Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, September 14, 1987

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, September 14, 1987
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
San Antonio attorney Roy Barrera tells Texas Gov. Bill Clements he does not wish to be considered for appointment as chief justice of the state Supreme Court Barrera, formerly a San Antonio district court judge, made a strong showing in last year's race for state attorney general... Denver Mayor Federico Pefta announces that Kathy Archuleta will serve as one of his three deputy chiefs of staff. Archuleta, a long-time Pefta aide, will oversee internal operations and community outreach... New York Mayor Edward Koch names the Rev. Roberto Gonzalez, a Roman Catholic pastor from the Bronx, to a 12-member panel that will investigate complaints of police mis-
conduct. Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward appointed George Sdnchez, deputy commissioner for equal employment for the department, to the panel... Alicia Coro takes over as director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs... Chicago Police Department Deputy Superintendent Matt Rodriguez becomes one of the top three contenders to head the nation’s second-largest police force upon the announced resignation of the current commissioner... Manuel G6mez, director of the University of California at Irvine’s Educational Opportunity Program, is named assistant vice chancellor for academic affairs and student affirmative action... Joaquin Bacardi, 85, retired president of the rum empire founded by his grandfather in 1862, dies Sept. 1 in his home in Nassau, Bahamas. Bacardi suffered from a heart ailment..
^^•^^^^^^^^JK^WEEKLY^REPORT
Latinos Grow 30% Since 1980
Latino TB Incidence Twice that of Nation
The tuberculosis rate among Hispanics is twice that of the national average and four times the rate of the lung disease among whites, according to a Sept.4 report issued by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta
Latinos have a rate of 18 cases per 100,000 compared with the national rate of nine and a rate of 4.5 for whitea The rates are based on the 22,201 cases reported to the CDC in 1985.
About 14% of the total - or 3,134 - were Hispanic. Forty-two percent - or 1,306 - of those Latinos were born in other countries.
“Many Hispanics are immigrants from countries that have higher rates of tuberculosis than the United States, and we see that among all immigrants who come from higher-prevalence areas,’’ said Dr. Hans Reider, who conducted the CDC study. Forty-eight percent of Hispanic victims were under age 35. |
California had the highest number of Hispanic TB cases with 40% (1,239), followed by Texas with 23% (731). New York had 13% (394). All other states had a total of 25%. Puerto Rico had 169 cases.
Asians had the highest rate of TB at 50 cases per 100,000 followed by blacks with 28 per 100,000 and American Indians and Alaska natives with a rate of 25.
Chicago AIDS Cases Rise
Hispanics in Chicago made up eight of 33-24% - of the documented new AIDS cases there for the month of August, reported the Chicago Health Department That compared with 10 out of 161 -6.2%-of the cases in the preceeding four months.
Brian Chapman, the health department’s project coordinator for AIDS surveillance, told Weekly Report that while the n umber of AIDS cases among Hispanics seems to be increasing, “The large increase for August may be attributed in part to the (slow) rate of reporting among physicians and the efficiency of particular hospitals.”
Hispanics have accounted for 7% of the AIDS cases in the city since the first case was diagnosed in 1981 and 9% of the cases so far in 1987.
U.S. Hispanics numbered 18.8 million in March 1987, a 30% increase since the 1980 census, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Sept. 11. The rate was five times higher than the 6% growth for the non-Hispanic population. Bureau figures show an increase of 4.2 million from the 14.6 million Hispanics reported in 1980.
As of July 1,1986,3.27 million people lived in Puerto Rico, according to bureau statistics. This would bring the U.S. Hispanic population
U.S. Hispanics - March 1987
Puerto Rican
to 22 million, or almost 9.2% of the nation’s 239 million people.
Between March 1986 and 1987, the Latino population grew by about 700,000. Of the 18.8 million Hispanics on the U.S. mainland, 11.76 million were of Mexican origin. Next came 2.28 million Puerto Ricans.
Central and South Americans, who are
combined in the census count, had the highest growth rate between 1982 and 1987 -40% -followed by “other Hispanics” at 33% and Mexicans at 22%. The “other” category includes those who are of Spanish origin or identify themselves in general categories such as Hispanic or Latino. Puerto Ricans(11%) and Cubans (7%) had the smallest growth during those five years.
The estimates for Cubans and Puerto Ricans show a decrease since 1985. Cubans, according to the bureau, numbered 1.04 million in 1985 and 1.02 million in 1987. The drop for Puerto Ricans was even greater, with 2.66 million in 1985 and 2.28 million in 1987.
While sampling error may be responsible for the lower number of Cubans, the change in Puerto Rican figures is still being investigated.
Hispanic population estimates were obtained through surveys in March of 1986 and 1987. This is the first report using an estimating procedure for Hispanics which allows for net undocumented immigration (adding 200,000 persons per year) and increases estimates foremigration by legal residents from 36,000 to 160,000 persons per year. This results in adding 76,000 persons per year to the total population estimate.
In education, the proportion of Hispanics 25 years and older with a high school education or more was 45% in 1982 and 51% in 1987. For Hispanics completing college, those numbers went from 8% to 9%.
In 1986 median income, Hispanic men earned a median of $11,958, or 61 % of the $19,588
continued on page 2
U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH, 1980 -1987
(Numbers in Thousands)
1987 1985 1982 1980
Mexican 11,762 10,269 9,642 8,740
Puerto Rican 2,284 2,562 2,051 2,014
Cuban 1,017 1,036 950 803
Central and South 2,139 1,722 1,523-^
American J>3,051
Other Hispanic 1,588 1,350 1,198-^
Total 18,790 16,940 15,364 14,609
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. In 1980, the bureau included Central or South American with Other Spanish Origin populations. The chart does not include figures for Puerto Rico, which had 3.27 million people as of 1986.


Unemployment Steadies; More Latinas Now Working
The Hispanic unemployment rate remained relatively steady last month, reported the U.S. Department of Labor Sept 4. The jobless rate for Latinos climbed one-tenth of a percentage point - from 7.9% in July to 8% last month.
The rate represented 680,000 Latinos who were out of jobs.
On the same day the National Committee for Full Employment, a non-profit public policy group in Washington, D.C., issued what it calls its “real” unemployment rate. Arriving at the real rate by adding workers forced to accept part-time jobs and those who have given up looking, NCFE figured the Hispanic
jobless rate for August to be 15.8%. This compares with 18.3% for August 1986.
NCFE reported that although there have been 56 months of economic recovery since 1981 -82, the jobs created have been primarily part time and low-paying.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently released a report which said Hispanic representation in the labor force was increasing at a much faster rate than that of blacks or
2nd Qtr. Unemployment 1986-1987
Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban
1986 11.0% 13.4% 8.5%
1987 9.6 8.2 6.7
whites. The growth in employment for His-panics from the first half of 1986 was 8.2%, compared with 3.0% for blacks and 2.3% for whites.
The report attributed the growth to increased immigration and a sharp rise in the proportion of the Hispanic non-institutional working-age population that is employed.
The report added that the sharpest rise in employment for Hispanics occurred among Latinas. Therewasa12% increase-300,000 - in the number of Hispanas working in the first half of 1987 compared to a year earlier.
The rate of growth for Hispanic men was roughly half that.___ - Felix Perez
â– j
|
I
1
1
1
1
Latino Student Loan Record Praised
Although Hispanic community-college and private-vocational school students are poorer and much more inclined to drop out, they repaid student loans at a comparable rate to whites, a report released Aug. 26 on California’s student-loan default rate found.
These two factors, poverty and dropping out according to the report, are important indicators as to whether students will default on government-guaranteed loans.
It found an 18% default rate for Hispanics, a 16% rate for Anglos and a 36% rate for black students for the 1982-83 period studied.
Hispanics comprise 165,200, or 13.5%, of the total enrollment in California community colleges. About one-third of them apply for financial aid.
Samuel Kipp, director of the California Student Aid Commission, told Weekly Report that the commission was not satisfied with the report because it implied that ethnicity was an indicator for default.
“Given the factors that might make low-income Hispanic students appear a higher risk, their default rate is not appreciably different from whites,” he said.
Pepe Barrbn, director of the Washington, D.C.-based El Congreso Nacional de Asuntos Coiegiaies, an organization concerned with Hispanic community-college issues, said that for Hispanics, “it is a matter of respectability to make arrangements to pay the loans, to at least keep your honor and family name.”
Firms operating in Puerto Rico under Section 936 of the U.S. Tax Code- tax credit incentives used to attract mainland firms - directly and indirectly account for 36% of the island’s 750,000 jobs, concludes a report released Sept 2.
The report further finds that firms set up under the 11-year-old tax code provision are responsible for 94,000 - 61% - of Puerto Rico's manufacturing jobs.
In 1982 and 1985 amendments were introduced in Congress that would have cut back some of the incentives offered by Section 936. They were defeated. These proposed amendments, says the report, created a state 2
Whites know how to use the system, he added, “and historically have abused grants and loans.”
The report is titled “Whose Fault is Default?”
The state received about $841.4 million in federal funds for guaranteed and direct student loans, roughly 10% of the nation’s funds for such programs. It has the sixth highest default rate in the nation at 13.2%. The national average is 8.7%.
Latinos9.2% of U.S. Pop.
continued from page 1
earned by non-Hispanic men. Median family income for Hispanics showed no significant change between 1981 and 1986. It was $19,995 in 1986. Non-Hispanic families saw an increase of 10% to $30,231 in that period.
The report also shows:
• The median age of the U.S. population is 32. For Latinos, the median age is 25, with those of Mexican origin having the lowest at 23.5 years, and Cubans the highest at 35.8 years.
• The mean number of persons in U.S. families is 3.19. For Hispanics, that number is 3.83, with those of Mexican origin averaging the largest number of persons per family (4.05) and Cubans the smallest (3.18).
• Hispanics of Mexican origin experienced higher unemployment rates(11.2%) than Puerto Ricans (9.2%) and Cubans (6.4%).
- Melinda Machado
of uncertainty and discouraged new investment in Puerto Rico.
“Any... changes of consequence(to Section 936) would destabilize the centerpiece of its (Puerto Rico’s) economic development program and jolt the economy,” said Carl Nordberg, executive director of the Puerto Rico, U.S.A. Foundation. The foundation, a group of 70 mainland concerns with operations in the island, commissioned the report Of the 25% of Section 936 firms that responded to a survey in 1985,35% said that they delayed $119 to $124 million worth of investments, representing a temporary loss of between 1,900 and 2,200 jobs.
Sept 14,1987
Four Quit Commission, Criticize Gov. Martinez
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez quickly replaced seven members of the 15-member state Commission on Hispanic Affairs on Sept. 4, three days after four commissioners publicly stated that they no longer intended to serve on the commission because of the governor’s apparent lack of interest in it.
The four charged that the governor ignored requests for meetings and refused to recognize commission recommendations on issues affecting Florida’s Hispanics.
The commissioners who resigned were chairman Rafael Penalver, who had been a member since 1979, Frank deVarona, Felipe Fernandez and banker Luis Botifoll.
Penalver told Weekly Report that Martinez’s treatment was a reaction to the commission’s success in influencing the legislature to extend it for another 10 years and keep it housed in the governor’s office. The Florida Legislature voted overwhelmingly to do so in May. Penalver charged Martinez with reacting like “a six-year old. It was an infantile and arrogant reaction.”
The new commissioners are: chairman Miguel Ribero Silva, 56, real estate broker, Eliseo Ferrer, 56, also a real estate broken Tere Zubizarreta, 49, president and owner of an advertising agency; Pedro Martin, 48, attorney, Dr. Alberto Herran,47; Armando Selerio, 44, president and owner of an office furniture manufacturer; and Max Borges,45, president of a construction company.
The terms of the new commissioners, which are unpaid positions, expire Sept 1,1991.
- Julio Laboy
Anti-Bork Service Initiated
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund announced Sept. 9 in San Antonio the formation of a telegram service for individuals to urge their senators to oppose the nomination of federal appellate court Judge Robert Bork to the U.S. Supreme Court.
The Western Union telephone number -1 -800-257-4900 - was to begin operation by this week.
The service will be operational for one month after Bork confirmation hearings begin Sept 15. *
Tax Credits Yield Many Island Jobs
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Velia Leal, guest columnist
The Perfect Hispanic
The notion of image nags at us Hispanics constantly. What should one look like? How should one act?
One more time, let's take on the challenge.
Sketch a model Hispanic American figure. Create the prototype-an image for our diverse community of 22 million people representing some two dozen countries of origin.
Give it an identity that pleases, a physical shape. Consider every aspect of this being.
Start with a scenario: Place this Hispanic figure at the turn of the century-the year 2001. Put him or her in the center of the United States. That way we can’t miss.
This ideal Hispanic must have stately qualities, a person of sufficient seasons.
He or she must be at least bilingual, preferably multilingual, symbolic of a cosmopolitan race.
He or she should have personally collected life experiences from low economic times to high economic times and have coped with moments of international strife, as well as the somber defeats and elating victories served to us by our civil rights struggles here at home.
We’re talking image, so let this individual have a college education and the maturation that comes from venturing into business and politics. Let him or her have experienced the responsibilities of administration and management.
SVELTE WE ARE NOT
Now let us delve into the physical profile of our model Hispanic.
We can’t be too tall. Lean to the short.
We’re not really fat, but svelte we are not. If you claim an hourglass figure or bloated muscles, give up. Just the essentials.
In our rostros - our faces-we have more to work with. Startwith the color of our skin- a range of blue-black, shades of brown and tan, to the creamy white so popular these days. For purposes of unity, let’s stay with vanilla-brown.
Our hair is “in” from one end of the spectrum to the other - kinky Afro or a mane of soft blond strands. Reach to the middle - gentle, curly, thick black-brown hair with a tinge of red.
Now the forehead. Forget the high brow and the small brow. Choose instead a moderate forehead dominated by thick dark well-formed eyebrows. Pluck and trim all day, but prominent eyebrows they will be! Work them. Use them for expression.
Eyes. We’re all eyes. iOjazos!
They are our best fixture. Large, expressive. Fringed and outlined with generous lashes. Windows of the soul, they are. For us they are that, plus the murals that reveal our hearts and paths to our minds. Our eyes tell it all. Is that bad?
HISTORICAL LIPS, STUBBORN CHIN Our nose. The flat, wide, large nostril or the Romanesque narrow arched nose? A plastic surgeon’s dream. Again, take the best of both and you’ve got a firm feature that’s not too bad.
Our lips are historical and determined. We have a choice of ample lips or very thin-lined ones. Take a combination and add a touch of steadfastness with a protruding, stubborn lower lip. Zippo! You have sensuous lips that are interesting, soft and ready to speak I like that.
Chins of Hispanics are molded not so much by heritage, but rather by all the features they must support Be proud of the chin and hold it to the sky.
I have taken these written concepts and moved them from my typewriter to the pen on my drawing table. I created a caricature. Nota stereotype. A caricature. I believe I’m on the right track I What I have created looks just like me.
j (Velia Leal, of Denver, Colo., is an accountant who also writes, draws \and acts.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept
Sin pelos en la lengua
NUMBERS GAMES: Counting crowds, like counting votes or counting sheep while trying to sleep, is an inexact science, highly subject to emotional tampering or other people’s tosses and turns.
Attendance at political rallies may be estimated at 100,000 by the candidate, 10,000 by his or her opponent, 50,000 by the press, and 40,000 by the police.
Unlike politicians, concert promoters and pope-watchers - or reporters or cops who want to impress their bosses with the enormity of their assignments- the Census Bureau, which is in the business of counting U.S. residents, has no obvious ax to grind. But even it has problems.
Look for example, at its figures for Puerto Ricans living on the mainland.
Its estimates for the past six years have been (in thousands):
1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987
2,051 2,261 2,354 2,562 2,340 2,284
Nobody really believes that the mainland Puerto Rican population increased by half a million between 1982 and 1985 and quickly dropped down nearly 280,000 since then. Data kept by the island government certainly do not support such shifts.
In its latest tabulation, the bureau admits that it has “not yet found a totally satisfactory explanation for the pattern of changes.” As expected, it defends its new population sampling design. The “fluctuations,” it suggests, could be the result of non-sampling variability. Among the suspected culprits it lists:
“... inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample, definitional difficulties, differences in the interpretation of questions, inability or unwillingness of respondents to provide correct information, errors made in estimating values for missing data, and failure to represent all units with the sample.. ”
If that sounds a bit like bureaucratic gobbledygook to you, there’s a more straightforward theory offered to Weekly Report’s Melinda Machado by Gary Martin, an economic advisor to the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs office in Washington:
“Because people are self-identified in the census, a lot of Hispanics - mainly Central Americans- who are illegal aliens call themselves Puerto Ricans,” he says. “It’s the only safe thing to be. What would you say if you were here illegally?”
The big “Puerto Rican” increase came along just when fears of deportation were building to their highest point.
As more undocumented workers begin the legalization process, he suggests, they lose their reluctance to tell a U.S. government enumerator where they’re really from.
The Census Bureau, of course, promises that the information it collects will be kept in the strictest of confidence and not shared with INS.
If Martin’s hypothesis is correct, it proves one thing effectively: Newcomers to this country don’t trust the word of our government any more than us old-timers do. _ K Barbaro
Quoting...
RAFAEL PENALVER, retiring chairman of Florida’s turbulent Commission on Hispanic Affairs, commenting Sept. 9 to Weekly Report after his resignation:
“Florida has a problem and that problem is (Governor) Bob Martinez Honest to God, we have a real problem here.”
LEE TREVINO, Texas-born Chicano who was struck by a lightning bolt in 1975 and nearly killed, but at 47, is still one of professional golfs biggest draws:
“At my age, I don’t even buy green bananas.”
JIM PLUNKETT, injury-plagued Chicano quarterback who twice led the Los Angeles Raiders pro football team to Super Bowl victories, working harder than ever at age 39 to stay with the team: “Ifs hard to replace what goes on on a Sunday afternoon.
14, 1987
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
TUBERCULOSIS AND HISPANICS: A copy of the Centers for Disease Control two-page report titled “Tuberculosis Among Hispanics - United States, 1985” is available for$1 bywritingto: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Requests should specify the Sept 4,1987, issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Volume 36, Issue 34.
HISPANIC POPULATION FIGURES: The U.S. Census Bureau report “The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1986 and 1987” (Advance Report Series P-20, No. 416) is available by writing to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. The 15-page report contains statistics on population, education levels, income of and poverty rates for Hispanic subgroups. (Price was not available at press time.)
TAX CREDITS IN PUERTO RICO: The Puerto Rico, U.S.A. Foundation is offering complimentary copies of its 58-page “Section 936 and Economic Development in Puerto Rico.” For a copy write to the foundationat: 1701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 857-0620.
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION FELLOWSHIPS: National Urban Fellows is seeking applicants from minorities and women for its Fellowships in Public Administration and Rural Development program. The fellowships - 25 to 35 will be distributed to people with several years work experience - last for 14 months and range from $15,000 to $17,000. The deadline is Jan. 15,1988. Applications and information may be obtained by contacting: NUF, 570 Seventh Ave., Suite 905, New York, N.Y. 10018 (212) 221-7090.
STUDENT DEFAULTS: For a copy of Wellford Wilms’ “Whose Fault is Default?”, which examines California’s high student-loan default rate, send $4 to: Training Research Corp., 309 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 323, Santa Monica, Calif. 90401 (Attn. Laura Powers).
GRANT TARGETS MED STUDENTS
The Robert Wood Foundation of New Jersey announced Aug. 31 a new program that will provide upto$8 million forsummer enrichment courses for minority students pursuing careers in medicine.
The foundation’s Minority Medical Education Program will provide grants to fund the courses for roughly 7,500 students.
Eight five-year grants, for as much as $1 million each, will be disbursed to universities, medical schools, community organizations and colleges to support the programs. The programs will include courses for structured laboratory experience, counseling and test preparation. Deadline for letters of interest is Oct. 1.
In 1986, 47% of all minority students applying to medical school were accepted. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges in Washington, in that year 919 of 1,782 Hispanic applicants were accepted.
For a booklet describing the program and grant requirements, write: The Robert Wood Foundation, Communications Department P.O. Box 2316, Princeton, N.J. 08543-2316 (609) 452-8701.
RIGHTS INFORMATION IN SPANISH
The U.S. Department of Education is offering Spanish-language editions of two civil rights booklets to help Spanish-speakers better understand their rights, it was announced Sept. 1.
The booklets, “Education and Title VI” and “Title IX and Sex Discrimination,” were prepared by the department’s Office for Civil Rights. Title VI deals with discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin. The pamphlets list the addresses and telephone numbers of the department*s regional civil rights offices.
For a free copy of either the Spanish or English versions, write to: Fred Tate, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 330 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 732-1528. - Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK: Below is a listing of events in honor of Hispanic culture and contributions
HISPANIC DESIGNERS FASHION SHOW Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 The third annual Hispanic Designers Fashion Show will honor Carolina Herrera with the "Moda” award and feature the designs of Adolfo, Oscar de la Renta and others. Proceeds will benefit Hispanic fashion design students.
Penny Harrison (202) 364-4399
FOLKLORIC BALLET, ANDEAN MUSIC Washington, D.C. Sept. 15, 17 Gibaro de Puerto Rico will perform folk dances from the island atthe Libraryof Congress. Marta Istomin, artistic director for the Kennedy Center, will be the guest speaker. The library will also present, on Sept. 17, a free outdoor concert featuring Ollantay, an Andean music group.
Helen Darlymple (202) 364-4399
MICHIGAN HISPANIC CELEBRATION Lansing, Mich. Sept. 15
A parade of regional costumes from various Latin American countries, mariachi music and a student forum will open Michigan’s celebration of Hispanic Heritage Week at the state capital. The Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will host a fund-raising awards banquet for the Michigan Hispanic Scholar* ship fund.
Essie Solano (517) 373-8339
HISPANIC MEDIA RECEPTION Washington, D.C. Sept. 15 4
Hallmark Cards is hosting a White House-sponsored reception in honor of Hispanic media professionals at the National Press Club and will salute Hispanics in five fields of the media, from print to motion pictures.
Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657
WHITE HOUSE BUSINESS BRIEFING Washington, D.C. Sept. 15 Vice President George Bush will address Hispanic entrepreneurs and Sen. James Abdnor(R-S.D.) will speak on federal minority set-aside contracts. Amparo Bouchey(202) 366-1930
PUERTO RICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR Washington, D.C. Sept. 15
Niftos Cantores de Puerto Rico-Centro de Ponce will perform at the Capitol. The Centro de Ponce is made up of 70 children, ages six to 12. The touring company will interpret folk, children’s and classical songs in six languages.
Ron Walker (202) 225-2615
CONGRESSIONAL INSTITUTE DINNER
Washington, D.C. Sept. 16
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute will
celebrate its 10th anniversary with a fund-raising
dinner.
Madelyn Serna (202) 543-1771
HISPANIC MILITARY SALUTE
Washington, D.C. Sept. 16
Enlisted Hispanic personnel will be honored during
a tribute to Latinos in the military.
Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657
HISPANIC GALA RECEPTION
Washington, D.C. Sept. 17
The White House task force on Hispanic Heritage
Week will host a formal reception featuring the
music of the Miami-based group Canaveral.
Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657 Sept. 14,1987
MARKETING SYMPOSIUM New York Sept. 17
The New York Life Insurance Co. presents the third annual Marketing to Hispanics symposium for senior marketing executives. Present will be advertising, media, creative directors and other professionals in the Hispanic market.
Gilbert Sabater(212) 410-5696
MOVIES
Washington, D.C. Sept. 17-20
The Smithsonian Institution will host three movies
centering on Hispanics. The movies will be Zoot
Suit, Macario and Machito: una leyenda de jazz
latino.
Madeleine Jacobs (202) 357-2627
HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND Washington, D.C. Sept. 18 The board of directors of the Hispanic Scholarship Fund will have a luncheon followed by a photo session with President Reagan.
Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657
HISPANIC FAMILY BANQUET Los Angeles Sept. 19
The Hispanic Family of the Year will be announced at a banquet with scholarship prizes to the top three families. The non-profit effort seeks to recognize Hispanic families for community involvement and family unity.
Bernie Kemp (818) 500-1309
LULAC10K RUN Washington, D.C. Sept. 19 A benefit run to help defray hospital costs for Ana Joyce Huezo, a nine-year-old kidney transplant patient, is being sponsored by League of United Latin American Citizens Councils in Washington, D.C., and Alexandria, Va.
Andres Tobar (703) 379-7487
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Hispanic-Origin Subgroups in the United States-1987
(Advance Report)
Table 3. Selected Social Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Hispanic Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1987
(For the United States. Numbers in thousands)
Hispanic origin
Characteristic Central Not of
Total Puerto and South Other Hispanic
population Total Mexican Rican Cuban American Hispanic origin1
Age
Total 238,789 18,790 11,762 2,284 1,017 2,139 1,588 219,999
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0* 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Under 5 years 7.6 10.6 11.4 11.7 7.6 8.9 7.5 7.3
5 and 6 years 3.0 4.5 5.1 5.1 1.4 3.4 3.1 2.9
7 to 9 years 4.3 6.0 6.5 7.3 2.2 4.9 4.2 4.2
10 to 13 years 5.5 7.4 8.1 7.1 4.4 6.0 6.2 5.3
14 and 15 years 2.9 3.5 4.0 3.1 1.9 2.8 2.6 2.9
16 and 17 years 3.1 3.5 3.8 3.9 2.1 2.6 2.8 3.1
18 and 19 years 3.0 3.5 3.7 3.4 2.2 4.1 3.0 2.9
20 and 21 years 3.1 4.1 4.3 3.5 4.0 4.2 4.0 3.0
22 to 24 years 5.0 6.5 6.6 6.3 6.4 7.3 5.1 4.9
25 to 29 years 9.1 10.3 10.3 9.7 9.2 12.1 9.3 9.0
30 to 34 years 8.8 8.9 8.6 8.4 7.7 10.4 10.5 8.8
35 to 44 years 14.1 13.0 11.9 14.5 12.4 16.8 14.2 14.2
45 to 54 years 9.6 7.7 6.9 6.9 13.3 9.0 9.9 9.8
55 to 64 years 9.2 5.5 4.8 5.3 13.2 4.5 7.8 9.5
65 to 74 years 7.2 3.1 2.7 2.5 7.1 1.9 5.8 7.6
75 years and over 4.5 1.8 1.5 1.1 5.0 0.9 3.8 4.7
18 years and over 73.5 64.5 61.2 61.7 80.4 71.2 73.5 74.3
21 years and over 69.0 58.9 55.5 56.8 76.0 65.0 68.6 69.9
Median age (years) 31.9 25.1 23.5 24.3 35.8 27.3 30.9 32.6
Sex
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Male 48.6 50.1 51.6 46.4 50.3 47.0 48.4 48.5
Female 51.4 49.9 48.4 53.6 49.7 53.0 51.6 51.5
Marital Status
Total, 15 years and over 186,688 13,104 7,869 1,534 849 1,617 1,234 173,584
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Single (never married) 26.3 31.5 31.8 35.3 22.5 33.5 28.7 26.0
Married 59.3 57.5 57.9 51.6 59.9 59.2 58.0 59.4
Widowed 7.1 3.9 3.7 3.8 7.5 2.9 4.2 7.3
Divorced 7.3 7.1 6.6 9.3 10.1 4.4 9.1 7.3
Education
Total, 25 years and over Percent completed— 149,144 9,449 5,489 1,106 690 1,190 973 139,694
Less than 5 years of school 2.4 11.9 15.4 10.3 6.0 6.1 5.2 1.8
4 years of high school or more 75.6 50.9 44.8 53.8 61.6 59.3 64.2 77.3
4 or more years of college 19.9 8.6 5.8 8.0 17.1 12.2 14.2 20.6
Median school years completed 12.7 12.0 10.8 12.1 12.4 12.3 12.4 12.7
Type of Family
All families 64,491 4,403 2,611 593 294 518 386 60,088
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Married-couple families Female householder, no 79.9 70.8 74.8 53.0 77.6 66.8 72.0 80.6
husband present 16.2 23.4 19.2 43.3 17.7 25.5 22.8 15.7
Male householder, no wife present... Size of Family 3.9 5.7 6.0 3.7 4.8 7.7 5.2 3.8
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Two persons 40.8 25.3 22.2 29.3 36.7 25.3 31.3 42.6
Three persons 23.9 22.8 21.1 26.5 25.2 23.0 26.9 23.9
Four persons 21.1 25.0 24.5 23.8 28.2 28.4 22.5 20.8
Five persons 9.1 14.9 16.4 14.0 6.1 14.7 13.0 8.7
Six persons ' 3.2 6.7 8.4 3.2 3.4 5.0 4.4 3.0
Seven or more persons 1.8 5.3 7.3 3.0 - 3.9 1.6 1.6
Mean number of persons 3.19 3.83 4.05 3.50 3.18 3.71 3.47 ? 3.14
- Represents zero or rounds to zero. _ c,n.u. Bureau chart
Includes persons who did not know or did not report on origin.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept. 14,1987 5


Hispanic-Origin Subgroups in the United States
(Advance Report)
Table 4. Selected Economic Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Hispanic Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1987
(For the United States. Numbers in thousands)
Hispanic origin
Characteristic Central Not of
Total Puerto and South Other Hispanic
population Total Mexican Rican Cuban American Hispanic origin* 1
Labor Force Status
Total, 16 years and over 183,093 12,772 7,642 1,499 839 1,581 1,212 170,320
In civilian labor force 118,134 8,302 5,072 808 560 1,127 735 109,832
Percent in civilian labor force 64.5 65.0 ' 66.4 53.9 66.7 71.3 60.7 64.5
Percent unemployed 7.0 10.2 11.7 11.0 5.5 7.9 5.6 6.8
Males, 16 years and over 87,524 6,343 3,962 655 418 746 562 81,181
In civilian labor force 65,174 5,030 3,194 470 328 636 401 60,145
Percent in civilian labor force 74.5 79.3 80.6 71.7 78.7 85.2 71.4 74.1
Percent unemployed 7.4 10.6 12.1 12.2 4.9 7.8 6.2 7.1
Females, 16 years and over 95,568 6,430 3,681 844 421 834 649 89,139
In civilian labor force 52,960 3,272 1,878 338 231 491 334 49,688
Percent in civilian labor force 55.4 50.9 * 51.0 40.1 54.9 58.9 51.4 55.7
Percent unemployed 6.6 9.5 11.2 9.2 6.4 8.1 4.9 6.4
Occupation
Employed males, 16 years and over. 60,368 4,497 2,809 412 312 587 376 55,871
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Managerial and professional specialty. 25.3 10.8 8.8 12.8 19.0 10.0 17.9 26.5
Technical, sales, and admin, support.. 19.9 15.6 12.4 21.6 24.1 19.2 20.2 20.3
Service occupations 9.9 14.3 12.9 14.9 9.1 22.8 15.3 9.5
Farming, forestry, and fishing 4.4 10.1 14.6 1.1 2.2 3.0 4.4 4.0
Precision production, craft, and repair. 20.0 21.1 22.5 15.8 21.8 18.8 19.7 19.9
Operators, fabricators, and laborers... 20.5 28.0 28.7 33.8 23.8 26.2 22.4 19.9
Employed females, 16 years and over 49,486 2,960 1,667 307 216 451 318 46,526
Percent. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 . 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Managerial and professional specialty. 24.8 14.6 13.0 15.4 25.4 11.6 19.0 25.5
Technical, sales, and admin, support.. 45.2 41.3 40.0 50.0 44.7 35.7 45.3 45.5
Service occupations 17.9 23.5 24.8 18.9 14.6 29.0 19.5 17.6
Farming, forestry, and fishing 1.0 1.6 2.3 0.6 0.0 0.4 1.4 0.9
Precision production, craft, and repair. 2.2 3.5 3.4 3.0 4.2 3.4 4.1 2.2
Operators, fabricators, and laborers... 8.8 15.5 16.5 12.1 11.1 19.9 10.8 8.4
Median Earnings in 1986 2
Males with earnings (dollars) 18,782 11,958 11,034 15,077 16,841 12,628 16,148 19,588
Females with earnings (dollars) 10,016 8,258 7,446 11,053 11,664 8,537 9,704 10,110
Family income in 1986
Median income (dollars) 29,458 19,995 19,326 14,584 26,770 22,246 24,240 30,231
Below Poverty Level in 1986
Families 7,023 1,085 649 226 39 97 75 5,938
Percent below poverty level3 .... 10.9 24.7 24.9 38.1 13.3 18.7 19.4 9.9
Family householder — 65 years old and over:
Number 716 58 34 6 9 2 7 659
Percent 7.0 17.4 17.5 (B) (B) (B) (B) 6.7
Not a high school graduate:
Number 3,008 678 434 123 17 61 43 2,330
Percent. 19.9 33.6 32.8 48.0 16.5 31.3 31.4 17.8
Female, husband absent:
Number 3,613 528 244 171 15 56 42 . 3,085
Percent Unrelated individuals: 34.6 51.2 48.6 66.5 (B) 42.4 47.7 32.8
Number 6,846 553 302 103 39 67 42 6,293
Percent * 21.6 32.8 34.5 41.4 31.7 29.0 20.4 21.0
(B) Base less than 75,000. Summary measures (such as medians and percent distributions) are shown only when the base is 75,000 or greater.
11ncludes persons who did not know or did not report on origin.
. *For civilian persons 15 years old and over.
3Percent of all families of specified origin.
Percentages based on householders with specified characteristics and of specified origin.
b. . ,7, . WB/. AWfl, - Census Bureau chart
householders 25 years old and over.
6
Sept. 14,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER
(Asst, to HEO)
Develop/coordinate instructional technology programs (CAI, video, etc.), seminars and workshops for students, faculty and staff, assist in managing operation of Center, development of grant proposals; supervise computer based activities and computer labs; and coordinate LRC publicity. BA in Instructional Tech., Computer Sci. or related field -I- ability to develop original materials; good organizational & communication skills. Salary: $23,035+.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #352 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 9/18/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED
FINANCIAL AID COUNSELOR Bilingual (English/Spanish)
Advise students on financing their education at LaGuardia; help them to correctly complete various aid forms; maintain a grasp of all major Federal and state Financial Aid Programs.
BA and two years Financial Aid experience required. MA preferred. Salary $23,035.
Send cover letter and resume by September 23 to:
Director of Financial Aid LaGuardia Community College/CUNY 31-10 Thomson Ave.
Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EEO/AA EMPLOYER
ATTORNEY
Attorney with 1 -3 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington, D.C.
Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW, Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20005.
ATTORNEY
Major Washington, D.C., corporation seeking attorney with environmental litigation experience. Four years minimum litigation experience up through trial. Admission to bar required. $70,000 range. Contact Martha McGinnis at (212) 697-8682.
GENERAL MANAGER
Salary to $33,680. Four years supervisory experience or degree in industrial management or related field and two years related supervisory experience. Year-to-year management experience in lieu of degree is acceptable. Experience in related industrial, related assembly or packaging plant required. Must have good written, verbal and people skills. Experience in assessing and analyzing diverse business and production work. Possess valid drivers license and bondable. Bilingual English/Spanish preferred. Resume with salary history to: CHARO,3951 East Medford St., Los Angeles, Calif., 90063-1698. NO CALLS PLEASE.
The following two positions are with Delta College in University Center, Mich.
Vice President - Student Services
Delta College, a community college with 15,000 students, isseeking an experienced Vice President to head its Student Services Staff. Deadline is October9,1987. For application procedure call (517) 686-9107.
Director of Career Development and Placement Services
Delta College is seeking a director to administer the college’s career development and placement programs. Deadline is October 2, 1987. For application procedure call (517) 686-9107.
EO/AA/MFH-Employer
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 centsperword. Display rates: $35 pcrcolumn inch.
The Montgomery County, Maryland, Department of Police is currently accepting applications for the position of
POLICE OFFICER CANDIDATE
• Starting salary $21,804 with increase to $22,895 upon completion of twenty weeks of training.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
• 60 college credit hours
• Not less than 21 years of age
• U.S. citizenship
• Possession of valid motor vehicle operator's license
• Clear police record
Montgomery County provides its employees with liberal fringe benefits.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CONTACT: Montgomery County Police Personnel Recruitment Office (301) 840-2525
Monday thru Friday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
DISTRICT MANAGER LIFE INSURANCE
Must be bilingual (Spanish/English). Guaranteed earnings first year $40,000. Opportunity to earn a much greater income. Outstanding fringe benefits. Automobile furnished. Position located in the Chicago area. Relocation paid if necessary. Call (312) 769-7643.
Equal Opportunity Employer; Male/Female
INFORMATION SOUGHT
Any Hispanic who in the last 10 years has applied for a position with the U.S. Department of Education nationwide and was not selected, please send information on position applied for, and date applied, to: Marketplace, Box E, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Include your address and phone number. Thank you.
PRODUCER/DIRECTOR
KAPP Television Productions, Yakima, Washington, has an opening fora Producer/Director. Must be able to direct and produce commercial work, and also have some experience in directing live programs.
Prefer BA in Television Production or equivalent experience, good writing skills and announcer quality voice.
Make all inqulriesto Craig Woolsey, Production Manager, KAPP Television, 1610 South 24th Ave., Yakima, Washington, 98902 (509) 453-0351./An Equal Opportunity Employer.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md, government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis Call (301) 251-2252.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY
NOW 6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES
Headline story • National News Roundup# Calendar# Names Making News • Guest Column # Collecting • Connecting # Media Report # Arts& Entertainment # Editorial Cartoon • Sin Petos en la Lengua • Marketplace
SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION’S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY:
Name , - —
Organization - -
Address - -
City, state, zip
â–¡ Start 13-week trial subscription $26
â–¡ Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96
â–¡ Check enclosed
â–¡ Bill me
â–¡ Bill my organization Mail toe
Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept. 14,1987


Arts& Entertainment
ARTS CELEBRATE HERITAGE: A series of art events at the Library of Congress is set to commemorate National Hispanic Heritage Week.
Washington, D.C., dates include performances of Puerto Rican dance and Andean music, displays of Puerto Rican art posters, and a talk by Marta Istomin, artistic director of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
Istomin will be the featured speaker at a program that includes a performance by the Puerto Rican folkloric ballet troupe Gibaro de Puerto Rico Sept. 15 at the Library’s Coolidge Auditorium.
The continuing exhibit Images of a Culture: The Puerto Rican Poster is expected to be at the Library for four months.
A free concert by Ollantay, a Bolivian band, will take place Sept. 17
at the Neptune Plaza in Washington, D.C.
Throughout the nation, various events coincide with local celebrations related to National Hispanic Heritage Week.
In Los Angeles, the Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit, held Sept. 12, launched the city's official celebrations. The show-a benefitfund-raiserfor students of fashion design-displayed recent creations by top designers Adolfo, Oscar de la Renta and Carolina Herrera. The latter won this year’s Mod a Award..
A parallel Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit took place in Washington, D.C., Sept. 14.
In Chicago, Recent Developments in Latin American Drawings continues through Sept. 27 at the city’s Art Institute. The exhibit includes some 35 pieces by contemporary Hispanic artists.
In San Antonio, an exhibit of the 25 finalists in the Year of the Hispana Poster Contest will be on view at the Guadalupe Cultural
Center Sept. 15-16. . .. f, â– 
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NEW MAGAZINES: Three national Hispanic magazines are in the planning stages or about to begin publication. They include:
HISPANIC ENTREPRENEUR: This English-language monthly is geared to Latinos and Latinas who are moving up the economic ladder and want to make the most of opportunities coming available to U.S. Hispanics.
The entrepreneur who packaged Hispanic Entrepreneur is Gloria Rodriguez, a San Juan, Puerto Rico, native who in the past has directed the Washington office of the National Puerto Rican Forum and most recently was executive publisher of Hispanic Review of Business.
Editor is Maria Siccardi, who anchors the World Net live news broadcasts to Latin America and was founder, executive producer and co-anchor of the television news magazine Latin Tempo.
The premiere October edition is 68 pages. It and the November edition will be distributed at the Oct. 1 -4 annual conference of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Los Angeles
Press runs for those two months will be
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week- Multiple use rates on request.
30,000. Beginning in December, Hispanic Entrepreneur will reach 200,000 select readers by direct mail, says Rodriguez.
She is offering special 2-year charter subscriptions for $12. She will also mail free to requesting Weekly Report readers a copy of the first issue.
For charter subscriptions or a free sample issue, write: Hispanic Entrepreneur, 1377 K St. NW, P.O. Box 699, Washington, D.C. 20005.
BUENA SALUD: The 50,000 press run of' this Spanish-language, health-oriented magazine will be directed to a general reader-ship, with special distribution - for waiting-room reading - to doctors, clinics and hospitals serving Spanish-speaking patients.
It combines its SeptyOct. and Nov./Dec. ’87 editionsand begins monthlycirculation in 1988.
Publisher is Rene Rodriguez Rojas, M.D., president of the New York-based Interamerican College of Physicians and Surgeons In 1981 Rodriguez launched the successful Medico monthly magazine, received by the nation’s .25,000 Spanish-speaking doctors.
Buena Salud editor is Frank Calderbn, formerly with Miami-based De Armas publications
Single issue price: $1.75. Annual subscription (12 issues) is $15.
Weekly Report readers who would like to review a complimentary copy of its premiere issue can do so by requesting it from Interamerican Medical Publications, 299 Madison Ave., Suite 400, New York, N.Y. 10017.
MAGAZINE WITH NO NAME: Former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca plans to announce the launching of a national Hispanic general-interest magazine this week. It will be in English and he will be its publisher.
Working with a group of Hispanic investors across the country, he expects to have a prototype ready by November and to produce Vol. I, No. 1 next May. His group includes Fred Estrada, leader of the initial group of investors in the successful Latino weekend newspaper supplement Vista.
Apodaca is in the process of moving from Santa Fe, N.M., to Washington, D.C. He will open offices for the magazine in the nation’s capital next month.
New Mexico journalist Maria Elena Alvarez, of Espahola, is editing the prototype. Apodaca will be announcing the magazine’s name and the selection of key staff in the near future.
He anticipates an initial press run of 100,000.
The publication’s projected annual subscription rate (12 issues): $18.
- Charlie Ericksen t
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week conduct. Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward appointed George Sanchez, deputy commissioner for equal employment for the depart ment, to the panel ... Alicia Coro takes over as director of the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs. . . Chicago Police Department Deputy Superin tendent Matt Rodrlguez' becomes one of the top three contenders to head the nation's second-largest police force upon the announced resignation of the current commissioner .. . Manuel G6mez, director of the University of California at Irvine's Educational Opportunity Program, is named assistant vice chancellor for academic affairs and student affirmative action ... Joaquin Bacardi, 85, retired president of the rum empire founded by his grandfather in 1862, dies Sept. 1 in his home in Nassau, Bahamas . Bacardi suffered from a heart ailment .. San Antonio attorney Roy Barrera tells Texas Gov . Bill Clements he does not wish to be considered for appointment as chief justice of the state Supreme Court. Barrera, formerly a San Antonio district court judge, made a strong showing in last year's race for state attorney general . . . Denver Mayor Federico Pei\a announces that Kathy Archuleta will serve as one of his three deputy chiefs of staff. Archuleta, a long-time Pena aide, will oversee internal operations and community outreach ... New York Mayor Edward Koch names the Rev . Roberto Gonzalez, a Roman Catholic pastor from the Bronx, to a 12-member panel that will investigate complaints of police mis••••N•.••I HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ll Sept 14, 1987 Latino TB Incidence Latinos Grow 300/o Since 1980 Twice that of Nation The tuberculosis rate among Hispanics is twice that of the national average and four times the rate of the lung disease among whites, according to a Sept. 4 report issued by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta Latinos have a rate of 18 cases per 100 , 000 compared with the national rate of nine and a rate of 4.5 for whites. The rates are based on the 22,201 cases reported to the CDC in 1985. About 14% of the totalor 3,134-were Hispanic . Forty-two percent-or 1 ,306of those Latinos were born in other countries. "Many Hispanics are immigrants from countries that have higher rates of tubercu losis than the United States, and we see that among all immigrants who come from higher-prevalence areas," said Dr. Hans Reider, who conducted the CDC study . Forty eight percent of Hispanic victims were under age 35. California had the highest number of His panic TB cases with 40% (1 , 239), followed by Texas with 23% (731). New York had 13% (394). All other states had a total of 25% . Puerto Rico had 169 cases . Asians had the highest rate of TB at 50 cases per 1 00,000 followed by blacks with 28 per 100,000 and American Indians and Alaska natives with a rate of 25. Chicago AIDS Cases Rise Hispanics in Chicago made up eightof3324%of the documented new AIDS cases there for the month of August, reported the Chicago Health Department. That compared with 10 out of 161-6.2%of the cases in the preceeding four months. Brian Chapman, the health departmenfs project coordinator for AIDS surveillance, told Weekly Report that while the number of AIDS cases among Hispanics seems to be increasing, "The large increase for August may be attribu ted in part to the (slow) rate of reporting among p!Jysicians and the efficiency of particular hospitals . " Hispanics have accounted for 7% of the AIDS cases in the city since the first case was diagnosed in 1981 and 9% of the cases so far in 1987. U .S. Hispanics numbered 18.8 million in March 1987, a 30% increase since the 1980 census, according to a U . S . Census Bureau report released Sept. 11. The rate was five times higher than the 6% growth for the non Hispanic population. Bureau figures show an increase of 4.2 million from the 14.6 million Hispanics reported in 1980. As of July 1, 1986, 3 . 27 million people lived in Puerto Rico, according to bureau statistics. This would bring the U . S . Hispanic population U.S. Hispanics-March 1987 Central and South American 11% Other Hispanic 8% Mex i can 63% to 22 million, or almost 9 .2% of the nation's 239 million people. Between March 1986 and 1987, the Latino population grew by about 700,000. Of the 18.8 million Hispanics on the U.S. mainland , 11.76 million were of Mexican origin. Next came 2.28 million Puerto Ricans. Central and South Americans, who are combined in the census count, had the highest growth rate between 1982 and 1987-40%followed by "other Hispanics" at 33% and Mexicans at 22%. The "other" category includes those who are of Spanish origin or identify themselves in general categories such as Hispanic or Latino . Puerto Ricans (11 %) and Cubans (7%) had the smallest growth during those five years . The estimates for Cubans and Puerto Ricans show a decrease since 1985. Cubans, accord ing to the bureau , numbered 1.04 million in 1985 and 1.02 million in 1987. The drop for Puerto Ricans was even greater, with 2.56: million in 1985 and 2 .28 million in 1987. While sampling error may be responsible for the lower number of Cubans, the change in Puerto Rican figures is still being investigated Hispanic population estimates were obtained through surveys in March of 1986 and 1987. This is the first report using an estimating procedure for Hispanics which allows for net undocumented immigration (adding 200,000 persons per year) and increases estimates for emigration by legal residents from 36,000 to 160,000 persons per year . This results in adding 76,000 persons per year to the total population estimate. In education, the proportion of Hispanics 25 years and older with a high school education ormorewas45% in 1982 and 51% in 1987. For Hispanics completing college, those numbers went from 8% to 9%. In 1986 median income, Hispanic men earned a median of $11 ,958, or 61% of the $19,588 continued on page 2 U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH, 1980' -1987 (Numbers in Thousands) 1987 1985 1982 1980 Mexican 11,762 10,269 9,642 8,740 Puerto Rican 2,284 2,562 2,051 2,014 Cuban 1,017 1,036 950 803 Central and South 2,139 1,722 1,523> American 3,051 Other Hispanic 1,588 1,350 1,198 Total 18,790 16,940 15,364 14,609 ' Source: U . S . Census Bureau . In 1980, the bureau included Central or South American with Other Span i sh Origin populations. The chart does not include figures for Puerto Rico , which had 3.27 million people as of 1986.

PAGE 2

Unemployment Steadies; More Latin as Now Working The Hispanic unemployment rate remained relatively steady last month, reported the U . S . Department of Labor Sept 4 . The jobless rate for Latinos climbed one-tenth of a per centage point-from 7 . 9% in July to 8% last month. The rate represented 680,000 Latinos who were out of jobs. On the same day the National Committee for Full Employment , a non-profit public policy group in Washington, D.C., issued what it calls its "real" unemployment rate. Arriving at the real rate by adding workers forced to accept part-time jobs and those who have given up looking, NCFE figured the Hispanic jobless rate for August to be 15. 8% . This compares with 18.3% for August 1986. NCFE reported that although there have been 56 months of economic recovery since 1981 -82, the jobs created have been primarily part time and lowpaying. The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently released a report which said Hispanic re presentation in the labor force was increasing at a much faster rate than that of blacks or 2nd Qtr. Unemployment 1986-1987 Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban 1986 1987 11 . 0% 13.4% 8 . 5% 9B 82 6.7 whites. The growth in employment for His' panics from the first half of 1986 was 8.2% , compared with 3 . 0% for blacks and 2 . 3% for whites. The report attributed the growth to increased immigration and a sharp rise in the proportion of the Hispanic non-institutional workingage population that is employed. The report added that the sharpest rise in employment for Hispanics occurred among Latinas. There was a 12% increase-300,000 -in the number of Hispanas working in the first half of 1987 compared to a year earlier. The rate of growth for Hispanic men was roughly half that. -Felix Perez Latino Student Loan Record Praised Four Quit Commission, Criticize Gov. Martinez Although Hispanic community-college and private-vocational school students are po'orer and much more inclined to drop out, they repaid student loans at a comparable rate to whites, a report released Aug . 26 on California's student-loan default rate found. These two factors, poverty and dropping out, according to the report, -are important indicators as to whether students will default on government-guaranteed loans. It found an 18% default rate for Hispanics , a 16% rate for Anglos and a 36% rate for black students for the 1982-83 period studied. Hispanics comprise 165,200, or 13.5%, of the total enrollment in California community colleges. About one-third of them apply for financial aid. Samuel Kipp, director of the California Stu dent Aid Commission, told Weekly Report that the commission was not satisfied with the report because it implied that ethnicity was an indicator for default. "Given the factors that might make low income Hispanic students appear a higher risk, their default rate is not appreciably dif ferent from whites," he said. Pepe Barron, director of the Washington, D.C. -based El Congreso Nacional de Asuntos Colegiales, an organization concerned with Hispanic community-college issues, said that for Hispanics, "it is a matter of respectability to make arrangements to pay the loans, to at least keep your honor and family name." Whites know how to use the system , he added, "and historically have abused grants and loans." The report is titled "Whose Fault is Default? " The state received about $841.4 million in federal funds for guaranteed and direct student loans , roughly 10% of the nation's fun<;ls for such programs . It has the sixth highest default rate in the nation at 13.2%. The national average is 8 .7%. Latinos9.2/o of U.S. Pop. Florida Gov . Bob Martinez quickly replaced seven members of the 15-member state Corn mission on Hispanic Affairs on Sept. 4, three days after four commissioners publicly stated that they no longer intended to serve on the commission because of the governor's apparent lack of interest in it. The four charged that the governor ignored requests for meetings and refused to recognize commission recommendations on issues af fecting Florida ' s Hispanics. continued trom page 1 The commissioners who resigned were earned by non-H ispanic men. Median family chairman Rafael Peiialver, who had been a income for Hispanics showed no significant member since 1979, Frank de Varona , Felipe change between 1 981 and 1986. It was Fernandez and banker Luis Botifoll. $19,995 in 1986. Non-Hispanic families saw Peiialvertold Weekly Report that Martinez's an increase of 10% to $30,231 in that period. treatment was a reaction to the commission' s The report also shows: success in influencing the legislature to extend • The median age of the U.S. population is it for another 10 years and keep it housed in 32. For Latinos, the median age is 25, with the governor's office . The Florida Legislature those of Mexican origin having the lowest at voted overwhelmingly to do so in May . Peiialver 23. 5 years, and Cubans the highest at 35.8 charged Martinez with reacting like "a six years . year old . It was an infantile and arrogant • The mean number of persons in U .S. reaction . " families is 3 .19. For Hispanics, that number The new commissioners are: chairman is3. 83, with those of Mexican origin averaging Miguel Ribero Silva , 56, real estate broker; the largest number of persons per family Eliseo Ferrer, 56, also a real estate broker; (4.05) and Cubans the smallest (3.18) . Tere Zubizarreta, 49, president and owner of e Hispanics of Mexican origin experienced an advertising agency; Pedro Martin, 48, attar higher unemployment rates(11.2%) than Puerto ney; Dr . Alberto Herran, 4 7 ; Armando Selerio, Ricans (9.2%) and Cubans (6.4%). 44, president and owner of an office furniture -Melinda Machado manufacturer; and Max Borges,45, president of a construction company. Tax Credits Yield Many Island Jobs The terms of the new commissioners, which are unpaid positions, expire Sept 1, 1991 . Firms operating in Puerto Rico under Section 936 of the U.S. Tax Code-tax credit incentives used to attract mainland firmsdirectly and indirectly account for 36% of the islands 750,000 jobs, concludes a report released Sept 2 . The report further finds that firms set up under the 11-year-old tax code provision are responsible for 94,000 -61%of Puerto Rico's manufacturing jobs. In 1982 and 1985 amendments were intro duced in Congress that would have cut back some of the incentives offered by Section 936. They were defeated. These proposed amendments, says the report, created a state 2 of uncertainty and discouraged new invest ment in Puerto Rico. "Any ... changes of consequence (to Section 936) would destabilize the centerpiece of its (Puerto Rico's) economic development program and jolt the economy," said Carl Nordberg, executive director of the Puerto Rico, U.S.A. Foundation. The foundation, a group of 70 mainland concerns with operations in the island, commissioned the report. Of the 25% of Section 936 firms that re sponded to a survey in 1985, 35% said that they delayed $119 to $124 million worth of investments, representing a temporary loss of between 1 ,900 and 2,200 jobs. Sept 14, 1987 Julio Laboy AntiBork Service Initiated The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund announced Sept. 9 in San Antonio the formation of a telegram se . rvice for individuals to urge their senators to oppose the nomination of federal appellate court Judge Robert Bork to the U.S. Supreme Court. The Western Union telephone number1-800-257-4900was to begin operation by this week The service will be operational for one month after Bork confirmation hearings begin Sept. 15. • Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Velia Leal, guest columnist The Perfect Hispanic The notion of image nags at us Hispanics constantly. What should one look like? How should one act? One more time, lefs take on the challenge. Sketch a model Hispanic American figure. Create the prototype-an image for our diverse community of 22 million people representing some two dozen countries of origin. Give it an identity that pleases, a physical shape. Consider every aspect of this being. Start with a scenario : Place this His panic figure at the turn of the centurythe year 2001 . Put him or her in the center of the United States. That way we can ' t miss . This ideal Hispanic must have stately qualit ies, a person of sufficient seasons . He o r she must be at least bilingual, preferably multilingual, symbolic of a cosmopolitan race . He or she should have personally collected life experiences from low economic times to high economic times and have coped w i th moments of international strife, as well as the somber defeats and elating victories served to us by our civil rights struggles here at home. We ' re talking image , so let this individual have a college education and the maturation that comes from venturing into business and politics. Let him or her have e xperienced the responsibilities of administration and management. SVELTE WE ARE NOT Now let us delve into the physical profile of our model Hispanic. We c an ' t be too tall. Lean to the short. We 're not really fat, but svelte we are not. If you claim an hourglass figure or bloated muscles , give up . Just the essentials. In our rostros -our faces-we have more to work with . Start with the color of our skin-a range of blueblack , shades of brown and tan, to the creamy white so popular these days . For purposes of unity, let ' s stay with vanilla-brown . Our hair is " in" from one end of the spectrum to the other-kinky Afro or a mane of soft blond strands. Reach to the middle-gentle, curly, thick, black-brown hair with a tinge of red . Now the forehead. Forget the high brow and the small brow. Choose instead a moderate forehead dominated by thick, dark, well-formed eyebrows. Pluck and tri m all day, but prominent eyebrows they will be! Work them. Use them for expression. Eyes. We 're all eyes. iOjazos! They are our best fixture. Large, expressive . Fringed and outlined with generous lashes . Windows of the soul , they are . For us they are that , plus the murals that reveal our hearts and paths to our minds. Our eyes tell it all . Is that bad? HISTORICAL LIPS, STUBBORN CHIN Our nose . The flat , wide, large nostril or the Romanesque narrow arched nose? A plastic surgeon's dream. Again , take the best of both and you ' ve got a firm feature thafs not too bad. Our lips are historical and determined. We have a choice of ample lips or very thin-lined ones. Take a combination and add a touch of steadfastness with a protruding, stubborn lower lip . Zippo! You have sensuous lips that are interesting, soft and ready to speak. I like that. Chins of Hispanics are m olded not so much by heritage, but rather by all the features they must support. Be proud of the chin and hold it to the sky. 1 have taken these written concepts and moved them from my ,typewriter to the pen on my drawing table . I created a caricature . Not a stereotype. A caricature. I believe I ' m on the track. I What I have created looks just like me. (Velia Leal, of Denver, Colo . , is an accountant who also writes, draws iand acts. ) Sin pelos en Ia /engua NUMBERS GAMES: Counting crowds, like counting votes or counting sheep while trying to sleep, is an inexact science, highly subject to emotional tampering or other people's tosses and turns. Attendance at political rallies may be estimated at 100,000 by the candidate, 1 0,000 by his or her opponent, 50,000 by the press, and 40,000 by the police. Unlike politicians, concert promoters and pope-watchers-or reporters or cops who want to impress their bosses with the enormity of their assignments-the Census Bureau, which is in the business of counting U.S . residents, has no obvious ax to grind. But even it has problems. Look, for example, at its figures for Puerto Ricans living on the mainland . Its estimates for the past six years have been (in thousands) : 1982 2,051 1983 2,261 1984 2,354 1985 2,562 1986 2,340 1987 2,284 Nobody really believes that the mainland Puerto Rican population increased by half a million between 1982 and 1985 and quickly dropped down nearly280,000 since then. Data kept by the island government certainly do not support such shifts. In its latest tabulation, the bureau admits that it has" not yet found a totally satisfactory explanation for the pattern of changes." As expected, it defends its new population sampling design. The "fluctuations," it suggests, could be the result of non-sampling variability. Among the suspected culprits it lists: " . . . inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample, definitional difficulties, differences in the interpretation of questions, inability or unwillingness of respondents to provide correct infor mation , errors made in estimating values for missing data, and failure to represent all units with the sample ... " If that sounds a bit like bureaucratic gobbledygook, to you, there's a more straightforward theory offered to Weekly Reporfs Melinda Machado by Gary Martin , an economic advisor to the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs office in Washington: "Because people are self-identified in the census, a lot of Hispanics-mainly Central Americans-who are illegal aliens call themselves Puerto Ricans ," he says. "lfs the only safe thing to be . What would you say if you were here illegally?" The big "Puerto Rican " increase came along just when fears of deportation were building to their highest point. As more undocumented workers begin the legalization process, he suggests, they lose their reluctance to tell a U . S . government enumerator where they're really from. The Census Bureau, of course, promises that the information it collects will be kept in the strictest of confidence and not shared with INS. If Martin's hypothesis is correct, it proves one thing effectively: Newcomers to this country don' t trust the word of our government any more than us old-timers do. _ Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • RAFAEL PENALVER, retiring chairman of Florida's turbulent Commission on Hispanic Affairs, comrr.enting Sept. 9 to Weekly Report after his resignation: "Florida has a problem and that problem is (Governor) Bob Martinez. Ho .nest to God, we have a real problem here." LEE TREVINO, Texas-born Chicano who was struck by a lightning bolt in 1975 and nearly killed, but at 47, is still one of professional golfs biggest draws: " A . t my age, I don ' t even buy green bananas. " JIM PLl.INKETT, injury-plagued Chicano quarterback who twice led the Los Angeles Raiders pro football team to Super Bowl victories, working harder than ever at age 39 to stay with the team: -''It's hard to replace what goes on on a Sunday afternoon. " Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept 14, 1987 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING TUBERCULOSIS AND HISPANICS: A copy of the Centers for Disease Control two-page report titled "Tuberculosis Among Hispanics United States, 1985" is available for$1 by writing to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402. Requests should specify the Sept 4 , 1987, issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Volume 36, Issue 34. CONNECTING GRANT TARGETS MED STUDENTS The Robert Wood Foundation of New Jersey announced Aug . 31 a new program that will provide up to $8 million for summer enrichment courses for minority students pursuing careers in medicine . HISPANIC POPULATION FIGURES: The U.S. Census Bureau report " The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1986 and 1987" (Advance Report Series P-20, No. 416) is available by writing to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. The 15-page reportcontainsstatistics on population, education levels , income of and poverty rates for Hispanic subgroups. (Price was not available at press time.) The foundation's Minority Medical Education Program will provide grants to fund the courses for roughly 7,500 students. Eight five-year grants, for as much as $1 million each , will be disbursed to universities , medical schools, community organizations and colleges to support the programs. The programs will include courses for structured laboratory experience, counseling and test preparation. Deadline for letters of interest is Oct. 1 . In 1986, 47% of all minority students applying to medical school were accepted. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges in Washington , in that year919 of 1,782 Hispanic applicants were accepted. TAX CREDITS IN PUERTO RICO: The Puerto Rico, U.S.A. Foun dation is offering complimentary copies of its 58-page "Section 936 and Economic Development in Puerto Rico." For a copy write to the foundation at: 1701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C . 20006 (202) 857-0620. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION FELLOWSHIPS: National Urban Fellows is seeking applicants from minorities and women for its Fellowships in Public Administration and Rural Development program . The fellowships-25 to 35 will be distributed to people with several years work experience-last for 14 months and range from $15,000 to $17,000. The deadline is Jan . 15, 1988 . Applications and information may be obtained by contacting: NUF , 570 Seventh Ave. , Suite 905, New York, N . Y . 10018 (212) 221-7090. For a booklet describing the program and grant requirements , write: The Robert Wood Foundation, Communications Department, P.O. Box 2316, Princeton , N.J. 08543-2316 (609) 452-8701. RIGHTS INFORMATION IN SPANISH The U.S. Department of Educat i on is offering Spanish-language editions of two civil rights booklets to help Spanish-speakers better understand their rights, it was announced Sept. 1 . STUDENT DEFAULTS: For a copy of Wellford Wilms' "Whose Fault is Default?", which examines California's high student-loan default rate, send $4 to: Training Research Corp., 309 Santa Monica Boulevard , Suite 323, Santa Monica, Calif. 90401 (Attn. Laura Powers) . The booklets, "Education and Title VI" and "Title IX and Sex Discrimination," were prepared by the department's Office for Civil Rights. Title VI deals with discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin . The pamphlets list the addresses and telephone numbers of the department's regional civil rights offices. For a free copy of either the Spanish or English versions , write to: Fred Tate, Office for Civil Rights , U .S. Department of Education, 330 C St. SW, Washington , D.C. 20202 (202) 732-1528. -Julio Laboy Calendar THIS WEEK HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK: Below is a listing of events in honor of Hispanic culture and contributions. HISPANIC DESIGNERS FASHION SHOW Washington , D.C. Sept. 14 The third annual Hispanic Designers Fashion Show will honor Carolina Herrera with the "Moda" award and feature the designs of Adolfo, Oscar de Ia Renta and others. Proceeds will benefit Hispanic fashion design students. Penny Harrison (202) 364-4399 FOLKLORIC BALLET, ANDEAN MUSIC Washington, D .C. Sept. 15, 17 Gibaro de Puerto Rico will perform folk dances from the island at the Library of Congress. Marta lstomin, artistic director for the Kennedy Center, will be the guest speaker. The library will also present, on Sept. 17, a free outdoor concert featuring Ollantay , an Andean music group. Helen Darlymple (202) 364-4399 MICHIGAN HISPANIC CELEBRATION Lansing, Mich. Sept. 15 A parade of regional costumes from various Latin American countries. mariachi music and a student forum will open Michigan's celebration of Hispanic Heritage Week at the state capital . The Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will host a fund-raising awards banquet for the Michigan Hispanic Scholar ship fund. Essie Solano (517) 373-8339 HISPANIC MEDIA RECEPTION Washington, D . C . Sept. 15 4 Hallmark Cards is hosting a White House-sponsored reception in honor of Hispanic media professionals at the National Press Club and will salute Hispanics in five fields of the media , from print to motion pictures. Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657 WHITE HOUSE BUSINESS BRIEFING Washington, D . C . Sept. 1 5 Vice President George Bush will address Hispanic entrepreneurs and Sen. James Abdnor (A-S . D.) will speak on federal minority set-aside contracts. Amparo Bouchey (202) 366-1930 PUERTO RICAN CHILDREN'S CHOIR Washington, D.C. Sept. 15 Ninos Cantores de Puerto Rico-Centro de Ponce will perform at the Capitol. The Centro de Ponce is made up of 70 children, ages six to 12 . The touring company will interpret folk , children' s and classical songs in six languages . Ron Walker (202) 225-2615 CONGRESSIONAL INSTITUTE DINNER Washington , D.C. Sept. 16 The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute will celebrate its 1Oth anniversary with a fund-raising dinner. Madelyn Serna (202) 543-1771 HISPANIC MILITARY SALUTE Washington, D.C. Sept. 16 Enlisted Hispanic personnel will be honored during a tribute to Latinos in the military . Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657 HISPANIC GALA RECEPTION Washington, D . C . Sept. 17 The White House task force on Hispanic Heritage Week will host a formal reception featuring the music of the Miami-based group Canaveral. Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657 Sept. 14, 1987 MARKETING SYMPOSIUM New York Sept. 1 7 The New York Life Insurance Co. presents the third annual Marketing to Hispanics symposium for senior marketing executives . Present will be advertising, media , creative directors and other professionals in the Hispanic market. Gilbert Sabater (212) 410-5696 MOVIES Washington , D.C. Sept. 17-20 The Smithsonian Institution will host three movies centering on Hispanics . The mov i es will be Zoot Suit , Macario and Machito: una /eyenda de jazz Iatino . Madeleine Jacobs (202) 357-2627 HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND Washington , D . C . Sept. 18 The board of di rectors of the Hispanic Scholarship Fund will have a luncheon followed by a photo session with President Reagan . Rudy Beserra (202) 456-2657 HISPANIC FAMILY BANQUET Los Angeles Sept. 19 The Hispanic Family of the Year will be announced at a banquet with scholarship prizes to the top three families . The non-profit effort seeks to recognize Hispanic families for community involvement and family unity. Bernie Kemp (818) 500-1309 LULAC 1 OK RUN Washington, D . C . Sept. 19 A benefit run to help defray hospital costs for Ana Joyce Huezo, a nine-year-old kidney transplant patient , is being sponsored by League of United Latin American Citizens Councils in Washington, D .C., and Alexandria , Va . Andres Tobar (703) 379-7487 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

Hispanic-Origin Subgroups in the United States-1987 (Advance Report) Table 3 . Selected Social Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Hispanic Origin, by Type of Origin : March 1987 (For the Uni t e d States . Numbers in thousands) H i spanic origi n Character i stic Centr a l Not of Total Puerto and South Other H i spanic populat i on Total Mexican Rican Cuban American H i spanic o rigin1 Age Total ............................ 238,789 18 ,790 11,762 2 ,284 1,017 2 ,139 1,588 219,999 Percent ........................ 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 ' 100.0 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 Under 5 years ...................... 7 . 6 10 . 6 11.4 11.7 7 . 6 8 . 9 7 . 5 7 . 3 5 and 6 years ...................... 3 . 0 4 . 5 5 . 1 5 . 1 1 . 4 3 . 4 3.1 2 .9 7 to 9 years ....................... 4 . 3 6 . 0 6 . 5 7 . 3 2 . 2 4.9 4 . 2 4 . 2 1 0 to 13 years ............. ........ 5 . 5 7 .4 8.1 7.1 4.4 6 . 0 6.2 5 . 3 1 4 and 15 years ........... . ....... 2 . 9 3 . 5 4 . 0 3 . 1 1 . 9 2. 8 2 . 6 2 . 9 16 and 17 yea r s ... ....... ......... 3 . 1 3 . 5 3.8 3 . 9 2 . 1 2 . 6 2 . 8 3 . 1 1 8 and 19 years ................. . . 3 . 0 3 . 5 3 . 7 3.4 2 . 2 4 . 1 3 . 0 2 . 9 20 and 21 years ................... 3.1 4 . 1 4 . 3 3 . 5 4 . 0 4 . 2 4 . 0 3.0 22 to 24 years ............... . ..... 5 . 0 6 . 5 6 . 6 6 . 3 6.4 7.3 5 . 1 4.9 2 5 to _29 ye ars .............. ....... 9 . 1 10 . 3 10 . 3 9.7 9 . 2 1 2 . 1 9 . 3 9 . 0 30 to 34 years .......... ........... 8 . 8 8 . 9 8 . 6 8.4 7 . 7 10 . 4 10 . 5 8 . 8 35 to 44 years . ....... . .... . . . ..... 14 . 1 13 . 0 11.9 14. 5 12.4 16 . 8 14 . 2 14.2 45 to 54 years . .... ................ 9 . 6 7.7 6.9 6.9 13 . 3 9.0 9 . 9 9.8 55 to 64 years ......... . . . . ........ 9.2 5.5 4 . 8 5.3 13 . 2 4 . 5 7 . 8 9 . 5 65 to 74 years ..................... 7 . 2 3.1 2.7 2 . 5 7 . 1 1 . 9 5 . 8 7 . 6 75 years and over . .............•. . . 4 . 5 1 . 8 1 . 5 1 . 1 5 . 0 0 . 9 3 . 8 4 . 7 18 ye ars and over ........ . ......... 73 . 5 64. 5 61.2 61. 7 80.4 71.2 73. 5 74.3 21 years and over ...... ........... . 69. 0 58 . 9 55 . 5 56 . 8 76 . 0 65 . 0 68.6 69. 9 Median age (years) .............. . . . 31. 9 25.1 23.5 24.3 35 . 8 27 . 3 30.9 32. 6 Sex Percent ............ ............ 100.0 100.0 100. 0 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 Male ......... ..................... 48. 6 50.1 51.6 46.4 50.3 47.0 48.4 48. 5 Female ...... . . ................... . 51. 4 49. 9 48.4 53 . 6 49. 7 53 . 0 51. 6 51. 5 Marital Status Total, 15 years and over .......... 186,688 13,104 7,869 1,534 849 1,617 1 ,234 173,584 Per cent .................... .... 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 100.0 "100. 0 Sing l e (never married) ............ ... 26.3 31.5 31.8 35.3 22.5 33. 5 28.7 26. 0 Married ... ....... ....... ........... 59 . 3 57 . 5 57.9 51.6 59 . 9 59.2 58 . 0 59 . 4 . Widowed .................... . . .... 7 . 1 3 . 9 3 . 7 3 . 8 7 . 5 2 . 9 4 . 2 7 . 3 Divorced ..... ................ ..... 7 . 3 7 . 1 6 . 6 9 . 3 10 . 1 4 . 4 9.1 7 . 3 Education Total, 25 years and over . . ....... . 149 ,144 9,449 5,489 1 ,106 690 1 ,190 973 139,694 Percent completed-Less than 5 years of school ........ 2.4 11.9 15.4 10 . 3 6.0 6.1 5 . 2 1 . 8 4 years of high school or more ..... 75. 6 50.9 44.8 53 . 8 61.6 59 . 3 64. 2 77. 3 4 or more years of college ... . ... . 19 . 9 8 . 6 5.8 8.0 17 . 1 12.2 14. 2 20.6 Median school years completed ...... 12 . 7 12 . 0 10 . 8 12 . 1 12.4 12.3 12 . 4 12.7 Type of Family All fam i l ies ................... .. .. 64,491 4,403 2 , 611 593 294 518 386 60,088 Percent ...... .................. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100. 0 Married couple famili es ...... ... ..... 79.9 70. 8 74.8 53.0 77 . 6 66.8 72.0 80. 6 Female householder , no husband present .............. . ... 16 . 2 23.4 19 . 2 43.3 17 . 7 25. 5 22.8 15 . 7 Male householder, no wife present ... 3.9 5.7 6.0 3 . 7 4 . 8 7 . 7 5 . 2 3 . 8 Size of Family Percent ........................ 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100. 0 100. 0 100.0 Two persons .............. ......... 40. 8 25. 3 22.2 29. 3 36. 7 25. 3 31.3 42. 0 Three persons . .... ................. 23. 9 22.8 21.1 26.5 25.2 23. 0 26. 9 23. 9 Four persons ......... . . . . ....... ... 21.1 25. 0 24.5 23. 8 28. 2 28. 4 22. 5 20. 8 Five persons . ....... . . . . ...... . . ... 9 . 1 14.9 16.4 14. 0 6 . 1 14.7 13. 0 8 . 7 Six persons ............ . ; . ..... .... 3.2 6.7 8.4 3 . 2 3.4 5.0 4.4 3 . 0 Seven or more persons .............. 1.8 5.3 7.3 3 . 0 3 . 9 1 . 6 1 . 6 Mean number of persons . ........... 3 . 19 3 .83 4 .05 3.50 3.18 3.71 3.47 3 .14 . Represents zero or rounds to zero . Census Bureau chart 1Jncludes persons who did not know or did not report on or i gin. H is p a ni c Link We ek l y R e p o rt Sept. 14 , 1987 5

PAGE 6

Hispanic-Origin Subgroups in the United States (Advance Report) Table 4. Selected Economic Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Hispanic Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1987 (For the United States. Numbers in thousands) Hispanic origin Characteristic Central Not of Total Puerto and South Other Hispanic population Total Mexican Rican Cuban American Hispanic origin 1 Labor Force Status Total, 16 years and over .......... 183,093 12,772 7,642 1,499 839 1,581 1,212 170,320 In civilian labor force ...... .......... 118,134 8,302 5,072 808 560 1 '127 735 109,832 Percent in civilian labor force ..... 64.5 65. 0 . 66.4 53.9 66. 7 71.3 60.7 64.5 Percent unemployed ..... -: . ....... 7.0 10.2 11.7 11. 0 5.5 7 . 9 5.6 6 . 8 Males, 16 years and over .......... 87,524 6,343 3,962 655 418 746 562 81 '181 In civilian labor force ... ............. 65,174 5,030 3,194 470 328 636 401 60,145 Percent in civilian labor force ... . . 74.5 79.3 80. 6 71.7 78.7 85. 2 71.4 74.1 Percent unemployed .. ............ 7 . 4 10. 6 12.1 12.2 4.9 7 . 8 6 . 2 7.1 Females, 16 years and over ....... . 95,568 6,430 3,681 844 421 834 649 89,139 In civilian labor force ... ............. 52,960 3,272 1,878 338 231 491 334 49,688 Percent in civilian labor force ... . . 55.4 50.9 51. 0 40.1 54.9 58.9 51.4 55. 7 Percent unemployed ............. . 6.6 9.5 11. 2 9.2 6.4 8.1 4.9 6.4 Occupation Employed males, 16 years and over . 60,368 4,497 2,809 412 312 587 376 55,871 Percent ....... . .... . . ...... . . 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100.0 100.0 100. 0 Managerial and professional specialty . 25. 3 10. 8 8 . 8 12. 8 19.0 10.0 17.9 26. 5 Technical, sales, and admin. support . . 19. 9 15.6 12.4 21. 6 24.1 19 . 2 20.2 20. 3 Service occupations ............... . 9.9 14. 3 12.9 14. 9 9.1 22.8 15. 3 9 . 5 Farming, forestry, and fishing ........ 4.4 10.1 14. 6 1 . 1 2.2 3.0 4.4 4 . 0 Precision production, craft, and repair. 20.0 21.1 22 . 5 15. 8 21.8 18 . 8 19.7 19. 9 Operators, fabricators, and laborers ... 20.5 28. 0 28. 7 33. 8 23.8 26.2 22.4 19 . 9 Employed females, 16 years and over 49,486 2,960 1,667 307 216 451 318 46,526 Percent . . . ................... 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100. 0 100.0 100. 0 100. 0 Managerial and professional specialty . 24.8 14.6 13.0 15.4 25.4 11. 6 19.0 25. 5 Technical, sales, and admin. support .. 45.2 41.3 40.0 50.0 44.7 35. 7 45.3 45.5 Service occupations ................ 17 . 9 23.5 24.8 18.9 14.6 29.0 19 . 5 17 . 6 Farming, forestry, and fishing . . ..... . 1.0 1.6 2.3 0.6 0 . 0 0.4 1.4 0.9 Precision production, craft, and repair. 2 . 2 3.5 3.4 3.0 4.2 3.4 4.1 2 . 2 Operators, fabricators, and laborers ... 8.8 15.5 16.5 12.1 11.1 19 . 9 10. 8 8.4 Median Earnings in 1986 2 Males with earnings (dollars) •........ 18 ,782 11,958 11,034 15,077 16,841 12,628 16,148 19,588 Females with earnings (dollars) ... . ... 10,016 8,258 7,446 11,053 11,664 8,537 9,704 10,110 Family Income In 1986 Median income (dollars) ............. 29,458 19,995 19,326 14,584 26,770 22,246 24,240 30,231 Below Poverty Level In 1986 Families .............. ........... 7,023 1,085 649 226 39 97 75 5,938 Perce.nt below _roverty level3 .•.• 10.9 24.7 24.9 38.1 13.3 18.7 19.4 9.9 Family householder -65 years old and ove r : Number ....................... 716 58 34 6 9 2 7 659 Percent . . ...................... 7.0 17.4 17.5 (8) (8) (8) (8) 6 . 7 Not a high school graduate :5 Number ................ . ...... 3,008 678 434 123 17 61 43 2,330 Percent . ....................... 19.9 33. 6 32.8 48.0 16.5 31.3 31.4 17.8 Female, husb ; and absent: Number ................•...... 3,613 528 244 171 15 56 42 3,085 Percent ........................ 34.6 51. 2 48.6 66. 5 (B) 42.4 47.7 32.8 Unrelated individuals: Number .......................... 6,846 553 302 103 39 67 42 6 ,293 Percent ............... . .......... 21.6 32.8 34.5 41.4 31.7 29.0 20.4 21.0 (8) Base Jess than 75,000. Summary measures (such as medians and perce0t distributions) are shown only when the base is 75,000 or greater. 1Jncludes persons who did not know or did not report on origin. ,For civilian persons 15 years old and over. 3Percent of all families of specified origin. 4Percentages based on householders with specified characteristics and of specified origin. ;-Census Bureau chart 5Householders 25 years old and over . 6 Sept. 14, 1987 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 7

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER (Asst. to HEO) Deve lop/coordinate instructional technology programs (CAl , video, etc.), seminars and workshops for stude nts, faculty and staff; assist in managing operatio n of Center , development of grant proposals; supervise computer based activi ties and computer labs; a nd coordinate LRC publicity. BA in Instructional T ech. , Computer Sci. or related field+ ability to develop orig in a l materi als; good o rganization a l & com munication sk ills. Salary: $23,035+. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #352 AND SEND RESUME WITH COVE R LEITER BY 9 /18/87 TO : Ms. A lyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York , NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY / AFF I RMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER I RCA VERIF IC A TIO N REQUIRED FINANCIAL AID COUNSELOR Bilingual (English/Spanish) Advise student s on financing their ed ucation at LaGuardia; help t hem to cor rect l y complete v ario u s aid forms; maintain a grasp of all major Federal a nd state Fin ancial Aid Programs. SA a nd two years Financial Aid experience req uired. MA preferred. Salary $23,035. Se nd cover l etter and resume by September 23 to : Director of Financial Aid LaGuardia Community College/CUNY 31-10 Thomson Ave. Long Isl a nd City, N.Y. 11101 EEO /AA EMPLOYER ATTORNEY Attorney wit h 1-3 years litigation e x perience. Ge nera l Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington , D . C . Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW , Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20005. ATTORNEY Major Washington , D.C., corporatio n seeking attorney w ith environmental litigation ex perience. Four years minimum litigation ex peri e nce up t hr o ugh trial. Admission to bar required. $70,000 range. Contact Martha McGinnis at (21 2) 697-8682. GENERAL MANAGER Salary to $33,680. Four years supervisory experie nce or de gree in indust rial management or re l ated field and two years related supervisory expe r ie nce. Year-to-year management experi ence in lieu of degree is acceptable. E x perience in related indu strial, related assembly or packag in g plant required. Must have good written, verb a l and people ski lls. Experience in assessing and ana l yzing diverse business and production work. Possess valid drivers license a nd bondable. Bilingual E n gl ish/ Spanish preferred. Resume with sa lary history to: CHA RO , 3951 East Med ford St. , Los Angeles, Calif., 90063-1698. NO CALLS PLEASE. The following two positions a r e with Delta College in University Center, Mich. Vice President-Student Services Delta College, a community college wi th 15 ,000 students, is seeking a n experienced VIce President to head its Student Services Staff . D eadline is O ctober9, 1987. For application procedure call (517) 686-9107. Director of Career Development and Placement Services Delt a College is seeking a director to administer the college's career development and placement programs. Deadline is O ctober 2 , 1987. For application procedure call (517) 686-9107. EO /ANMFH-Employe r PRODUCER/DIRECTOR KAPPTelevision Productions, Yakima , Wash ington, has an opening for a P ro ducer / Director. Must be able to direct and produce commercial work, and also have some e x perience in directing live programs. Prefer B.A in Television Production or equivalent experience, good writing skills and announcer quality voice. Make all inquiries-to Craig Woolsey, Production Manager, KAPP Television, 1610 South 24th Ave., Yakima , Washington, 98902 (5 09) 453-'0351./An Equal Opportunity Employer. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252. Hispanic Link Weekly Report HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U .S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY .NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • Con necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter tainment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Palos en Ia Lengua • Marketplace Sept. 14, 1987 PERSONNEL MANAGERS L et Hispanic Link help yo u in your sea r c h for execut ives and professi onals. Mail or phone you r corporate c la ssified ads to: Hispanic link, 1420 N St. NW,Was h i ngton, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.rn. ( E Sl) Tuesday wi ll be carried in Weekly R eports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per w ord . Display rates: $35 per column inch. The Montgomery County, Maryland , Depart ment of Police is currently accepting appli cation s f o r the position of: POLICE OFFICER CANDIDATE • Starting sa lary: $21 ,804 with increase to $22,895 u po n completion of twenty weeks of training. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS • 60 college credit hours • Not less than 21 years of age • U .S. citizensh i p • P ossessio n of valid motor vehicle oper ator's license • Clear police record Montgomery County provides its employees with liberal fringe benefits . FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION , CONTACT: Montgomery County Pol ic e Personnel Re cruitment Office (301) 840-2525 Monday thru Fr iday, 8 :00 am to 4:00 pm DISTRICT MANAGER LIFE INSURANCE Must be bilingual (Spanish/English). Guaran teed earnings first yea r $40,000. Opportunity to ea rn a much greater income. Outstanding fringe benefits . Automobile furnished . Position located in the Chicago area. Relocation paid if necessary. Call (312) 769-7643. Equal Opportunity Employer; Male/Female INFORMATION SOUGHT Any Hispanic who in the last 10 years has applied for a position with the U.S. Department of Education nationwide and was not selected , please send information on position applied for, and date applied, to: Marketplace, Box E , Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. lncludeyouraddressandphone number. Thank you. SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization---------Address----------City, state, zip 0 Start 13-week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed o Bill me 0 Bill my organization Mall to: Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737 7

PAGE 8

Arts & Entertainment at the Neptune Plaza in Washington, D.C. Throughout the nation, various events coincide with local celebrations related to National Hispanic Heritage Week. ARTS CELEBRATE HERITAGE: A series of art events at the Library of Congress is set to commemorate National Hispanic Heritage Week. 1 n Los Angeles, the Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit, held Sept. 12, launched the city's official celebrations. The show-a benefit fund-raiserforstudents offashion design-displayed recent creations by top designers Adolfo, Oscar de Ia Renta and Carolina Herrera. The latter won this year's Moda Award Washington, D .C., dates include performances of Puerto Rican dance and Andean music, displays of Puerto Rican art posters, and a talk by Marta lstomin, artistic director of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts . A parallel Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit took place in Washington, D .C., Sept. 14 . lstomin will be the featured speaker at a program that includes a performance by the Puerto Rican folkloric ballet troupe Gibaro de Puerto Rico Sept. 15 at the Library's Coolidge Auditorium. In Chicago, Recent Developments in Latin American Drawings continues through Sept. 27 at the city's Art Institute. The exhibit includes some 35 pieces by contemporary Hispanic artists. In San Antonio, an exhibit of the 25 finalists in the Year of the Hispana Poster Contest will be on view at the Guadalupe Cultural The continuing exhibit Images of a Culture: The Puerto Rican Poster is expected to be at the Library for four months. Center Sept. 15-16. A free concert by 01/antay , a Bolivian band , will take place Sept. 1 7 Media Report NEW MAGAZINES: Three national His panic magazines are in the planning stages or about to begin publication. They include: HISPANIC ENTREPRENEUR: This English language monthly is geared to Latinos and Latinas who are moving up the economic ladder and want to make the most of op portunities coming available to U .S. Hispanics . The entrepreneur who packaged Hispanic Entrepreneur is Gloria Rodriguez, a San Juan , Puerto Rico, native who in the past has directed the Washington office of the National Puerto Rican Forum and most recently was executive publisher of Hispanic Review of Business. Editor is Maria Siccardi, who anchors the World Net live news broadcasts to Latin America and was founder, executive producer and co-anchor of the television news magazine Latin Tempo. The premiere October edition is 68 pages. It and the November edition will be distributed at the Oct. 1-4 annual conference of the U.S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Los Angeles. Press runs for those two months will be 30,000. Beginning in December, Hispanic Entrepreneur will reach 200,000 select readers by direct mail, says Rodriguez. She is offering special 2-year charter sub scriptions for $12. She will also mail free to requesting Weekly Report readers a copy of the first issue . For charter subscriptions or a free sample issue, write: Hispanic Entrepreneur, 1377 K St. NW, P.O. Box 699, Washington, D.C. 20005. BUENA SALUD: The 50,000 press run of. this Spanish-language, health-oriented magazine will be directed to a general reader ship, with special distribution -for waiting room reading . -to doctors , clinics and hospitals serving Spanish-speaking patients. It combines its SeptJOct. and Nov./Dec. '87 editions and begins monthly circulation in 1988. Publisher is Rene Rodriguez Rojas, M.D., president of the New York-based I nteramerican College of Physicians and Surgeons. In 1981 Rodriguez launched the successful Medico monthly magazine, received by the nation's .25,000 Spanish-speaking doctors. Buena Salud editor is Frank Calderon, for merly with Miami-based De Armas publications. Single issue price: $1.75. Annual sub scription (12 issues) is $15. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Weekly Report readers who would like to review a complimentary copy of its premiere issue can do so by requesting it from Inter american Medical Publications, 299 Madison Ave . , Suite400, New York, N.Y. 10017. MAGAZINE WITH NO NAME: Former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca plans to announce the launching of a national Hispanic general interest magazine this week It will be in English and he will be its publisher. Working with a group of Hispanic investors across the country, he expects to have a prototype ready by November and to produce Vol. I, No. 1 next May. His group includes Fred Estrada, leader of the initial group of investors in the successful Latino weekend newspaper supplement Vista. Apodaca is in the process of moving from Santa Fe, N.M., to Washington, D .C. He will open offices for the magazine in the nation's capital next month. New Mexico journalist Maria Elena Alvarez, of Espanola, is editing the prototype. Apodaca will be announcing the magazine's name and the selection of key staff in the near future. He anticipates an initial press run of 100,000. The publication's projected annual sub scription rate (12 issues): $18. Charlie Ericksen, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Indo-Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept 13 a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector Ericksei'>'Mendoza Editor Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio MejiasRentas, Melinda Machado. Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/ Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias. No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Dis play ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placf'd by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 Hispanic Link Weekly Report