and monitors productions of publication and informational materials for blind and physically handicapped users of the Library of Congress free reading program, a national network of cooperating libraries, consumer groups and the general public.
Two years of specialized experience demonstrating clear, concise writing and editing of public education, training and informational materials for print and audio-visual formats; marking copy for typesetters printers and other technical personnel; publication layout and pasteup. Bachelor’s degree in English, journalism, communications or a related field.
Submit a Standard Form 171, Application for Federal Employment to:
The Library of Congress Employment Office James Madison Memorial Bldg., LM 107 101 Independence Ave. SE Washington, D.C. 20540 (202) 287-JOBS
WRITING POSITION
New Jersey
Writer to prepare Latin American Spanish teaching materials Native fluency, excellent grammar required. Teaching, editing, or publishing experience helpful. Reply to: Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. N W, Washington, D.C. 20005. Attn: Corporate Classifieds.
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics Washington, D.C., provides • Design • Illustration # Typesetting • layout • silkscreen and • Stats El Barrio Graphics 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY
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Arts& Entertainment
FESTIVAL FILE: The 11 th edition of New York’s Festival Latino continues this week, with extended performances in San Francisco, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and two cities in Mexico.
Produced by Joseph Papp and the New York Shakespeare Festival, this year's event includes several stage performances, a film festival and a free concert in its Aug. 1 -23 schedule.
Already staged was Carlos Morton’s new play Pancho Diablo -about a devil who escapes from hell to become a border patrolman in the United States- with Mexican actor Fernando Allende in his New York debut Mortonwasthe winner of the 1986 New York Shakespeare Festival national contest for Latino plays.
Continuing this week is Mario Vargas Llosa’s La Sehorita Tacna, with Norma Aleandro in the title role. The play runs at New Yorks Public Theater through Aug. 23, travels to San Francisco Aug. 26-30, San Juan Sept 2-6 and Mexico City Sept 9-13.
Other traveling pieces include Las bacantes, a version of Euripides’ Bacchae staged by Spain’s La Cuadra de Sevilla, which closes Aug. 18 in San Francisco and continues on to Mexico City (Aug. 18-25) and Tabasco, Mexico (Aug. 25-31).
Venezuela’s Rajatabla company will move with La tragicomedia de Calisto y Melidea to San Francisco Aug. 17-25 then on to the-two Mexican cities. Argentina’s Comedia Cordopesa and Chile’s Taller Teatro Dos will only travel to Mexico.
Concurrent with the New York event is a film program, at the Public and Metro theaters, with entries from Spain and Latin America Selections from an Argentine film retrospective will also travel to San Francisco and San Juan.
Another Big Apple event, the New York Film Festival, holds a 25th anniversary retrospective of past NYFF entries through Aug 25. Screenings at the Lincoln Center include Ruy Guerra’s Erendira (1983) and Luis Buhuel’s Tristana (1970). Spanish and Latin American films can be expected on the roster of this year's NYFF, scheduled forSept 25 through Oct. 11.
Fifteen Latin American films are scheduled for this weeks International Film Festival in Vevey, Switzerland. Spain’s Mi general, by Jaime de Armindn, and Argentina’s Made in Argentina, by Juan Jos6 Jusig, are entered for competition in the Montreal World Film Festival Aug. 21-Sept1.
Spanish and Latin American films will also screen in film festivals in Venice (Aug. 29-Sept. 9), Biarritz, Spain (Sept. 29- Oct 4), Peru and Acapulco (no dates set yet). - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NEWSPAPER BOYCOTT: The People’s Coalition for Responsible Media, a coalition of Hispanic, black Asian and gay organizations, will meet again with editors from the Rocky Mountain News newspaper in Denver Aug. 18 to discuss the groups concerns and charges of incomplete and biased reporting on minority issues by the newspaper.
The group held its second in a series of meetings on July 23.
The coalition, chaired by John Garcia, the president of Hispanics of Colorado, includes representatives from the League of United Latin American Citizens, the American Gl Forum and National Image.
Garcia told Weekly Report that the group has called a boycott of the paper. He said that the boycott was prompted in part by the paper's coverage and unfairly critical editorials of Mayor Federico Peha during the Denver
mayoral race in May and June.
Garcia said that the editorials were biased, helped develop a“campaigrf forthen-candidate Donald Bain, had undercurrents of racism and that the reports on the elections appeared to take on an editorialized treatment.
He said that the coalition has set two goals: to improve coverage of minority issues and to improve the paper's affirmative action.
“We want a written agreement between the coalition and the Rocky Mountain News,” he told Weekly Report
Garcia said that the boycott is being developed methodically and estimated that the paper has lost anywhere from 800 to 900 subscriptions to date because of it
The Rocky Mountain News’ 1987 report to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission indicates that there are six Hispanics in the paper’s editorial department staff of 175, personnel director Andy Martelon told Weekly Report. That represents 3.4% of the staff. The city of Denver is 18% Hispanic.
TRANSPORTATION MODES: How do
undocumented workers enter the United States? Following the Sierra Blanca, Texas, boxcar tragedy this summer, Houston Chronicle reporter Jo Ann Zuniga checked INS records to determine how such workers were entering the United States in the Laredo area- one of the nation’s busiest border crossing points.
In the period October 1985 through June 1987, nearly 200,000 persons were apprehended. Of those, 39% were picked up crossing the river, 33% were found on freight cars and the balance were caught using other modes of transportation, including vans, trucks, buses and aircraft, she found.
NAMES: Debra Casteldn, formerly
with the Institute for Journalism Education in Berkeley, Calif., has joined the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund in Princeton, N.J., as assistant to the director... Laura Martinez, who was recently dropped as director of promotions for Chicago’s WM AQ- Radio, has lodged a sex and national origin discrimination complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission... - Julio Laboy
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President Reagan honors recipients of the National Puerto Rican Coalition’s Lifetime Achievement Awards at the White House (See Connecting, page 4.)
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Making The News This Week A Vatican spokesman announces that Pope John Paul II will not beatify Father Junlpero Serra, the 18th century priest who founded nine Franciscan missions along the California coast, during his visit to California next month. Beatification is the second of three steps toward sainthood . . . California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Sacramento school teacher Cecilia J im6nez to the California Com mission on Educational Equality . The commission evaluates the educational and fiscal techniques of the state's K-12 system ... New York City Council President Andrew Stein asks the city's board of education to evaluate the performance of city Schools Chancellor Nathan Quiftones for possible replacement Stein was angered at the recent failure of a summer school dropout prevention/jobs program ... Teacher Marfa Gonzalez, 49, is named to fill a vacant seat on the nine-member Hartford, Conn., City Council. The seat has been vacant since Nancy Mel6ndez Burch resig ned in March. Gon zalez must run to retain the seat in November . . . Javier Nava becomes Aug. 10 the first Chicago-area resident to gain approval for the federal legalization program ... Jaime Ernesto Ramirez, an 18year-old, files a $10 million lawsuit against two former Huntington Park, Calif., police officers, charging that they tortured him with jolts from a stun gun. Ramirez says the incident occurred last November when he was sitting in the back of a police car with his hands cuffed behind him. The officers were later dismissed and charged with felonious assault. .. vol.sNo.••l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1987 Latino Groups Huddling_ on '88 National Agenda Hispanic leaders and organizations across the nation are marshaling their forces and laying the groundwork fora national Hispanic agenda to be presented to candidates for the 1988 presidential election. These organizations and ad hoc coalitions. which will attempt to incorporate Mexican , Puerto Rican, Cuban and other Latino group concerns, will be meeting from mid-October through April1988. Two major sessions are planned for Washington, D.C., and one for Chicago . Delegates will network, frame the agenda issues and set dates for their public release. Although there are no formal plans to merge the three agendas, several participants have indicated the desirability of doing so. They readily admit however , that no single document can likely address the concerns of all Hispanic groups, particularly on foreign policy issues. Representatives from most organizations agree that the agenda should focus on do mestic issues such as education, immigration and English-only legislation. Among meetings that have taken place or are planned : e On Aug. 11, a New York delegation of Hispanic leaders, organizations and politicians met in New York City to sharpen their version of an agenda they have been working on for several weeks. The group was brought together by former U . S . Congressman Herman Badillo. • On Oct. 16, the Midwest Voter Regis tration Education Project will meet with invited Hispanic politicians and leaders to write its agenda during itsannualleadershipconference in Chicago . • On Oct 19-20, the League of United Latin American Citizens and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will meet with the New York delegation and possibly other regional groups in Washington to merge the agendas with one being drafted by LULAC. e On April 18-20 , 1988, the National His panic Leadership Conference led by Pablo Sedillo, director of the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs of the U.S. Catholic Conference, and Raul Yzaguirre , . president of the National Council of La Raza, will prepare a refined agenda to present to those candidates still in the race. The NHLC has prepared similar agendas for the last three presidential elections. Oscar Moran, president of LULAC, was quick to point out that the summit his organi zation was taking a lead role in was not being framed solely by Hispanic politicians. "We will cast as wide a net as possible. We will get leaders from education, religion, the political sector, the corporate sector and the community," he said . Hallmark Finalizes SICC Purchase Hallmark Cards Inc. and First Chicago Venture Capital finalized their purchase Aug. 6 of 1 0 Spanish-language television stations formerly owned by the Spanish International Com munications Corporation. The two companies are also buying KDTV in San Francisco from Bahia de San Francisco Television Company. Cost for the 11 stations is more than $300 million. "We feel a long-term commitment to a Spanish-language format," said Hallmark Director of Communications Nancy Matheny , adding that the Federal Communications Commission will only allow a two-year cap on Spanish-language programming decisions. FCC approved the sale of the 1 0 stations in June after a January ruling that ownership by Mexican media mogul Emilio Azcarraga violated a U.S. law limiting toreign ownership of radio and television stations to 20%. "Our mission is to be the foremost Spanish language communications company in the United States, improving the quality of life and economic well-being of U.S. Hispanics through mass media information , education and entertainment," said Irvine Hockaday Jr., president of Hallmark. Hallmark now has a 75% controlling interest in the stations. Many Hispanic leaders and interested Latino investors unsuccessfully tried to block the sale , fearing the stations would convert to English-language broadcasts. Five major stations included in the sale are WXTVin NewYork, LosAngeles' KMEX, KFTV in . Fresno, Calif., WL TV in Miami and KWEX in San Antonio. Denver , Philadelphia, Austin, Texas, Hartford, Conn., and Bakersfield , Calif., are sites of the group's five low-power stations. MVREP has scheduled its agenda summit to coincide with its annual leadership con ference. Headed by Juan Andrade, MVREP has also invited a cross section of Latino groups and leaders from diverse fields. Included are Congressman Esteban Torres, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Denver Mayor Federico Pena, Los Angeles Councilwoman Gloria Molina, Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez and Chicago Alderman Luis Gutierrez. Also invited were such groups as continued on page 2 Legislator Seeks INS Probe of Ezell Talk Comments by U.S. immigration official Harold Ezell that recent Salvadoran death" squad threats in Los Angeles were part of an " orchestrated P.R. campaign" to promote legislation halting the deportation of Salva dorans from the United States have prompted U.S. Rep. Joe Moakley(DMass. ) to request a formal investigation of Ezell. Moakley called for the probe in an Aug . 5 letter to Immigration and Naturalization Ser vice Commissioner Alan Nelson He charged that Ezell, the western regional commissioner , was either privy to information of a crime and jeopardized ongoing investigations by police and the FBI or, "without any evidence, he has presented as fact the wildest of speculation, with the obvious intent of im properly influencing the vote of the House on matters pending before it." A Mexican American priest, Father Luis Olivares, the office of the Guatemalan Con sulate, Central American refugees and Soli darity movement workers have been recipients of "Escuadr6n de Ia Muerte" death threats in Los Angeles. Moakley's legislation would halt deportation of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans for two years while Congress studies human rights abuses in those countries. It passed the House in July and still faces a Senate vote . Nelson, on vacation, has not issued any comment Moakley has threatened to launch his own investigation depending on INS ' response .

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._, L.A. Teachers Union Vote Favors English Immersion The 22,000-member United Teachers Los Angeles llnion. voted Aug . . 7 to support the immersion method of bilingual education, overturning a seven-year union .policy in support of transitional bilingual education, which allows the use of a studenfs native language. "lfs our position, but we are not going to launch attacks on bilingual education," UTLA President Wayne Johnson said after vote results were counted Aug. 12. Johnson inter preted the vote as a reaction to the Los Angeles Unified School Districfs policywhich requires many teachers to join the bilingual program l.Hider a "waiver" system, in which they have seven years to become fluent. Spanish is usually the required language. Several teachers formed the Learning English Advocates Drive to support Englishimmersion classes for all limited-English students and to limit Spanish-language in struction. They forced a referendum which passed on a vote of 5,346 to 1 ,499. UTLA's Chicano Education Committee pre pared a counter-referendum supporting the districf s current use of transit i onal bilingual education programs. It was defeated, 2,831 to 3,944. CEC member and former chair Mark Over street said, " These English-only groups wanted it(the proposal) so they can use it in lobbying the legislature to get the state to move in the same direction." Johnson added, "lfs really a political issue and they've brought it to school campuses in California. I don't think our kids will benefit from it , our organization isn't going to benefit from it and I don't think our teachers will, either. " On July 24, California Gov. George Deuk-Three National Agendas Shaping Up continued from page 1 the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, LULAC, NCLR, the National Puerto Rican Forum and the Miami-based Cuban American National Council. Tony Bonilla, head of another " National Hispanic Leadership Conference," incorporated in Texas, said his group also expects to be working with Andrade . A national Hispanic agenda first received wide publicity at LULAC ' s June convention in Corpus Texas. The concept was broached by Cisneros. Eight presidential aspirants attended the conference . Most enthusiastically embraced the idea. Moran said the agenda to be intiated at the October Washington summit will be ready before the first presidential primaries in March 1988. He added that the candidates would not be placed in a "quandary'' if presented with more than one agenda. "If anything, the agendas will enhance each other. The can didates will hear a very loud and clear voice. " manageable. Elvira Castillo, director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said despite some regional, economic and political differences among Latinos, "as an ideal, the agenda can be done. " . Moran commented, "We may not include everybody but many people will be surprised when they see the wide representation at the summit in Washington." The two dozen New York Hispanic leaders who met Aug . 11 agreed to meet again in two to three weeks to f i nalize their proposed agenda and mail it to area organizations and leaders. NCLR President Yzaguirre said that the April National Hispanic Leadership Conference already includes such groups as the National Puerto Rican Coalition, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed OffiCials , LULAC and CANC. He expects about 20 groups to participate. He said that other organizations , including the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, were soon to be invited . By then, he said, "Hopefully the field will have narrowed to one or two candidates from each party. Therefore, we will have a much better , more in-depth dialogue with whomever emerges." -Julio Laboy and Felix Perez mejian vetoed a bilingual education extension bill. While the state will continue to provide funds for bilingual education, each district will be responsible for setting its own guide lines. Previously, a bilingual teacher was required for any class in which 10 or more students did not speak English. More than half of Los Angeles school districfs560,000 students are Hispanic and the district has more pupils in bilingual any other district in the United States. "A lot of teachers have a misunderstanding of bilingual education, its methods arid the<>"" ries," Overstreet. said, adding many teachers voted to support immersion because of the districfs requirements for bilingual certification. "There was a lot of resentment," Johnson said. "The children are the victims of this war." Melinda Machado FLOC Negotiates Pact for Ohio Farm Workers The Farm Labor Organizing Committee, based in Toledo, Ohio, signed Aug. 6 a three year contract with Vlasic Foods Inc. and 24 of its Ohio vegetable growers, raising the number of state cucumber pickers and growers covered by FLOC collective bargaining agreements to more than half. Vlasic itself has 64 growers in Ohio . FLOC's contract increases wages 4% and provides pay bonuses for about 650 migrant workers presently covered by the contract. There are approximately 50,000 migrant workers in the .upper midwest. During the five-week cucumber harvest season, they earn about $250-$300 a week. The contract covers wages, housing and health care. "The cost for signing contracts is not coming out of the growers' pockets," Mary Templin , FLOC office manager , told Weekly Report. " The money is being paid by the companies. Incentives in the plan will benefit the growers." The contract is the fourth that the union has negotiated with growers and processors since early 1986. In total, the contracts cover about 2 ,700 workers and 78 growers of cucumbers and tomatoes in Ohio and Michigan. Mary Brunette, the deputy press secretary for candidate Jack Kemp ( R-N.Y. ) , told Weekly Report that she was sure Kemp would meet with Hispanic leaders to try to incorporate some of their concerns into his platform . Representatives from other Republican and Democratic candidates' camps have indicated similar interest to Latino political and organi zational leaders. L.A. Aids City Worker Legalization While several Latino leaders surveyed by Weekly Report felt that composing a nat i onal Hispanic agenda was difficult at best, they all agreed that the effort was worthwhile and Jobless Rate Falls Again The Hispan ic unemployment rate dropped to 7 . 9 % i n July from 8 .5% in June, the fourth consecutive month of decline, according to figures released Aug. 7 by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau o f Labor Statistics. The number of jobless Latinos fell from 722,000 to 667,000 la st mon t h . 2 Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley announced Aug . 5 a program to help undocumented city employees apply for le ga lization under the fe deral immigration law . Bradleywas"concerned that they(employees) should be prov ided information in an orderly basis," a spokesnia' n said. Nearly 17% of Los Angeles' 4 2 , 092 employees are Hispanic. T he city program wi ll allow employees to receive immediate written documentation of their work history on a confidential basis. Richard Alarcon, p resident of t he Los Angeles City Employees Chicano Association, told Weekly Report that although the number of undocumented Hispanic city employees was probably small, he hoped that the program would serve as a model for other empl o yers and municipalities. Minority employee associations , particularly those that represent Hispan ics and A sia ns , will provide referral serv i ces. The Los Ange l es office of the Mexican America n Legal Defense and Edu cational Fund will advise the employee associations on how best to structure the program. Hispani c Link Weekl y Report

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Miguel Perez, guest columnist The Secret Agenda At first, they wanted a commitment of complete silence. was not to divulge any information obtained from a meeting in which a group of New York Latinos were secretly draftingwithout informing or consulting their community-a "national Hispanic agenda. " The agenda was to be used to pressure presidential candidates to address Latino issues in 1988. When I entered a conference room in lower Manhattan on the morning of July 28, former U .S. Congressman Herman Badil crony of Mario Cuomo , read me the rules . For someone who went there as a journalist, the rules were unacceptable , especially since through my own sources I had already obtained the document they were reviewing. But they agreed to let me stay so long as I agreed not to write about the specifics of their discussions. Don't worry, you didn't miss much . Although the document has a lot of potential, the meeting was a tedious discussion to revise the agenda's language . The idea of drafting a national Latino agenda is a great one. I wrote my own my York Daily News column in 1984 when the presidential candidates were ignoring Latino issues . WHAT IF AGENDA HADN'T BEEN LEAKED? Even in a mere column, though, I had the sense to ask for community input for preparing my agenda, and I drafted it with letters from readers. If the draft of this new agenda had not been leaked, Badillo's hand picked committee would have kept it a secret for who knows how long. Perhaps until they go to Washington in October to negotiate with other Latinos from around the country on behalf of a community they haven't even consulted . Of the meeting, one explained, "lfs not secret. lfs private . " They say the group is still expanding, but they have not sought an open forum with all Latino leaders in the city. They tell you that other groups of Latinos, especially the Cubans from Florida and the Chicanos from the Southwest, will have their input when all of the groups meet in Washington . But if Dominicans, Colqmbians other Latinos don't get some input in New York, where will they get it? At the Badillo meeting, the people who stood out were the people who weren't there. Even if the group doesn't have the time to take their agenda to public hearings, as they claim, you would think that they would have included representatives from many community based organizations that have closer ties with the people in the barrios. IMPOSSIBLE TO AVOID STIGMA But here they were, Badillo's old vanguard, an elitist group of Puerto Ricans, voting on every item on their agenda as if they each had their own constituency. However, although a few work for Mario Cuomo , not all of them are government hacks and political opportunists. Some of them were there because they sincerely believe that working on a Latino agenda is better than not doing anything at all . Unfortunately, with Badillo leading the troops, it will become impossible for them to avoid the stigma, right or wrong, that this is a Badillo agenda Although they have set off on the wrong course, they still have time to set the sails straight by bringing in the grass roots leadership, from Puerto Rican to all other Latinos, which has been excluded . Some members of the group have vested interests and others clearly have good intentions. They tell you that they are doing it in private with a small number of people because they can accomplish more that way. They tell you that they are "trying to do a good thing." But that was the pretext used by many of our Latin ancestors when they led or conformed to totalitarian regimes. When they decide for the people in secret meetings, even dictators say they are "trying to do a good thing." (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua ARE YOU ALIVE? Look out of the window. Is there still a world out there? Trees dripping acid dew? Barking dogs? Grouchy Anglo neighbors who complain when we party late? If so , Jose Arguelles was wrong. Dr. Arguelles , an art historian and stargazer who resides in Boulder , Colo., has been predicting that Sunday, Aug. 16, would "a-.... .,,A"''d. at least the beginning of the end, torus all._!:!_: Section missing from original and the general public. -----_ _ , _ , • Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital, came at the completion of a 52-year cycle. And the ninth 52-year cycle since Cortes' arrival ended on Sunday . Arguelles, the Times explained, gives special significance to the number nine because, in the olden days, there were nine levels of the underworld through which the dead had to descend. Oh, what a beautiful morning! Sunday passed without so much as a poof. Considering Dr. Arguelles' alternative, acid dew, barking dogs and grouchy neighbors aren't so bad after all. OBSERVING, TEXA&STYLE: Eduardo Pefta, former president of the League of United Latin American Citizens and current board chairman of the LULAC Foundation, isn't as _ happy as we are. He is upset with the coverage of LULAC's recent convention in the biweekly Texas Observer, a publication which has never been noted for its objectivity in reporting on the Latino role in the Lone Star state. Observer writer Louts Duboae took LULAC's leadership to task in its July 17 edition, challenging, "They cannot rail against Reagan and (Texas Gov. William) Cleme.-. e Republican like Oscar Mor6n to lead their organization ... LULAC, though always a middle class and assimilatlonist organization, played an important part in the demise of Jim Crow, particularly in Texas. Butto be relevant again, even in the twilight of the Age of Reagan, they will have to abandon their Mugwump Mejicanismo 1 Ya basta! The nation's largest Hispanic organization needs new leadership and a unified agenda" Fired back Perla in a lengthy letter which may or may not see the light of day: "What is it about an Observer job that makes any gringo jackass think he's become a Patr6n (who can) arrogantly lay down the conditions that must be met if LULAC is to become 'relevant again.' ... "Moran was re-elected to an unprecedented third term by90% of the delegates at a convention attended by more people than the Observer has paid subscribers ... " _ Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • • MARIO VASQUEZ RANA,, Mexican media mogul who bought United Press International a year ago, commenting to a Scripps Howard reporter on his efforts to make the long-ailing U.S . news agency profitable : "/love my country. I was born in a Third World country, but I have the mental capacity to be from any country in the world. There are Third World countries, but not Third World men . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report Aug. 17. 1987 3

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COLLECTING HISPANIC AGENDAS: The National Council of La Raza has available at no cost the last three Hispanic agendas prepared by the National Hispanic Leadership Conference and presented to oast presidential candidates. Contact Raul Yzaguirre of the National Counci l of La Raza . (See address below. ) 1 CONNECTING REAG A N H ONORS PUERTO R ICAN S The National Puerto Rican Coal ition recognized 10 prominent Puerto Ricans Aug . 6 for their achievements in the continental United States and for providing Puerto Ricans, especially youth , with positive role models. AGENDA PARTICIPATORS: The following is a list of the some key members of the organizations and coalitions forming Hispanir_, Seven recipients were honored at a White House ceremony with _____ _ _ ---v uo,-,uii.:;TSCUrrentuse • President Reagan. Pictured with Reagan on page 6 are, from left to right: Diego Hernandez, vice admiral and commander of the U.S . Navy's 3rd Fleet; Nathan Quinones, New York City public schools chancellor, Efren Ramirez, psychiatrist; NPRC president Louis Nunez ; Reagan; Rita Moreno, actress; Rafael Pagan , CEO of Pagan International, a public policy consulting firm ; Sister lsolina Ferre, community activist and youth advocate; and Jose Cabranes, federal judge for the Section missing from original . , District of Connecticut. Those not present to receive their awards were: Juan "Chi Chi" il Rodriguez, professional golfer, Marta Casals lstomin, artistic director i4 of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts ; and Jose : I Ferrer, actor. DEADLINE EXTENDED ENGINEERING MENTOR PROGRAMS: Westinghouse Electric Corp . offers two programs , Spokesperson and Ambassador, to Hispanic and black middle and secondary school students interested in learning about engineering careers and the educational steps necessary for one. The programs provide Westinghouse senior engineers to speak at schools. To receive a free information packet catered to Hispanics on engineering and technical careers, call 1-800-2454474. For further information, write to: Corporate Contributions & Community Affairs, Westinghouse Corp. , Westinghouse Building, Six Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 (412) 642-3017. La Casa de Don Pedro's Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program , a series of seminars and workshops designed to help young, profes sional Hispanics in New Jersey improve their management and leadership skills and gain appointments to local and statewide policy-making boards and commissions, has extended its application deadline to Aug . 21. The program , funded in main part by the Ford Foundation for $150,000, will begin Sept. 1 and last 15 weeks. For more information, contact Marco Navarro at (201) 624-4567. $59.3 MILLION GOES TO FARM WORKERS The U . S . Department of Labor will grant $59.3 million between now and June 30, 1988, for training and employment services and housing administrative assistance for migrant and seasonal farm workers and their families , it has announced. STATISTICS ON YOUTH: "American Youth: A Statistical Snapshof' is a 33-pag e report detailing a myriad of characteristics on youths, including Latinos, ranging from 16 to24 years of age. Fora free copy, write to: William . T . Grant Foundation Commission on Youth and America's Future, 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 1001, Washington , D .C. 20036-5541. . . Fifty-three organizations in 48 states and Puerto Rico will rece i ve funds to provide training and employment services to economically disadvantaged workers and their families. .:, THIS WEEK fNTELLIGENCE/EDUCATION CONFERENCE Arlington, Va. Aug . 1 7 ' ' The Right to be lntelligenf ' is a conference sponsored t'ly the League of United Lati n American Citizens of Montgomery Co!Jnty , Md. , and several school and community organizations in the Washington, D .C., metropolita n area . Venezuela ' s first Ministerforthe Development of Human Intelligence Luis Alberto Machado and Warren Simmons of the U . S . Depart ment of Education' s Office of Bilingual Education will be speaking. Carlos Guillen (301) 299 FESTWAL LATINO San Francisco Aug . 19 Raja tabla, a Venezuelan theater company , will perform during the second annual Festival Latino sponsored by the Festival Latino Committee in association with the New York Shakespeare Festival . Latino films , plays and music will run in San Francisco and Oakland through Aug. 30. Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE Milwaukee Aug . 20 4 San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and Wisconsin Gov . Tommy Thompson will headline a statewide conference on Hispanic economic development sponsored by the Milwaukee Area Technical College and the H ispanic Chamber of Commerce of Wisconsin. The conference will include 12 workshops on His panic economic development, including affirmative action , employer needs and immigration reform . Darrin Pack (414) 278 ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM Miami Aug . 20 The Coalit i on of Minority Women in Business is an entrepreneurship program titled " Business Opportunities: Putting All the Pieces Together . " The program , which will be held in several cities, offers an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network and exh ibit new products and serv ices. Workshops on international business, home-based business , franchising , marketing and other topics will be held. Silvia Rodriguez (202 ) 328 FOURTH ANNUAL HISPANIC FESTIVAL Wichita, Kan . Aug . 22 The Hispanic Women ' s Network, made u p of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Central American and other Latinas, is sponsoring a Hispanic festival to promote the diversity of cultures in Wichita . The festival is a fundraiser for the group's scholarship and emergency assistance programs . Martha Sanchez (316) 267 Aug. 17. 1987 COMING SOON HISPANIC ARTS, CULTURE IN RADIO KUVO Radio Denver Aug . 26 Florence Hernandez (303) 934 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION . . National Puerto Rican Forum New York Aug . 27 Lourdes Colon (212) 685 URBAN FELLOWS CONFERENCE National Urban Fellows Chicago Aug . 27 Antonio Delgado (312) 7 44 TORRES FUNDRAISER Friends of Sen . Art Torres Los Angeles Aug . 29 Lisa Baca (21 3) 384 SMALL BUSINESS EXPO Small Business Administration and U.S. Rep . Esteban Torres Whittier, Calif. Sept. 2 Bob Alcock (202) 225 HISPANIC ALCOHOLISM CONVENTION South Flor ida Alcoholics Anonymous Hispanic Groups Miami Sept. 4 Juan M . (305) 6432522 Hispanic Link Weekly "'eport

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS The University of Southern California invites nominations and applications for the position of General Manager of KUSC , the arts and information public radio service of USC , which also own sand operates affiliated s tations KCPB/Thousand Oaks, KSCNSanta Barbara and KPSH/Palm Springs. The GM has overall responsibility for. establishing artistic direction and maintaining stations' legal , regulatory, and fiscal leading the program staff in creation, production, and acquisition of classical music and news programs of pre-eminent art isti c and journalistic quality; determining and serving needs of stations' listeners and subscribers; and continuing the development of KUSC as a major production center for radio programs of local , regional, and national interest. Requires demonstrated qualities of vision, leadership, and organizational management skills ; thorough understanding of the nature and purpose of public broadcasting; ability to relate to varied constituencies and individuals in the many communities served by KUSC ; ability to develop and implement successful fundraising strategies; and, preferably, proven track record in developing and/or managing nationally prominent broadcast fac ility. Address inquiries, nominations, and applications NLT Aug . 21,1987 to: John R. Curry, VP BudgeVPianning; Chair, Search Committee; USC , ADM-150; Los Angeles, Calif . 900895012. USC is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. The following position closes Thursday, August 20, 1987 at 5 p .m. EEO RECRUITMENT-OUTREACH SPECIALIST (Personnel Department) Ann.# 1805 8A-PER $25,883.52-$28,512. 64 Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit tar geted populations including minorities, women and disabled persons. Duties include identify ing potential sources of applicants; developing and ma intaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials , com munity groups, etc. ; developing outreach plans, ads , brochures, etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis. Minim urn requirements: at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelo(s degree from a recognized college or university in public , business or personnel administration o r related field. Knowledge of outreach methods and recruitment sources. Preferred requirements: Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following: A) experience working in an organization op e rating under a merit system; B) bilingual capabilities in one or more languages re presented in the community. All applicants must submit an Official County a p plicatio n form. Resumes, SF-171 's , etc. , submitted without a completed Official Arli ng ton County application form will NOT be acce pted. Applications must be r e ceived into the Personnel Department by 5 p .m. on the cl o s in g dat e . To request appli c ation material , please call (70 3 ) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired o nly) . ARLINGTON COUNTY P e r sonnel D e p artment 2100 N . 1 4th Street Arlington , Va. 22201 EOE M /F/H PRO DUCTION ASSISTANT Assist i n producing a nationall y distributed S panish language newscast. F l uent in Span is h / E ngli s h and radio production experience. Contact Sa muel Orozco, KSJV Radio Bil ingue, 1044 F ulton Ma ll , #413, Fresno, Calif. 93721 (209) 486-5174. Hispanic Link Weekl y Report NEWS ANCHOR-WSN5-TV, Chicago Channel 44, Chicago' s Number 1 Spanish language television station, is looking for an anchor for its ten o'clock newscast, Noticentro. You must be bilingual (Spanish/English) and have had prior television experience. Please send your resume , picture and sample tape to: Irene Be rmudez WSNS-TV 430 W . Grant Place Chicago, Illinois 60614 The deadline for submitting your materials is Monday, August 31. FINANCIAL AID COUNSELOR (Asst. to HED-Substitute) General financial aid counseling requiring current knowledge of all FederaVState financial aid regulations; serves as liaison to other ad ministrative offices on related issues . BA, min . 2 yrs . exp. req., Maste(s pref. Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Fluency in French or Chinese desirable . Salary: $23,035/ A REFERTOBMCCVACANCY#351 ANDSEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 9/11/87 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy D i rector o f Personn e l Borough of Manhattan Community College/ CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY / AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER I RCA VERIFICATION REQU I RED HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING TH E U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story e National News R o und up e Calen dar e Names Making N e ws e Guest C o lumn e Coll e cting e C on necting e Media Report e Arts& Ent er tainment e Editorial Cartoon e Sin Pel os en /a Lengua e Marketplace RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY sought by MALDEF. Type 45 wpm. Good grammar and organizati on required. Good benefits. . Near subway. Send resume to: MALDEF, 1430 K St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C . 20005. WRITER/EDITOR VAC #70496 $22,458-$29,199 Participates in development and production of nationally distributed print, recorded, braille, and broadcast media information materials. Plans, researches, coordinates, writes, edits, proofreads and monitors productions of cation and informational materials for blind and physically handicapped users of the Library of Congress free reading program , a national net of cooperating libraries, consumer groups, and the general public Two years of specialized experience demon strating clear, concise writing and editing of public education, training and informational materials for print and audio-visual formats; marking copy for typesetters, printers, and other technical person net publication layout and paste up. Bachelor's degree in English, journalism, communications, or a relatec:l field. Submit a Standard Form 171, Application for Federal Employment to: The Library of Congress, Employment Office James Madison Memorial B ldg. , LM 107 101 Independence Ave . SE Washington, D.C. 20540 (202) 287-JOBS WRITING POSITION New Jersey Writer to prepare Latin American Spanish teaching materials. Native fluency, excellent grammar required. Teaching, editing , or publish ing experience helpful. Reply to: Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. Attn : Corporate Classifieds. GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Wash l ngtOI\ D . C., provides: • Design • Illustration e Type setting • layout • sllkscreen and e Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irv i ng St NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483-7755. SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION ' S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address-----------City, state, zip 0 Start 13-week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subsc r i pti o n $96 0 Check enclosed 0 Bill m e 0 Bill m y org a ni zat ion M ail to: Hispan ic Link News Se rvice 1420 N Street N W W a shingto n , D.C. 20005 ( 2 0 2 ) 234 0737 5

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Arts & Entertainment Venezuela's Rajatabla company will move with La tragicomedia de Calisto y Me/idea to San Francisco Aug. 17-25 then on to the. two Mexican cities. Argentina's Comedia Cordopesa and Chile's Taller Teatro Dos will only travel to Mexico. FESTIVAL FILE: The 11th edition of New York's Festival Latino continues this week, with extended performances in San Francisco, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and two cities in Mexico. Concurrent with the New York event is a film program, at the Public and Metro theaters, with entries from Spain and Latin America tions from an Argentine film retrospective will also travel to San Francisco and San Juan. Produced by Joseph Papp and the New York Shakespeare Festival, this year's event includes several stage performances, a film festival and a free concert in its Aug. 1-23 schedule. Another Big Apple event, the New York Film Festival, holds a 25th anniversary retrospective of past NYFF entries through Aug . 25. Screen ings at the Lincoln Center include Ruy Guerra's Erendira (1983) and Luis Buiiuel's Tristana (1970) . Spanish and Latin American films can be expected on the roster of this year's N YFF, scheduled for Sept. 25 through Oct. 11. Already staged was Carlos Morton's new play Pancho Diabloabout a devil who escapes from hell to become a border patrolman in the United States-with Mexican actor Fernando Allende in his New York debut. Morton was the winner of the 1986 New York Shakespeare Festival national contest for Latino plays. Continuing this week is Mario Vargas Llosa's La Senorita Tacna, with Norma Aleandro in the title role . The play runs at New York's Public Theater through Aug. 23, travels to San Francisco Aug. 26-30, San Juan Sept. 2-6 and Mexico City Sept. 9-13 . Other traveling pieces include Las bacantes, a version of Euripides' Bacchae staged by Spain's La Cuadra de Sevilla, which closes Aug . 18 in San Francisco and continues on to Mexico City (Aug. 18-25) and Tabasco, Mexico (Aug. 25-31 ) . Fifteen Latin American films are scheduled for this week's International Film Festival in Vevey, Switzerland. Spain ' s Mi general, by Jaime de Armimin, and Argentina's Made in Argentina, by Juan Jose Jusig, are entered for competition in the Montreal World Film Festival Aug . 21-Sept.1. Media Report NEWSPAPER BOYCOTT: The People's Coalition for Responsible Media, a coalition of Hispanic, black, Asian and gay organizations, will meet again with editors from the Rocky Mountain News newspaper in Denver Aug . 18 to discuss the group's concerns and charges of incomplete and biased reporting on minority issues by the newspaper. The group held its second in a series of meetings on July 23. The coalition, chaired by John Garcia, the president of Hispanics of Colorado , includes representatives from the League of United Latin American Citizens, the American Gl Forum and National Image. Garcia told Weekly Report that the group has called a boycott of the paper . He said that the boycott was prompted in part by the paper's coverage and unfairly critical editorials of Mayor Federico Peiia during the Denver HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-Q737 ..;'<' Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza ........ Editor. Felix Perez . . .• Reportinq : Charlie Encksen, Antomo MeJ•as-Renfl!S Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre . Graphics / Production: Carlos Arrien . Zoila Elias No portion of Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesdavwi ll run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rate s on request. Spanish and Latin American films will also screen in film festivals in Venice (Aug. 29-Sept. 9), Biarritz, Spain (Sept. 29Oct. 4), Peru and Acapulco (no dates set yet) . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas mayoral race in May and June. Garcia said that the editorials were biased, helped develop a "campaign'' for then-candidate Donald Bain, had undercurrents of racism and that the reports on the elections appeared to take on an editorialized treatment. He said that the coalition has set two goals: to improve coverage of minority issues and to improve the paper's affirmative action. "We want a written agreement between the coalition and the Rocky Mountain News," he told Weekly Report. Garcia said that the boycott is being devel oped methodically and estimated that the paper has lost anywhere from 800 to 900 subscriptions to date because of it. The Rocky Mountain News' 1987 report to the U .S. Equal Employment Opportunity Corn mission indicates that there are six Hispanics in the paper's editorial department staff of 175, personnel director Andy Martelon told Weekly Report. That represents 3 . 4% of the staff. The city of Denver is 18% Hispanic . TRANSPORTATION MODES: How do undocumented workers enter the United States? Following the Sierra Blanca, Texas, boxcar tragedy this summer, Houston Chronicle reporter JoAnn Zuniga checked INS records to determine how such workers were entering the United States in the Laredo area-one of the nation's busiest border crossing points. In the period October 1985 through June 1987, nearly 200,000 persons were appre hended. Of those, 39% were picked up cross ing the river, 33% were found on freight cars and the balance were caught using other modes of transportation , including vans, trucks, buses and aircraft, she found. NAMES: Debra Castelan, formerly with the Institute for Journalism . Education in Berkeley , Calif . , has joined the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund in Princeton , N.J. , as assis tant to the director. . . Laura Martinez, who was recently dropped as director of promotions for Chicago's WMAO Radio , has lodged a sex and national origin discrimination complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. . . -Julio Laboy President Reagan honors recipients of the National Puerto Rican Coalition's Lifetime Achievement Awards at the White House (See Connecting, page 4.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report