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Hispanic link weekly report, September 7, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 7, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Making The News This Week
Arizona Gov. Evan Mecham vows to Hispanic leaders in Tucson that he will fight any legislation that would make English the official language of the state... Bexar County, Texas, District Attorney Fred Rodriguez says his office will drop a misdemeanor assault charge against U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez(OTexas)if Gonzalez apologizes publicly to the victim. The congressman agrees to do so... New Mexico Gov. Garrey Carruthers appoints James Ma6s as the deputy secretary for the state Economic Development and Tourism Department... California Gov. George Deukmejian bestows one of five Governor's Military Heroism Awards on Staff Sgt. Rodrigo De Zubiria for his efforts in saving a critically burned crew from a
tugboat 1,100 miles off the California coast. De Zubiria and other members of the 129th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Group parachuted into the Pacific Ocean, contending with waves that at times reached 12 feet, and tended to the injured crewmen for 22 hours.. The executive committee of the Mexican American Democrats of Texas names Rub6n Bonilla president of MAD’s Political Action Committee, the organization’s fundraising and candidate-endorsement arm. Bonilla recently completed a two-year term as MAD’s chairman... The Community Service Society of New York, established in 1848, names Angelo Falc6n, director of Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, to its 37-member board of trustees... Michael Oliveras, a Brooklyn, N.Y., elementary school student, is honored as the national fifth-grade winner in the U.S. Patent Model Foundation’s Invent America program. Oliveras constructed a swivel headrest...
rm HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Pope’s U.& Visit Spotlights Hispanic Concerns
Pope John Pc ul M’s visit to several U.S. cities this month will highlight the growing visibility of Hispanics within the church and bring new national attention to Latinos’ social and economic problems outside of it, acknowledge Hispanic Catholic clergy. These clergy members point out that much also remains to be done to increase the number of Hispanic priests and sisters and to stanch the flow of Latinos leaving the church.
According to the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs for the U.S. Catholic Conference, Hispanics in the United States and Puerto Rico comprise 40% of the 52.8 million Catholics in the United States. This compares with 5% of the church’s 383 bishops and archbishops, roughly 3% of the 19,546 pastors and a little more than 2% of the 112,489 sisters. An encouraging sign, say many, is that Latinos account for 11 % of the nation’s 11,000 seminarians.
Father Virgilio Elizondo, former director of the Mexican American Cultural Center in San Antonio, a renown research and educational center on the needs of Hispanic ministry, says, “The greatest area of challenge to U.S. Catholicism is how are they going to promote, educate, inform - quickly- Hispanic American vocations to priesthood.”
The Hispanic clergy surveyed by Weekly Report, including Elizondo, stress that despite
III. Colleges Settle
Five Illinois state universities will no longer tie students’ immigration status to residency requirements, following an Aug. 18 settlement of a lawsuit brought by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. MALDEF had filed a class-action suit challenging the schools^ policy of denying admission or charging out-of-state rates to Illinois residents who could not prove U.S. citizenship or resident status.
In July, MALDEF settled with the University of Illinois system, with campuses in Chicago and Urbana The other institutions, which are under the Board of Governors of State Colleges and Universities, are Northeastern Illinois University, Governors State University, Western Illinois University, Eastern Illinois University
the underrepresentation of Latinos in decisionmaking positions in the church hierarchy, great strides have been made as a result of the three encuentros to date - gatherings of clergy and laity on ministry to Hispanics -and the recognition by the church of the central role of laymembers espoused by Vatican II.
Father Mario Vizcaino, director of the Southeast Regional Office of Hispanic Affairs in Miami, says that because of the encuentros, the first of which was held in 1972, “We were able to create a common consciousness... that grows stronger and stronger every day.” He says the organization of Hispanics in the church has improved dramatically but concedes that the number of Latino clergy remains “very low.”
Among factors given for the lack of lay • participation in the church and the scarcity of Hispanic clergy are: the historical exclusion of Indians and mestizos in Latin America; the unattractiveness of celibacy, given the strong family tradition of Hispanics; the lack of cultural sensitivity displayed by parishes; the failure of priests to go out in the community and actively minister to Latinos; the language barrier, and the church’s laxity in recognizing the central role of Latinas in the imparting of religion to families.
Sister Yolanda Tarango, with the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio
Admissions Suit
and Chicago State University.
Plaintiffs Refugio Alarcdn, Elizabeth Govea and Guillermo Alvarado are Mexican nationals who have lived most of their lives in Illinois and have been granted permission to remain in the United States.
According to the suit, they were not considered state residents (who pay $1,764 annual tuition). They were either denied admission or charged out-of-state tuition of $4,260. U.S. citizens can be classified as state residents after living in Illinois for six months.
MALDEF attorney Arturo Jauregui explained that the new policy applies unless a document such as a foreign student visa, specifically states that a student cannot establish residency in the United States.
and one of three national coordinators for Las Hermanas, an organization of laywomen and clergy, says a further hindrance to the growth of Hispanic clergy, particularly men, was the past policy of seminaries ano convents not to accept Latinos.
“One of the drawbacks has been that a lot of the Hispanics- men especially- going into convents and seminaries came from inferior educational systems and couldn’t maka it” This caused seminaries and convents to look for Hispanics who came out of prep schools and were more assimilated, she adds.
Las Hermanas has 400 members.
Father Ricardo Chavez, director of the Division of Hispanic Affairs at the California Catholic Conference, says that those Hispanics who
________________________; continued on page 2
Koch’s‘Guarantee’ Hit
Statements by New York City Mayor Edward Koch that a Hispanic probably would not be named as the new schools chancellor but that he would “guarantee” the next appointee to the Board of Education would be Latino drew strong criticism from elected Hispanic leaders.
I When Chancellor Nathan Quinones steps down Jan. 1, there will be no high-ranking Hispanics in the school system. One black and no Hispanics serve on the seven-member education board. No current terms expire before 1990.
j The mayor, who made the comments Aug. 27, has two appointments on that board j and each of the citys five borough presidents j has .one. Koch appointed two white males i to four-year terms which end in 1990.
The chairman of the Education Committee of the New York State Assembly, Jos£ Serrano, said Koch’s remark about a Hispanic appointment was “one of the cheapest shots I have ever heard in politics.”
Serrano, who represents District 73 in the South Bronx, said Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, who will select the next member, has already promised to appoint a Latino.
Ferrer called Koch’s comments “astounding and “condescending.”


Latino Teen Birth Rates Differ Significantly by Group
The birth rate for Hispanic females aged 15 through 19 in 1980 was considerably higher than the rate for white females but birth rates among Hispanic subgroups were found to vary significantly, according to a report recently released by the National Council of La Raza.
The report used figures for 1980 and 1984.
The birth rate for Hispanic teen-age mothers in 1980 was 7.3%, compared to 4.5% for Anglo teen mothers. Blacks were at 10.2%. Among Hispanic subgroups, the Mexican American rate was8.9%, Puerto Ricans were at 6.8% and Cubans were at 2.3%.
The report, “Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy: Overview and Implications,” examined data mostly from the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Statistics.
Norma Lopez, the author of the study, told Weekly Report that while in most states the black teen-age birth rate was higher than that of Hispanics, the Hispanic rate in New Jersey was higher. There, the Puerto Rican rate was 11.6%, compared with 10.0% for blacks.
Hispanic teen-age mothers were less likely to complete high school than Anglo or black mothers, the study found. Cuban teen mothers
were the only subgroup whose educational levels were comparable to white teen-age mothers.
The study also revealed that Hispanics were more likely to be married when their children are born than were blacks but they were less likely to be married than white teen mothers.
The incidence of low birth-weight babies for Hispanics in 1984 (7.5%) was about the same as for white non- H ispanics (7.6%). Puerto Ricans were most likely of any Hispanic subgroup to give birth to babies with low weights. - Julio Laboy
RNHA Agrees to Hold New Elections
Republican National Hispanic Assembly members will elect new officers Nov. 20-21 in Washington, D.C. The date was chosen at its constitutional convention in that city Aug. 29. Delegates also approved a new constitution.
The constitutional convention was called by a six-member “blue ribbon” task force charged with unifying the Hispanic affiliate of the Republican National Committee after RNHA split ranks on the legality of Chairman Fernando de Baca’s February election. RNHA claims more than 10,000 members.
De Baca will serve as chairman until the November elections with the blue ribbon task force charged with carrying out operations.
“lam not a candidate for any office in RNHA and I will not be one in November,” de Baca told the delegates.
Three members of the task force, George Adams, Alfred Villalobos and Cathi Villalpando,
do make it to the seminary experience “tremendous culture shock” due to differences in language, culture and “religious expression.” “A lot of us, because of our experience in this country and our many years in the seminary, would be ordained but not be able to work with our own people... For 12 years I could not work with Hispanic people because I had grown so far away from them," says Father Chdvez.
One example of efforts by the church to sensitize parishes around the country to the ministerial needs of Hispanics are the retreats, courses and speeches that occupy Father Domingo Rodriguez year-round.
Rodriguez, who came on loan to the Cleveland parish of San Juan Bautista from Puerto Rico seven years ago, works with the Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity/
“In the seven years I have been here, I have been very pleased in witnessing a tremendous concern on the part of the church and the hierarchy toward prompting and motivating Hispanics to integrate into the church,” says Rodriguez.
“Prejudice has been a factor but another has been that Hispanics have not been strong enough to enable us to cogerlas riendas de la vida - take control of our own destiny.”
2
have expressed interest in leading the RNHA. Future national elections will be set for April of each odd-numbered year.
The new document mandates that RNHA chapters be organized similar to the national Republican Party. “The emphasis will be at the local level,” said Edward Lujan, whochaired the blue ribbon committee and the constitutional convention.
Changes in the RNHA constitution include:
• Eliminating affiliates whereby autonomous groups of 100 members were granted a vote at conventions. Membership groups must now be organized at the county or other governmental body level and be part of the state RNHA; and
• Ensuring more equitable representation for women by creating national committee-woman positions and other posts for them on the executive committee.
Rodriguez, like the other clergy surveyed, believes that the church is paying more attention to the importance of the Hispanic presence in religious and non-religious matters. Many feel that the stops on the pope’s Sept. 10-19 itinerary speak to this recognition.
Among the cities to be visited by the pope, many of which have a predominantly Hispanic Catholic population, are: Miami, Sept. 10; NewOrleans, Sept. 12; San Antonio, Sept. 13; Phoenix, Ariz., Sept 14; Los Angeles, Sept. 15-16; San Francisco and Monterey, Calif., Sept. 18; and Detroit, Sept. 19.
Besides the widespread belief that the pope’s visit may shift the national spotlight toward Hispanics- albeit momentarily- there are two other events stirring excitement among Hispanip Catholics. The first is the release of a national Hispanic pastoral plan to be ratified by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops this November in Washington, D.C. The other is the fourth encuentro, scheduled for 1992.
There are also those among the clergy who temper their excitement with doses of realism.
Concludes Elizondo: “It’s like climbing a mountain. We’ve climbed through the first foothills and looked back. We say we’ve come a long way, but we look up toward the top and say, ‘My God, will we ever make it?’ ”
- Felix Perez
Legalization AIDS Test, to Start Dec. 1, Assailed
The Reagan administration announced Aug 28 that all undocumented persons seeking legalized status will be required to undergo testing for the AIDS virus.
The new rules were sharply criticized by a coalition of advocacy groups The regulations, to take effect Dec. 1, bar persons who test positive for the AIDS virus from immigrating to the United Statea “From a public health standpoint, it is counterproductive. Those with the disease are likely to go further underground, avoid the legalization process and continue to spread AIDS,” said National Council of La Raza spokesman Charles Kamasaki.
According to Vern Jervis, information officer for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization ? Service, undocumented persons who test l positive can be excluded from permanent ; residency unless they are granted a waiver from the U.S. Attorney General. Waivers are granted to assure family unity, for humanitarian purposes and when in the public interest Those who have applied for legalization â–  will also be required to undergo testing.
Kamasaki said that centers which provide free or low-cost testing, ranging to $15, are backlogged. An applicant may, therefore, choose to be tested at a costlier private institution, he said. If patients initially test; positive, they may elect to take a three-part: test which can cost up to $200.
Tenants’ Case Wins Big
Four Hispanics who lived in an Upper West Side building in New York City were awarded $683,275 in a harassment case Aug. 26 for unsuitable living conditions they endured from 1979 to 1982.
A Manhattan civil court jury awarded former tenants Charles Acosta, F6lix Gonzalez, Armida Reyna and her six-year-old son the money for having had to live with inadequate heat or hot water, crumbling walls and ceilings, and no front door on the 19-unit building. The suit charged that the landlords tried to drive tenants out by not making repairs.
The five-story brownstone apartment building was under rent control. The tenants’ rents averaged $110 amonthforoneortwo rooms with no private bath.
‘Church Improving, More Work Ahead’
continued from page 1
Hispanic Link Weekly Repori


Martin McMurtrey, guest columnist
The Mariachi Bishop
The visit by Pope John Paul II to San Antonio, Texas, this Sunday brings to the national stage a short, dark-skinned bishop with a smile as wide as the state. Patricio Flores became in 1970 the first bishop of Mexican descent in the United States. Now, at 58, he is Archbishop of San Antonio.
The Pope’s visit is a recognition of the importance of the Hispanic community in U.S. Catholicism. It also underscores the role of Flores as a leader in this community.
Raised with eight brothers and sisters as part of a migrant farm worker family in south Texas, Flores achieved his eminent position in the church not through theological subtlety or political maneuvering, but through his simple concern for people, vigorously acted and expressed.
The driving force behind Flores has been an acute awareness of the generations of neglect and prejudice that have afflicted Mexican Americans. Until he was named auxiliary bishop of San Antonio, there were no Mexican Americans among the 285 bishops in the United States- and very few Mexican American priests.
Flores has rarely hesitated to take sides on political issues -whether they concern school funding, the organization of farm laborers, the status of the church in Cuba or the selection of a police chief in San Antonio.
HAS REPUTATION AS ACTIVIST
He has acquired a reputation as an activist, even something of a radical. The Mexican American Cultural Center, which he helped found in 1972, frequently invites from all over Latin America spokespersons for what has come to be called “Liberation Theology.”
But Flores is not easily labeled. In his personal devotions, he is quite traditional. His preaching is filled with stories of traditional values: love of family, education, of the Mother of God, and his own Mama
Flores also has a peerless reputation as a money-raiser. Years ago, when he was a young priest in a town near Houston, he received a frantic call from a mother whose two-year-old was choking on a coin. The woman’s neighbor had urged her to call Flores. When the mother protested that she needed a doctor, not a priest the neighbor quickly responded: “Nevermind! Father Flores can get money out of anyone.”
Flores, whose story-telling ability is renown, enjoys telling that one on himself. He concludes it by claiming that he did indeed retrieve the coin - and put it in his pocket for charity.
RESULT OF FOUR YEARS PREPARATION
Whatever Flores does, the motivating force is made up of both doctrine and compassion. When the impact of AIDS began to be felt in South Texas, he was among the first to emphasize that “when somebody is a patient, we do not point the finger, but lend a helping hand.”
The papal visit to San Antonio this month is the result of four years of preparation, beginning when Archbishop Flores made his required five-year report to the Vatican in 1983. Before leaving home, Flores met with the other 12 diocesan bishops in Texas. They decided to invite the Holy Father to Texas. Flores carried their petition to Rome.
It is a visit that Pope John Paul II won’t likely forget. Its planned agenda includes his being awakened on Sunday, Sept. 13, the day of his departure, by a 60-member mariachi band and being serenaded by musicians lining the six-mile route from the archbishop’s residence to Kelly Air Force Base.
Thus, his memory of the nation’s Hispanic Catholics and the “mariachi bishop” who hosted him will be forever etched.
(Martin McMurtrey, a published novelist, teaches English at Central Catholic High School in San Antonio. This column is adapted from his biography of Archbishop Flores, “Mariachi Bishop,” published this month.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept 7
Tom&s Romero, guest columnist
My Best Friend
He had been my best friend. I saw Phillip recently and both of us were embarrassed at our unscheduled reunion. Years had gone by since we had sat together at our eighth grade commencement.
Commencement “To begin, to enter upon, the act of starting..
For me the graduation exercises had been a beginning, a beginning that led to other commencements in high school and college.
For Phillip it marked the end. When fall came, both of us entered high school; within a few months, he was gone. He became, to use the euphemism of today, a “Hispanic discontinuer,” and no one noticed. I barely noticed. His leaving was so commonplace an occurrence.
Yet I can still see him - undersized, rope-thin body circling gracefully beneath a fly ball. If some of us are intellectually literate,
Phillip was physically literate, gifted with an ability to do everything with ease. He was not just street smart, or what I call asphalt smart but intelligent and curious about everything.
Now my boyhood friend considers himself a failure, he told me. He works hard to support his family, pays his taxes and is a neighbor anyone would like to have. But he feels a sense of non-achievement “I could have been.. ”
‘NOBODY SEEMED TO CARE’
Phillip’s discomfort came as each of us, looking at the other, realized that except for a decision made or forced upon us, we could be standing in each other’s shoes.
“I never felt welcome in high school,” he said. “It wasn’t that I was afraid or couldn’t do the work. It was that nobody seemed to care. Mom and Dad tried to understand, but they had less schooling than I did. They didn’t know how to help me. After a while, I felt invisible, so I just left.”
He smiled wryly. “Nobody came looking for me, so I guess I didn’t matter.”
Yes, we do have some bad, bigoted and uncaring teachers.
Hispanic parents? Just as the mythical teacher is not uniformly bad or good, we cover the full range of characteristics. Some Hispanic parents couldn’t care less. Others, most of them, care deeply.
THE THEORY OF THE THREE PS
Why non-success and non-involvement then? My theory: the three “Fs.”
Food - A person whose daily life is engulfed with sheer effort to survive sometimes doesn’t have time to visit a school, talk to a teacher, help with homework. Find time? Tell that to a three-job mother.
Fear- If the experience is unfamiliar or past experiences negative, we hesitate and are reluctant
Faith - Hispanics have a profound respect for institutions and authority figures. The ironic ultimate expression of trust may be that H ispanic parents defer to the wisdom of educators, just as they do to parish priests.
The line of Phillips is endless. Every day they grow tired of waiting, of hoping.
Phillip and I had another friend. He died in prison. Even his death was symbolic of poverty. He didn’t even have a rope to hang himself. He used his socks.
Human capital. Use it or lose it.
(Tomas Romero, of Denver, Colo., is a businessman active in Hispanic, civic and educational affairs there. This column, adapted from a lengthier article he wrote for The Rocky Mountain News, is reprinted with permission)
KAY BARBARO is on vacation. Her column, Sin pelos en la lengua,” will resume on her return from the Yoruba Cays, where she is diving for Spanish treasure.
1987 3


COLLECTING
MARIACHI BISHOP: The biography of Patricio Flores, archbishop of San Antonio, “Mariachi Bishop,” by Martin McMurtrey, is published thismonth. It is 175 pages with 40 photographs. Send $6.95 for the paperback, or $17.95 for the hardcover, plus $1.25 shipping cost. Order from Corona Publishing Co., 1037 S. Alamo, San Antonio, Texas 78210(512)227-1771.
HISPANIC TEEN-AGE PREGNANCY: The National Council of La Raza's “Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy: Overview and Implications?’ is a 17-page report which examines data on pregnancies using ethnic breakdowns. For a copy send $2 to the NCLRs Policy Analysis Center, Office of Research Advocacy and Legislation, 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001.
LATIN AMERICAN BIBLIOGRAPHY: The Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress recently published its 47th volume of the “Handbook of Latin American Studies.” The book provides an exhaustive list of books and articles available on various disciplines, such as education and politics. To order the hardback version, send $65 plus tax to: University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713.
N.Y.C. PAY DISCRIMINATION: For a free copy of “Wage Discrimination and Occupational Segregation in New York City’s Municipal Work Force: Time for a Change,” a 13-page study by the Urban Research Center, write to: Edward Handman, Dept of Public Relations, District Council 37, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, 125 Barclay St., New York, N.Y. 10007.
CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE: The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute has three fellowships through which Latinos can come to Washington, D.C., and become familiar with the federal government system. The Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program is geared toward recent college graduates and graduate students; the Graduate Fellowship Program places fellows with congressional committees; and the Summer H igh School I ntern-ship Program selects college-bound high school graduates for an eight-week internship. For applications and information, write to: CHCI, Fellowship Programs Coordinator, 504 C St NE, Washington, D.C. 20002(202)543-1771.
CONNECTING
HISPANIC ELDERLY TARGETED
La Asociacion National Pro Personas Mayores, based in Los Angeles, is among eight national organizations that will share $7.8 million in grants from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Senior Community Service Employment Program.
The funds, announced Aug. 3, are part of a program which offers part-time employment in community service activities to persons 55 years of age and older who are poor employment prospects. It runs from July 1,1987, through June 30,1988.
The association will receive $975,000 to enable it to establish 191 more older worker positions.
AIDS SATELLITE CONFERENCE NEARS
The first Pan American Teleconference on AIDS, linking several world experts, will be broadcast live via satellite Sept 14 and 15 from Quito, Ecuador, throughout Latin America, the Caribbean and the United States.
The conference is a joint effort of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, the Miami Children’s Hospital, Project Share of Intelsat, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the Inter-American Development Bank and Abbott Laboratories.
Interested parties can participate and ask questions from a series of planned reception sites, presently in 24 countries. The proposed reception site for the United States is the PAHO office in Washington.
The conference will be aired for general viewing by the Health Care Information Network based in San Diego, Calif. Fora list of their U.S. broadcast sites, call 1-800-433-0437. For further information contact PAHCs Daniel Epstein at (202) 861-3459.
HACU GETS IBM PLANNER
The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, based at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, was provided an expert programmer/planner by International Business Machines Corp. to help establish a data base file, OLLU announced Aug. 25.
The planner will work with HACU until July 1988 through IBM’s Faculty Loan Program.
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
NEW YORK SALSA FESTIVAL New York Sept. 7
The 12 th annual New York Salsa Festival concludes with two concerts: "Fiesta de Sonores-en la Playa" at Orchard Beach and “Salsa Meets Jazz” at the Village Gate. The first event features the orchestras of Ray de la Paz, Jose Alberto “El Canario" and Frankie Morales, while Cheo Feliciano and Oscar tf Leon and their orchestras will play at the salsa/Jazz show.
Harriet Wasser (212) 570-7037
LATIN AMERICA PEACE PANEL Washington, D.C. Sept. 9
“ If Not Contadora Then What?” is the title of a panel discussion sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens Foundation. Speakers include Manuel Cordero, minister-counselorat the Nicaraguan Embassy; Rub&n Robles, minister-counselor at the Costa Rican Embassy, and Cresencio Arcos, White House coordinator for Public Diplomacy on Central America.
Beatriz Zorn berg (202) 628-8516
HISPANIC HERITAGE LUNCHEON
Washington, D.C. Sept. 10
Federal Hispanic employment program managers
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will be honored at a luncheon for national Hispanic Heritage Week.
Salvador Soliz (202) 653-1602
MINORITY ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM Washington, D.C. Sept. 10-12 The Coalition of Minority Women in Business is sponsoring a program with the U.S Department of Commerce's Minority Business Development Agency. The program, “Putting All The Pieces Together,” provides an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network and exhibit products and services.
Silvia Rodriguez (202) 328-9001
PUERTO RICAN POSTER ART Washington, D.C. Sept. 10 - March 13 The Library of Congress will open an exhibit “Images of a Culture: The Puerto Rican Poster,” as part of national Hispanic Heritage Week celebrations. Helen Darlymple (202) 287-5108
KANSAS HISPANIC EVENTS Kansas Sept. 11-13
Various cities in Kansas will celebrate national Hispanic Heritage Week. Chanute will hold its70th annual Mexican American Fiesta on Sept.11-12. For more information, contact Irene Ortiz at (316) 431 -0856. Garden City will celebrate its 61st annual Mexican American Fiesta on Sept 11-12. Contact Patty De La Rosa at (316) 275-4523. Wichita is hosting Mexican Independence Weekend on Sept 11-13. Contact Anthony Ramirez (316) 681-2731. On Sept. 13, Dodge City will host the Our Lady oF Guadalupe Fiesta Contact Margarita Amaro at (316) Sept. 7,1987
227-7614.
LULAC SCHOLARSHIP DANCE Atlanta Sept 12
The Atlanta League of United Latin American Citizens Council 950 is sponsoring a dance to raise funds for its Hispanic college students scholarship fund. Music will be provided by Los Selectoa Aida Garrity (404) 752-4165
U.S. CONSTITUTION CONFERENCE Claremont Calif. Sept 12
Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will be the keynote speaker at the American Civil Liberties Union issues conference on the Constitution. The conference will have six workshops, including “Lifting the Lamp: Expanding the Rights of Non-Citizens” with Rev. Luis Olivares, co-chairman of the Coalition for Humane Immigration Rights of Los Angeles.
Linda Valentino (213) 487-1720
COMING SOON
VIOLENCE/HOMICIDE IN HISPANIC COMMUNITIES
Office of Minority Health, U.S. Dept, of Health and
Human Services
Los Angeles Sept. 14-15
Jess Kraus (213) 825-7066
EDITOR’S NOTE: Weekly Report will publish a roundup of national Hispanic Heritage Week events in Its Sept 14 issue.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER
(Asst, to HEO)
Develop/coordinate instructional technology programs (CAI, video, etc.), seminars and workshops for students, faculty and staff; assist in managing operation of Center, development of grant proposals; supervise computer based activities and computer labs; and coordinate LRC publicity. BA in Instructional Tech., Computer Sci. or related field + ability to develop original materials; good organizational & communication skills. Salary: $23,035+.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #352 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 9/18/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED
ATTORNEY
RADIO NEWS INTERNS
National Public Radio, together with The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and The Rockefeller Foundation, presents the 1987/1988 Residency in News for Minority Journalists.
This unique residency program at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., offers minority journalists an opportunity to enhance reportorial as well as production skills Working and training with NPR’s editors, reporters and producers, each resident spends one month in the News and Information Department reporting and producing for NPR’s national news magazines: Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
The program provides housing, a stipend, and up to $500 for transportation costs to and from Washington, D.C.
Applicants must have a minimum three years working experience in broadcast journalism as a reporter, producer or editor. The application process is open to minority journalists and producers affiliated with Public Radio station news departments and independent producers. Six applicants will be selected to participate in the program which will begin in mid-October.
For information regarding the Residency Program, call Elaine Salazar at (202) 822-2734. Deadline for applications is October 1.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
DIRECTOR OF
RADIO DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
The Foundation for Public Broadcasting in Georgia, Inc. has a vacancy for Director of Radio Development Services, coordinating development activities for Peach State Public Radio.
Designs and implements two membership drives per year for Peach State Public Radio. Coordinates administrative activities associated with radio underwriting. Oversees membership file and all Friends group activities.
Undergraduate degree in communication, public relations or marketing preferred. Experience in the production and implementation of radio fund drives preferred. Excellent communication, research and organizational skills required. Experience in membership management and volunteer management preferred. Salary $20,052-$23,196 with excellent benefits.
Qualified applicants should forward resume, letter of interest and salary requirements by September 10,1987 to: Personnel Office, Foundation for Public Broadcasting in Georgia, Inc., 1540 Stewart Ave., SW, Atlanta, Georgia30310.
•Major Washington, D.C., corporation seeking attorney with environmental litigation experience. Four years minimum litigation experience up through trial. Admission to bar required. $70,000 range. Contact Martha McGinnis at (212) 697-8682.
GENERAL MANAGER
Salary to $33,680. Four years supervisory experience or degree in industrial management or related field and two years related supervisory experience. Year-to-year management experience in lieu of degree is acceptable. Experience in related industrial, related assembly or packaging plant required. Must have good written, verbal and people skills. Experience in assessing and analyzing diverse business and production work. Possess valid drivers license and bondable. Bilingual English/Spanish preferred. Resume with salary history to: CHARO,3951 East Medford St., Los Angeles, Calif., 90063-1698. NO CALLS PLEASE
CONFERENCE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Assist in the planning of the annual conference. Requirements: Bachelor’s degree, computer knowledge, good coordination skills, self-motivated, attention to details, 50 wpm typing, excellent telephone technique and works well under pressure a must Bilingual ability preferred English/Spanish, good salary, benefits and travel.
Mail resume to: Conference A.A., c/o Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St NW, 2 nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001.
BRISTOL-MYERS COMPANY
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
DISTRIBUTION CENTER MANAGER
Buena Park, California $60,000 plus bonus
Contact Lionel M. Stevens, 345 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10154 (212) 546-5644.
The Montgomery County, Maryland, Department of Police is currently accepting applications for the position ot
POLICE OFFICER CANDIDATE
• Starting salary: $21,804 with increase to $22,895 upon completion of twenty weeks of training.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
• 60 college credit hours
• Not less than 21 years of age
• U.S. citizenship
• Possession of valid motor vehicle operator's license
• Clear police record
Montgomery County provides its employees with liberal fringe benefits.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CONTACT: Montgomery County Police Personnel Recruitment Office (301) 840-2525
Monday thru Friday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
DISTRICT MANAGER LIFE INSURANCE
Must be bilingual (Spanish/English). Guaranteed earnings first year $40,000. Opportunity to earn a much greater income. Outstanding fringe benefits. Automobile furnished. Position located in the Chicago area. Relocation paid if necessary. Call (312) 769-7643.
Equal Opportunity Employer; Male/Femdle
INFORMATION SOUGHT
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Arts & Entertainment
LATINOS ON THE FRINGE: The absence of Hispanic and other U.S. ‘minority’ performers in this month’s Los Angeles Festival was the topic of a recent City Council debate there.
Organizers of the festival - the privately funded successor of the 1984 Olympic Arts Festival - had requested that the city provide without charge up to $22,000 worth of equipment Before giving its approval to the event- which is expected to turn a profit- the council heard from dissenting members.
“Are we creating a kind of snobby arts festival here?” asked Gloria Molina, the newest of the 15 council members and the body’s first Latina.
Reminded by Councilman Mike Woo that several local Hispanic groups are expected to participate in a parallel Fringe Festival, Molina retorted that if minority groups“get to participate in the Fringe Festival, that’s just the way ifs going to be reflected. We’re part of the fringe, and not part of the main city.”
The Sept. 3-27 festival schedule includes 14 U.S. groups and/or artists on its roster, with the Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble among them. On Sept. 12 and 13, the dance group will present two
pieces choreographed by Perez. Spain’s comedy troupe El Tricicle (Sept. 22-27) is the only Hispanic group among visiting foreign companies.
In contrast, some500 local artsgroupsand individuals will produce more than 450 events for the Fringe Festival, most of which are scheduled between Sept 4 and Oct 4.
Up to 20 Latino events are planned for the Fringe Among them, Central American artists Rafael Rivera Escamilla and Jos6 Mario Garcia present an exhibit titled El Salvador Images and Reality (Sept. 4-12); the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts will stage an adaptation of Juan Rulfo’s novel Pedro Paramo (Sept. 16-Nov. 22); and El Rescate Community Center will hold a New Song Festival (Sept. 17).
ONE LINERS: An exhibit of paintings and silkscreens by Argentina’s
Mario Agatiello opens Sept. 8 at the Organization of American States
Building in Washington, D.C_Alejandro Montoya’s New Works on
Paper opens Sept. 10 at the Intar Latin American Gallery in New York
City... Los Lobos are scheduled to appear on the cable-TV broadcast
of the MTV Music Video Awards Sept. 11... And the last in a four-part
series of variety specials taped in Miami for Televisa’s Siempre en
Domingo, hosted by Raul Velasco, airs on the Univision network
Sept 13,9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. EDT... * ..... 0 . „
K - Antonio Me/ias-Rentas
Media Report
COVERING THE POPE: Newsweek magazine upset San Antonio Hispanics with its portrayal of them sitting around drinking beer while awaiting the pope’s arrival.
A Reuters news agency correspondent in the same city offered this Sept. 1 account later toned down:
“Each stop on the Pope’s upcoming tour of the United States has a purpose... Many of those flocking to hearthe Pope in San Antonio on Sept. 13 will be illegal aliens from Mexico, hungry for both spiritual and economic nourishment. ..”
WHITE HOUSE TRIBUTE: As part of this year’s Hispanic Heritage Week celebration, the public liaison office of the White House is coordinating a Washington, D:G, ceremony at the National Press Club to salute Latinos
in the media.
Some 300 Hispanics in journalism and related fields are expected to attend the Sept. 15 evening reception. It is sponsored by Hallmark Cards.
Plaques of recognition will be awarded for Hispanic contributions in five media fields Accepting them will be:
Print ArturoVillar, publisher, Vista magazine
Television: Ronald Gordon, co-owner, ZGS Productions.
Radio: Jos6 McMurray, National Public Radio.
Motion Pictures: Luis Valdez, director/pro-ducer, La Bamba.
Performing Arts: Marta Casals Istomin, artistic director, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
- Rudy Beserra, associate public liaison director at the White House, says he hopes to make the event an annual one, with national Latino media organizations selecting individuals to honor in the five media fields in future
years
EL MUNDO FOLDS: Puerto Rico’s oldest newspaper, El Mundo, founded in 1919, discontinued publication Aug. 30. It had been losing circulation and money in recent years The paper had 525 employees Its departure leaves the island with three other Spanish-language dailies and one English-language one.
COVERING LEGALIZATION: The Aug. 26 Washington Times quotes Father Kevin Farrell, directorof an immigration counseling program for the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, D.C., on the less-than-anticipated response by Salvadoran and Nicaraguan refugees there to the I NS’ legalization program: “In the Hispanic culture, ‘everything's mahana - tomorrow,’ he said. ‘I predict things will increase dramatically in February, March and April. Then we will have an avalanbhe of people.’ ”
- Charlie Ericksen
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Pope John Paul II and San Antonio Archbishop Patricio Flores.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week tugboat 1,100 miles off the California coast. De Zubiria and other members of the 129th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Group parachuted into the Pacific Ocean, contending with waves that at times reached 1 2 feet, and tended to the injured crewmen for 22 hours ... The executive committee of the Mexican American Demo crats of Texas names Ruben Bonilla president of MAD's Political Action Committee, the organization's fundraising and candidate endorsement arm . Bonilla recently completed a two-year term as MAD's chairman ... The Community Service Society of New York, established in 1848, names Angelo Falc6n, director of Institute for Puerto Rican Policy , to its 37-member board of trustees . . . Michael Oliveras, a Brooklyn, N . Y., elementary school student, is honored as the national fifth-grade winner in the U.S . Patent Model Foundation's Invent America program . Oliveras constructed a swivel headrest. .. Arizona Gov . Evan Mecham vows to Hispanic leaders in Tucson that he will fight any legislation that would make English the official language of the state ... Bexar County, Texas, District Attorney Fred Rodriguez says his office will drop a misdemeanor assault charge against U.S. Rep . Henry B. Gonzalez(DTexas) if Gonzalez apologizes publicly to the victim. The congressman agrees to do so . . . New Mexico Gov . Garrey Carruthers appoints James Maes as the deputy secretary for the state Economic Development and Tourism Department. .. California Gov. George Deukmejian bestows one of five Governor's Military Heroism Awards on Staff Sgt. Rodrigo De Zubiria for his efforts in saving a critically burned crew from a VOL5N<>35 ll HISPANIC LINK WEEKLy REPORT , ..... 7,1987 Pope's U.S. Visit Spotlights Hispanic Concerns Pope John P , ul ll's visit to several U . S . cities this month will highlight the growing visibility of Hispanics within the church and bring new national attention to Latinos ' social and economic problems outside of it, acknow ledge Hispanic Catholic clergy. These clergy members point out that much also remains to be done to increase the number of Hispanic priests and sisters and to stanch the flow of Latinos leaving the church. According to the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs for the U.S. Catholic Conference, His panics in the United States and Puerto Rico comprise 40% of the 52.8 million Catholics in the United States . This compares with 5% of the church's 383 bishops and archbishops, roughly 3% of the 19,546 pastors and a little more than 2% of the 112,489 sisters. An encouraging sign, say many, is that Latinos account for 11% of the nation's 11,000 sem inarians. Father Virgilio Elizondo, former director of the Mexican American Cultural Center in San Antonio, a renown research and educational center on the needs of Hispanic ministry, says, "The greatest area of challenge to U.S. Catholicism is how are they going to promote, educate, inform-quickly-Hispanic American vocations to priesthood . " The Hispanic clergy surveyed by Weekly Report, including Elizondo, stress that despite the underrepresentation of Latinos in decision making positions in the church hierarchy, great strides have been made as a result of the three encuentros to date-gatherings of clergy and , laity on ministry to Hispanicsand the recognition by the church of the central role of laymembers espoused by Vatican II. Father Mario Vizcaino , director of the South east Regional Office of Hispanic Affairs in Miami, says that because of the encuentros, the first of which was held in 1972, "We were able to create a common consciousness. .. that grows stronger and stronger every day." He says the organization of Hispanics in the church has improved dramatically but con cedes that the number of Latino clergy remains "very low . " Among factors given for the lack of lay participation in the church and the scarcity of Hispanic clergy are : the historical exclusion of Indians and mestizos in Latin America; the unattractiveness of celibacy , given the strong family tradition of Hispanics; the lack of cultural sensitivity displayed by parishes; the failure of priests to go out in the community and actively minister to Latinos ; the language barrier; and the church's laxity in recognizing the central role of Latinas in the imparting of religfon to families . Sister Yolanda Tarango, with the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio Ill. Colleges Settle Admissions Suit Five Illinois state universities will no longer tie students' immigration status to residency requirements, following an Aug . 18 settlement of a lawsuit brought by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund . MALDEF had filed a class-action suit challenging the schools' policy of denying admission or charging out-of-state rates to Illinois residents who could not prove U .S. citizenship or resident status . In July, MALDEF settled with the University of Illinois system , with campuses in Chicago and Urbana The other institutions, which are under the Board of Governors of State Colleges and Universities, are Northeastern Illinois University, Governors State University, Western Illinois University, Eastern Illinois University and Chicago State University. Plaintiffs Refugio Alarcon, Elizabeth Govea and Guillermo Alvarado are Mexican nationals who have lived most of their lives in Illinois and have been granted permission to remain in the United States. According to the suit, they were not con sidered state residents(who pay$1,764 annual tuition). They were either denied admission or charged out-of-state tuition of $4,260 . U . S . citizens can be classified as state residents after living in Illinois for six months. MALDEF attorney Arturo Jauregui explained that the new policy applies unless a document, such as a foreign student visa, specifically states that a student cannot establish re sidency in the United States . and one of three national coordinators for Las Hermanas, an organization of l n ywomen and clergy, says a further to the growth of Hispanic clergy, particu ! 1rly men , was the past policy of seminaries ana convents not to accept Latinos. "One of the drawbacks has been that a lot of the Hispanics-men especiallygoing into convents and seminaries came from inferior educational systems and couldn't makeJt" This caused seminaries and convents to look for Hispanics who came out of prep schools and were more assimilated , she adds. Las Hermanas has 400 members. Father Ricardo Chavez, director of the Division of Hispanic Affairs at the California Catholic Conference , says that those Hispanics who ; continued on page 2 Koch's 'Guarantee' Hit Statements by New York City Mayor Ed ward Koch that a Hispanic probably would not be named as the new schools chancellor but that he would "guarantee" the next appointee to the Board of Education would be Latino drew strong criticism from elected Hispanic leaders. When Chancellor Nathan Quii'tones steps down Jan. 1, there will be no high-ranking Hispanics in the school system. One black and no Hispanics serve on the seven-member education board. No current terms expire before 1990. The mayor, who made the comments Aug. 27, has two appointments on that board and each of the city's five borough presidents has .one. Koch appointed two white males 'to four-year terms which end in 1990. The chairman of the Education Committee of the New York State Assembly, Jose Serrano. said Koch's remark about a Hispanic ap pointment was "one of the cheapest shots 1 have ever heard in politics . " Serrano, who represents District 73 in the South Bronx, said Bronx Borough Pre sident Fernando Ferrer, who will select the next member, has already promised to ap point a Latino. Ferrer called Koch's comments "astounding'' and "condescending. "

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Latino Teeri Birth Rates Differ Significantly by Group ... The birth rate for Hispanic females aged 15 through 19 in 1980 was considerably higher than the rate for white females but birth rates among Hispanic subgroups were found to vary significantly, according to a report recently released by the National Council of La Raza. The report used figures for 1980 and 1984. The birth rate for Hispanic teen-age mothers in 1980 was 7 . 3% , compared to 4.5% for Anglo teen mothers. Blacks were at 1 0.2%. Among Hispanic subgroups, the Mexican American rate was8.9%, Puerto Ricans were at 6.8% and Cubans were at 2.3% . The report, "Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy: Overview and Implications," examined data mostly from the U.S . Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Statistics. Norma Lopez, the author of the study, told Weekly Report that while in most states the black teen-age birth rate was higher than that of Hispanics, the Hispanic rate in New Jersey was higher. There, the Puerto Rican rate was 11. 6% , compared with 1 0.0% for blacks. Hispanic teen-age mothers were less likely to complete high school than Anglo or black mothers, the study found. Cuban teen mothers RNHA Agrees to Hold New Elections Republican National Hispanic Assembly members will elect new officers Nov. 20-21 in Washington, D.C. The date was chosen at its constitutional convention in that city Aug. 29. Delegates also approved a new constitution The constitutional convention was called by a six-member "blue ribbon" task force charged with unifying the Hispanic affiliate of the Republican National Committee after AN HA split ranks on the legality of Chairman Fernando de Baca's February election. RNHA claims . more than 10,000 members. De Baca will serve as chairman until the November elections with the blue ribbon task force charged with carrying out operations. "I am notacandidateforanyoffice in RNHA and I will not be one in November," de Baca told the delegates. Three members of the task force, George Adams, Alfred Villalobos and Cathi Villalpando, have expressed interest in leading the RNHA. Future national elections will be set for April of each odd-numbered year. The new document mandates that RNHA chapters be organized similar to the national Republican Party . "The emphasis will be at the local level," said Edward Lujan, who chaired the blue ribbon committee and the constitutional convention. Changes in the AN HA constitution include: • Eliminating affiliates whereby autonomous groups of 100 members were granted a vote at conventions. Membership groups must now be organized at the county or other govern mental body level and be part of the state RNHA; and e Ensuring more equitable representation for women by creating national committeewoman positions and other posts for them on the executive committee. 'Church Improving, More Work Ahead' continued from page 1 do make it to the seminary experience "tre mendous culture shock'' due to differences in language, culture and" religious expression." "A lot of us, because of our experience in this country and our many years in the seminary, would be ordained but not be able to work with our own people ... For 12 years I could not work with Hispanic people because I had grown so far away from them," says Father Chavez . One example of efforts by the church to sensitize parishes around the country to the ministerial needs of Hispanics are the retreats, courses and speeches that occupy Father Domingo Rodriguez year-round . Rodriguez, who came on loan to the Cleveland parish of San Juan Bautista from Puerto Rico seven years ago, works with the Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity. ' "In the seven years I have been here, I have been very pleased in witnessing a tremendous concern on the part of the church and the hierarchy toward prompting and motivating Hispanics to integrate into the church," says Rodriguez. "Prejudice has been a factor but another has been that Hispanics have not been strong enough to enable us to coger las riendas de Ia vida-take control of our own destiny." 2 Rodriguez, like the other clergy surveyed, believes that the church is paying more attention to the importance of the Hispanic presence in religious and non-religious matters. Many feel that the stops on the pope's Sept. 10-19 itinerary speak to this recognition . Among the cities to be visited by the pope, many of which have a predominantly Hispanic Catholic population, are: Miami, Sept. 1 0; New Orleans, Sept. 12; San Antonio , Sept.13; Phoenix, Ariz., Sept. 14; Los Angeles, Sept. 15-16; San Francisco and Monterey, Calif., Sept. 18; and Detroit, Sept. 19. Besides the widespread belief that the pope's visit may shift the national spotlight toward Hispanics-albeit momentarily-there are two other events stirring excitement among Catholics. The first is the release of a national Hispanic pastoral plan to be ratified by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops this November in Washington, D.C. The other is the fourth encuentro, scheduled for 1992. There are also those among the clergy who temper their excitement with doses of realism. Concludes Elizondo: "lfs like climbing a mountain. We've climbed through the first foothills and looked back. We say we've come a long way, but we look up toward the top and say , 'My God, will we ever make it?' " Felix Perez were the only subgroup whose educational levels were comparable to white teen-age mothers. The study also revealed that Hispanics were more likely to be married when their children are born than were blacks but they were less likely to be married than white teen mothers. The incidence of low birttt-weight babies for Hispanics in 1984 (7.5%) was about the same as for white nonHispanics (7 .6%). Puerto Ricans were most likely of any Hispanic subgroup to give birth to babies with low weights. -Julio Laboy Legalization AIDS Test, to Start Dec. 1 ' Assailed The Reagan administration announced Aug. 28 that all undocumented persons seeking legalized status will be required to undergo testing for the AIDS virus. The new rules were sharply criticized by a coalition of advocacy groups. The regulations , to take effect Dec . 1 , bar . persons who test positive for the AIDS virus from immigrating to the United States. "From a public health standpoint, it is counter productive . Those with the disease are likely ' to go further underground, avoid the legalization process and continue to spread AIDS," said National Council of La Raza spokesman Charles Kamasaki . According to Vern Jervis, information officer for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization ! Service, undocumented persons who test positive can be excluded from permanent ' residency unless they are granted a waiver from the U.S. Attorney General . Waivers are . granted to assure family unity, for humanitarian 1 purposes and when in the public interest. 1 Those who have applied for legalization • will also be required to undergo testing . Kamasaki said that centers which provide free or low-cost testing, ranging to $15, are 1 backlogged . An applicant may, therefore, , choose to be tested at a costlier private institution, he said . If patients initially test 1 positive, they may elect to take a three-part i test which can cost up to $200. Tenants' Case Wins Big Four Hispanics who lived in an Upper West Side building in New York City were awarded $683,275 in a harassment case Aug . 26 for unsuitable living conditions they endured from 1979 to 1982. A Manhattan civil court jury awarded former tenants Char1esAcosta, Felix Gonzalez, Armida Reyna and her six-year-old son the money for having had to live with inadequate heat or hot water, crumbling walls and ceilings, and no front door on the 19-unit building. The suit charged that the landlords tried to drive tenants out by not making repairs. The five-story brownstone apartment buildI ing was under rent control. The tenants' rents averaged $110 a month for one or two rooms with no private bath. Hispanic Link Weekly Reporl

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Martin McMurtrey, guest columnist The Mariachi Bishop The vis i t by Pope John Paul II to San Antonio, Texas, this Sunday brings to the national stage a short, dark-skinned bishop with a smile as wide as the state. Patricio Flores became in 197 0 the first bishop of Mexican descent in the United St a t e s . Now, at 58, he is Archbishop of San Antonio . Th e Pope's visit is a recognition of the importance of the Hispanic c om m uni t y in U . S . Catholicism. It also underscores the role of Flores as a leader in this community. Raised with eight brothers and sisters as part of a migrant farm worker family in south ' Texas , Flores achieved his eminent position in the church not through theological subtlety or political maneuvering, but through his simple concern for people, vigorously acted and expressed . The driving force behind Flores has been an acute awareness of the generations of neglect and prejudice t hat have afflicted Mexican Americans . Until he was named auxiliary bishop of Sa n Antonio, ther e were no Mexican Americans a m ong the 285 b i sh o p s in the United States-and very few Mexican Amer i can pri ests. F lores has rarely hesitated to take sides on political issues -whether they concern sc h o ol funding, the organization of farm laborers , the status of th e c hurch in Cuba or the selection of a police chief in San Antonio. HAS REPUTATION AS ACTIVIST He has acquired a re p u tation as an activist , even something of a radical. The Mexican A merican Cul t u r al Center, which he helped found in 1972, frequently invites from all over Latin America spokes persons for what has come to be called "Liberation Theology." But F lores i s not ea sily labeled . In his personal devotions, he is quite traditional. His preaching is filled with stories of traditional values: lo ve of family, educat ion , of the Mother of God, and his own Mama . F l ores also has a p e erl ess reputation as a money-raiser . Years ago, when he was a you ng priest in a town near Houston, he received a frantic call from a m o ther whose two-yearold was choking on a coin. The woman's nei g hbor had urged her to call Flores . When the mother protested that s he needed a doctor, not a priest, the neighbor quickly responded: "Never m ind! Father Flores can get money out of anyone. " Flores, whose story-t elli n g ability is renown , enjoys telling that one on himself. He concludes i t by claiming that he did indeed retrieve the coin-and put it i n h is pocket for charity. RESULT OF F O UR YEARS PREPARATION Whatever Flo res does , the motivating force is made up of both doctrine and compassion . When the impact of AIDS began to be felt. in South Texas, he w as among the first to emphasize that "when somebo d y is a patient, we do not point the finger, but lend a helping h a nd ." Th e papal v i s i t t o San Antonio this month is the result of four years o f p reparation, beginn i ng when Archbishop Flores made his required f iv e-y e a r repo rt to t he Vatican in 1983. Before leaving home. Flores met with the o ther 12 diocesan bishops in Texas . They decided to invi t e the Holy Father to Texas . Flores carried their petition to Rome . It is a v is i t th a t Pope John Paul II won't likely forget. Its planned agenda i ncludes his being awakened on Sunday, Sept. 13, the day of his departure, by a 60-member mariachi band and being serenaded by musicians lining the six-mile route from the archbishop ' s residence to Kelly Air Force Base . Thus , hi s m e m o ry of the nation's Hispanic Catholics and the "mariachi bishop" who hosted him w i ll be forever etched. (Martin McMurtrey, a published novelist, teaches English at Central Ca tholic High School in San Antonio. This column is adapted from his biog r aphy of Archbishop Flores, "Mariachi Bishop," published this m o nth.) 'Tomas Romero, guest columnist My Best Friend He had been my best friend. I saw Phillip recently and both of us were embarrassed at our unscheduled reunion. Years had gone by since we had sat together at our eighth grade commencement. Commencement: "To begin, to enter upon, the act of starting . . . " For me the graduation exercises had been a beginning, a beginning that led to other commencements in high school and college. For Phillip it marked the end. When fall came, both of us entered high schoot, within a few months, he was gone. He became, to use the euphemism of today, a "Hispanic discontinuer," and no one noticed. I barely noticed. His leav i ng was so commonplace an occurrence. Yet I can still see him-undersized, rope thin body circling gracefully beneath a fly ball . If some of us are intellectually literate, Phillip was physically literate, gifted with an ability to do everything with ease . He was not just street smart, or what I call asphalt smart, but intelligent and curious about everything. Now my boyhood friend considers himself a failure, he told me. He works hard to support his family , pays his taxes and is a neighbor anyone would like to have . But he feels a sense of non-achievement " I could have been . . . " 'NOBODY SEEMED TO CARE' Phillip ' s discomfort came as ea c h of us, looking at the oth er, realized that except for a dec i s ion made o r forced upon US, We COUld be standing in each other's shoes. " I never felt welcome in high school, " he said. "It wasn' t that I was afraid or couldn' t do the work. It was t ha t nobody seemed to care. Mom and Dad tried to understand, but they had less schooling than I did. They didn't know how to help me. After a while, I felt invisible, so I just left." He smiled wryly. " Nobo d y c am e looki n g f o r me, s o I guess I didn't matter." Yes , we do have som e bad, bi gote d a nd uncaring teachers. Hispanic parents? Just a s the mythical teacher is not uniformly bad or good, we cover the full ran g e of characteristics. Some Hispanic parents couldn' t ca r e less . Others, most of them, care deeply. THE T H E ORY O F THE THREE P S Why non-success and non-involvement then? My t heory: the three " Ps." Food-A person whose daily life is engulfed with sheer effort to survive sometimes doesn' t hav e time to visit a school, talk to a teacher, help with homework. Find t i m e ? Tell that to a three-job mother. FearIf the experience is unfam i l iar or past e xperiences negative, we hesitate and are reluctant. Faith-Hispanics have a profound respect for institutions and authority f igures. The ironic ultimate expression of trust may be that Hispanic parents defer to the wisdom of educators, just as they do to parish priests. The line of Phillips is endless . Every day they grow tired of waiting, of hoping. Phillip and I had another friend. He died in prison. Even his death was symbolic of poverty . He didn't even have a rope to hang himself. He used his socks. Human capital. Use it or lose it. (Tomas Romero , of Denver, Colo., is a businessman active in Hispanic, civic and educational affairs there . This column, adapted from a lengthier article he wrote for The Roc ky Mountain News, is reprinted with permission.) KAY BARBARO Is on vacation. Her column, Sin pelos en /a /eng us," will resume on her return from the Yoruba Cays, where she Is diving for Spanish treasure. Hispa nic Lin k Weekl y Report Sept 7 , 1987 3

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COLLECTING MARIACHI BISHOP: The biography of Patricio Flores, archbishop CONNECTING of .san Antonio," Mariachi Bishop," by Martin McMurtrey, is published 1----------------------------' th1s month. It is 175 pageswith40 photographs. Send$6.95 for the HISPANIC ELDERLY TARGETED paperback, or $17.95 for the hardcover, plus $1.25 shipping cost. La Asociaci6n Naciona/ Pro Personas Mayores, based in Los Order from Corona Publishing Co., 1037 S. Alamo, San Antonio, Angeles, is among eight national organizations that will share $7 . 8 Texas 78210 (512) 227-1771. million in grants from the U .S. Department of Labor's Senior ComHISPANIC TEEN-AGE PREGNANCY: The National Council of La munity Service Employment Program. Raza's "Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy: Overview and Implications" The funds, announced Aug . 3, are part of a program which offers is a 17-page report which examines data on pregnancies using part-time employment in community service activities to persons 55 ethnic breakdowns. For a copy send $2 to the NCLR's Policy years of age and older who are poor employment prospects. It runs Analysis Center, Office of Research Advocacy and Legislation, 20 F from July 1 , 1987, through June 30, 1988. St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D .C. 20001. The association will' receive $975,000 to enable it to establish 191 LATIN AMERICAN BIBLIOGRAPHY: The Hispanic Division of more older worker positions. the Library of congress recently published its 47th volume of the AIDS SATELLITE CONFERENCE NEARS "Handbook of Latin American Studies." The book provides an exThe first Pan American Teleconference on AIDS, linking several haustive list of books and articles available on various disciplines, world experts, will be broadcast live via satellite Sept. 14 and 15 from such as education and politics. To order the hardback version, send Quito, Ecuador, throughout Latin America, the Caribbean and the $65 plus tax to: University of Texas Press , P.O. Box 7819, Austin , United States. Texas 78713. The conference is a joint effort of the Pan American Health N. Y.C. PAY DISCRIMINATION: For a free copy . Organization/World Health Organization, the Miami Children's Hospital, nation and Occupational Segregation in New York City's Municipal Project Share of lntelsat, the U .S. Centers for Disease Control, the Work Force: Time for a Change, " a 13. page study by the Urban Inter-American Development Bank and Abbott Laboratories. Research Center, write to: Edward Hand man, Dept of Public Relations, Interested parties can participate and ask questions from a series District Council 37, American Federation of State, County and of planned reception sites, presently in 24 countries. The proposed Municipal Employees, 125 Barclay St., New York, N.Y . 1 OOO?. reception site for the United States is the PAHO office in Washington. The conference will be aired for general viewing by the Health Care CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE: The Information Network based in San Diego , Calif. For a list of their U.S. Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute has three fellowships through broadcast sites, call1-800-433-0437. For further information contact which Latinos can come to Washington, D .C., and become familiar PAHO's Daniel Epstein at (202) 861-3459. with the federal government system. The Hispanic Leadership OpHACU GETS IBM PLANNER portunity Program is geared toward recent college graduates and graduate students; the Graduate Fellowship Program places fellows The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, based at withcongressionalcommittees;andtheSummerHighSchoollntern-Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, was provided an ship Program selects college-bound high school graduates for an expert programmer/planner by International Business Machines eight-week internship. For applications and information, write to: Corp. to help establish a data base file, OLLU announced Aug. 25. CHCI , Fellowship Programs Coordinator, 504 C St NE, Washington, The planner will work with HACU until July 1988 through IBM's D.C . 20002 (202) 543-1771. Faculty Loan Program . Calendar THIS WEEK NEW YORK SALSA FESTIVAL New York Sept. 7 The 12th annual New York Salsa Festival concludes with two concerts: "Fiesta de Sonores-en Ia Playa" at Orchard Beach and " Salsa Meets Jazz" at the Village Gate . The first event features the orchestras of Ray de Ia Paz , Jose Alberto "EI Canario" and Frankie Morales, while Cheo Feliciano and Oscar cfLeon and their orchestras will play atthe sa/sa/jazz show . Harriet Wasser (212) 570-7037 LATIN AMERICA PEACE PANEL Washington, D . C . Sept. 9 "If Not Contadora Then What?" is the title of a panel discussion sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens Foundation . Speakers include Manuel Cordero , minister-counselor at the Nicaraguan Embassy; Ruben Robles, minister-counselor at the Costa Rican Embassy; and Cresencio Arcos, White House coordinator for Public Diplomacy on Central America. Beatriz Zornberg (202) 628-8516 HISPANIC HERITAGE LUNCHEON Washington, D . C . Sept. 10 Federal Hispanic employment program managers 4 will be honored at a luncheon for national His panic Heritage Week . Salvador Soliz (202) 653-1602 MINORITY ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAM Washington , D . C . Sept.10-12 The Coalition of Minority Women in Business is sponsoring a program with the U . S . Department of Commerce's Minority Business Development Agency . The program , " Putting All The Pieces Together, " provides an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network and exhibit products and services . Silvia Rodriguez (202) 328-9001 PUERTO RICAN POSTER ART Washington, D .C. Sept. 10 March 13 The Library of Congress will open an exhibit, "Images of a Culture: The Puerto Rican Poster , " as part of national Hispanic Heritage Week celebrations. Helen Darlymple (202) 287-5108 KANSAS HISPANIC EVENTS Kansas Sept. 11-13 Various cities in Kansas will celebrate national Hispanic Heritage Week. Chanute will hold its 70th annual Mexican American Fiesta on Sept. 11-12 . For more information, contact Irene Ortiz at (316) 4310856. Garden City will celebrate its 61 st annual Mexican American Fiesta on Sepl11-12. Contact Patty De La Rosa at (316) 275-4523. Wichita is hosting Mexican Independence Weekend on Sept. 11-13 . Contact Anthony Ramirez (316) 681-2731. On Sept. 13, Dodge City will host the Our Cady of Guadalupe Fiesta Contact Margarita Amaro at (316) Sept. 7,1987 227-7614. LULAC SCHOLARSHIP DANCE Atlanta Sept 1 2 Julio Laboy The Atlanta League of United Latin American Citizens Council950 is sponsoring a dance to raise funds for its Hispanic college students scholarship fund. Music will be provided by Los Selectos. Aida Garrity (404) 752-4165 U.S. CONSTITUTION CONFERENCE Claremont, Calif . Sept. 12 Former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will be the keynote speaker atthe American Civil Liberties Union issues conference on the Cons titution. The conference will have six workshops, including "Lifting the Lamp: Expanding the Rights of Non-Citizens" with Rev . Luis Olivares, of the Coalition for Humane Immigration Rights of Los Angeles. Linda Valentino (213) 487-1720 COMING SOON VIOLENCE/HOMICIDE IN HISPANIC COMMUNITIES Office of Minority Health, U .S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Los Angeles Sept. 14-1 5 Jess Kraus (213) 825-7066 EDITOR'S NOTE: Weekly Report will publish a roundup of national Hispanic Heritage Week events in Ita Sept. 14 Issue. Hispanic Link Weekly Report I

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER (Asst. to HEO) Develop/coordinate instructional technology programs (CAl, video , etc.) , seminars and wo rkshops for students, faculty and staff; assist in managing operation of Center , development of grant proposals; supervise computer based activities and computer labs ; and coordinate LRC publicity. BA in Instructional Tech., Computer Sci . or related field +ability to develop original materials ; good organizational & communication skills. Salary: $23,035+. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #352 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 9 /18/87 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York , NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED RADIO NEWS INTERNS National Public Radio , together with The Cor poration for Public Broadcasting and The Rocke feller Foundation, presents the 1987/1988 Residency In News for Minority Journalists. This unique residency program at NPR head quarters in Washington , D . C . , offers minority journalists an opportunity to enhance reportorial as well as production skills. Working and training with NPR ' s editors, reporters and producers, each resident spends one month in the News and Information Department reporting and pro ducing for NPR ' s national news magazines : Morning Edition , All Things Considered , and Weekend Edition. The program pro v ides housing , a stipend, and up to $500 for transportation costs to and from Washington , D . C . Applicants must have a minimum three years working e xperience in broadcast journalism as a reporter, producer or editor. The application process is open to minority journalists and producers affiliated with Public Radio station news departments and independent producers. Six applicants will be selected to participate in the program which will beqin in mid-October . For information regarding the Residency Pro gram, call Elaine Salazar at (202) 822-2734. Deadline for applications is October 1. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md. , govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. DIRECTOR OF RADIO DEVELOPMENT SERVICES The Foundation for Public Broadcasting in Georgia, Inc . has a vacancy for Director of Radio Development Services, coordinating development activities for Peach State Public Radio. Designs and implements two membership dri ves per year for Peach State Public Radio . Coordinates administrative activities associated with radio underwriting. Oversees membership file and all Friends group activities. Undergraduate degree in communication; publ i c relations or marketing preferred . Ex ence in the production and implementation of radio fund drives preferred. Excellent com munication, research and organizational skills required . Experience in membership manage ment and volunteer management preferred. Salary $20,052-$23,196 with excellent benefits. Qualified applicants should forward resume , l etter of interest and salary requirements by September 10, 1987 to : Personnel Office , Found ation for Public Broadcasting in Georgia, Inc., 1540 Stewart Ave., SW, Atlanta, Georgia3031 0 . Hispani c Link Weekly Report ATTORNEY . Major Washington , D.C., corporation seeking attorney with environmental litigation ex perience. Four years minimum litigation ex pe rience up through trial. Admission to bar required . $70,000 range . Contact Martha McGinnis at (212) 697-8682. GENERAL MANAGER Salary to $33,680. Four years supervisory experience or degree in industrial management o r related field and two years related supervisory e xperience. Year-to-year management experi ence in lieu of degree is acceptable . Experience in related related assembly or packag ing plant required . Must have good written , verbal and people skills. Experience in assessing and analyzing diverse business and production work. Possess valid drivers license and bondable . Bilingual English/Spanish preferred . Resume with salary history to: CHARO , 3951 East Med ford St., Los Angeles, Calif. , 90063-1698. NO CALLS PLEASE . CONFERENCE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Assist in the planning of the annual conference . Requirements : Bachelor's degree, computer knowledge, good coordination skills , vated , attention to details, 50 wpm typing , ex cellent telephone technique and works well under pressure a must. Bilingual ability preferred English/Spanish, good salary , benefits and travel Mail resume to : Conference AA. , c/o Lupe Aguirre , National Council of La Raza , 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor , Washington , D . C . 20001 . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY .NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • Con necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter tainment • Editorial Cartoon • S/n Pelos en Ia Lengua • Marketplace BRISTOL-MYERS COMPANY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DISTRIBUTION CENTER MANAGER Buena Park, California $60,000 plus bonus Contact Lionel M . Stevens, 345 Park Ave. , New York, N . Y . 10154 (212) 546-5644. The Montgomery County , Maryland, Department of Police is currently accepting cations for the position of: POLICE OFFICER CANDIDATE • Starting salary: $21,804 with increase to $22,895 upon completion of twenty weeks of training . MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS • 60 college credit hours • Not less than 21 years of age • U.S . citizenship • Possession of val i d motor vehicle oper ator's license • Clear police record Montgomery County provides its employees with liberal fringe benefits. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CONTACT : Montgomery County Police Personnel Recruitment Office (301) 840-2525 Monday thru Friday, 8 :00 am to 4 :00 pm DISTRICT MANAGER LIFE INSURANCE Must be bilingual (Spanish/English) . Guaran teed earnings first year $40, 000. Opportunity to earn a much greater income. Outstanding fringe benefits. Automobile furnished . Position located in the Chicago area . Relocation paid if necessary . Call (312) 769-7643. Equal Opportunity Employer ; INFORMATION SOUGHT Any Hispanic who in the last 10 years has applied for a position with the U . S . Department of Education nationwide and was not selected, please send information on position applied for, and date applied, to: Marketplace, Box E , Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. lncludeyouraddressandphone number. Thank you . SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Nanie Organization----------Address-----------City, state, zip 0 Start 13week trial subscri ption $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed o Bill me 0 Bill my organization Mall to: Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washlnglon, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737

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Arts & Entertainment pieces choreographed by Perez . Spain's comedy troupe El Tricicle (Sept. 22-27) is the only Hispanic group among visiting foreign companies. LATINOS ON THE FRINGE: The absence of Hispanic and other In contrast, some500 local artsgroupsand individuals will produce U.S.' minority' performers in this month's Los Angeles Festival was the more than 450 events for the Fringe Festival, most of which are topic of a recent CityCouncil debate there. scheduled between Sept. 4 and Oct. 4. Organizers of the festival-the privately funded successor of the Up to 20 Latino events are planned for the Fringe. Among . them, 1984 Olympic Arts Festival-had requested that the city provide Central American artists Rafael Rivera Escamilla and Jose Mario without charge up to $22,000 worth of equipment. Before giving its Garcia present an exhibit titled El Salvador: Images and Reality approval to the event-which is expected to turn a profit-the council (Sept. 4-12); the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts will stage an heard from dissenting members. adaptation of Juan Rulfo's novel Pedro Paramo (Sept. 16-Nov. 22); "Are we creating a kind of snobby arts festival here?" asked Gloria and El Rescate Community Center will hold a New Song Festival Molina, the newest of the 15 council members and the body's first (Sept. 17). Latina. ONE LINERS: An exhibit of paintings and silkscreens by Argentina's Reminded by Councilman Mike Woo that several local Hispanic Mario Agatiello o,pens Sept. 8 at the Organization of American States groups are expected to participate in a parallel Fringe Festival, Building in Washington, D.C .... Alejandro Montoya's New Works on Molina retorted that if minoritygroups"get to participate in the Fringe Paper opens Sep't. 10 at the In tar Latin American . Gallery in New York Festival, thafs just the way ifs going to be reflected . We're part of City .. . Los Lobos are scheduled to appear on the cableTV broadcast . the fringe , and not part of the main city." of the MTV Music Video Awards Sept. 11 .. . And the last in a four-part The Sept. 3-27 schedule includes 14 U.S. groups and/or series of variety specials taped in Miami for Televisa's Siempre en artists on its roster, with fhe Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble Domingo , hosted by Raul Velasco, airs on the Univision network among them. On Sept. 12. and 13, the ' dance group will p ' rese 'nt two Sept. 13, 9 to 12:30 a.m. EDT ... . . . . '"''.: . IY!edia R . e_. porf Hispanics in journalism and related fields are expected to attend the , COVERING THE POPE! . magazine upset San Antonio Hispanic ' s with its portrayal of them sitting around drinking beer while awaiting the pope's arrival. A Reuters news agency correspondent in the same city offered this Sept. 1 account, later toned down: "Each stop on the Pope's upcoming tour of the United States has a purpose ... Many of those flocking to heart he Pope in San Antonio on Sept. 13 will be illegal aliens from Mexico, hungry for both spiritual and economic nourishment. .. " Sepl 15 even .ir;Jg reception . It is sponsored by Hallmark Cards. Plaques of recognition will be awarded for Hispanic contributions in five media fields. Accepting them will be : Print: Arturo Villar, publisher, Vista magazine Television : Ronald Gordon, ZGS Productions. Radio: Jose McMurray , National Public Radio. Motion Pictures: Luis Valdez, ducer, La Bamba . Performing Arts: Marta Casals lstomin, artistic director, J . ohn F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts . , . WHITE HOUSE TRIBU.TE: . A,s part of this Rudy Beserra, . associate public liaison di year's Hispanic Heritage Week celebration, rector at the White House, says he hopes to the public liaison office of the White House is make the event an annual one , with national coordinating a Washington, D:C., ceremony Latino media organizations selecting individuals -Antonio Mejias-Rentas years . EL MUNDO FOLDS: Puerto Rico's oldest newspaper, El Mundo, founded in 1919, dis continued publication Aug. 30. It had been losing circulation and money in recent years. The paper had 525 employees. Its departure leaves the island with three other Spanish-language dailies and one English language one. COVERING LEGALIZATION: The Aug. 26 Washington Times quotes Father Kevin Farrell, director of an immigration counseling program for the Catholic Archdiocese of Wash ingtqn, D.C., on the less-than-anticipated re sponse by Salvadoran and Nicaraguan re fugees there to the INS' legalization program: "In the Hispanic culture, 'everything ' is manana tomorrow,' he said . 'I predict things will increase dramatically in February, March and April. Then we will have an avalanche of National Press Club to sai'ute . Latinos to honor in the five media fields in future -Charlie Ericksen people.'" HI$PANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service. . . 1420 'N' Street NW . . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting : Cha rlie Eri c ksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias . No portion of H ispa n ic Weekly Report may be reproduced o r broadcast in any form without advance permission.,-,. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $2!1. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 75 ce nts Per word. Dis play ad s are $35 per column inc . h . Ads pla c<>d by TuP.sday 'I! ill run in Weekly Rep o rt s mailed Frida y of sa'nie week . Multiple use rate s on reauest. ... ... 6 : _?_ Pope John Paui .ILand. Antonio Archbishop Patricio Flores. Hispanic Link Weekly Report