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Hispanic link weekly report, August 24, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 24, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Malang The News This Week
After eight years as its founding chief, H6ctor Barreto of Kansas City, Mo., resigns as president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Aug 22 to devote more time to his business and family... Jorge Samaniego, Cuba-born dancer who choreographed the Public Broadcasting Service’s Romeo and Juliet in 1981, dies at age 40 of AIDS in Los Angeles... In the recent Chicago deluge, Jos6 Arellano, 26, drowns in his flooded basement when its windows burst inward and water rushes in to ceiling level... The parents of Leonard Falc6n, 19, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., file a $3 million claim against San Bernardino County for their son’s April 7 death. The young man was shot while playing Lazer Tag with friends in a dark schoolyard when a deputy sheriff, mistaking his toy pistol for a real
gun, shot him. . . On his way home from viewing “Robocop,” Chicagoan Victor Guzm6n, 48, grabs the gun of a wounded state trooper and holds two suspects at bay until more police arrive... Walking out of a New York deli, Marla NCihez, 39-year-old mother of five, is shot to death by deranged Alberto Diaz, 31, who grabbed her as a hostage as he ran from police. Diaz then shot himself in the head.. Texas Gov. Bill Clements appoints Ernesto Ancira to the Board of Directors of the new state Department of Commerce. He is from San Antonio... Miami businessman Carlos P6rez flies to Washington, D.C., to deliver petitions of support bearing 60,000 signatures, to his friend Oliver North... Actor Jimmy Sm its, honored June 17 with an Imagin award for the positive images he and the NBOTV series, “LA. Law’’ provide Latino youth, is arrested Aug. 10 for battery against three police officers who went to his home in response to a “woman screaming” report Smits’ girlfriend, Juanita Cruz, is also booked...

Hispanic State Commissions Cut Back to 18
A 50-state Weekly Report survey updating a review it conducted three years ago has found that the number of Latino state-level commissions designed to help identify and address community concerns is declining.
Major Latino-populated states such as New Mexico (37%), California (19%) and Arizona (16%) still have no such advisory bodies. Texas (21%) is just now forming one.
Of 18 commissions now in existence, eight
RNHA Set to Restructure
Members of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly will hold a constitutional convention in Washington, D.C., Aug. 29, following more than three months of meetings to settle internal leadership differences.
AMblue ribbon” committee has been meeting intermittently since April 28, after many RNHA members challenged the validity of the February re-election of its chairman, Fernando de Baca
Convention participants will revise the constitution and set a date for new elections, said Edward Lujdn, chairman of the blue ribbon committee.
Church of Santeria Opens
A church of santeria, a hybrid of Catholicism and the worship of ancient African gods which claims 300,000 adherents in the Caribbean and elsewhere, conducted formal opening ceremonies in Hialeah, Fla, Aug. 16.
The church, Lukumi Babalu Aye, has been vigorously opposed by the community there because its rituals include the sacrifice of small animals. Five protesters picketed the opening.
Church president Ernesto Pichardo told reporters that the Hialeah church has more than 300 members. With reporters excluded, two dozen entered its door to beat drums and chant at the opening.
Pichardo declined to say when ceremonies involving animal sacrifice would be conducted. Their ritual slaughter, unless they are consumed, was recently ruled illegal by the Florida Attorney General’s office.
are in states with less than 2% Hispanic population. And, claim critics, many active panels serve the political interests of their creators more than the community itself.
The new national canvass revealed:
• Between 1984 and 1987, four of 20 states with such advisory units - Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and Wisconsin - have disbanded them.
• Two new states- Idaho along with Texas
- have established commissions and are in the process of finalizing their funding.
• Ten states with commissions - Delaware, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Utah and Washington
- have increased funding for their Hispanic advisory bodies since 1984.
• Three- Iowa, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania
- cut back on funds.
• Florida, Michigan and New Jersey are funded at their 1984 levels.
The commissions, or committees or councils, as they are called in some states, are formed by a governor’s executive order or by the legislature to serve as a liaison between the Hispanic community and state government
Most conduct studies on Hispanic concema They advise the governor or legislature on the impact of state proposals on their com-
Panel Backs Reunification
By a 5-1 vote, the El Paso, Texas, City Council Aug. 18 passed a resolution supporting two family reunification amendments to the 1986 immigration bill.
The House resolutions were introduced by Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) on March 25. They call fora waiver of continuous residency requirements for spouses and children of those qualifying for legalization and for the parents of children born in the United States between the cutoff date of Jan. 1,1982, and the act’s effective date of Nov. 6,1986.
According to Carlos Spector Calderbn, cochair of the Texas League of United Latin American Citizens’ immigration committee, who is urging such actions, the city councils of Houston, Laredo and San Antonio are also considering resolutions in support of Roybaf s amendments.
munity and provide a political conduit for local Hispanic organizations to the statehouse.
New Jersey’s Office of Hispanic Affairs also has authority to grant $1 million in state and federal funds to Latino organizations in that state.
Some commissions have claimed success in such matters as helping thwart nativist bills forbidding the use of non-English languages.
The survey showed that the commissions have staffs ranging from no persons (Delaware and Massachusetts) to seven (New York). Their boards average about 12 members each, with newcomer Texas planning the biggest, 35 members.
Their budgets range from $2,500 in Delaware - up from $1,500 three years ago- to $345,000 in New York, up from $150,000 three years ago. Most are in the $60,000 - $150,000 range.
The commissions, especially those created
continued on page 2
Su&rez to Run Again, Quarrels with Carollo
Miami Mayor Xavier SuArez announced Aug. 14 that he will seek a second term. He challenged his chief critic, Joe Carollo, to run against him - “if he has the guts” -rather than seek re-election as a Miami commissioner.
Carollo responded with his own challenge: a three-round boxing match at the Orange Bowl, with proceeds going to help the poor.
Carollo^ who as a commissioner has blocked some of Su&rez’s initiatives, added that the job of mayor would probably take too much time away from his personal security business.
Sudrez, who has endured Carolltfsfrequent taunts silently for two years, called the commissioner an “embarrassment” to the city, saying that it was“an important task for Miamians to make sure that Carollo is not re-elected.”
So far, two candidates have challenged the 38-year-old mayor, attorney Arthur Teele Jr. and military school owner Evaristo Marina Neither is viewed as a major threat.


Quinones Will Quit, Search for Replacement Starts
Names of qualified Hispanic candidates to replace New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quihones are expected to be presented next month to the board of education. Quihones announced on Aug. 13 that he plans to step down Jan. 1.
“We will have a meeting of Hispanic elected officials and try to present some names,” Assemblyman Angelo Del Toro told Weekly Report The meeting will probably take place after Labor Day, he said.
Hern&n La Fontaine, Superintendent of Schools in Hartford, Conn, Peter Nigroni, Superintendent of Community School District 12 in the Bronx and former deputy chancellor Alfredo Mathews are some names mentioned as possible Hispanic candidates.
The New York Alliance for Black Educators has already called for the appointment of Adelaide Sanford, a black State Board of Regents member, to the post.
The board should announce by Aug. 24 how the search for a new chancellor will be conducted.
Quihones’ departure leaves the New York public schools with no Hispanics at the high administrative levels. The seven-member Board of Education is also without a single Latino member. One black serves on it
Eighty percent of the 939,142 students in the country’s biggest public school system are minority. As of October 1986, Hispanics were 34% of the student population with 318,431, blacks numbered 358,254 or38.1 %, and whites were 200,089 or 21%.
Del Toro called the chancellor’s position a “criticaf'’ one for Hispanics. “It is our children who suffer the most. We have the largest number of dropouts, the largest number of underachievers in reading. We need a chancellor who understands the problems and needs of Hispanic children,” he said.
Chancel lorsince May 1984, Quihones, 56, will retire six months before his contract expires. He had recently come underfire for problems in the district, including dropout rates and summer job programs that did not meet expectations.
New York Mayor Ed Koch tried to convince Quihones to remaia “ I think that we’ re losing a first-rate chancellor,” Koch said. “I think he was on the right track. I only regret that others were not supportive of him.”
A 30-year veteran of the school system, Quihones was executive director of the system’s Division of High Schools when he was chosen to succeed Chancellor Anthony Alvarado, the first Puerto Rican to serve as such. Alvarado resigned after 10 months following much publicity concerning large sums of money he had borrowed from subordinates.
- Melinda Machado
Hispanic State Commissions Decline
Seven Latinos Win 13 Pan Am. Medals
After ten days of competition, the 1987 Pan American Games in Indianapolis brought the glory of victory home to seven Spanish-sumamed U.S. competitors as they totaled six gold medals, two silver medals and five bronze medals. At press time, the gold medal winners:
Mario Martinez, three medals in weighlifting, 242 1/2 lb. weight class: medals in clean and jerk event, snatch and overall standings.
Tracy Ruiz-Conforto, two medals in synchronized swimming solo event and overall standings.
Mike Gonzalez, one medal: decathlon.
The two silver medals were won by Rojelio Arredondo in shooting: team rapid fire pistol and rapid fire pistol, 25 meter event.
The five bronze medals went to: Roberto Urrutia, who defected from Cuba in 1980, three medals in weightlifting, 165 lb-weight class: clean and jerk, snatch and overall standings James Martinez, one medal in wrestling 149.5 lb weight class and Brenda Nyil Rodriguez, one medal in roller skating: 10,000 meter speed event.
The Puerto Rican team had won a total of 16 medals: two gold, three silver, 11 bronze.
The festive spirit of the games was marred Aug. 14 when anti-Castro demonstrators became involved in a violent altercation with members of the Cuban boxing team. Members of the team charged up into the stands during a boxing event to confront members of the Cuba Independiente y Democratica, after the anti-Castro group allegedly stepped on and tore the Cuban flag.
The Cuban American National Foundation, based in Washington, D.C., distributed cards to the Cuban contingent with the telephone numbers of local police, immigration officials and CANF contacts. Mario Portundo, CANF spokesperson, told Weekly Report that the information was passed out to provide an easier route for those planning to defect.
- Julio Laboy
continued from page 1
by executive order, are in “a structurally bad position,” says Angelo Falc6n, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York City. He charges that Gov. Mario Cuomo changed that state’s body from being an effective tool to help the community into “Cuomo’s Hispanic Re-election Commission.”
Clara Garcia, executive director of a Boston tenants' association, Inquilinos Boricuas en Accidn, describes a scenario of a comm ission being formed as the result of an election promise, of it flourishing for a short period, but in time losing its clout as politicians learn to neutralize it.
Annabelle Jaramillo, the chairman of Oregon’s Commission on Hispanic Affairs, a panel which reports both to the governor and legislature, says it would be too cynical to suggest that the commissions are easily converted into political buffers.
Former president of the national Hispanic employment advocacy group Image, she has support from California neighbor Mario Obledo, who himself once headed the League of United Latin American Citizens.
Acle to Run for Congress
Luis Acle, 44, who quit the White House Office of Public Liaison in July 1986 after a year as its associate director, will soon announce his intention to seek the Republican nomination in the 44th U.S. Congressional District in San Diego, Calif.
The30%-Latino district has been represented since 1982 by Democrat Jim Bates.
Salinas Succeeds Bonilla
Norberto Salinas, an Hidalgo, Texas County Commissioner, is the new president of the Mexican American Democrats of Texas Elected by acclamation at the group’s convention in El Paso Aug. 15, Salinas replaces attorney Ruben Bonilla of Corpus Christi.
Obledo, who served as director of the California Health and Welfare Agency between 1975-1981 under Gov. Jerry Brown, considers the alternative. Citing the need for continuous contact between the statehouse and politically excluded groups such as Hispanics he comments that it would be beneficial for California Gov. George Deukmejian to have such a commission. Deukmejian has a staff person acting as liaison with the state’s Hispanic community of more than 4 1/2 million. “It’s better to gain a body of opinion than to have one person act as a filter,” Obledo says.
States with large Hispanic population may avoid having commissions he suggests, because politicians fear the influence such bodies could have. - Julio Laboy
Valdes Backs Away from Referendum Idea
Jorge Valdes the only Hispanic on Dade County’s nine-member Metro Commission, called on the group Aug. 17 to remove from its Sept. 1 agenda his resolution asking fora referendum on the county’s seven-year-old English-only ordinance.
Valdes originally had tried to repeal the ordinance at a July 7 commission meeting but his motion was not seconded. Two weeks later he introduced a resolution calling for the referendum. It was approved, 8-0.
After meeting with representatives of more than a dozen Cuban-American organizations, a loosely formed coalition sometimes called Unidos - “United” - Valdes decided to urge the commission not to discuss the issue. Unidos, which shares Valdes’ opposition to the existing ordinance, fears that a referendum battle would exacerbate ethnic tensions in the county.
At a later meeting, probably in October, said Valdes, he will resurrect his outright repeal motion with backing from the Cuban-American organizations
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


L. Houle Gutierrez, guest columnist
No Table to Dance On
NOGALES, Arlz. - Living on the U.S. - Mexico border is not the experience depicted in the movies. There are no sehoritas dancing on tabletops or massaging doorways with their shoulders. We rarely see those guys, like Ricardo Montalb&n or Cesar Romero, whose suits, hair and teeth are all the same color.
And I absolutely can’t remember the last time I encountered someone taking a siesta in an alleyway under a ten-gallon sombrero.
What we do have in our border town, or in the nativo sod, as our Irish-Mexicans like to call it, are two sharing cultures. Language, customs and traffic laws have melded to form a fascinating community.
When we relate a story, we are used to reciting a person’s lineage. It goes something like this:
“The other day, I was sitting in that restaurant, you know, al lado del Post Office, and I recognized el Jaime Samaniego. His mother is la Elvira Partida who married el Samaniego- the one who moved to Los Angeles after high school, recuerdas? Anyway, elhijo de Elvira is back and he’s living with his abuela. He’s getting married to la Magda Lopez...
A GRINGA IN THEIR MIDST
The Spanglish we speak is a baffling, often indecipherable combination plate. A friend of mine from Brooklyn tried to buy some horseradish at a convenience market on the outskirts of town. He asked the salesclerk to point him in the right direction, to which she responded, “Mister, we barely have lettuce here, much less radishes for your horses.”
The Hispanic community often accepts the random gringa or gringo who marries in their midst, as I did 10 years ago, adding Hispanic to my cultural mix as a French-Canadian, Irish, German-American raised in Phoenix, Arizona.
So long as the newcomer makes an effort to learn to speak some Spanish and appreciate customs such as kissing everyone in the family “hello” and “goodbye” (a lengthy process at a reunion), she or he quickly becomes one of the familia. I have found this acceptance to be more common among Hispanics than in the Anglo culture.
On occasion, when I am seated in a group of non-Hispanics from our border town, sometimes they expound on “the Mexicans who won’t speak English” or the way “those Mexicans” drive. (Have they never driven in a big U.S. city?) Suddenly, they realize there’s a crossover Hispanic in their midst. “Oh, we don’t mean Mexicans like you,” they say graciously.
They must mean the Mexicans in the movies. Remind me next time to carry a rose between my teeth.
NO ‘IVIVA LA RAZAV HERE
You might think that the politics of U.S. Mexicans along the border is radical. Viva la Raza and all that. If snot. Hispanics on the border seldom talk about the Hispanic experience.
They don’t debate what it means to be bicultural. They just are.
My husband’s cousins in Los Angeles have Mexican flag stickers on their low-riders. They are Chicanos. Yet they don’t speak a word of Spanish, other than their own names.
On the border, life offers new as well as old residents a variety of cultural possibilities. You have a very loyal familia. Children learn two languages Usually, the entire family stays in the same town for generations, so there is still the extended-family experience - so rapidly disappearing from the rest of the United States - to savor.
There are many rewards, new ones every day. If you let yourself accept, you will be accepted.
But do me one favor, okay? Don’t dance on the tabletops. We have to eat there.
(L. Houle Gutierrez is a reporter with the Nogales International Newspaper, Nogales, Ariz)
S[n pelos en la lengua
TYPO TIME: Our fancy invitation to the Sept. 12 Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit at the Los Angeles Biltmore promises- in big letters-“SILENT ACTION.” Hmmmmm. Turns out they are planning to auction off gift certificates for Carolina Herrera, Adolfo and Carlota Alfaro originals, plus trips and jewelry. What they meant to entice me with was a SILENT AUCTION. Ohhhhh.
HEALING POWER: If s doubly embarrassing when journalists get caught with their typos down. The invitation for the California Chicano News Media Association’s 15th anniversary celebration Aug. 29 at member Tom Castro’s Malibu manse warns: “ Because this is a garden party, it is recommended that guests wear low-healed shoes.”
PLANTATION BOATLIFT? Then there’s the paragraph in an article in the current Customs Today magazine on U.S. Customs worker Mlrta Peebles, whose talent and sixth sense have resulted in some 2,000 seizures of contraband ranging from counterfeit currency and drugs to Communist propaganda and pornography.
“Peebles came to the U.S. in the 1963 boatlift from Cuba Her father was a newspaperman and a staunch anti-Communist. In order to avoid prosecution by Castro’s regime, the family had to leave all possessions, including their plantation, behind.”
I’ve seen some of those Caribbean plantations. My goodness' You’d need an aircraft carrier to haul all those rowsof banana and mafngo trees from Havana to Miami.
FINAL LITERARY NOTE: Gio Hernandez is a barber in Manhattan. A good one, no doubt, as his customers include (at least, they did) the likes of Chyslef s Lee lacocca and Bantam Books’ executive Stu Applebaum. By Hernandez’s account, as a courtesy to good customers, he brought Lee and Stu together when the biography ‘lacocca’ was a just a gleam in Lee’s eye.
History records that the book chalked up 2.5 million sales. That could generate as much as $2 million in literary fees for the man who brought the pair together, reasoned Hern&ndez. So he checked with his lawyer. The Manhattan state Supreme Court has now cleared the way for him to sue Bantam. Snip, snip.
MEAN MOTHER: New York is a strange place. Especially if you read about it in the New York Post. The tabloid recently sent a pair of reporters to follow two city transit cops on their appointed subway rounds.
Ifs the cops’ job, among other things, to catch people who slither through the system’s gates without depositing their tokens and to whack each of them with a $50 summons.
The first fare-dodger they encountered was thin, mustachioed Alberto Alvarez, age 29, who rated two pictures in the paper and an interview.
Why didn’t he pay like the rest of the city's honest citizens?
“I had to sneak in,” Alvarez was quoted. “My mother didn’t want to give me a dollar.”
FREE ADVICE: For Alberto and all others who speak first and think later, there’s this fine Spanish dicho:
En boca cerrada no entran moscas.
Flies do not enter a closed mouth.
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
REV. CARMEN GUERRERO of San Antonio, one of three Latina Episcopal priests in the country, commenting in a recent Clamor magazine on Hispanic women’s relationship with Hispanic men:
"From an Anglo perspective, our men treat us like dirt, like they are the boss. I think we have a lot of power. It may not be exerted like it is in the Anglo culture. I know how to drive from the back seat. I've done that all my life.
“You (Anglos) know about us what we let you know about us.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Aug. 24,1987
3


STATE COMMISSION DIRECTORY
Here’s a list of state-level commissions, committees and councils on Hispanic affairs throughout the country.
DELAWARE: William Rodriguez, exec dir., Governor's Council on Hispanic Affairs, 820 N. French St, Fourth Floor, Wilmington, Del. 19801 (302) 571-3497.
FLORIDA: Rafael Peftalver, chair., Florida Commission on Hispanic Affairs, 701 S.W. 27th Ave., Suite 1200, Miami, Fla 33135 (305) 649-1414.
IDAHO: Rudy Pefta, commissioner, Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs, Office of the Governor, State House, Boise, Idaho 83720 (208) 334-6188.
IOWA: Miguel Ter&n, exec die Spanish Speaking Peoples Commission, Lucas State Office Building, Capital Complex, Des Moines, Iowa 50319 (515) 281-4080.
KANSAS: Marc Marcano, exec die Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs, 503 Kansas Ave., Suite 328, Topeka Kan. 66603 (913) 296-3465.
MARYLAND: Carlos Anzoategui, exec dir., Governor's Commission on Hispanic Affaira Globe Building, Suite 404, 817 Silver Spring Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910 (301) 565-3211.
MASSACHUSETTS: (Director to be named), Massachusetts Commission on Hispanic Affairs, State House, Room413F, Boston, Masa 02133(617)722-1364 or (617) 722-1673.
MICHIGAN: Marylou Olivarez-Mason, director, Commission and Office on Spanish Speaking Affaira 611 W. Ottawa North Tower, Third Floor, P.O. Box 30026, Lansing, Mich. 48909 (517) 373-8339.
MINNESOTA: Jos6 Trejo, director, Spanish Speaking Affairs Council, 506 Rice St, St Paul, Minn. 55103 (612) 296-9587.
NEBRASKA: Isaiah Vel&squez, exec, die State of Nebraska Mexican-American Commission, P.O. Box 94965, Lincoln, Neb. 68509-4965(402)471-2791.
NEW JERSEY: William Cheezum, director, Office of Hispanic Affaira363 W. State St, #800, Trenton, N.J. 08625-0800 (609) 984-3223.
NEW YORK: Shirley Rodriguez-Remeneski, exec die Governor's Office for Hispanic Affaira 2 World Trade Center, 57th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10047 (212) 587-2266.
OHIO: Ramiro Estrada, director, Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs, 65 S. Front St, Columbua Ohio 43266-0323 (614) 466-8333.
OREGON: Annabelle Jaramillo, chair., Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs, 695 Summer St NE, Salem, Ore. 97310 (503) 373-7397.
TEXAS: Cynthia Ramirez, exec, dir., Dept, of Hispanic and Latin American Affaira P.O. Box 12428, Austin, Texas 78711 (512) 463-1964.
PENNSYLVANIA: Mercedes Roldin, director, Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community, 378 Forum Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 17120 (717) 783-3877.
UTAH: Marla Ortiz, director, Governor’s Hispanic Advisory Council, State Office Building, Room 6234, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114 (801) 533-4060.
WASHINGTON: Hector Gonz&lez, director, Commission on Mexican American Affaira 1515 S. Cherry, Olympia, Wash. 98504 (206) 753-3159.
CONNECTING
LA RAZA RECEIVES AWARD The National Council of La Raza was granted $20,000 by the Adolph Coors Co. to continue providing training and assistance to Hispanic community organizations.
The award is earmarked for NCLR’s “Capacity Building Technical Assistance Component” program. The program trains Hispanic groups to increases their effectiveness in the community by providing technical assistance, on-site consultation and various materials.
SER AWARDED $1.5 MILLION The U.S. Department of Labor approved $1.5 million in funding for SER-Jobs for Progress Inc., a national non-profit employment and training organization which concentrates on the special needs of Hispanics.
SERs Training and Technical Assistance contract, which enables SER National to provide services to local SER affiliates, will be refunded for $927,000, a 3% increase over last year's funding.
The other award, a $500,000 12-month grant for SER’s Family Learning Centers, will be used for developing and evaluating the centers and provide a foundation for SERs literacy initiative through the 1990s.
COLLECTING
LATIN AMERICAN ART CATALOG: “Art of the Fantastic: Latin America, 1920-1987” is a 302-page art catalog by the Indianapolis Museum of Art based on an exhibition there running until Sept. 13. The full-color catalog has three sections: the first is a historical overview of earlier Latin American art, the second looks at the art according to generation of the artists and the third gives biographies of the artists. For a copy ($30 softcover, $45 hardcover - plus tax) write: IMA, 1200 W. 38th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46208.
MINORITIES, POVERTY AND SOCIAL POLICY: The University of Wisconsin at Madison’s Institute for Research on Poverty has issued a special issue of its FOCUS newsletter. Included among its articles is one on the declining economic status of mainland Puerto Ricans. To order, send $3.50 to: FOCUS, Institute for Research on Poverty, 1180 Observatory Drive, 3412, Social Science Building, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wise. 53706. -Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM Los Angeles Aug. 24-25
The coalition of Minority Women in Business is sponsoring an entrepreneurship program entitled, "Business Opportunities - Putting All the Pieces Together.” The program, to be held in several cities, offers an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network and exhibit new products and services. Workshops will be held on international business, home-based business, franchising, marketing and other topics. Silvia Rodriguez (202) 328-9001
HISPANIC ARTS, CULTURE IN RADIO Denver Aug. 26-28
KUVO Radio, a bilingual public radio station, is sponsoring a national conference to examine radio programming and Hispanics, including the future of Spanish-language programs, Hispanic ownership and control of radio stations and funding options for cultural programming. Panelists include Henry Rivera, former FCC Commissioner, Richard Gonzales
of National Public Radio and Jos6 Mir6lez of Enfoque
Nacional in San Diego
Florence Hernandez (303) 934-5880.
FESTIVAL LATINO
San Francisco Aug. 26-30
The star of the movie “The Official Story1 will bring
her Argentine theater troupe, Norma Aleandros and
Co., to the second annual Festival Latino sponsored
by the Festival Latino Committee in association
with the New York Shakespeare Festival. A series
of Latino films, plays and music will run in San
Francisco and Oakland through Aug. 30.
Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION New York Aug. 27
The National Puerto Rican Forum is celebrating its 30th anniversary aboard the World Yacht's Empress Vessel with a buffet dinner and entertainment. Lourdes Col6n (212) 685-2311
URBAN FELLOWS CONFERENCE Chicago Aug. 27-30
“Impacting the Political Process” is the theme of the third annual National Urban Fellows Conference. U.S. Civil Rights Commissioner Blandina C&rdenas-Ramirez will be one of the speakers. The conference
will allow prospective applicants to the fellowship program, which works to increase the number of minority public administrators at all government levels, to meet former fellows and high-level elected or appointed government officials.
Lourdes Parker (312) 890-5135
TORRES FUNDRAISER Los Angeles Aug. 29
The Friends of California Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) are hosting a fundraiser for the senator. Lisa Baca (213) 384-9811
HISPANIC FAMILY AWARD Los Angeles Aug. 29
The third annual California Hispanic American Family of the Year will be named during an awards banquet sponsored by the Hispanic American Family of the Year Foundation.
Evelyn Kemp (818) 500-1309
COMING SOON
ROAST COMMISSIONER GALLEGOS American G.I. Forum of Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C. Sept. 2 Laura de Herrera (202) 628-9600
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Aug. 24,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GENERAL MANAGER - KUSC-FM
The University of Southern California invites nominations and applications for the position of General Manager of KUSC, the arts and information public radio service of USC, which also owns and operates affiliated stations KCPB/Thousand Oaks, KSCA/Santa Barbara and KPSH/Palm Springs.
The GM has overall responsibility for establishing artistic direction and maintaining stations’ legal, regulatory, and fiscal well-being; leading the program staff in creation, production, and acquisition of classical music and news programs of pre-eminent artistic and journalistic quality; determining and serving needs of stations’ listeners and subscribers; and continuing the development of KUSCas a major production center for radio programs of local, regional, and national interest.
Requires demonstrated qualities of vision, leadership, and organizational management skills; thorough understanding of the nature and purpose of public broadcasting; ability to relate to varied constituencies and individuals in the many communities served by KUSC; ability to develop and implement successful fundraising strategies; and, preferably, proven track record in developing and/or managing nationally prominent broadcast facility.
Address inquiries, nominations, and applications NLT Aug. 21,1987 to: John R. Curry, VP Budget/Planning; Chair, Search Committee; USC,ADM-150; Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-5012. USC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
ZGS Television Productions, based in Washington, D.C., is looking for an associate producer to work on the National News Magazine America aired by UNIVISION.
Knowledge of television production and good Spanish writing skills are required.
Send resume, Demo tape and/or a sample of your writing to: Jos6 J. Sanz, Producer, ZGS Television Productions, 1726 M St. NW, Suite 704, Washington, D.C. 20036(202)463-0486.
BRISTOL-MYERS COMPANY
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
DISTRIBUTION CENTER MANAGER Buena Park, California $60,000 plus bonus
Contact Lionel M. Stevens, 345 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10154 (212) 546-5644.
PERSONNEL ASSISTANT
Diversified position in busy Personnel Office. Need individual to maintain and coordinate computerized personnel system.
Bachelor's degree and minimum of two years of appropriate professional experience required. Knowledge of data processing a plus. Applicants should be detail oriented and possess excellent communication skills. Good benefits.
Salary: $23,000+ commensurate with experience. Send resume to: Director of Personnel, Lehman College, The City University of New York, Bronx, N.Y. 10468.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
EDUCATION POLICY FELLOW
Carry out secondary research on education policy issues; prepare policy papers, issue briefs, testimony, newsletters and other documents; assist with other education policy analysis tasks.
BA strong writing skills, strong oral presentation and some experience in education required.
Send letter, resume and writing sample to: National Council of La Raza, 20 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20001, ATTN: Arturo Vargas.
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics* Washington D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • layout • silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 1470 Inring St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARYsought by MALDEF. Type 45 wpm. Good grammar and organization required. Good benefits. Near subway. Send resume to: MALDEF, 1430 K St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CONFERENCE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Assist in the planning of the annual conference. Requirements: Bachelor's degree, computer knowledge, good coordination skills, self-motivated, attention to details, 50 wpm typing, excellent telephone technique and works well under pressure a must Bilingual ability preferred English/Spanish, good salary, benefits and travel.
Mail resume to: Conference AA, c/o Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001.
NEWS ANCHOR - WSNS-TV, Chicago Channel 44, Chicago’s Number 1 Spanish language television station, is looking for an anchor for its ten o’clock newscast, Noticentro. You must be bilingual (Spanish/English) and have had prior television experience.
Please send your resume, picture and sample tape to. Irene Bermudez WSNS-TV
430 W. Grant Place Chicago, Illinois 60614 The deadline for submitting your materials is Monday, August 31.
LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT PROGRAM SPECIALIST
$2099.82-$2611.09
A Program Specialist supervises volunteers who serve as child advocates for child abuse victims in Dependency Court and assists in the resolution of problems involved in dependency cases. Other duties may include: screening cases referred for guardian ad litem appointment; developing and implementing programs for the recruitment screening and training of volunteers; and conducting and attending group meetings and conferences relating to the child advocate program.
Graduation from an accredited college or university and two years experience in one of following:
• Public or private agency providing service to abused and neglected children and/or their parents.
• A child advocacy program concerned with the special needs and rights of children.
• As a volunteer guardian ad litem in Dependency Court proceedings and/or as a supervisor of volunteers.
All applicants must submit a Superior Court Employment Application and Supplemental Data Form by 5:00 p.m., September 3,1987.
Apply to: County Courthouse, Room 203,111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, California 90012.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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5


Hispanic Commissions- How They Compare
State % Hispanic Population (1980 Census] Name ' Year Est Staff/ Members Funding FY’87 +/- *87 v. ’84 Reports to:
Delaware 1.6% Governor's Council on Hispanic Affairs 1978 0/15 $2,500 + $1,000 Community Affairs Dept
Florida 8.8 Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs 1977 2/15 $25,000 same Gov. & Leg.
Idaho 3.9 Commission on Hispanic Affairs 1987 0/9 *** *** Leg.
Iowa 0.9 Spanish Speaking Peoples Commission 1977 2/9 $60,280 - $2,720 Human Rights Dept
Kansas 2.7 Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs 1974 4/7 $129,000 + $29,000 Human Services Dept
Maryland 1.5 Commission on Hispanic Affairs 1871 2/15 $71,864 + $33,864 Human and Community Resources Dept
Massachusetts 2.5 Commission on Hispanic Affairs 1984 0/0 $125,000 + $25,000 Leg.
Michigan 1.8 Commission and Office on Spanish Speaking Affairs 1975 4/15 $233,000 same Management and Budget Dept
Minnesota 0.8 Spanish Speaking Affairs Council 1978 3/7 $154,000 + $42,000 Gov. A Leg.
Nebraska 1.8 State of Nebraska Mexican American Commission 1972 2/10 $98,776 —$107,224 Gov. A Leg.
New Jersey 6.7 Office of Hispanic Affairs 1975 4/25 $100,000* same Community Affairs Dept
New York 9.5 Governor's Office for Hispanic Affairs 1986 7/10 $345,000 +$195,000 Gov.
Ohio 1.1 Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs 1977 3/10 $168,000 + $24,437 Gov. a Leg.
Oregon 2.5 Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs 1983 1/11 $90,800 + $27,900 Leg.
Pennsylvania 1.3 Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community 1973 3/27 $86,000** - $89,667 Community Affairs Dept
Texas 21.0 Dept of Hispanic and Latin American Affairs 1987 4/35 *** *** Office of State Affairs.
Utah 4.1 Governor's Hispanic Advisory Council 1972 1/9 $43,000 + $6,000 Gov.
Washington 2.9 Commission on Mexican-American Affairs 1971 5/11 $104,000** + $42,000 Gov. a Leg.
* Approximation ** Budget for 1986 *** Not finalized Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Media Report
HERALDING CHANGES: A unique print/ broadcast switch will be completed in Miami this week.
WLTV(Ch. 23) news director Gustavo Pupo-Mayo moves to The Miami Herald with the title of “general executive.” And the Herald’s most popular columnist, Guillermo Martinez, tests the electronic media waters as WLTVs
new news director.
Martinez, who was a member of the Herald’s editorial board, will continue writing regular columns for the Herald.
The station is one often Spanish-language television stations sold by the Spanish International Communications Corporation to Hallmark Cards and First Chicago Venture Capital.
Hallmark announced Aug. 12 that Danny Villanueva will manage the day-to-day operations of the stations in the West while
Joaquin Blaya will manage operations of those in the East.
The sale is not final pending action on appeals before the Federal Communications Commission by Latino groups which also made bids on the SICC package.
- Charlie Ericksen
ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT The Arts & Entertainment column will return next week.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
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6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week gun, shot him . . . On his way home from viewing "Robocop," Chicagoan VIctor Guzman, 48, grabs the gun of a wounded state trooper and holds two suspects at bay until more police arrive ... Walking out of a New York deli, Marla Nuflez, 39-year-old mother of five, is shot to death by deranged Alberto Dlaz, 31, who grabbed her as a hostage as he ran from police . Diaz then shot himself in the head . . Texas Gov. Bill Clements appoints Ernesto Ancira to the Board of Directors of the new state Department of Commerce. He is from San Antonio . . . Miami businessman Carlos Perez flies to Washington, D .C., to deliver petitions of support, bearing 60,000 signatures, to his friend Oliver North .. . Actor Jimmy Smits, honored June 17 with an lmagin award for the positive images he and the NB(} TV series , "LA Law" provide Latino youth , is arrested Aug. 1 0 for battery against three police officers who went to his home in response to a "woman screaming" report. Smits ' girlfriend , Juanita Cruz, is also booked. .. After eight years as its founding chief , Hector Barreto of Kansas City , Mo . , resigns as president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Aug . 22 to devote more time to his business and family . . . Jorge Samaniego, Cuba-born dancer who choreographed the Public Broadcasting Service's Romeo and Juliet in 1981, dies at age 40 of AIDS in Los Angeles. . . In the recent Chicago deluge, Jose Arellano, 26, drowns in his flooded basement when its windows burst inward and water rushes in to ceiling level ... The parents of Leonard Falc6n, 19 , of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif . , file a $3 million claim against San Bernardino County for their son ' s April? death . The young man was shot while playing Lazer Tag with friends in a dark schoolyard when a deputy sheriff , mistaking his toy pistol for a real Vol. 5 No. 33 HISPANIC LINK WEE Aug.24,1987 Hispanic State Commissions Cut Back to 18 A 50-state Weekly Report survey updating . a review it conducted three years ago has found that the number of Latino stat&-level commissions designed to help identify and address community concerns is declining . Major Latinopopulated states such as New Mexico (37%), California (19%) and Arizona (16%) still have no such advisory bodies. Texas (21%) is just now forming one. Of 18 commissions now in existence, eight RNHASetto Restructure Members of the Republican National His panic Assembly will hold a constitutional convention in Washington , D .C., Aug. 29, follow ing more than three months of meetings to settle internal leadership differences . A " blue ribbon " committee has been meeting intermittently since April28, after many RNHA members challenged the ' validity of the February re-election of its chairman , Fernando de Baca . Convention participants will revise the constitution and set a date for new elections, said Edward Lujan, chairman of the blue ribbon committee. Church of Santeria Opens A church of santeria, a hybrid of Catholicism and the worship of ancient African gods . which claims 300,000. adherents in the Caribbean and elsewhere , conducted formal opening ceremonies in Hialeah , Fla,, Aug . 16. The church , Lukumi Babalu Aye , has been vigorously opposed by the community there because its rituals include the sacrifice of small animals. Five protesters picketed the opening . Church president Ernesto Pichardo told reporters tha t the Hialeah church has more than 300 members. W ith reporters e x cl uded, t wo dozen en t ered its door t o be at d r ums and chant at t he operiing . Pic h a r do declin e d t o say w h e n cere mo ni e s inv olving a nim a l sacrific e woul d b e c onducted Their rit u a l sl aughter , unl ess the y are c on sume d , was recent l y r ul ed i ll ega l by the Florida Att orn ey Ge neral ' s office. are in states with less than 2% Hispanic population. And , claim critics , many active panels serve the political interests of their creators more than the community itself. The new national canvass revealed : • Between 1984 and 1987 , four of 20 states with such advisory units Illinois , Missouri , Oklahoma and Wisconsin have disbanded them. • Two new states-Idaho along with Texas have established commissions and are in the process of finalizing their funding. e Ten states with commissionsDelaware , Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Ohio , Oregon, Utah and Washington have increased funding for their Hispanic advisory bodies since 1984. . e ThreeIowa, Nebraska , and Pennsylvania -cut back on funds . • Florida, Michigan and New Jersey are funded at their 1984 levels . The commissions, or committees or councils, as they are called in some states, are formed by a executive order or by the legislature to serve as a liaison between the Hispanic community and state government Most conduct studies on Hispanic concerns. They advise the governor or legislature on the impac t of state proposals on their cornPanel Backs Reunification By a 5-1 vote , the El Paso , Texas, City Counc i l Aug. 18 passed a resolut i on supporting two family reunification amendments to the 1986 immigration bill . The House resolutions were in t roduced by Rep . Edward Roybal (D-Calif . ) on March 25 . They call for a waiver of conti nuous residency requirements for spouses and ch i ldren of those qualifying for legalization and for the pa r e nts of children born i n the Uni ted States b e t ween the cu t o f f da t e o f Jan . 1 , 1982 , and the acfs effective d a t e o f No v . 6 , 1986. Acc o rding to Carlos Spe ctor C al d e r6n , co c ha ir o f the Texas Leag u e of U n ited L at i n American Citizens' i mmigration committee, who is u rging such act i ons, the city cou ncils of H ouston, Laredo and San Antonio are also considering resolutions in support of Roybars amendments. mun ity and provide a political conduit for local Hispanic organizations to the statehouse . New Jersey's Office of Hispanic Affairs also has authority to grant $1 miHion in state and federal funds to Latino organizations in that state . Some commissions have claimed success in such matters as helping thwart nativist bills forbidding the use of non-English languages . The survey showed that the commissions have staffs ranging from no persons(Delaware and Massachusetts) toseven(NewYork). The i r boards average about 12 members each , with newcomer Texas planning the biggest, 35 members. Their budgets range from $2,500 in Delaware up from $1 , 500 three years ago-to $345,000 in New York, up from $150,000 three years ago . Most are in the $60,000 $150,000 range. The commissions, especially those created co ntin ue d o n page 2 Suarez to Run Again, Quarrels with Carollo Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez announced Aug. 14 that he will seek a second t erm. He challenged his chief cri tic , Joe Carollo , to run against him " i f he has the guts" rather than seek r&-election as a Miami commissioner . Carollo responded with his own challenge: a thre&-round box i ng match at the Orange Bowl , with proceeds going to help the poor. Carollo, who as a commissioner has blocked some of Su a rez's i nitiatives, added that the job o f mayor w ould prob a bly take too much t i m e away from his persona l security b u s i ness. Suarez, wh o ha s e ndur ed Carollds frequent t aunts s ilent l y for two years, called the co mmis s i oner an "embarrassmenf' to t h e c it y , saying t h at it was"an importa nttask for Miamians to make sure that Ca r ollo is n o t re-elected." So far, two candidates have challenged the 38-year-old mayor: attorney Arthur Teele Jr. and military school owner Evaristo Marina Neither is viewed as a major threat.

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' . Quinones Will Quit, Search for Replacement Starts . ' Names of qualified Hispanic candidates to replace New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones are expected to be pre sented next month to the board of education . Quinones announced on Aug. 13 that he pl ,ans to step down Jan. 1. "We will have a meeting of Hispanic elected officials and try to present some names," Assemblyman Angelo DelToro told Weekly Report The meeting will probably take place after Labor Day, he said. Hernan La Fontaine, S14perintendent of Schools in Hartford, Conn., Peter Nigroni, Superintendent of Community School District 12 in the Bronx and former deputy chancellor Alfredo Mathews are some names mentioned as possible Hispanic candidates. The New York Alliance for Black Educators has already called for the appointment of Adelaide Sanford, a black State Board of Regents member, to the post. Seven Latinos Win 1 3 Pan Am. Medals After ten days of competition, the 1987 Pan American Games in Indianapolis brought the glory of victory home to seven Spanish-surnamed U.S. competitors as they totaled six gold medals, two silver medals and five bronze medals. At press time, the gold medal winners: Mario Martinez, three medals in weighlifting, 242 1/2 lb . weight class: medals in clean and jerk event, snatch and overall standings. Tracy Ruiz-Conforto, two medals in synchro nized swimming solo event and overall standings. Mike Gonzalez, one medal: decathlon. The two silver medals were won by Rojelio Arredondo in shooting: team rapid fire pistol and rapid fire pistol, 25 meter event. The five bronze medals went to: Roberto Urrutia, who defected from Cuba in 1980, three medals in weightlifting, 165 lb. weight class: clean and jerk, snatch and overall stan& ings. James Martinez , one medal in wrestling: 149 . 5 lb weight class and Brenda Nyll Rodriguez, one medal in roller skating: 10,000 meter speed event. The Puerto Rican team had won a total of 16 medals: two gold, three silver , 11 bronze. The festive spirit of the games was marred Aug . 14 when anti-Castro demonstrators became involved in a violent altercation with members of the Cuban boxing team. Members of the team charged up into the stands during a boxing event to confront members of the Cuba lndependiente y Democratica, after the anti-Castro group allegedly stepped on and tore the Cuban flag . The Cuban American National Foundation , based in Washington, D . C . , distributed cards to the Cuban contingent with the telephone numbers of local police, immigration officials and CANF contacts. Mario Portundo, CANF spokesperson, told Weekly Report that the information was passed out to provide an easier route for those planning to defect. -Julio Laboy 2 The board should announce by Aug . 24 how the search for a new chancellor will be conducted. Quinones' departure leaves the New York public schools with no Hispanics at the high administrative levels. The seven-member Board of Education is also without a single Latino member. One black serves on it. Eighty percent of the 939,142 students in the country's biggest public school system are minority. As of October 1986, Hispanics were 34% of the student population with 318,431, blacksnumbered358,254 or38.1% , and whites were 200,089 or 21%. DelToro called the chancellor's position a "critical" one for Hispanics. "It is our children who suffer the most. We have the largest number of dropouts, the largest number of underachievers in reading. We need a chan cellor who understands the problems and needs of Hispanic children," he said. Chancellor since May.1984, Quinones, 56, will retire six months before his contract expires. He had recently come under fire for problems in the district, including dropout rates and summer job programs that did not meet expectations. New York Mayor E
PAGE 3

L. Houle Gutierrez, guest columnist No Table to Dance On NOGALES, Ariz.-Living on the U.S. -Mexico border is not the experience depicted in the movies. There are no senoritas dancing on tabletops or massaging doorways with their shoulders. We rarely see those guys, like Ricardo Montalban or Cesar Romero, whose suits, hair and teeth are all the same color. And I absolutely can't remember the last time I encountered someone taking a siesta in an alleyway under a ten-gallon sombrero. What we do have in our border town, or in the nativo sod, as our Mexicans like to call it, are two sharing cultures. Language, customs and traffic laws have melded to form a fascinating community. When we relate a story, we are used to reciting a person's lineage . It goes something like this: " The other day, I was sitting in that restaurant, you know, allado del Post Office, and I ._. recognized el Jaime Samaniego. His mother J....._.:::.\ __ .:.:__....s,_..J is /a Elvira Partida who married el Samaniegothe one who moved to Los Angeles after high school, recuerdas? Anyway, el hijo de Elvira is back and he's living with his abuela. He's getting married to Ia Magda Lopez ... A GRINGA IN THEIR MIDST The Spanglish we speak is a baffling, often indecipherable combi nation plate. A friend of mine from Brooklyn tried to buy some horseradish at a convenience market on the outskirts of town . He asked the salesclerk to point him in the right direction, to which she r esponded, " Mister, we barely have lettuce here, much less radishes for your horses." . The Hispanic community often accepts the random gringa or gringo who marries in their midst , as I did 1 0 years ago, adding Hispanic to my cultural mix as a Irish, German American raised in Phoenix, Arizona . So long as the newcomer makes an effort to learn to speak some Spanish and appreciate customs such as kissing everyone in the family"hello" and "goodbye" (a lengthy process at a reunion), she or he quickly becomes one of the familia. I have found this acceptance to be more common among Hispanics than in the Anglo culture. On occasion, when I am seated in a group of nonHispanics from our border town, sometimes they expound on "the Mexicans who won't speak English" or the way "those Mexicans" drive. (Have they never driven in a big U.S. city?) Suddenly, they realize there's a crossover Hispanic in their midst. "Oh, we don't mean Mexicans like you," they say graciously. ThP.y must mean the Mexicans in the movies . Remind me next time to carry a rose between my teeth. NO '!VIVA LA RAZA!' HERE You might think that the politics of U . S . Mexicans along the border is radical. Viva Ia Raza and all that. lfs not. Hispanics on the border seldom talk about the Hispanic experience. They don't debate what it means to be bicultural. They just are. My husband's cousins in Los Angeles have Mexican flag stickers on their low-riders . They are Chicanos. Yet they don't speak a word of Spanish, other than their own names. On the border, life offers new as well as old residents a variety of cultural possibilities. You have a very loyal familia Children learn two languages. Usually, the entire family stays in the same town for generations, so there is still the extended-family experience -so rapidly disappearing from the rest of the United Statesto savor. There are many rewards, new ones every day. If you let yourself accept, you will be accepted. But do me one favor, okay? Don't dance on the tabletops. We have to eat there. (L. Houle Gutierrez is a reporter with the Nogales International Newspaper, Nogales, Ariz.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua TYPO TIME: Our fancy invitation to the Sept. 12 Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit at the Los Angeles Biltmore promises-in big letters-"SILENT ACTION." Hmmmmm. Turns out they are planning to auction off gift certificates for Carolina Herrera, Adolfo and Carlota Alfaro originals, plus trips. and jewelry. What they meant to entice me with was a SILENT AUCTION. Ohhhhh. HEALING POWER: lfs doubly embarrassing when journalists get caught with their typos down. The invitation for the California Chicano News Media Association's 15th anniversary celebration Aug. 29 at member Tom Castro's Malibu manse warns: "Because this is a garden party, it is recommended that guests wear low healed shoes. " PLANTATION BOATLIFT? Then there's the paragraph in an article in the current Customs Today magazine on U.S . Customs worker Mlrta Peebles, whose talent sixth sense have resulted in some 2,000 seizures of contraband ranging from counterfeit currency and drugs to Communist propaganda and pornography. "Peebles came to the U . S . in the 1963 boatlift from Cuba. Her father was a newspaperman and a staunch anti-Communist. In order to avoid prosecution by Castro's regime, the family had to leave all possessions, including their plantation, behind. " I've seen some of those Caribbean plantations. My goodness) You'd need an aircraft carrier to haul all those rows of banana and ma'ngo trees from Havana to Miami . FINAL LITERARY NOTE: Glo Hernandez is a barber in Man hattan. A good one, no doubt, as his customers include (at least, they did) the likes of Chysler's Lee lacocca and Bantam Books' executive Stu Applebaum. By Hernandeis account, as a courtesy to good customers, he brought Lee and Stu together when the biography 'lacocca' was a just a gleam in Lee's eye. History records that the book chalked up 2.5 million sales. That could generate as much as $2 million in literary fees for the man who brought the pair together, reasoned Hernandez. So he with his lawyer. The Manhattan state Supreme Court has now cleared the way for him to sue Bantam. Snip, snip. MEAN MOTHER: New York is a strange place. Especially if you read about it in the New York Post. The tabloid recently sent a pair of reporters to follow two city transit eops on their appointed subway rounds. lfs the cops' job, among other things, to catch people who slither through the system's gates without depositing their tokens and to whack each of them with a $50 summons. The first fare-dodger they encountered was thin, mustachioed Alberto Alvarez, age 29, who rated two pictures in the paper and an interview. Why didn't he pay like the rest of the city's honest citizens? "I had to sneak in," Alvarez was quoted. "My mother didn't want to give me a dollar." FREE ADVICE: For Alberto and all others who speak first and think later, there's this fine Spanish dicho: En boca cerrada no entran moscas. Flies do not enter a closed mouth. Quoting. • • • Kay Barbaro REV. CARMEN GUERRERO of San Antonio, one of three Latina Episcopal priests in the country, commenting in a recent Clamor magazine on Hispanic women's relationship with Hispanic men: "From an Anglo perspective, our men treat us like dirt, like they are the boss . I think we have a lot of power. It may not be exerted like it is in the Anglo culture. I know how to drive from the back seat. I've done that all my life. "You (Anglos) know about us what we let you know about us." Hispanic Link Weekly Report. Aug. 24, 1987 3

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STATE COMMISSION DIRECTORY Here's a list of state-level commissions, committees and councils on Hispanic affairs throughout the country. DELAWARE: William Rodriguez. exec. dir., Governor's Council on Hispanic Affairs, 820 N. French St, Fourth Floor, Wilmington, Del. 19801 (302)571. FLORIDA: Rafael Pei'lalver, chair., Florida Commission on Hispanic Affairs, 701 S . W . 27th Ave., Suite 1200, Miami , Fla 33135 (305) 649. IDAHO: Rudy Pei'la, commissioner, Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs, Office of the Governor, State House, Boise, Idaho 83720 (208) 334. IOWA: Miguel Teran, exec. dir. , Spanish Speaking Peoples Commission , Lucas State Office Building, Capital Complex, Des Moines, Iowa 50319 (515) 281. KANSAS: Marc Marcano , exec . dir., Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs , 503 Kansas Ave., Suite 328, Topeka, Kan . 66603 (913) 296. MARYLAND: Carlos Anzoategui, exec. dir. , Governor's Commission on Hispanic Affairs, Globe Building , Suite 404, 817 Silver Spring Ave., Silver Spring , Md. 20910(301)565. MASSACHUSETTS: (Director to be named) , Massachusetts Commission on Hispanic Affairs, State House, Room 413F, Boston, Mass. 02133(617) 722 1364 or (617) 722. MICHIGAN: Marylou Olivarez Mason, director, Commission and Office on Spanish Speaking Affairs , 611 W. Ottawa, North Tower , Third Floor, P .O. Box 30026, Lansing, Mich. 48909 (517) 373. MINNESOTA: Jose Trejo, director, Spanish Speaking Affairs Council, 506 Rice St. , St. Paul, Minn. 55103 (612) 296. NEBRASKA: Isaiah Velasquez. exec . dir. , State of Nebraska Mexicart American Commission, P.O. Box 94965, Lincoln , Neb. 685094965(402)471 2791 . NEW JERSEY: William Cheezum, director, Office of Hispanic Affairs,363 W . State St, #800, Trenton, N . J . 08625 (609) 9843223. NEW YORK: Shirley Rodriguez Remeneski, exec. dir., Governor's Office for Hispanic Affairs, 2 World Trade Center, 57th Floor , New York, N .Y. 10047 (212) 587. OHIO: Ramiro Estrada, director, Commiss i on on Spa n ish Speaking Affairs , 65 S . Front St., Columbus, Ohio 43266 (614) 466. OREGON: Annabelle Jaramillo, chair., Oregon Commis si o n on Hispani c Affairs , 695 Summer St NE, Salem, Ore. 97310 (50 3 ) 3737397. TEXAS: Cynthia Ramirez. exec . dir. , Dept. of Hispanic and Latin American Affairs , P . O . Bo x 12428, Austin , Texas 78711 (512) 463. PENNSYLVANIA: Mercedes Roldin, director, Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community, 378 Forum Building , Harrisburg , Pa. 17120 (717) 783 3877. UTAH: Maria Ortiz , director, Governor's Hispanic Advisory Council, State Office Building, Room 6234, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114 (801) 533. WASHINGTON: Hector Gonzalez , director, Commission on Mexican A mer ican Affairs, 1515 S . Cherry, Olympia, Wash . 98504 (206) 753. CONNECTING LA RAZA RECEIVES AWARD The National Council of La Raza was granted $20,000 by the Adolph Coors Co. to continue providing training and assistance to Hispanic community organizations. The award is earmarked for NCLR's "Capacity Building Technical Assistance Componenf' The program trains Hispanic groups to increases their effectiveness in the community by providing technical assistance, on-site consultation and various materials . SER AWARDED $1.5 MILLION The U.S . Department of Labor approved $1. 5 million in funding for SEA-Jobs for Progress Inc., a national non-profit employment and training organization which concentrates on the special needs of Hispanics . SEA's Training and Technical Assistance contract, which enables SEA National to provide services to local SEA affiliates, will be refunded for $927,000, a 3% increase over last year's funding. The other award , a $500,000 12-month grant for SEA ' s Family Learning Centers, will be used for developing and evaluating the centers and provide a foundation for SEA's literacy initiative through the 1990s. COLLECTING LATIN AMERICAN ART CATALOG: "Art of the Fantastic : Latin America, 1920" is a 302-page art catalog by the Indianapolis Museum of Art based on an exh ibition there running until Sept. 1 3. The full -color catalog has three sections: the first i s a h istorica l overview of earlier L atin Ame r ican a rt , the second loo ks a t the a rt according to generat io n o f the art i st s a nd t he thi r d gives biographies of the artis ts. For a copy ($30 softcover, $45 hardcover-plus t ax) write: IMA, 1200 W. 38th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46208. MINORITIES, POVERTY AND SOCIAL POLICY: The Universit y of Wisconsin at Madison ' s Institute for Research on Poverty has issued a special issue of its FOCUS newsletter. Included among its articles is one on the declining economic status of mainland Puerto Ricans . To order, send $3.50 to : FOCUS, Institute for Research on Poverty , 1180 Observatory Drive, 3412, Social Science Building , University of Wisconsin , Madison, Wise. 53706. -Julio Laboy Calendar of National Public Radio and Jose Mirelez of En toque Nacional in San Diego . will allow prospective applicants to the fellowship program, which works to increase the number of minority public administrators at all government levels , to meet former fellows and high-level elected or appointed government officials . THIS WEEK ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM Los Angeles Aug . 24 The coalition of Minority Women in Business is sponsoring an entrepreneurship program entitled, "Business Opportunities-Putting All the Pieces Together. " The program , to be held in several cities, offers an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network and exhibit new products and services. Workshops will be held on international business, home-based business, franchising, marketing and other topics. Silvia Rodriguez (202) 328 HISPANIC ARTS, CULTURE IN RADIO Denver Aug. 26 KUVO Radio , a bilingual public radio station, is sponsoring a national conference to examine radio programming and Hispanics, including the future of Spanish-language programs , Hispanic ownership and control of radio stations and funding options for cultural programming. Panelists include Henry Rivera, former FCC Commissioner , Richard Gonzales 4 Florence Hernandez (303) 934. FESTIVAL LATINO San Francisco Aug . 26 The star of the movie "The Official Story'' will bring her Argentine theater troupe , Norma Aleandros and Co .. to the second annual Festival Latino sponsored by the Festival Latino Committee in association with the New York Shakespeare Festival . A series of Latino films , plays and music will run in San Francisco and Oakl and through Aug. 30. Maria Romero (415) 648-ARTS ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION New York Aug . 27 The National Puerto Rican Forum is celebrating its 30th anniversary aboard the WorldYachfs Empress Vessel with a buffet dinner and entertainment. Lourdes Col6n (212) 685 URBAN FELLOWS CONFERENCE Chicago Aug. 27 "Impacting the Political Process" is the theme of the third annual National Urban Fellows Conference. U.S. Civil Rights Commissioner Blandina Cardenas Ramirez will be one of the speakers. The conference Aug. 24, 1987 Lourdes Parker (31 2) 890-5135 TORRES FUNDRAISER Los Angeles Aug. 29 The Friends of California Sen . Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) are hosting a fundra iser for the senator. Lisa Baca (213) 384 HISPANIC FAMILY AWARD Los Angeles Aug. 29 The third annual California Hispanic American Family of the Year will be named during an awards banquet sponsored by the Hispanic American Family of the Year Foundation . Evelyn Kemp (818) 500 COMING SOON ROAST COMMISSIONER GALLEGOS American G.l . Forum of Washington , D . C . Washington , D.C. Sept. 2 Laura de Herrera (202) 628 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GENERALMANAGER-KUSCFM CONFERENCE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT The University of Southern California invites nominations and applications for the position of General Manager of KUSC , the arts and information public radio service of USC, which also owns and operates affiliated stations KCPB/Thousand Oaks, KSCNSanta Barbara and . KPSH/Palm Springs. Assist in the planning of the annual conference. Requirements: Bachelo(s degree, computer knowledge, good coordination skills, vated, attention to details, 50 wpm typing, excelle.nt telephone technique and works well under pressure a must. Bilingual ability preferred English/Spanish, good salary, benefits and travel The GM has overall responsibility for: establishing artistic direction and maintaining stations' legal , regulatory, and fiscal well-being; leading the program staff in creation, production, and acquisition of classical music and news programs of pre-eminent artistic and journalistic quality; determining and serving needs of stations' listeners and subscribers; and continuing the development of KUSCas a major production center for radio programs of local , regional, and national interest. Mail resume to: Conference AA., c/o Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C . 20001. Requires demonstrated qualities of vision , leadership, and organizational management s kills; thorough understanding of the nature and purpose of public broadcasting; ability to relate to varied constituencies and individuals in the many communities served by KUSC; ability to develop and implement successful fund raising strategies; and, preferably, proven track record in developing and/or managing nationally prominent broadcast facility. NEWS ANCHORWSNS..TV, Chicago Channel 44, Chicago' s Number 1 Spanish language television station, is looking for an anchor for its ten o'clock newscast, Noticentro. You must be bilingual (Spanish/English) and have had prior television experience. Address inquiries, nominations, and applications NL T Aug. 21, 1987 to: John R. Curry, VP Budget/Planning; Chair, Search Committee; USC , ADM-150; Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-5012. USC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. ASSOCIATE PRODUCER ZGS Television Productions, based in Washington, D .C., is looking for an associate producer to work on the National News Magazine America aired by UNIVISION . Knowledge of television production and good Spanish writing skills are required. Send resume, Demo tape and/or a sample of your writing to: Jose J. Sanz, Producer, ZGS Te levision Productions, 1726 M St. NW, Suite 704, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 463-0486. BRISTOL-MYERS COMPANY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DISTRIBUTION CENTER MANAGER Buena Park, California $60,000 plus bonus Contact Lionel M. Stevens, 345 Park Ave., New York, N.Y . 10154 (212) 546-5644. PERSONNEL ASSISTANT Diversified position in busy Personnel Office. Need individual to maintain and coordinate computerized personnel system. Bachelo(s degree and minimum of two years of appropriate professional experience required Knowledge of data processing a plus Applicants should be detail oriented and possess excellent communication skills . Good benefits. Salary: $23,000+ commensurate with ex perience. Send resume to: Director of Personna\ Lehman College, The City University of New York, Bronx, N.Y. 10468. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer EDUCATION POLICY FELLOW Carry out secondary research on education policy issues; prepare policy papers, issue briefs, testimony, newsletters and other documents; assist with other education policy analysis tasks BA, strong writing skills, strong oral presentation and some experience in education required. Send letter, resume and writing sample to: National Council of La Raza. 20 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20001, ATTN: Arturo Vargas GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D . C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Type setting • layout • silkscreen and • Slats. El Barrio Graphics. 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D .C. 20010 (202) 483-7755. His p a nic Link Weekly Report RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY sought by MALDEF. Type 45 wpm. Good grammar and organization required. Good benefits Near subway. Send resume to: MALDEF, 1430 K St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, D .C. 20005. Please send your resume , picture and sample tape to: Irene Bermudez WSNS-TV 430 W . Grant Place Chicago, Illinois 60614 The deadline for submitting your materials is Monday, August 31. LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT PROGRAM SPECIALIST $2099.82-$2611.09 A Program Specialist supervises volunteers who serve as c hild advocates for child abuse victims in Dependency Court and assists in the resolution of problems involved in dependency cases. Other duties may include: screening cases referred for guardian ad litem appointment; developing and implementing programs for the recruitment screening and training of volunteers; and conducting and attending group meetings and conferences relating to the child advocate program . Graduation from an accredited college or university and two years experience in one of following: • Public or private agency providing service to abused and neglected children and/or their parents • A child advocacy program concerned with the special needs and rights of children. • As a volunteer guardian ad litem in Dependency Court proceedings and/or as a supervisor of volunteers All applicants must submit a Superior Court Employment Application and Supplemental Data Form by 5:00 p.m., September 3, 1987. Apply to: County Courthouse, Room 203, 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News,., ound up • Calendar • Names Maki!J9 News • Guest Column • Collecting e Cq' , necting • Media Report • Arts 't. Enter tainment • Editorial Cartodi r • e Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua • MarketeJpce ' "'l" SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address------------City, state, zip ----------0 Start 13-week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed 0 Bill me 0 Bill my organization Mail to: Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 5

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Hispanic CommissionsHowTheyCorripare State %Hispanic Name Population (1980 Census) Delaware 1.6% Governor's Council on Hispanic Affairs Florida 8.8 Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs Idaho 3.9 Commission on Hispanic Affairs Iowa 0.9 Spanish Speaking Peoples Commission Kansas 2.7 Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs Maryland . 1.5 Commission on Hispanic Affairs Massachusetts 2.5 Commission on Hispanic Affairs Michigan 1.8 Commission and Office on Spanish Speaking Affairs Minnesota 0.8 Spanish Speaking Affairs Council Nebraska 1.8 State of Nebraska Mexican American Commission New Jersey 6.7 Office of Hispanic Affairs New York 9.5 Governor's Office for Hispanic Affairs Ohio 1 . 1 Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs Oregon 2.5 Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs Pennsylvania 1.3 Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community Texas 21.0 Dept. of Hispanic and Latin American Affairs Utah 4.1 Governor's Hispanic Advisory Council Washington 2 . 9 Commission on Affairs • Approximation •• Budget for 1986 ••• Not finalized new news director. Year Est 1978 1977 1987 1977 1974 1871 1984 1975 1978 1972 1975 1986 1977 1983 1973 1987 1972 1971 Staff/ Members 0/15 2/15 0/9 2/9 4/7 2/15 0/0 4/15 3/7 2/10 4/25 7/10 3/10 1/11 3/27 4/35 1/9 5/11 Media Report Martinez, who was a member of the Herald's editorial board, will continue writing regular columns for the Herald. HERALDING CHANGES: A unique prinV broadcast switch will be completed in Miami this week. WL TV (Ch. 23) news director Gustavo Pupo Mayo moves to The Miami Herald with the title of"general executive." And the Herald's most popular columnist, Guillermo Martinez, tests the electronic media waters as WL TVs HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW Washington , D .C. 20005 (202) 234..0280 or 234..0737 Publisher. Hector E ricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Charlie Eri cksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias No portion of Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word . Display ads are $35 per col umn inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 The station is one of ten Spanish-language television stations sold by the Spanish International Communications Corporation to Hallmark Cards and First Chicago Venture Capital. Hallmark announced Aug. 12 that Danny Villanueva will manage the day-to-day oper ations of the stations in the West, while Funding +/-Reports to: FY '87 '87 v. '84 $2,500 + $1 ,000 Community Affairs Dept $25,000 same Gov. & Leg. Leg. $60,280 $2,720 Human Rights Dept $129,000 + $29,000 Human Services Dept $71 ,864 + $33,864 Human and Community Resources Dept $125,000 + $25,000 Leg. $233,000 same Management and Budget Dept $154,000 + $42,000 Gov. & Leg. $98,776 -$107,224 Gov. & Leg. $100,000* same CommunltyAffalrsDept. $345,000 +$195,000 Gov. $168,000 + $24,437 Gov. & Leg. $90,800 + $27,900 Leg. $86,000** $89,667 Community Affairs Dept Office of State Affairs. $43,000 + $6,000 Gov. $104,000** + $42,000 Gov. & Leg. Hispanic Link Weekly Report Joaquin Blaya will manage operations of those in the East. The sale is not final pending action on appeals before the Federal Communications Commission by Latino groups which also made bids on the SICC package. Charlie Ericksen ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Arts & Entertainment column will return next week. Hispani c Link Weekly Report