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Hispanic link weekly report, September 28, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 28, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez rejects a request from Pope John Paul II that he block the execution of death row inmate James Armando Card. Card later won an indefinite stay from a U.S. District Court judge... Jaime Oaxaca, a vice president with the aerospace concern of Northrop Corporation in California, is reportedly considered a leading candidate to replace U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Hanford Dole... San Antonio lawyer Roy Barrera tells Texas Gov. Bill Clements he would consider replacing the retiring chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court if Clements cannot find a qualified candidate. Barrera had earlier expressed disinterest... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Judge Lourdes Baird of Los
Angeles as a municipal court judge for the Los Angeles Judicial District. . . Former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferr6 files nomination papers for the city’s Nov. mayoral race, opposing incumbent Xavier Su&rez .. New York City Mayor Edward Koch names Herminia Ramos* Donovan as assistant commissioner of the division of economic opportunity in the city's Office of Business Development and Harry Alier as the city’s language services coordinator. Aliens position will be to work with all city agencies to make their services more accessible to limited English-speaking constituents... The California Senate Rules Committee names Santa Clara law student Lily Cervantes to the state’s 12-member Coastal Commission. The commission regulates development along the California coast.. Isidoro Rodriguez, founder of National Foods Industries, one of the largest plantain chip manufacturers in the nation, dies in Miami at the age of 74...
^^toHISPANICUNKWEEKL^^^^^^^^^^
Latina Elected Officials Up 20%
Mexican, Puerto Rican SATScoresTake a Dip
Mexican American and mainland Puerto Rican college-bound seniors scored lower on this year’s Scholastic Aptitude Test than they did in 1985, when the last results were recorded, the College Board revealed Sept 22.
Both groups fell further behind white seniors In 1987 white students scored 447 (down two points from 1985) on the verbal and 489 (down one point) on the math.
Mexican American Puerto Rican
'85 '87 '85 '87
VERBAL 382 379 368 360
MATH 426 424 409 400
This year marks the first time that scores for “other Hispanics” were included. While Mexican Americans scored 19 (verbal) and 24 (math) points above Puerto Ricans, they trailed “other Hispanics” by eight points on both the verbal and math scores
Overall, 52% of the test-takers were women. Among Mexican-American students, women were 54% of the test-takers. Puerto Ricans who took the 2 1 /2-hour multiple choice test were 55% female. Of the other Hispanics
continued on page 2
Seven Groups Favor Bork
Seven Hispanic organizations are supporting President Reagan’s nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court, according to a statement released Sept. 16 by the White House.
The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the Mexican American Foundation, the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation, the Mexican American Organization of Texas, Hispanic Businessmen’s Council of Southern California, Cuban Women for Human Rights and the National Hispanic Association of Construction Enterprises are groups supporting the U.S. Appeals Court judge.
“Bork is what Americans need because he is not a political judge,” said USHCC President Hector Barreto. In a letter of support, Barreto called Bork a “mainstream jurist” and said he has “consistently upheld the rights of civil rights plaintiffs who have been the victims of race and sex discrimination
The number of Latina elected officials increased a record 20% between 1986 and 1987, according to a survey released Sept. 17 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
Overall, Hispanic elected officials on the U.S. mainland increased 3.5%, from 3,202 in 1986 to 3,314 this year.
N ALEOs study shows the number of females elected to office grew from 492 in 1986 to 592. They now make up 18% of the total number of Hispanic elected officials. This compares with 15% in 1986. In the general population, women hold about 12% of the elected posts. The Hispanic increase:
1986 1987 Increase - %
Latinas 492 592 100 20.3%
Latinos 2,710 2,722 12 0.4
Overall 3,202 3,314 112 3.5
Thirty states have Hispanics in elective positions. Of all elected Hispanics, 47% are in Texas. That state saw a 7% increase between 1986 and 1987, double the national average.
“A good barometer of national origin group integration is through its number of elected officials,” said NALEO National Director Harry Pachon.
In the last 15 years, the number of elected Hispanics officials in six key states grew:
1973 1987 % Increase
New York 10 68 580%
Florida 13 47 262
Texas 565 1,572 178
Arizona 95 247 160
California 231 466 102
New Mexico 366 577 58
There was no increase in Hispanics elected to Congress last year. All 11 serve in the U.S. House of Representatives: California and Texas (4 each), New Mexico (2) and New York d).
LATINOS ELECTED BY STATE-1987
Texas 1,572 Ore. 6
N.M. 577 Pa. 6
Calif. 466 Ind. 5
Ariz. 247 Nev. 5
Colo. 166 Wyom. 5
N.Y. 68 Mont 4
Fla. 47 Mass. 3
N.J. 34 Minn. 3
III. 28 Utah 3
Mich. 14 Iowa 2
Wash. 13 Neb. 2
Conn. 11 Wise. 2
La. 8 Mo. 1
Kansas 7 Okla 1
Ohio 7 R.I. 1
Total: 3,314
Source: NALEO Education Fund, 1987 Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials.
The lone Hispanic governor, Bob Martinez, comes from Florida.
The largest increase came at the municipal level, where 57 more were elected than in 1986. The majority of elected positions held by Latinos are at the municipal level and on local school boards. Most Latinas are serving
continued on page 2
LATINO ELECTED OFFICIALS IN KEY STATES - 1987
Level of Office Ariz. Calif. Colo. Fla III N.J. N.M. N.Y. Texas
U.S. Rep. 0 4 0 0 0 0 2 1 4
State Exec. 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0
State Leg. 9 7 8 8 3 1 38 8 25
County 9 7 28 1 2 2 89 1 173
Municipal 112 154 82 26 8 13 195 4 451
Judicial/ Law 40 43 5 7 4 0 90 3 359
School Board 77 251 43 4 11 18 160 51 560
TOTAL 247 466 166 47 28 34 577 68 1,572
Source: NALEO Education Fund, 1987 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials.


Proposed Medicare Rate Hike Assailed by Hispanics
The Reagan administration’s proposed 38.5% increase for next year’s Medicare premiums would have a disproportionate adverse impact on Hispanic elderly, charged leaders of national Latino elderly advocacy and health organizations.
“The increase is ominous because it plays into the myth that elderly are well off. That’s not true, particularly with Hispanic elderly,” said Carmela Lacayo, president of the Asociacion Nacional Pro-Personas Mayor-es.
The proposal raises monthly premiums to $24.80 from $17.90. It will go into effect Jan. 1 unless Congress passes legislation to halt or lessen the boost
Jane Delgado, executive director of the Washington, D.C. -based National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, said Hispanic elderly were particularly vulnerable to premium increases because of their lack of medical insurance coverage.
“It’s important to know that any across-the-board increase will disproportionately affect the loweMncome people, many of whom are Hispanic,” added Delgado.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Health Care Financing Administration, the agency which oversees Medicare, does not break down Medicare beneficiaries by ethnic group. But Lacayo’s Los Angeles-
based group conducted two studies in the early ’80s which estimated the participation rate among Puerto Ricans at50% and Mexican Americans at 60%.
Medicare serves 31 million elderly and disabled people.
Marta Sotomayor, chairwoman of the National Hispanic Council on Aging in Washington, D.C., assailed the proposed increase as “outrageous.” She said the increase would further cut the already small Social Security benefits received by Hispanic elderly. Normally, the premiums are automatically deducted from the Medicare beneficiaries’ Social Security checks.
- Felix Perez
Officials increase by3.5% n.Y.C. Doctor Charges Hospital Bias
continued from page 1
as elected members of school boards, Pach6n said, adding seats on local education bodies are often the first rung on the political ladder.
Twelve cities with populations over25,000 have a Hispanic mayor and four have a Latino as mayor pro-tem. Only one of these is a woman.
Pachdn said he foresees a steady 2-4% annual increase in the number of elected Latinos until the 1990 census
NALEO and other Hispanic groups predict an increase in Latino office holders when district lines are redrawn, enlarging Hispanic voting blocs - Melinda Machado
New York City hospitals are discriminating against Spanish-speaking physicians by denying them intern and residency positions according to Dr. Hugo Morales a psychiatrist and member of the Mayor's Hispanic Commission.
Morales made the comment Sept 11 while speaking to a psychiatric convention in Washington, D.C. He estimated there are more than 1,500 doctors in New York who have studied in Latin America but are unable to earn licenses to practice in the United States.
“It’s simply discrimination by a majority of the hospitals" he told Weekly Report, adding
that the H ispanic physicians were just as well prepared as those trained in U.S. medical schools.
As a result of a December 1986 report on Hispanic concerns Mayor Edward Koch approved three preresidency programs in psychiatry for minority medical school graduates Two such programs, with six residents each, are already in place and the third is being developed. Four out of six resident spaces in each of the hospitals have gone to Hispanics
Hispanics are 20% of New Yorkers but according to the city’s Hispanic concerns report, they are 36% of the patients in municipal hospitals. “We need to increase the number of Hispanic professionals in the hospitals,” said Luis Miranda, the mayor's advisor on Hispanic affairs
Many Hispanic physicians not educated in the United States are driving taxi cabs or working in factories because they cannot gain admittance to residency programs Morales said.
Educated in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic, Morales has resided in the United States since 1956. He said he would continue pursuing avenues at area university and religious-affiliated hospitals to place foreign physicians - Melinda Machado
Baca Follows Castillo at Caucus Directorship
Bettie Baca, an official with the Democratic National Committee, became executive director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Sept. 24. She succeeded Elvira Castillo, who headed CHC since 1985.
Baca, who had headed the Hispanic Affairs Division at DNC, was most recently the director of constituent coordination there. A native of Greeley, Colo., she joined the DNC in 1981.
Castillo, a native of El Paso, Texas, worked for the chief legislative analyst of Los Angeles prior to becoming the caucus’ director. She said she was leaving to return to California to work for the state or city government
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
College SAT Score Emphasis Rapped
continued from page 1
taking the test, 53% were female.
From 1976 to 1987, Puerto Ricans and whites experienced declines in both verbal and math scores. The changes:
White M.A. P.R. Black Asian
VERBAL —4 48 -4 +19 —9
MATH -4 4-14 -1 4-23 4-3
This year whites had the highest verbal score, 447, and Asians had the highest math score, 521.
Despite recent efforts by the Educational
Testing Service to eliminate cultural biases, in the test, Hispanic educators agree that too much emphasis is placed on the exam.
“I’m particularly concerned that there may be misuse of SAT scores by using the scores as a prime determinant of whether or not you’re going to be admitted to college,” Cecilia Burciaga, a member of ETS’ board of directors, told Weekly Report. Class rank and grade-point averages are probably better predictors of a student’s potential, she said.
- Julio Laboy
ETHNIC GROUP SAT AVERAGES, 1976-1985 , 1987*
SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST- VERBAL
’76 ’77 '78 ’79 '80 '81 ’82 '83 ’84 ’85 ’87
Black 332 330 332 330 330 332 341 339 342 346 351
Mex American 371 370 370 370 372 373 377 375 376 382 379
Puerto Rican 364 355 349 345 350 353 360 358 358 368 360
Other Hisp. NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 387 **
White 451 448 446 444 442 442 444 443 445 449 447
SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST- MATHEMATICAL
Black 354 357 354 358 360 362 366 369 373 376 377
Mex American 410 408 402 410 413 415 416 417 420 426 424
Puerto Rican 401 397 388 388 394 398 403 403 405 409 400
Other Hisp. NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 432 **
White 493 489 485 483 482 483 483 484 487 491 489
* Because of an insufficient sample size in 1986, figures for that year were not available.
** 1987 marks the first year that such numbers were collected.
Source: The College Board's "1987 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers."


Jim Sagel, guest columnist
Land of the Dicho
In the four centuries since Spanish-speaking settlers populated New Mexico’s fertile river valleys and rugged mountain ranges, a rich oral tradition has developed.
A garrulous people, the Spanish have always relished story-telling and listening, and one of the most concise and popular components of that tradition is the dicho, the carefully crafted saying passed on from generation to generation, with its wit and wisdom capsulated in a few well-chosen words
No matter what the subject of conversation, the viejitos- the old folks on this arid land-always seem to have a dicho custom-fit for the occasion.
They explain, for example: El diablo lo que sabe es por viejo y no por diablo - What the devil knows, he knows because of his age and not because he’s the devil.
Another of their dichos contradicts: Entre mas viejo, m&s pendejo- The older you get, the more stupid you become.
It would be a mistake to confuse the dicho with its stodgy cousin, the moralistic proverb. The proverb limps along on a stilted crutch while the dicho pirouettes on a linguistic pogo stick Whaf s more, there was no Benjie Franklin around to stultify the Spanish dicho in a dime store almanac. What has kept the dicho so vital is its oral nature.
BEWARE OF TOP CHICKEN
La gallina de arriba siempre caga a la de abajo, one of my personal favorites, expresses a timeless reality in a sharp metaphor The top chicken always defecates on the one below.
And why does God allow such inequality to go unchecked?
The dichos do not speculate on the motives of the Almighty, though they do characterize the incomprehensible workings of Providence in such concise terms as: Dios da almendras al que no tiene muelas-God gives almonds to those without teeth.
Unos nacen con estrella yotros nacen estrellados, another reminds us. Some are born under a star, while others are born seeing stars.
A good number of dichos concern themselves with the process of socialization, providing pointers on how to coexist with other members of their community. Because of their isolation, many nuevomejicanos know a limited number of people with whom they have close relationships It is these dichos which tend to be the thorniest.
De los parientes y el sol, entre m&s lejos, mejor- When it comes to relatives and the sun, the farther away they are, the better.
Observes another dicho: Muy buenas son las vecinas, pero me faltan tres gallinas- The neighbor women are very nice, but Fm still missing three chickens
DOCTOR, POET AND MADMAN
Although the vast majority of the dichos arose spontaneously out of human experience, they have served over the years as small cultural vessels that transmit the values and spirit of a people.
De medico, poeta y loco, todos tenemos un poco, one observes We all have a little bit of the doctor, the poet and the madman within us.
Los dichos de los viejitos son evangelios chiquitos, a dicho about dichos observes The sayings of the old ones are like little gospels.
Thanks to folklorists like Dr. Rub6n Cobos, from whose delightful book, Refranes, many of these dichos are drawn, they are at least being preserved in writing.
What is lamentable is the fact that they are fading as oral tradition. A breath expires every time one of our viejitos dies.
In the future, I fear, we will know dichos only in alphabetized lists on library shelves, and our children will never delight in these beautiful conversations the old ones took for granted No echamos de menos al agua hasta que se seca la noria- We won’t miss the water until the well runs dry.
(Jim Sagel, of Espahola, N.M., is a bilingual poet and novelist) Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept.
Sin pelos en la lengua
NICE NUMBERS: Latinas now make up 18% of Hispanic elected officials across the country. Thaf s a boost of 3% over last year. And it’s 50% greater than the 12% slice of elective posts held by women in general.
Most Latinas are elected in predominantly Hispanic districts. No question about that
So who can tell me why districts with lots of Hispanic men elect Hispanic women in much greater proportion than districts with white men elect white women? Are Latinos finally running out of their legendary machismo?
I doubt whether Gloria Molina, who in February became the first Latina ever voted onto the Los Angeles City Council, would buy that theory. A group of Latino political power brokers tried their darnedest to talk her out of running, claiming a woman could never win in that heavy Hispanic district.
Texas state Rep. Irma Rangel, who in 1976 became the first Latina elected to the House there, tells us that while “our men are finally realizing the need for the women,” still much of the discrimination she sees is cultural.
Of the 11 Hispanic Congress members, not one is a woman.
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ new survey shows the biggest one-year increases in Latina elected officials to be in Texas and California. They gained 41 and 35, respectively, while Florida stood still and New York lost four. (Could that be interpreted as saying something about, attitudes among Puerto Rican and Cuban males, or is it just a blip on NALEO’s computers?)
More than 80% of the 592 Hispana elected officials serve on local school boards or on municipal levels, it says. Should that surprise us?
Who is teaching our children? Women. Who attends parent-teacher meetings? Women. So who has the knowledge to best serve our children’s interests on school boards?
These board positions are generally regarded as the first rung on the political ladder. Latinas don’t intend to remain there. There is motion and there is hope. iQu6 siga la lucha!
KING’S LOTTERY: This is the week that Spain’s King Juan Carlos I and Queen Sofia visit their former colony, New Mexico. One of the previsit yearnings expressed by el rey was to visit with as many Hispanics as possible.
An innocent request. But, oh, what a pihata of problems he broke open with that little comment!
An Associated Press story earlier this month reported that Robert Dales, the state’s chief of protocol, accepted the king’s wish as his command and planned to invite only Hispanics to a Sept. 29 morning reception and to give them 2-1 preference for another reception that evening.
This prompted state Attorney General Hal Stratton, a colorful man even for New Mexico, to accuse the governor’s office of a vile discriminatory act and misuse of state property. (The state-owned Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe was to be the site of the morning festivities.) “The wish of a foreign monarch does not supersede the provisions of the New Mexico Constitution,” he brayed.
That sent Dales spinning in retreat He claimed he was misquoted. He meant to say that Hispanics were responding by a 2-1 ratio over non-Hispanics* or something like that Arturo Ortega, Spain’s honorary consul in New Mexico, suggested that requests by monarchs to meet descendants from their country really were just good manners, not at all uncommon.
As the press continued to quote Stratton and keep the pot boiling, the last word we heard was that the king had retreated on his desire to mix with the state’s bounty of Spanish descendants.
It’s not easy to be a Spanish-American any more. Maybe more Hispanics in New Mexico will convert, as their former governor Toney Anaya did, to Chicanismo. _ K B&rbaro
28, 1987
Sin pelos en la lengua


COLLECTING
N E W M EX ICO’S ORAL TRADITION: The 192- page book" Refranes - Southwest Spanish Proverbs,” by Ruben Cobos(see guest column), is available in cloth cover($14.95) or paperback($7.95). Published in 1985, it is available from the Museum of New Mexico Press, P.O. Box 2087, Santa Fe, N.M. 87503 (505) 827-6454.
NATIONAL HISPANIC STATUS REPORT: “The State of Hispanic America, Vol. VI” is an 80-page collection of six articles by Latino experts and leaders. Sponsored by National Hispanic University, the report deals with topics ranging from teen-age pregnancy to Hispanic representation in the media to education. For a copy, send $24 to the National Hispanic Center for Advanced Studies and Policy Analysis, NHU, 255 E. 14th St., Oakland, Calif. 94606 (415) 451-0511.
HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS ROSTER: The 1987 National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ roster, listing the names and addresses of elected Latinos by state and position, will be available in October. To obtain a copy, send $32.40 to: NALEO, 708 G St SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
SAT STUDY: The College Board has released a 12-page report which gives the Scholastic Aptitude Test scores from 1976-87 for racial and ethnic groups. To receive a free copy of the report titled “1987 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers,” write: College Board, Public Affairs, 45 Columbus Ave., New York, N.Y. 10023-6992 (212)713-8000.
YOUNGER SCHOLAR AWARDS: The National Endowment for the Humanities seeks candidates for its Younger Scholar Awards program for the summer of 1988. A college student below the senior level or any high school student may apply. The nine-week program entails the student writing a research paper in the humanities field under the supervision of a scholar. The deadline is Nov. 2. For more information and applications, write: Younger Scholars Guidelines, Room 316, Division of Fellowships and Seminars, NEH, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506.
RIGHTS OF THE HANDICAPPED: The U S. Department of Education recently released a pamphlet, available in English or Spanish, titled “Handicapped Persons’ Rights Under Federal Law.” Request either version from: Fred Tate, Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 330 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 732-2075.
CONNECTING
N.Y.C. KICKS OFF HOTLINE
New York City kicked off Sept. 8 a telephone hotline and an advertising campaign to inform eligible undocumented persons there how to obtain legal status under the federal immigration law.
The hotline - (718) 899-4000 - is staffed by counselors fluent in Spanish and several other languages. It is being publicized through a citywide advertising campaign using 15,000 multilingual posters on city buses and subway cars. Radio and newspapers ads are also being used.
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service provided the city with $40,000 of the $85,000 needed to operate the phone line for one year. INS also provided $46,000 for the poster campaign.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
The Prudential Insurance Co. announced this month that it will provide $14.5 million in long-term financing to TELACU, a Hispanic community development corporation, to increase employment opportunities in the East Los Angeles area. The money will be used to finance four retail and industrial buildings... The Ford Foundation awarded a $75,000 grant to the San Francisco-based California Tomorrow organization to conduct a study on the barriers facing immigrants in education, political participation and employment...
NEV. POLITICAL GROUP FORMS
A group of Reno, Nev., Latinos is attempting to recruit 500 individuals at a $500-a-year membership fee to help form an organization to involve Hispanics in that city’s politics.
The Hispanic 500 group was initiated last month by Ahora Publisher and Editor Miguel Sepulveda, City Councilman Gustavo Nuftes and Waldo de Castroverde, an investigator for the state attorney general.
The goals of the Hispanic 500 group are to conduct voter registration drives, contribute money to political campaigns favorable to Hispanic causes and to train volunteers to work in political campaigns.
For further information contact Sepulveda at Ahora Spanish News, 30 Mary St., Suite 2, P.O. Box 3528, Reno, Nev. 89505 (702) 323-6811. - Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC COLLEGES MEETING Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 28-29 The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will highlight Hispanic initiatives in higher education by major foundations, corporations and federal agencies during its meeting, “Building Institutional Strengths Through Partnerships.” Richard Pesqueira, executive director of the western region for the College Board, is the keynote speaker.
Pamela Eoff Salazar (512) 434-6711 ext 368
HISPANIC MEDIA INFLUENCE CONFERENCE Los Angeles Sept. 30
Two panels will examine theimpact of Hispanic print and electronic news coverage on Los Angeles’ business and culture during a conference sponsored by The Media Institute. The conference features Miami Herald reporter Ana Veciana-Suarez, La Opinion Publisher Jos6 Lozano and F6lix Gutierrez, University of Southern California journalism professor.
Edith Torres (202) 298-7512
U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER CONVENTION
Los Angeles Sept. 30 - Oct. 4
The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s eighth
annual convention and international trade exchange
4
will feature more than 300 exhibitors, including representatives from private industry, U.S. and foreign governments Among featured speakers are Alfredo Phillips Olmedo, director of Mexico’s Banco Nacional de Comercio Exterior, and Mexican Secretary of Commerce Hector Hernandez Cervantes Carlos Guevara (202) 789-2717.
LATINO INSTITUTE CELEBRATION Chicago Oct. 1
The Latino Institute will honor during its 12th anniversary Guadalupe Reyes, founder of El Valor Corp., an organization serving the handicapped, and the Amoco Corp. for its efforts in Chicago’s Hispanic community. The celebration features a reception, dinner and entertainment.
Edwin Claudio (312) 663-3603
QUINCENTENARY LECTURE SERIES College Park, Md. Oct. 1
The Department of Spanish and Portuguese of the University of Maryland is presenting its first 1992 lecture series titled “ Mesoamerica 1492 and on the Eve of 1992.” Miguel Leon-Portilla, of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico will deliver the address Saul Sosnowski (301) 454-4305
MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Oct. 4-7 Minority Enterprise Development Week seeks to help minority entrepreneurs identify new business opportunities provide updates on legislative initiatives and network with other business owners Seminars include non-conventional ways for obtaining financing, Sept 28,1987
how to do business with major corporations and government agencies and trends for small businesses Hattie Bickmore (202) 377-5196
KENNEDY CENTER OPEN HOUSE Washington, D.C. Oct. 4
Salsa music, mariachis and Spanish dance performances will be among the music and entertainment featured by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ third annual open house.
Susan Lamb (202) 254-8700
COMING SOON
PUBLIC RELATIONS FUND-RAISER Hispanic Public Relations Association Los Angeles Oct. 11 Martin Quiroz (213) 726-7690
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR CONFERENCE: The 12th annual convention of the Hispanic National Bar Association will be Oct. 8-10 in Miami.' Billed as a major educational event, the convention features a session on sports law, criminal law, a Spanish-language session on immigration law, discussions on employer sanctions and tax law. The American Bar Association will present a panel on minorities in the legal profession, and the HNBA will honor achievements of business and professional women during a luncheon. For more information, contact HNBA President William M&ndez at (212) 878-0000.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DEAN
School of Education California State College, Bakersfield
California State College, Bakersfield (CSB) invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of the School of Education. CSB was founded in 1968 and is the youngest of the nineteen campuses in the California State University System. Thecampus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of
700.000 people who live primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. CSB enrolls about
43.000 students in baccalaureate and master’s degree programs.
The College is composed of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Business& Public Administration. The School of Education offers credential programs required in the State of California for service as elementary and secondary school teachers, counselors, and administrators. The School also offers a bachelor of science degree in physical education and a Master of Arts in Education allowing for concentrations in Bilingual/Bicultural Education, Counseling and Personnel Services, Curriculum and Instruction, Early Childhood Education, Educational Administration, Reading, and Special Education. Education students are served by approximately thirty faculty in the school.
The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Education in the areas of teaching, academic planning, research, and service. Responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Dean represents the School to the College; external professional constituencies; local, state, and national agencies; and the community.
Qualifications include: (1) an earned doctorate and a record of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment (2) appropriate administrative experience leading to the dean’s level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with faculty, students, other administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the Southern San Joaquin Valley.
The appointment is expected to be announced by April30,1988, and it will begin by July 1, 1988. Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Nominations, or letters of application with resume and names of at least four references, should be sent to:
Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Education c/o Vice President for Academic Affairs California State College, Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
For maximum consideration, deadline for receipt of application materials is December 1, 1987. CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer actively seeking qualified candidates from underrepresented groups.
ASSOCIATE DEAN
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in ALBANY, NX a leader in non-tradl higher educ, seeks Associate Dean to begin 1/88. Students work one-to-one w/faculty to develop degree programs & eval experiential learning. Responsible for Academic program including: academic/assessment qual & sys; prog/faculty development Doctorate, substan coil-level teaching, Admin exp& intin adult educ Salary low to mid 40’s.
Lettfer & resume by 10/23/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Dir/pers/AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm802,1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. For more info call Dean DeLong (518)447* 6746. AA/EOE.
COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT
Communications Assistant fora national Hispanic civil rights organization. Strong writing and communications skills necessary, fluency in Spanish, and PR background. One to three years experience in print or broadcast journalism, public relations, advertising or related field. Undergraduate degree in journalism, mass communications, English or related field. Will assist in the development and implementation of MAL-DEFs media strategy.
Submit resume to: MALDEF, Alicia Maldonado, Director of Communications, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, California 90014. By October 2, 1987.
SPANISH WRITER
International corporation seeks writer to prepare Latin American language teaching materials (for international professionals). Native fluency required in writing, reading and conversation. Must have an excellent command of grammar and syntax. Teaching and or foreign language textbook publishing helpful. Full-time position in central New Jersey. Send resume and salary requirements to: Hispanic Link, Corporate Classifieds, Box H, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
FACULTY POSITION SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY FOR
1988-89 ACADEMIC YEAR POSITION:
Assistant Professor (ladder rank). Law and Social Welfare/Social Work. RESPONSIBILITIES Include:
Leadership in curriculum development, instruction of master’s and doctoral students, direction of doctoral research. REQUIREMENTS:
Doctoral degree with background in law/legal studies and knowledge of social welfare, social work, and the social services. APPLICATION DEADLINE January 15,1988 Send vita and list of references to:
Dean
School of Social Welfare University of California Berkeley, California 94720 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer.
OFFICE MANAGER
Washington, D.C., non-profit policy analysis group seeks experienced individual for overall office management and administration. Salary in Iow20’& Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Send letter and resume to: C. Oppenheimer, HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036.
ATTORNEY
Attorney with 1 -3 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington, D.C.
Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW, Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20005.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
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Arts & Entertainment
WHO’S DOING WHOM: The fall and winter months will bring a harvest of Latino actors and actresses in a wide selection of films and television characters.
La Bambais Roseanna de Soto and Esai Morales reprise mother and son roles in a still-unscheduled episode of NBCs Miami Vice.
Other Latinos making appearances in network television programs this fall include Steven Louis Gonz&lez, who played a “worker” on an episode of CBS’s Knots Landing that aired recently, Gina Gallego and Henry Darrow, who taped an upcoming episode of Simon & Simon, also on CBS, and Sal Lopez, who appears in a skit on the new Dolly variety show on ABC. Lopez’s character, a cook named Carlos, may become a recurring character on Dolly Parton’s series.
Gustav Vintas appears on Mistress, a television movie starring Victoria Principle that airs on CBS Oct. 4.
Ren6 Enriquez stars with Raymond Burr in The Case of the
Scoundrel, a new Perry Mason mystery to air on NBC.
Cheech Marin and Paul Rodriguez are reportedly working on Latino sitcoms being considered as midseason replacements. .
Various films with Latino stars await release. Norma Aleandro will appear in Gaby, the film biography of Mexican writer Gaby Brimer. Edward James Olmos and Roseanna de Soto are among the leads in Walking on Water, a film for public television’s American Playhouse set to premiere theatrically. And singer Maria Victoria stars in Welcome Maria, a film produced in the United States by Mario Moreno Jr.
Upcoming projects include Moon Over Parador, a film shooting in Brazil starring Raul Julia and Sonia Braga. Jane Fonda has begun production of (and will probably star in) Gringo Viejo, the film based on Carlos Fuentes' novel about U.S. writer Ambrose Bierce and his encounters with Pancho Villa. And Julia Migenes-Johnson has been cast in the Marlene Dietrich role in Ricardo Franco’s remake of Blue Angel. Lalo Schifrin has written the new score for the film, which will be shot in Madrid and Berlin. _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
CAPITAL OPPORTUNITIES: Here are some internships for developing print journalists who would like to work in the nation’s capital: CAUCUS/LINK: As part of its Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute will place an intern with Hispanic Link News Service from January through September next year.
Funded by the Ford Foundation, the program offers a $1,000 monthly stipend and transportation to and from Washington, D.C.
CHCI places a total of 12 Hispanic college graduates and graduate students with congressional committees, think tanks, government-related institutions and the media The intern selected to work with Hispanic Link will report and write for its nationally syndicated column service and Weekly Report, as well as participate in caucus-sponsored seminars covering major areas of public policy, plus other activities.
Some of the other caucus internships may
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be for single semesters (4 1/2 months).
Application deadline is Nov. 13. Final selections will be announced Dec. 17. The program starts Jan. 19.
For applications, contact Marina Morales, director, Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771 or 1-800-367-5273.
WASHINGTONIAN: This general-interest city magazine selects up to five editorial interns each year to fact-check, proofread, research and do some writing. They work for three to five months and earn minimum wage.
Candidates should be in college or recent college graduates. Some print journalism experience preferred.
Deadlines are Nov. 15 (for January May internships), Feb. 15 (for June-August) and July 15 (for September-December).
Submit cover letter, resume and writing samples to Katherine Dunbar, asst, editor, Washingtonian magazine, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 296-3600.
WASHINGTON POST: EachsummerThe Washington Post hires 20 interns to work
for three months in various editorial department divisions, including sports, news, photo. (This year, two of those were Latino.)
Salary is $396 weekly. The internships are open to college juniors, seniorsand graduate students.
Application deadline is Nov. 15. Those selected are notified by the end of January.
For an application, contact Tom Wilkinson, The Washington Post, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071.
WASHINGTON TIMES: Eight college students - graduate or undergraduate - are hired by The Washington Times for eight-week internships each summer. They work from mid-June to mid-August. This year those selected were paid $200 a week.
Deadline to apply for ’88 is Jan. 31, with notification of acceptance made by late March.
There is no application form. For more information, contact Polly Coreth at (202) 636-3000. For consideration, send resume, some clips of your writing, and a cover letter to Preston Innerst, asst, managing editor, Washington Times, 3600 New York Ave. NE,
Washington, D.C. 20002. _. .. _ . ,
- Charlie Ericksen
p, If, DE ftBMO
,\V

3
(THE TOP CHICKEN...
ALMYS DEFECATES OH THE ONE BELOW.')
Hispaic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Angeles as a municipal court judge for the Los Angeles Judicial District. . . Former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre files nomination papers for the city's Nov . mayoral race, opposing incumbent Xavier Suarez. . . New York City Mayor Edward Koch names Herminia Ramo&Donovan as assistant commissioner of the division of economic opportunity in the city's Office of Business Development and Harry Alier as the city's language services coordinator. Alier's position will be to work with all city agencies to make their services more accessible to limited English-speaking constituents ... The California Senate Rules Committee names Santa Clara law student Lily Cervantes to the state's 12-member Coastal Commission . The commission regulates development along the California coast.. lsidoro Rodriguez, founder of National Foods Industries, one of the largest plantain chip manufacturers in the nation, dies in Miami at the age of 74 ... Florida Gov . Bob Martinez rejects a request from Pope John Paul II that he block the execution of death row inmate James Armando Card. Card later won an indefinite stay from a U.S. District Court judge .. . Jaime Oaxaca, a vice president with the aerospace concern of Northrop Corporation in California, is reportedly considered a leading candidate to replace U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Hanford Dole . . . San Antonio lawyer Roy Barrera tells Texas Gov . Bill Clements he would consider replacing the retiring chief justice of the state ' s Supreme Court if Clements cannot find a qualified candidate. Barrera had earlier expressed disinterest. . . California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints Judge Lourdes Baird of Los Voi.SNo.3SI HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Mexican, Puerto Rican SAT Scores Take a Dip Mexican American and mainland Puerto Rican college-bound seniors scored lower on this year's scholastic Aptitude Test than they did in 1985, when the last results were recorded , the College Board revealed Sept. 22. Both groups fell further behind white seniors. In 1987 white students scored 447 (down two points from 1985) on the verbal and 489 (down one point) on the math . Mexican American Puerto Rican VERBAL MATH 382 379 368 360 426 424 409 400 This year marks the first time that scores for "other Hispanics " were included . While Mexican Americans scored 19 (verbal) and 24 (math) points above Puerto Ricans, they trailed "other Hispanics" by eight points on both the verbal and math scores. Overall, 52% of the test-takers were women. Among Mexican-American students, women were 54% of the test-takers . Puerto Ricans who took the 2 1 /2-hour multiple choice test were 55% female . Of the other Hispanics continued on page 2 Seven Groups Favor Bork Seven Hispanic organizations are supporting President Reagan ' s nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court, according to a statement released Sept. 16 by the White House. The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the Mexican American Foundation, the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation, the Mexican American Organization of Texas, Hispanic Businessmen's Council of Southern California, Cuban Women for Human Rights and the National Hispanic Association of Construction Enterprises are groups supporting the U.S . Appeals Court judge. " Bork is what Americans need because he is not a political judge," said USHCC President Hector Barreto . In a letter of support, Barreto called Bork a "mainstream jurist'' and said he has "consistently upheld the rights of civil rights plaintiffs who have been the victims of race and sex discr imin ati o r . Latina Elected Officials Up200/o The number of Latina elected officials in creased a record 20% between 1986 and 1987, according to a survey released Sept. 17 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. Overall, Hispanic elected officials on the U.S. ma i nland increased 3 . 5%, from 3,202 in 1986 to 3,314 this year . NALEOs study shows the numberoffemales elected to office grew from 492 in 1986 to 592. They now make up 18% of the total number of Hispanic elected officials . This compares with 15% in 1986. In the general population, women hold about 12% of the elected posts. The Hispanic increase : 1986 198 7 Increase-% Latin as 492 592 100 20. 3% Latinos 2,710 2,722 12 0.4 Overall 3,202 3,314 112 3 . 5 Thirty states have Hispanics in elective positions. Of all elected Hispanics, 47% are in Texas. That state saw a 7% increase between 1986 and 1987, double the national average. "A good barometer of national origin group integration is through its number of elected officials, " said NALEO National Director Harry Pach6n . In the last 15 years, the number of elected Hispanics officials in six key states grew: New York Florida Texas Arizona California New Mexico 1973 1987 % Increase 10 68 580% 13 47 262 565 1,572 178 95 247 160 231 466 102 366 577 58 There was no increase in Hispanics elected to Congress last year. All 11 serve in the U.S. House of Representatives: California and Texas(4 each) , New Mexico(2) and New York (1 ) . LATINOS ELECTED BY STATE-1987 Texas 1,572 Ore. 6 N . M . 577 Pa. 6 Calif . 466 Ind. 5 Ariz . 247 Nev. 5 Colo . 166 Wyom. 5 N.Y . 68 Mont 4 Fla. 47 Mass . 3 N.J. 34 Minn . 3 Ill. 28 Utah 3 Mich. 14 Iowa 2 Wash. 13 Neb. 2 Conn. 11 Wise . 2 La. 8 Mo. 1 Kansas 7 Okla Ohio 7 R.I. Total: 3,314 Source: NALEO Education Fund, 1987 Roster of Hispanic Elected O fficials. The lone Hispanic governor, Bob Martinez, comes from Florida . The largest increase came at the municipal level , where 57 more were elected than in 1986. The majority of elected positions held by Latinos are at the municipal level and on local school boards. Most Latinas are serving co ntinued on page 2 LATINO ELECTED OFFICIALS IN KEY STATES-1987 Level of Office Ariz. Calif. Colo . Fla Ill N.J. N .M. N.Y. Texas U.S. Rep. 0 4 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 State Exec. 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 State Leg. 9 7 8 8 3 1 38 8 25 County 9 7 28 1 2 2 89 1 173 Municipal 112 154 82 26 8 13 195 4 451 Judicial/Law 40 43 5 7 4 0 90 3 359 School Board 77 251 43 4 11 18 160 51 560 TOTAL 247 466 166 47 28 34 577 68 1,572 Source: NALEO Edu ca tion Fund . 198 7 Nation a l Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials.

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Proposed Medi care Rate Hike Assailed by Hispanics The Reagan administration's proposed 38.5% increase for next year's Medicare premiums would have a disproportionate adverse impact on Hispanic elderly, charged leaders of national Latino elderly advocacy and health organizations. "The increase is ominous because it plays into the myth that elderly are well off. That's not true, particularly with Hispanic elderly," said Carmela Lacayo , president of the Asociaci6n Nacional Pro-Personas Mayores. The proposal raises monthly premiums to $24.80 from $17.90. It will go into effect Jan. 1 unless Congress passes legislation to halt or lessen the boost. Jane Delgado, executive director of the Washington, D . C . -based National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations , said Hispanic elderly were particularly vulnerable to premium increases because of their lack of medical insurance coverage. "It's important to know that any across the-board increase will disproportionately affect the lower-income people, many of whom are Hispanic," added Delgado . The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Health Care Financing Administration, the agency which oversees Medicare, does not break down Medicare beneficiaries by ethnic group. But Lacayo's Los Angelesbased group conducted two studies in the early '80s which estimated the participation rate among Puerto Ricans at 50% and Mexican Americans at 60%. Medicare serves 31 million elderly and disabled people. Marta Sotomayor, chairwoman of the Na tional Hispanic Council on Aging in Wash ington, D . C . , assailed the proposed increase as "outrageous." She said the increase would further cut the already small Social Security benefits received by Hispanic elderly. Nor mally, the premiums are automatically deducted from the Medicare benefic i aries' Social Security checks. Felix Perez Officials Increase by3.SO/o Hospital Bias continued from page 1 N.Y.C. Doctor Charges as elected members of school boards, Pach6n said, adding seats on local education bodies are often the first rung on the political ladder. Twelve cities with populations over 25,000 have a Hispanic mayor and four have a Latino as mayor pro-tem. Only one of these is a woman. Pach6n said he foresees a steady 2 4% annual increase in the number of elected Latinos until the 1990 census. NALEO and other Hispanic groups predict an increase in Latino office holders when district lines are redrawn, enlarging Hispanic voting blocs. -Melinda Machado New York City hospitals are discriminating against Spanish-speaking physiGians by denying them intern and residency positions, according to Dr. Hugo Morales, a psychiatrist and member of the Mayor's Hispanic Com mission. Morales made the comment Sept. 11 while speaking to a psychiatric convention in Wash ington , D . C . He estimated there are more than 1 ,500 doctors in New York who have studied in Latin America but are unable to earn licenses to practice in the United States . "It's simply discrimination by a majority of the hospitals," he told Weekly Report, adding College SAT Score Emphasis Rapped continued from page 1 Testing Service to eliminate cultural biases, in the test, Hispanic educators agree that too much emphasis is placed on the exam . taking the test, 53% were female. From 1976 to 1987, Puerto Ricans and whites experienced declines in both verbal and math scores. The changes: White M.A. P.R. Black VERBAL -4 +8 -4 +19 MATH -4 +14 -1 +23 Asian --9 +3 This year whites had the highest verbal score, 44 7, and Asians had the highest math score, 521. "I'm particularly concerned that there may be misuse of SAT scores by using the scores as a prime determinant of whether or not you're going to be admitted to college," Cecilia Burciaga , a member of ETS' board of directors, told Weekly Report. Class rank and grade point averages are probably better predictors of a student's potential, she said. Despite recent efforts by the Educational -Julio Laboy ETHNIC GROUP SAT AVERAGES, 1976, 1987* SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TESTVERBAL '76 '77 '78 '79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '87 Black 332 330 332 330 330 332 341 339 342 346 351 Mex. American 371 370 370 370 372 373 377 375 376 382 379 Puerto Rican 364 355 349 345 350 353 360 358 358 368 360 . . Other Hisp. NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 387 * * White 451 448 446 444 442 442 444 443 445 449 447 SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TESTMATHEMATICAL Black 354 357 354 358 360 362 366 369 373 376 377 Mex. American 410 408 402 410 413 415 416 417 420 426 424 Puerto Rican 401 397 388 388 394 398 403 403 405 409 400 Other Hisp. NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 432 ** White 493 489 485 483 482 483 483 484 487 491 489 • Because of an insufficient sample size in 1986, figures for that year were not available. •• 1987 marks the first year that such numbers were collected. Source : The College Board's "198 7 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers" 2 that the Hispanic physicians were just as well prepared as those trained in U.S. medical schools. As a result of a December 1986 report on Hispanic concerns, Mayor Edward Koch proved three preresidency programs in psy chiatry for minority medical school graduates. Two such programs , with six residents each , are already in place and the third is being developed . Four out of six resident spaces in each of the hospitals have gone to Hispanics. Hispanics are 20% of New Yorkers but according to the city's Hispanic concerns report, they are 36% of the patients in municipal hospitals. "We need to increase the number of Hispanic professionals in the hospitals," said Luis Miranda, the mayor's advisor on Hispanic affairs. Many Hispanic physicians not educated in the United States are driving taxi cabs or working in factories because they cannot gain admittance to residency programs , Morales said. Educated in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic , Morales has resided in the United States since 1956. He said he would continue pursuing avenues at area university and religious affiliated hospitals to place foreign physicians. Melinda Machado Baca Follows Castillo at Caucus Directorship Bettie Baca, an official with the Democratic National Committee, became executive director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Sept. 24. She succeeded Elvira Castillo, who headed CHC since 1985. Baca, who had headed the Hispanic Affairs Division at DNC, was most recently the director of constituent coordination there. A native of Greeley, Colo., she joined the DNC in 1981 . Castillo, a native of El Paso, Texas, worked for the chief legislative analyst of Los Angeles prior to becoming the caucus' director. She said she was leaving to return to California to work for the state or city government. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Jim Sagel, guest columnist Land of the Dicho In the four centuries since settlers populated New Mexico's fertile river valleys and rugged mountain ranges, a rich oral tradition has developed . A garrulous people, the Span i sh have always relished story-te l ling and listening, and one of the most concise and popular components of that tradition i s the dicho , the carefully crafted saying passed on from generation to generation, with its wit and wisdom capsulatedi n a few well-chosen words. No matter what the subject of conversation , the viejitos-the old folks on this arid landalways seem to have a dicho custom-fit for the occasion. They explain, for example: El diablo lo que sabe es por viejo y no por diablo -What the devil knows, he knows because of his age and not because he's the devil. Another of their dichos contradicts: Entre mas viejo , mas pendejo-The older you get, the more stupid you become. It would be a mistake to confuse the dicho with its stodgy cousin, the moralistic proverb. The proverb limps along on a stilted crutch while the dicho pirouettes on a linguistic pogo stick. Whafs more , there was no Benjie Franklin around to stultify the Spanish dicho in a dime store almanac . What has kept the d icho so vital is its oral nature. BEWARE OF TOP CHICKEN La gallina de arriba siempre caga a Ia de abajo, one of my personal favorites , expresses a timeless reality in a _ sharp metaphor. The top chicken always defecates on the one below. And why does God allow such inequal i ty to go unchecked? The dichos do not speculate on the motives of the Almighty, though they do characteri ze the incomprehensible workings of Providence i n such concise terms as : Dios da almendras a/ que no tiene muelasGod gives almonds to those without teeth. Unos nacen con estrella yotros nacen est rei/ados, another reminds us. Some are born under a star, while others are born seeing stars . A good number of dichos concern themselves with the process of socialization , providing pointers on how to coexist with other members of their community . Because of their isolation, many nuevomejicanos know a limited number of people with whom they have close relationships. It is these dichos which tend to be the thorniest. De los parientes y el so( entre mas lejos, mejor-When it comes to relatives and the sun , the farther away they are , the better. Observes another d i cho: Muy buenas son /as vecinas, pero me f a/tan tres gallinas-The neighbor women are very nice, but I'm still missing three chickens. DOCTOR, POET AND MADMAN Although the vast majority of the dichos arose spontaneously out of human experience, they have served over the years as small cultural vessels that transmit the values and spirit of a people. De medico , poet a y loco , todos tenemos un poco, one observes. We all have a little bit of the doctor, the poet and the madman within us. Los dichos de los viej i tos son evangelios chiquitos, a d icho about dichos observes. The sayings of the old ones are like little gospel s . Thanks to folklorists like Dr. Ruben Cobos, from whose delightful book, Refranes, many of these dichos are drawn, they are at least being preserved in writing. What is lamentable is the fact that they are fading as oral tradition. A breath expires every time one of our viejitos d i es. In the future, I fear, we will know dichos only in alphabetized lists on library shelves, and our children will never delight in these beautiful conversations the old ones took for granted. No echamos de me nos a/ agua hast a que se seca Ia noria-We won't miss the water until the well runs dry. (Jim Sage/, of Espanola, N . M., is a bilingual poet and novelist.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua NICE NUMBERS: Latinas now make up 18% of Hispanic elected officials across the country. Thafs a boost of 3% over last year. And ifs 50% greater than the 12% slice of elective posts held by women in general. Most Latin as are elected in predominantly Hispanic districts. No question about that. So who can tell me why districts with lots of Hispanic men elect Hispanic women in much greater proportion than districts with white men elect white women? Are Latinos finally running out of their legendary machismo? I doubt whether Gloria Molina, who in February became the first Latina ever voted onto the Los Angeles City Council, would buy that theory. A group of Latino pol i tical power brokers tried their darnedest to talk her out of running, claiming a woman could never win in that heavy Hispanic district. Texas state Rep. Irma Rangel, who in 1976 became the first Latina elected to the House there, tells us that while "our men are finally realizing the need for the women, " still much of the discrimination she sees is cultural. Of the 11 Hispanic Congress members. not one is a woman. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials ' new survey shows the biggest one-year increases in Latina elected officials to be in Texas and California. They gained 41 and 35, respectively, while Florida stood still and New York lost four. (Could that be interpreted as saying something abouJ_ attitudes among Puerto Rican and Cuban males, or is it just a blip on NALEO's computers?) More than 80% of the 592 Hispana elected officials on local school boards or on municipal levels, it says . Should that surprise us? Who is teaching our children? Women . Who attends parentteacher meetings? Women. So who has the knowledge to best serve our children's interests on school boards? These board positions are generally regarded as the first rung on the political ladder . Latinas don ' t intend to remain there. There is motion and there is hope. ;Que siga Ia lucha! KING'S LOTTERY: This is the week that Spain's Klng'Juan Carlos I and Queen Sofia visit their former colony, New Mexico . One of the previsit yearnings expressed bye/ rey was to visit with as many H ispanics as possible. An innocent request. But, oh, what a pinata of problems he broke open with that little comment! An Assoc iated Press story earlier this month reported that Robert Dales, the state' s chief of protocol, accepted the king' s wish as his command and planned to invite only Hispanics to a Sept. 29 morning reception and to give them 2-1 preference for another reception that evening. This prompted state Attorney General Hal Stratton, a colorful man even for New Mexico, to accuse the governor's office of a vile discriminatory act and misuse of state property. (The state-owned Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe was to be the site of the morning festivities.) "The wish of a foreign monarch does not supersede the provisions of the New Mexico Constitution," he brayed . That sent Dales spinning in retreat He claimed he was misquoted He meant to say that Hispanics were responding by a 2-1 ratio over nonHispanics, or something like that Arturo Ortega, Spain's honorary consul in New Mexico, suggested that requests by monarchs to meet descendants from their country really were just good manners, not at all uncommon. As the press continued to quote Stratton and keep the pot boiling, the last word we heard was that the king had retreated on his desire to mix with the state' s bounty of Spanish descendants. lfs not easy to be a Spanish-American any more. Maybe more Hispanics in New Mexico will convert, as their former governor Toney Anaya did, to Chicariismo. K 8 ... b -ay ar aro H is p a ni c Lin k W eekly Report Sept. 28, 1987 3

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COLLECTING NEW MEXICO'S ORAL TRADITION: The 192-page book" Refranes CONNECTING -Southwest Spanish Proverbs ," by Ruben Cobos( see guest column), is available in cloth cover($14. 95) or paperback($7. 95) . Published in . 1985, it is available from the Museum of N 'ew Mexico Press, P . O . Box 2087, Santa Fe , N.M . 87503 (505) 827-6454. NATIONAL HISPANIC STATUS REPORT: "The State of Hispanic America , Vol. VI" is an 80-page collection of six articles by Latino experts and leaders. Sponsored by National Hispanic University, the report deals with topics ranging from teen-age pregnancy to Hispanic representation. in the media to education. For a copy, send $24 to the National Hispanic Center for Advanced Studies and Policy Analysis , N H U , 255 E. 14th St. , Oakland, Calif . 94606 (415) 451-0511. HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS ROSTER: The 1987 National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials' roster, listing the names and addresses of elected Latinos by state and position , will be available in October. To obtain a copy, send $32.40 to : NALEO, 708 G St. SE , Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. SAT STUDY: The College Board has released a 12-page report wtiich gives the Scholastic Aptitude Test scores from 1976-87 for racial and ethnic groups. To receive a free copy of the report, titled "1987 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Take r s , " write: College Board, PublicAffairs,45 Columbus Ave., NewYork, N .Y. 10023-6992 (21 2) 71 3-8000. YOUNGER SCHOLAR AWARDS : The Nati onal Endowment for the Humanities seeks cand idates for its Younger Scholar Awards program for the summer of 1988. A college student below the senior level or any high school student may apply. The nine-week program entails the student writing a research paper in the human i ties field under the supervision of a scholar. The deadline is Nov. 2. For more information and applications, write : Younger Scholars Guidelines , Room 316, Division of Fellowships and Seminars , NEH , 1100 Pennsylvania Ave . NW, Washington, D.C. 20506. RIGHTS OF THE HANDICAPPED: The U . S . Department of Edu cation recently released a pamphlet , available in English or Spanish , titled "Handicapped Persons' Rights Under Federal Law . " Request either version from : Fred Tate, Office of Civil Rights , U.S. Department of Education, 330 C St. SW , Washington , D.C. 20202 (202) 732-2075. N. Y.C. KICKS OFF HOTLINE New York City kicked off Sept. 8 a telephone hotline and an advertising campaign to inform eligible undocumented persons there how to obtain tegal status under the federal immigration law . The hotline-(718) 899-4000i s staffed by counselors fluent in Spanish and several other languages . It is being publicized through a c itywide advertising campaign using 15,000 multilingual posters on city buses and subway cars. Radio and newspapers ads .are also being used. The U.S. Imm i gration and Naturalization Service provided the city with $40,000 of the $85,000 needed to operate the phone line for one year. INS also provided $46,000 for the poster campaign. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES The Prudential Insurance Co. announced this month that it will provide $14. 5 million i n long-term financing to TELACU , a Hispanic community development corporation, to i ncrease employment op portunities in the East Los Angeles area . The money will be used to finance four retail and industrial buildings. .. The Ford Foundation awarded a $75,000 grant to t he San Francisco-based California Tomorrow organization to conduct a study on the barriers facing immigrants in education, polit i cal participation and employment. .. NEV. POLITICAL GROUP FORMS A group of Reno , Nev. , Latinos is attempting to recruit 500 individuals at a$500-a-year membership fee to help form an organization to involve H i spanics i n that city's politics. The Hispanic 500 group was initiated last month by Ahora Publisher and Editor Miguel Sepulveda, City Councilman Gustavo Nunes and Waldo de Castroverde , an investigator for the state attorney general. The goals of the Hispanic 500 group are to conduct voter registration dri ves , contribute money to political campaigns favorable to Hispanic causes and to train volunteers to work in political campaigns. For further information contact Sepulveda at Ahora Spanish News, 30 Mary St., Suite 2 : P . O . Box 3528, Reno, Nev. 89505 (702) 323-6811 . -Julio Laboy Calendar THIS WEEK will feature more than 300 exhibitors , including representat i ves from private industry , U.S. and foreign governments. Among featured speakers are Alfredo Phillips Olmedo, director of Mex ic o's Banco Nacional de Comercio Exterior, and Mexican Secretary of Commerce Hector Hernandez Cervantes. how to do business with majo r corporations and government agencies and trends for small businesses. Hatt i e Bickmore (202) 377-5196 KENNEDY CENTER OPEN HOUSE Washington , D . C . Oct. 4 HISPANIC COLLEGES MEETING Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 28-29 The Hispanic Associa ti on of Colleges and Universities will highlight Hispanic initiatives in higher education by major foundations, corporations and federal agencies during its meeting, " Building Institutional Strengths Through Partnerships." Richard Pesqueira, executive director of the western region for the College Board , is the keynote speaker ... Pamela Eoff Salazar (512) 434-6711 ext 368 HISPANIC MEDIA INFLUENCE CONFERENCE Los Angeles Sept. 30 Two panels will examine the impact of Hispanic p rint and electronic news coverage on Los Angeles' business and culture during a conference sponsored by The Media Institute. The conference features Miami Herald reporter Ana Veciana-Suarez, La Opin i on Publisher Jose Lozano and Felix Gutierrez , University of Southern Ca l ifornia journalism professor . Edith Torres (202) 298-7512 U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER CONVENTION Los Angeles Sept. 30 Oct. 4 The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce ' s eighth annual convention and international trade exchange 4 Carlos Guevara (202) 789-2717. LATINO INSTITUTE CELEBRATION Chicago Oct. 1 The Latino Institute will honor during its 12th al'} niversary Guadalupe Reyes , founder of El Valor Corp., an organization serving the h . andicapped , and the Amoco Corp . for its efforts in Chicago ' s Hispanic community. The celebration features a reception , dinner and entertainment. Edwin Claud i o (312) 663-3603 QUINCENTENARY LECTURE SERIES College Park, Md. Oct. 1 The Department of Spanish and Portuguese of the University of Maryland i s presenting its first 1992 lecture series titled " Mesoamerica 1492 and on the Eve of 1992." M i guel Leo!'}-Portilla, of the Universidad Nac i onal Aut6noma de Mexico, will deliver the address. Saul Sosnowski (301) 454-4305 MINORITY BUSINESS Washington , D . C . Oct. 4-7 Minority Enterprise Development Week seeks to help minority entrepreneurs identify new business opportunities, prov ide updates on legislative init i atives and network with other business owners. Seminars include nOI'}-COnventional ways for obtaining financing , Sept. 28, 1987 Sa/sa music, mariach i s and Spanish dance per forman c es will be among the music and enterta i nment featured by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts ' third annual open house. Susan Lamb (202) 254-8700 COMING SOON PUBLIC RELATIONS FUND-RAISER Hispanic Public Relat ions Ass o ciation Los Angeles Oct. 11 Martin Quiroz (213) 726-7690 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR CONFERENCE : The 12th annual convention of the Hispanic National Bar Associat i on will be0ct.8-10 in Miami .' Billed as a major educational event, the convention features a session on sports law , cri minal law , a Spanish language session on immigration law , discussions on employer sanctions and tax law . The American Bar Association will present a panel on minorities i n the legal profession , and the HNBA will honor achievements of business and professional women during a luncheon. For more i nformat i on , contact HNBA President William Mendez at (212) . 8780000. H i spani c Link Weekly R eport

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASSOCIATE DEAN SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in ALBANY , N.Y., a leader in non-tradl highereduc, seeks Associate Dean to begin 1/88. Stu dents work one-to-onew/faculty to develop degree programs & eval experiential learning. Responsible for Academic program including: academic/assessment qual & sys; prog/faculty development. Doctorate, substan coli-level teaching, Admin exp& int 1Q adult educ. Salary: low to mid 40's. Letter & resume by 10/23/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Dir/pers/AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm802, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. For more info call Dean Delong (518) 447-6746. ANEOE. COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT Communications Assistant for a national His panic civil rights organization. Strong writing and communications skills necessary, fluency in Spanish , and PR background. One to three years experience in print or broadcast journalism , public relations, advertising or related field . Undergraduate degree in journalism, mass com munications, English or related field. Will assist in the development and implementation of MAL DEPs media strategy. Submit resume to : MALDEF , Alicia Maldonado , Director of Communications, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, California 90014. By October 2, 1987. SPANISH WRITER International corporation seeks writer to pre pare Latin American language teaching mater ials (for international professionals). Native fluency required in writing, reading and conversation. Must have an excellent command of grammar and syntax. Teaching and or foreign language textbook publishing helpful. Full-time position in central New Jersey. Send resume and salary requirements to: H1span1c L1nk, Corporate Clas sifieds , B ox H , 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005. FACULTY POSITION SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY FOR 1988-89 ACADEMIC YEAR POSITION: Assistant Professor(ladder rank). Law and Social Welfare/Social Work. RESPONSIBILITIES Include: Leadership in curriculum development, in struction of master's and doctoral students, direction of doctoral research. REQUIREMENTS: Doctoraldegreewith background in law/legal studies and knowledge of social welfare, social work, and the social services. APPLICATION DEADLINE January 15, 1988 Send vita and list of references to: Dean School of Social Welfare University of California Berkeley, California 94720 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer. Hispanic Link Weekly Report DEAN School of Education California State College, Bakersfield California State College, Bakersfield (CSB) invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of the School of Education. CSB was founded in 1 fl68 and is the youngest of the nineteen campuses in the California State University System . The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of 700,000 people who live primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley . CSB enrolls about 43,000 students in baccalaureate and master's degree programs. The College is composed of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Business& Public Administration. The School of Education offers credential programs required in the State of California for service as elementary and secondary school teachers, counselors, and administrators. The School also offers a bachelor of science degree in physical education and a Master of Arts in Education allowing for concentrations in BilinguaVBicultural Education , Counseling and Personnel Services, Curriculum and Instruction , Early Childhood Education , Educational Administration , Reading , and Special Education . Education students are served by approximately thirty faculty in the school. The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Education in the areas of teaching, academic planning, research, and service. Responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs , the De!ln represents the School to the College; external professional constituencies; local, state, and national agencies; and the community. Qualifications include: (1) an earned doctorate and a record of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment, (2) appropriate administrative experience leading to the dean 's level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with faculty, students, other administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the Southern San Joaquin Valley . The appointment is expected to be announced by April30, 1988, and it will begin by July 1 , 1988. Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Nominations, or letters of application with resume and names of at least four references, should be sent to: Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Education C/o Vice President for Academic Affairs California State College, Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfie l d , California 93311-1099 For max imum consideration, deadline for receipt of application materials is December 1 , 1987. CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer actively seeking qualified candidates from underrepresented groups. OFFICE MANAGER Washington, D.C., non-profit policy analysis group seeks experienced individual for overall office management and administration. Salary in low 20's. Bilinguai(English/Spanish) preferred. Send letter and resume to: C. Oppenheimer, HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D . C . 20036. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • Con necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter tainment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua • Marketplace ATTORNEY Attorney with 1-3 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington, D.C. Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW , Suite 600, Washington, D.C . 20005. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address -----------City, state, zip 0 Start 13-week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed 0 Bill me 0 Bill my organization Mail to: Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737 5

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Arts & Entertainment a new Perry Mason mystery to air on NBC. Cheech Marin and Paul Rodriguez are reportedly working on Lat ino sitcoms being considered as midseason replacements .. WHO'S DOING WHOM: The fall and winter months will bri ng a harvest of Latino actors and actresses in a wide selection of films and televis ion characters. Various films with Latino stars await release. Norma Aleandro w i ll appear in Gaby, the film biography of Mexican writer Gaby Brimer. Edward James Olmos and Roseanna deSoto are among the leads in Walking on Water, a film for public television ' s Ameri can Playhouse set to premiere theatrically. And singer Maria Victoria stars in Welcome Maria, a f i lm produced in the United States by Mario Moreno Jr. La Bamba ' s Roseanna de Soto and Esai Morales reprise mother and son roles in a still-unscheduled episode of NBC's Miami Vice . Other Latinos making appearances in network television programs this fall include Steven Louis Gonzalez, who p l ayed a " worker" on an episode of CBS' s Knots Landing that a i red recently, Gina Gallego and Henry Darrow , who taped an upcoming episode of Simon & Simon , also on CBS, and Sal Lopez, who appears in a skit on the new Dolly variety show on ABC. Lopez' s character, a cook named Carlos , may become a recurring character on Dolly Parton ' s series. Gustav Vintas appears on Mistress , a television movie starring Victoria Principle that airs on CBS Oct. 4 . Rene Enriquez stars with Raymond Burr in The Case of the Upcoming projects include Moon Over Parador, a film shooting in Braz i l starri ng Raul Julia and Sonia Braga . Jane Fonda has begun production of (and w i ll probably star in) Gringo Viejo , the film based on Carlos Fuentes' novel about U.S. writer Ambrose Bierce and his encounters w i th Pancho Villa . And Julia Migenes-Johnson has been cast in the Marlene Dietrich role in Ricardo Franco ' s remake of Blue Angel. Lalo Schifrin has written the new score for the film, which will be shot in Madrid and Berlin. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report CAPITALOPPORTUNITIES: Herearesome internships for developing print journalists who would like to work in the nation's capital: CAUCUS/LINK: As part o f its Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program , the Congres sional Hispanic Caucus Institute will place an intern with Hispanic Link News Service from January through September next year. Funded by the Ford Foundation, the program offers a $1,000 monthly stipend and trans portation to and from Washington , D . C . CHCI places a total of 12 H i spanic college graduates and graduate students with con gressional committees, think tanks, government related institutions and the media The intern selected to work with H i spanic Link will report and write for its nationally syndicated column service and Weekly Report, as well as participate in caucussponsored seminars covering major areas of public po licy, plus other activiti es . Some of the other caucus internships may HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a nation a l publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 2340280 or 234 Publisher Hector Erickser>-Mendoza Editor F e lix P e rez Reportin g : Cha r lie Ericksen. Antonio Mejias-Rentas. Melinda Mach ado. Julio L aboy. Richard Sayre. G r a phics/Production: Carlos A rr ie n . Zoil a Eli a s . No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be rep roduced or broadcast in any form without advance per mission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORAT E C L ASS IF IED : Ad rales 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 pe r colum n inch. Ads placPd by T u.,sday will run i n Weekly Reports mailed Friday of me week. Multipl e use ra tes on reouest. be for single semesters (4 1/2 months). Application deadline is Nov . 13. Final selec t i ons w i ll be announced Dec . 17 . The program starts Jan. 19. For applications, contact Marina Morales, director, Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, 504 C St. NE , Washington , D.C. 20002 (202) 543 or 1-800. WASHINGTONIAN: This general-interest c ity magazine selects up to five editorial interns each year to fact-check, proofread , research and do some writing. They work for three to five months and earn minimum wage . Candidates should be in college or recent college graduates. Some print journalism experience preferred . Deadlines are Nov . 15 (for January-May internships), Feb . 15 (for June-August) and July 15 (for September-December). Subm i t cover letter, resume and writing samples to Katherine Dunbar , asst. editor, Washingtonian magazine , 1828 L St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 296. WASHINGTON POST: Each summer The Washington Post hires 20 interns to work for three months in various editorial depart ment divisions, including sports , news, photo. (This year , two of those were Latino . ) Salary i s $396 weekly. The internships are open to college juniors, seniors and graduate students. Application deadline i s Nov. 15. Those selected are notifi'ed by the end of January. For an application , contact Tom Wilkinson , The Washington Post, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20071. WASHINGTON TIMES: E ight college stu dents -graduate or undergraduate are hired by The Washington Times for eight week internships each summer. They work from mid-June to mid-August. This year those selected were paid $200 a week. Deadline to apply for '88 is Jan. 31, with notif i cation of acceptance made by late March. There is no application form . For more info r mation , contact Polly Coreth at (202) 636. For considerati on , send resume, some clips of your writing , and a cover letter to Preston lnnerst, asst. managing editor, Wash i ngton T i mes , 3600 New York Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002. _ Charlie Ericksen Hispaic Link Weekly R e p ort