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Hispanic link weekly report, October 5, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 5, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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OCT 5 WT
Making The News This Week
U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett announces that Erlinda Palz Archuleta, the principal of McMeen Elementary School in Denver, is the National Distinguished Principal for Colorado. Archuleta, along with the other state winners, will be honored at a Washington, D.C., banquet... Denver Mayor Federico Pefta names Captain Aristedes Zavaras as the new chief of the city’s police department... San Antonio lawyer Roy Barrera, after a meeting with Texas Gov. Bill Clements, says he is not interested in being the chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court. Barrera, who initially expressed no interest in the position and later said he would consider it says he would like to seek an elected office in the near future... Rafael
Cortada assumes his duties as president of the University of the District of Columbia... American Bar Association President Robert McCrate reappoints Gilbert Casellas, past national president of the Hispanic National Bar Association, to the ABA’s Special Committee on Delivery of Legal Services. Casellas practices in Philadelphia... Nilo Men6ndez, 84, the Cuba-born bandleader whose song Green Eyes achieved wide popularity during World War II, dies in Burbank, Calif. The cause of death was not reported.. . George Bell, the Dominican baseball player who plays left field for the Toronto Blue Jays, breaks Sept. 23 the record for the most home runs hit by a Latin American in the majors - 47. Bell had 48 home runs at press time... Benito Santiago, catcher for the San Diego Padres baseball team, extends his rookie record consecutive game-hitting record to 32, also at press time...
HISPANIC LINKWEEKLTREPORf8!^^
N. Y. Mayor Report Review Mixed
Former MALDEF Chair, Olivarez, Dies at Age 59
Graciela Olivarez, the first and only female to chair the board of directors of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, died Sept. 19 in Albuquerque, N.M., after a long bout with cancer. She was 59 years old.
Olivarez, born and raised in Sonora, N.M., became in 1970 the first woman to graduate from the Notre Dame law school. She was appointed by President Jimmy Carter as director of the Community Services Administration from 1977 until 1980.
“Graciela was an inspiration to Latinas and all women,” said MALDEF president Antonia Hernandez. “She was in the forefront as an attorney and a community leader.”
Olivarez was majority owner of KLUZ-TV in Albuquerque, a Spanish-language station, and co-owner of a management consultant firm in that city. She was re-elected to MALDEFs board of directors four months ago. She served as MALDEFs chairwoman during 1976-77.
Olivarez is survived by her son, Victor, 28, her mother, Eloisa Gil, three sisters and a brother.
Now in the midst of this year's bumper apple crop in Washington state, many migrant workers are finding the short-lived season offers fewer jobs than expected and many may find it economically impossible to return home.
Unseasonably warm weather delayed the harvest until the first two weeks of October, straining the meager resources of workers lured there in mid-August to September by a massive advertising campaign by the Washington Apple Commission.
The commission’s ads drew migrant workers from California, other western states and Mexico to what is possibly the nation’s largest ever apple harvest, with more than 2.9 billion pounds of apples - 25% more than 1986.
Fear of a labor shortage led the commission to continue advertising for workers until late September, said United Farm Workers of
New York City Mayor Edward Koch released Sept 16 the first of what he promised to be annual status reports on Hispanic concerns in the city. Reception by Hispanic leaders there ranged from cautious acceptance to derision.
The 176-page document expands on responses offered by Koch iniMarchito recommendations made last December by the now disbanded Mayor's Commission on Hispanic Concerns It also addresses other city actions aimed at creating greater opportunities and more efficient city services for the city s Latinos
The mayor's report announced the appointment of two Hispanics to key positions within his administration but acknowledges that much remains to be done to improve city services
The report highlighted 15 initiatives that are presently underway. Among those:
• the computation of dropout rates by ethnic and racial groups;
• the .creation of an Equal Employment Opportunity Office to coordinate recruitment efforts for city employment;
• an expansion of the city police departments bilingual receptionist program, including
Washington board member George Finch. Finch said the state usually needs 38,000 pickers half of whom already reside in Washington.
There are now45,000 pickers mainly from out of stats Many are living along river banks and in orchards and eating at food banks Finch said.
The state has allocated approximately $50,000 in emergency aid and growers have donated almost $20,000. The state has also provided gas vouchers to workers.
Even if all the workers do find jobs, Finch says many will not earn enough to return home because of this year*s two-week harvest The season usually runs a month but because of the late start, the apples will have to be picked before the weather turns too cold.
- Melinda Machado
all precincts with populations that are more than 30% Hispanic;
• the appointment of Herminia Ramos-Donovan as assistant commissioner for the newly established Division of Economic Op-
continued on page 2
N.Y.C. Hispanics- 1980*
Puerto Ricans 61.2%
Dominicans 8.5
Cubans 4.3
Colombians 3.1
Mexicans 1.6
Other Hispanics 21.4
* According to 1980 census; Percentages may not add to 100 because of rounding
NPRC, Census to Meet
The director of the U.S. Census Bureau agreed Sept 25 to meet with the National Puerto Rican Coalition to discuss NPRC concerns about the recently released Hispanic census survey which reported 278,000 fewer Puerto Ricans on the U.S. mainland in 1987 than in 1985.
The survey, “The Hispanic Population in the United States : ’March 1986 !and 1987,” projected that there are 2,284,000 Puerto Ricans on the mainland compared with 2,562,000 in 1985.
In a Sept. 16 letter to Census Director John Keane, NPRC President .Louis Nufiez said that a discrepency “of this magnitude” in the upcoming 1990 decennial census could adversely affect Puerto Ricans. He pointed to the distribution of federal funds allocated to service organizations on the basis of population, as well as the effect it could have on how political district lines will be drawn.
No date for the meeting has been set
The Washington-based coalition represents 59 organizations nationally.
The census, in its report, admitted to not finding a satisfactory explanation for the pattern changes.
Wash. Apple Pickers Suffer Hardships


t! too____________________________________
Ex-Director Calls USCCR Funding Cuts ‘Appropriate’
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is no longer an important entity and a Senate panePs proposed budget cuts for the body are “appropriate," Louis Nuhez, its staff director from 1979-1981, said Sept. 28.
Nuhez, currently the president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition, told Weekly Report that while the commission still has potential, “it is not moving ahead in terms of studies and research on civil rights issues.” The Senate Appropriations Committee proposed Sept. 23 a $5.9 million budget for
the commission for fiscal year 1988, a reduction from $7.5 million allocated in 1987. When Nuhez was staff director, the commission was funded at about $13 million.
The Senate committee charged USCCR with failing to investigate patterns of discrimination and evaluating laws and governmental policies on civil rights. The committee also requested the General Accounting Office audit the commission on a quarterly basis.
In July, the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut off all funding for the eight-
member commission.
Esther Arroyo-Buckley, who was appointed to the commission by President Reagan in 1983, told Weekly Report that those who attack the commission’s reports do so without fully analyzing them.
Susan Prado, the commission’s acting staff director, added, “We’re being heavily micro-managed by the Congress and told what we can and can not do, which for a supposedly independent commission is pretty appalling.”
- Julio Laboy
Coalition Asks for Ezell’s Resignation
Charging that Western Region U.S. immigration and Naturalization Commissioner Harold Ezell’s remarks and actions have discouraged undocumented persons from applying for legalization, a coalition of Latino and other civil rights groups in California is calling for his ouster.
Attorney Bob Gnaizda, legal counsel to the Latino Issues Forum, alleged that the western region has approved only 6,000 temporary resident applicants out of a potential 2 million qualified undocumented residents As of Sept 28, INS said442,251 applications have been received in that region, which includes Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Hawaii and Guam.
The forum made its demands known at a Sept. 23 press conference in San Francisco. It sent a petition, signed by 14 leaders including former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, to President Reagan that same day.
During the last two years said a spokesman forthe group, Ezell’s insensitive and insulting comments have included references to “wets” and “fry ’em.” John Gamboa said the new group was formed following an Aug. 2 article in the San Francisco Examiner which quoted several of Ezell’s comments.
The press conference was called after the forum received no reply to an Aug. 18 letter it sent to Attorney General Edwin Meese, asking him to fire Ezell.
U.S. Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass), sponsor of legislation to halt deportation of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans for two years while the General Accounting Office studies human rights abuses in those countries, is still investi-
Exile Caravan to DlG Starts
A caravan of Cuban exiles, seeking support for legislation permiting immigration to the United States by thousands of Cubans now living in othercouptries, is expected to arrive in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8.
Coordinated by the Cuban Exodus Relief Fund and the Cuban-American National Foundation, the group’s arrival may coincide with the Senate’s consideration of a proposal by Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) to ease restrictions on immigration by Cubans in other countries.
The proposal was approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee Sept. 28.
2
gating what action he will take regarding comments Ezell made.
Ezell’s comments, referring to reports of Salvadoran death squad threats against Central Americans in Los Angeles as a “public relations campaign” to promote the legislation, appeared in print July 28 - the same day the House considered the bill.
On Sept 18, Moakley received a letterfrom INS Commissioner Alan Nelson saying Ezell was unaware Congress was considering the bill when he made his comments. Nelson did say he found Ezell’s comments too strong and that Ezell had apologized.
- Melinda Machado
Screening Panel Unveiled
The New York City Board of Education announced Sept 30 that two Latinos -William Diaz, a program officer with the Ford Foundation, and Victor Marrero, former assistant secretary with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development- were named to the eight member screening committee to select the new schools chancellor.
Federal Judge Berated by Puerto Rico Senate
Miguel Hernandez Agosto, the president of the Puerto Rico Senate, charged Sept. 25 that decisions made by U.S. District Court Judge Juan P6rez Gim6nez spanning the last eight years were biased toward parties that were pro-statehood.
Agosto Herndndez made his charges at a press conference in San Juan after the Puerto Rico Senate approved a resolution censuring Perez Gimenez for making two speeches this summer urging listeners to opt for statehood.
The issue of seeking statehood, total independence from the U nited States or retaining commonwealth status is a volatile matter in Puerto Rico politics.
The Senate, controlled by the pro-commonwealth Popular Democratic Party, intends to send its resolution to the U.S. House and Senate Judiciary Committees; the Judicial Conference of the United States, the agency which administers federal courts; and the 1 st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston, the court that hears appeals arising from P6rez. Gimenez’s court.
Mayor Admits Much Work Remains
continued from page 1
portunity in the city's Office of Business Development; and
• the appointment of Harry Alier as Language Services Coordinator in the Mayor’s Office of Operations.
The two appointments, according to Hispanic leaders in the city, were the most promising steps Koch took.
Guillermo Linares, founding member of the Asociacidn Comunal de Dominicanos Pro-gresistas-Community Association of Progressive Dominicans - said that any initiatives addressing the needs of Latinos, particularly Dominicans, is welcome and praised the time lines Koch set. He said, however, that given the history of broken city promises, the report does not generate trust
Dominicans, according to Linares, are the second fastest growing Hispanic group in the city, next to Puerto Ricans.
Although Hispanics comprise almost 20% of the city’s population, they represent 10% of city employees and 5% of the city’s officials
and administrators.
The mayor’s report listed numerous new programs, policy initiatives and descriptions of city services important to the city’s more than 1.8 million Hispanics.
“I’m not that pleased with the report... It was too long in coming... and did not speak to high expectations,” Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer told Weekly Report He said that he would rather have seen the continuation of the Mayor’s Commission on Hispanic Concerns.
Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, said that Koch chose to address roughly 24% of the commission’s 178 recommendations. He said the report is an attempt by Koch to avoid monitoring the servicing of Hispanics by city agencies.
Falcon also said that the mayor did not meet with Hispanic representatives for their input until two weeks before his report was released, adding that the report “reads like a 176-page press release.” - Julio Laboy
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Frank G6mez, guest columnist
Did the Press Hear the Pope?
Rarely have Hispanic Americans been in the spotlight as during the recent visit of Pope John Paul II.
His presence helped focus public attention on the emergence of Hispanics as an increasingly important force in U.S. society. His stops in Miami, San Antonio and Los Angeles, in particular, highlighted Hispanics as major factors not only in the Catholic church but also in the nation and in the hemisphere.
John Paul IPs visit coincided with Hispanic Heritage Week and came at the end of a summer when Luis Valdez* hit film La Bamba and the recording of the same rocketed to the top of the charts. One might conclude that the Vatican knew just what it was doing.
It was a welcome sight- the pope speaking in Spanish, special masses, headlines, the evening news night after night, the movie screens, MTV, radio- everywhere one looked,
Hispanics were featured.
All this attention contrasts greatly with news earlier in the year- the boxcar suffocation deaths of 18 Mexican nationals in West Texas; campaigns by U.S. English and English First that most Latinos regard as racist and xenophobic; stories of the emergence of a permanent underclass; the high rate of AIDS among Hispanics.
IGNORANCE, INSENSITIVITY REVEALED
By and large, the pope-related publicity was positive and accurate. There were reports, however, which revealed both ignorance and insensitivity among the media with respect to Hispanics.,
ABCs World News Tonight did a story on santeria in Miami. Introducing it, anchor Peter Jennings said the cult, African in origin, is new to the United States. “Itcamefrom Cuba,” he said. Atnotimedid the reporter, a non-Hispanic, say non-Cubans practice it. Nor did he mention its existence elsewhere in the country. Apparently ABC never learned (or chose not to report) that Dominicans, Colombians, Puerto Ricans and other Latinos practice santeria. It’s been in New York for decades. For ABC, “the Cubans did it.” For ABC, only Cubans live in Miami.
Another network, reporting from San Antonio, said papal visit organizers had expected larger numbers of Mexicans to come from northern Mexico. “For Mexican campesinos,” explained the correspondent, “even the cost of a trip to San Antonio was more than they could afford.” The correspondent, It seems, concluded either that all Mexicans were campesinos or that the only Mexicans who wanted to travel to see the pope were peasants too impoverished to do so.
WELCOME WAVE OF NEWS, INTROSPECTION
The Washington Post which tried recently to become more sensitive, published an excellent editorial on Hispanics in the United States But it seemed to suggest that U.S. Hispanics are only someplace else. Not only did the newspaper not mention the more than 300,000 Hispanics in the metropolitan area, its reporting largely ignored impressive heritage week events carried out right under its nose in the nation’s capital.
What occurred in September was a welcome wave of news and introspection about the fastest growing segment of our population. For the most part, it was shallow, lacking in analysis. It lacked insights that might have been provided by leading Hispanic experts, political figures, journalists, demographers and academics.
There is one big “upside,” however. Things Hispanic are catching on.
There is greater awareness, interest, understanding, popularity and appreciation of so many different manifestations of U.S. Latinos. The pope demonstrated that.
Another event on the horizon could give us even more sustained attention than Pope John Paul M’s visit That is the 1988 elections.
For the next year, the emergence of Hispanics will be- or should be - a frequent and important theme.
(Frank Gdmez is a public affairs consultant in Washington, D.C.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
INFERIORITY COMPLEX: England’s Economist magazine of Sept. 5 devotes 20 pages to a survey of Mexico. Its final paragraph offers some very British commentary on cultural differences between Mexico and its powerful neighbor to the north:
“If only Mexico could see itself as others see it, some of its inferiority complex might vanish... It could become an economic powerhouse without losing its distinctive character... Mexicans have what the United States has lost a sense of style, grace and argument. Dinners there are almost European; decent wine is served in decent quantity; the conversation does not come to a dead stop at ten o’clock; smokers are not persecuted..
I’ll drink to that.
WHO’S BIGGEST? In August Weekly Report printed its second survey on state-level Hispanic commissions, reporting that of the 18 still in existence, New York had the one with the greatest annual budget ($345,000) and the largest staff (7).
Today’s question: What U.S. political entity has an Office of Latino Affairs with 16 employees and a budget of $722,000.
It’s the District of Columbia Headed by puertorriqueha Arlene Gillespie, the D.C. Office on Latino Affairs reports to Mayor Marion Barry and the city council, which created it It aggressively advocates a variety of employment education, health and other services to the districts estimated 80,000 Latino residenta
The district wants to be a state some day.
I’ll vote for that
THE UNFORGIVING CITY: In the predawn hours of Sept 24, as New York Mayor Edward Koch was sound asleep upstairs, his bodyguards discovered a man wandering in the kitchen holding eight forks, two spoons and two knives.
“Who are you?” Koch’s bodyguards demanded.
“I’m a burglar,” the man replied.
As they led him away, Juan Suftrez, the 33-year-old intruder, offered the cops a deal: “I’ll put everything back and leave.”
I’ll buy that
LA LAW: The Los Angeles Times took a recent look at what it calls “The Real L.A Law,” examining the growth and power of that city's most powerful legal firms.
In the second article of the two-part series Sept 28, it reported that LA’s leading corporate law firms practiced discrimination freely, allowing Jews to enter “the mainstream of the legal profession in the mid-’50s, followed by the first significant numbers of women in the late 1960s and blacks a few years later. The first Latinos were hired in 1977.”
The article recounts that O’Melveny and Myers, the first major U.S. law firm to build its own skyscraper headquarters, bought Mexican votes to pass a bond issue bringing the Southern Pacific Railroad to Los Angeles in 1872, when the city was 80% Mexican.
Now, it reports, of CTMelvenys 385 lawyers, 13 are Asian, nine are black and five are Latino.
That. I won’t buy. - Kay B6rbaro
Quoting...
BOB MARTINEZ, Florida governor, reacting to “At Least Kirk Was Funny” bumper stickers (referring to the state’s last Republican governor) and “Don’t Blame Me. I Voted for Pajcic” buttons (referring to Martinez’s 1986 opponent Steve Pajcic) being worn by Florida Democratic legislators:
"/ guess when you don’t have much to say you put a button on.”
LINDA RONSTADT, singer, describing her Arizona MexicarVGerman roots:
“Our family didn’t move so much, but the (U.S. -Mexico) border moved from time to time. A huge number of Germans settled in Northern Mexico in the last century. My great-grandfather came in 1810 and married into a Spanish family.”
Oct. 5,1987


COLLECTING
N.Y.C. HISPANIC CONCERNS: For a free copy of New York City Mayor Edward Koch’s 176-page “First Annual Report on Hispanic Concerns,” contact the Mayors Office of Hispanic Affairs, 52 Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007 (212) 566-1778.
LOS ANGELES COUNTY CENSUS: “Central Los Angeles County, California: 1986 Test Census” is a 127-page report that offers population and housing figures It finds that each city or unincorporated area grew except for East Los Angeles. For a copy send $6.50 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
CONSUMER TELEPHONE GUIDE: “AT&T Consumer Guide” is a 33-page booklet with numerous tips on handling a wide variety of problems or questions that can arise with telephone service. For a free copy, call 1-800-424-3366 (English language) or 1-800-835-2211 (Spanish).
BILINGUAL EDUCATION DISSERTATIONS: The National Association for Bilingual Education is seeking dissertations for its 1988 competition. The competition is open to anyone who has completed his or her doctoral dissertations in the field of bilingual education between June 1,1984, and Aug. 1,1987. The deadline for entries is Nov. 23, and further information can be obtained by contacting: Alfredo de los Santos, NABE Outstanding Dissertation Competition 1988, Maricopa Community Colleges, 3910 E Washington St., Phoenix, Ariz. 85034 (602) 267-4307.
LATINO VOTERS IN THE CALIFORNIA BAY AREA: “SuVoto, Su Derecho The Untapped Latino Voting Power of the Bay Area” is a 10-page essay by former Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Joaquin Avila The pamphlet discusses institutional barriers to full participation by Latinos in the electoral system in the area It also includes the results of a 33-city survey on at-large election systems and Spanish-surnamed elected officials. For a copy, send $10 to: 200 Brown Road, Suite 114, Fremont, Calif. 94539.
CONNECTING
TEXAS GROUP AIDS APPLICANTS
The executive director of the Texas Legal Services Center in Austin announced recently a program to provide legal assistance to economically disadvantaged Texans who are seeking help with the new immigration law.
The center's Immigration Project is funded by a $60-70,000 grant from the Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation. It will provide volunteer help from lawyers and legal aid offices to attorneys representing applicants, Qualified Designated Entities and church and community organizations.
For legal assistance or for further information about the program contact Jeff Larsen at the center at (512) 477-4562.
NEEDS OF ELDERLY EXAMINED
The Michigan Office of Services to the Aging is currently surveying approximately 300 elderly Hispanics in that state to update a 1985 report on the needs of the elderly.
The OSA is using bilingual interviewers in eight cities. The survey will be used to identify the issues facing older Latinos in planning for future generations of Latino elderly.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
Manuel Jos6 Villareal became one of the highest ranking Hispanics in the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment Standards Administration when appointed deputy assistant administrator for program operations Sept. 18... AbelQuintela is installed Oct. 4 as president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at the organization’s annual convention in Los Angeles... Ricardo Fouster De Jesus, formerly with Chicago Mayor Harold Washington’s press office, has been named the program developer and public relations director of the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund in San Francisco...
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION SEMINAR Chicago Oct. 7
The Latino Institute will hold its first in a series of seminars to discuss with employers the impact of the immigration law on them and their employees. The meeting is being sponsored by the Hispanic American Construction Industry Association.
Ada Gonz&lez (312) 663-3603
SPANISH AIDS AWARENESS Los Angeles Oct. 7
A bilingual AIDS awareness presentation will provide general information on the disease, its transmission and prevention and how it relates to the Latino community. The program is sponsored by the East Los Angeles Rape Hotline.
Alva Moreno (213) 260-7774
HISPANIC WOMEN’S HEALTH Wheato. Vld. Oct. 8
Mujeres Hispanas: lAyudense! is the title of a Spanish-language conference sponsored by the Women’s Commission of Montgomery County, Md. The conference will cover how diseases can be prevented through exercise and diet.
Marta Torufto (301) 565-6700
HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP DINNERS Miami Oct. 8; Denver and Dallas Oct. 9 4
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will host three dinners this week to raise money for scholarships for undergraduate and graduate Hispanic students. This is the second year the NHSF sponsors the dinners and eight others are set for the rest of October.
Judy Chapa (213) 551-1714
HISPANIC BAR CONVENTION Miami Oct. 8-11
The 12th annual convention of the Hispanic National Bar Association will feature sessions on sports law, criminal law, a Spanish-language session on immigration law, discussions on employer sanctions and tax law. The American Bar Association will present a panel on minorities in the legal profession and the HNBA will honor achievements of business and professional women during a luncheon. William Mendez at (212) 878-0000
QUINCENTENARY LECTURE SERIES Washington, D.C. Oct. 9
The Academic Association for the Quincentenary will host its third annual celebration commemorating Columbus’ discovery of the New World. The Economic Transcendence of the Scientific, Political and Economic Discovery of the Americas and the Modern Age is the lecture being presented by New York City University Emeritus Professor Emilio Gonzalez L6pez. Minnesota University Professor Antonio Ramos will be honored for his efforts to coordinate programs between Spain and U.S. universities.
Elda Phillips (202) 342-9030
COLUMBUS DAY CELEBRATION San Antonio Oct 9-11
Oct. 5,1987
The first Feria de las Americas, featuring food, entertainment and cultural events, is being sponsored by Los Compadres, a group supporting San Antonio’s Spanish missions. The group plans to make the fair an international event by the 1992 Quincentennial. Charissa Funaro (512) 922-3218
PUERTO RICO’S POLITICAL STATUS Washington, D.C. Oct. 9
Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua, a Puerto Rican political analyst, will speak on Modernization and Dependence: The Political Status of Puerto Rico at a lecture sponsored by the Center for the Advanced Studies of the Americas Student Association.
Jean-Yves Lacascade (202) 333-9143
ARTIST PANEL DISCUSSION New York Oct. 10
El Museo del Barrio is sponsoring a panel discussion on the paintings of Carlos Osorio, a New York City painter and community activist Speaking about Osorio, who died in 1984, will be painter Nancy Wells, who co-founded two New York galleries with Osorio and his former student, Jorge Soto.
Rafael Col6n Morales (212) 831-7272
AIDS FILM/DISCUSSION Los Angeles Oct. 10
Mas Alla del Medio is a Spanish-language film on AIDS being presented by the American Red Cross. Diane Martinez (213) 484-4310
PUBLIC RELATIONS FUND-RAISER Los Angeles Oct. 11
The Hispanic Public Relations Association is sponsoring a Day at the Races fund-raiser.
Martin Quiroz (213) 726-7690
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
FACULTY POSITION SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY FOR
1988-89 ACADEMIC YEAR POSITION:
Assistant Professor (ladder rank). Law and Social Welfare/Social Work. RESPONSIBILITIES Include:
Leadership in curriculum development, instruction of master’s and doctoral students, direction of doctoral research. REQUIREMENTS:
Doctoral degree with background in law/legal studies and knowledge of social welfare, social work, and the social services. APPLICATION DEADLINE January 15,1988 Send vita and list of references to:
Dean
School of Social Welfare University of California Berkeley, California 94720 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer.
SPANISH WRITER International corporation seeks writer to prepare Latin American language teaching materials (for international professionals). Native fluency required in writing, reading and conversation. Must have an excellent command of grammar and syntax. Teaching and or foreign language textbook publishing helpful. Full-time position in central New Jersey. Send resume and salary requirements to: Hispanic Link, Corporate Classifieds, Box H, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
The following positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College. NURSING (Search Extended)
Nursing faculty for Medical/Surgical Nursing to teach & supervise students in classroom and clinical settings. Instr.: M.S. in Nursing, currently licensed R.N., teaching exp. pref. Asst. Prof.: M.S. in Nursing + 15 appropriate credits beyond Master’s or 60 credits above B.S., 2 yrs. college/clinical teaching exp.; 5 yrs. related prof, hospital exp. progressively resp. and relevant Excellent benefits package. Beg. Salary: Inst $23,035/A; Asst Prof. $25, 114/A.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY # 329 a AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 11/20/87.
DEVELOPMENTAL SKILLS (Search Extended)
Teacher of Reading. Ph.D. Pref. + 5 yrs. teaching adults pref. Rank and salary contingent upon qualifications. Good benefits.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY#302b AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER BY 11/20/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED
NEWSCAST PRODUCER
Newscast producer will be responsible for producing newscasts, news specials, series, elections and other projects. Prefer applicants with conversational TV news copywriting ability, sharp news judgment and understanding of the in’s and out’s of production. The ability to manage people and be a team player is essential.
Candidates should have a minimum 3 years experience as a producer rrr a commercial TV newsroom, and should have a degree in Journalism.
Please send resume to: Sharon Buchanan, WPLG/TV.3900 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL33137.
ATTORNEY
Attorney with 1 -3 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington, D.C.
Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW, Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20005.
APPLE VALLEY BROADCASTING, INC.
Yakima, Washington
KAPP Television has an immediate opening for an Entry Level Production Assistant
The position requires knowledge of one-inch video tape machines and multi-effects switchers. An announcer-type voice and experience on newscast technical directing would be preferred
Makeall inquires to Craig Woolsey, Production Manager, KAPP Television, 1610 South 24th Ave., Yakima, Wash. 98902.
Deadline for applications is Friday, Oct 16, 1987.
PRESIDENT
INDIANA UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION The Board of Directors of the Indiana University Foundation is currently conducting a national search to fill the position of President of the Foundation. The President is appointed by the Directors of this organization. The Foundation manages the endowment for the University and serves as its fundraising arm. The Directors invite letters of application and nominations for the position of President. Correspondence should be addressed to: Herman B Wells, University Chancellor Chair, IUF Presidential Search Committee Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana 47405 The Presidential Search Committee hopes to submit recommendations to the Board of Directors on February 17,1987.
The Indiana University Foundation is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
OFFICE MANAGER Washington,. D.C., non-profit policy analysis group seeks experienced individual for overall office management and administration. Salary in low 20’s. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Send letter and resume ta C. Oppenheimer, HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite St0, Washington, D.C. 20036.
PRINCE GEORGPS COUNTY, Md., govern* ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
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Arts& Entertainment
ONE MORE TIME, VALDEZ: A new television version of EITeatrO Campesino’s play Corridos, written and directed by Luis Valdez, premieres this week on some 300 public television stations around the country.
Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution is slotted for Oct 7 at 9 p.m. (check local listings - some public TV and radio stations will simulcast in Dolby stereo).
The show was created in workshops by the California theater troupe at its San Juan Bautista home base. It opened at San Francisco's Marine Memorial Theater in 1983, and a year later the play received 10 Bay Area Theater Critics Circle Awards
The new version is a production of San Francisco’s KQED-TV, in association with El Teatro Campesino-a presentation of the station’s series From San Francisco. Funding for the program, produced by Janis Blackschleger, was provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ford Foundation and the members of KQED.
The cast of Corridos includes several members of previous stage casts - Miguel Delgado (who also choreographed), George Galvdn, Lettie Ibarra, Sal L6pez, Alma Martinez, Irma Rangel, Luis Valdez
(who plays El Maestro) and Robert Vega.
Added to the TV production are performances by singer Linda Ronstadt, ballerina Evelyn Cisneros, and actor/singer Daniel Valdez (Luis’ brother and the show’s musical director). Felipe Cantti, Linda L6pez, Rogelio Lopez and Lakin Valdez complete the cast.
OTHERS: Two upcoming episodes of the new cable-TV series Likely Stories have Hispanic themes.
I ncluded in the 13-part series of video and film stories are The Cruz Brothers and Mrs Malloy, a story about the relationship between an aging woman and three Puerto Rican boys, and Clarence and Angel, about a shy black boy who can’t read and the Puerto Rican boy who teaches him.
ONE LINERS: The La Bamba soundtrack fell to the number two spot on the Sept 26 Billboard “top pop album” charts, pushed by Michael Jackson’s Bad. Los Lobos’ single La Bamba enjoyed its second week as number one in the “Hot Latin 50” chart... Beatriz Rodriguez is one of the principals in the Joffrey Ballet revival of Vaslav Nijinsky's “lost” ballet Le Sacre du Printemps which has performances Oct 6 and 8 in Los Angeles... And the Tex/Mexgroup La Mafia has joined a “Stay in School" TV and radio campaign in Texas... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TRIPLE THREATS James Brady chose talk show hostess Sally Jessy Raphael as his personality page subject for the Sept 27 Parade magazine.
In it Sally Jessy, born in Easton, Pa, and raised in Puerto Rico, explained her use of a triple identifier (Raphael was her mother's maiden name):
“I lived for years in Puerto Rico. Down there, everyone has three names If you don’t have three names, they thinkyou’re strange.”
MAGAZINE HAS A NAME: The national magazine that former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca plans to launch next spring now has a name: Hispanic.
Apodaca, who’ll be publisher, has hired his first aide. Randy Belcher Torres who worked for another past New Mexico governor, Toney
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Anaya, as Washingtcn representative, will Sosa is subcontracting the Centers for carry the title of assistant to the publisher. Disease Control account through Ogilvy & FIERRO ELECTED: The California Chi- Mather.
cano News Media Association, which will conduct its seventh annual scholarship banquet at Los Angeles’ Sheraton Grande Hotel Oct. 16, has its first woman president.
KNBC-TV news producer Evelyn Fierro was elected by CCNMA’s board of directors to complete the ’87 term of Los Angeles Times’ editorial columnist Frank del Olmo, who started a one-year Neiman fellowship.
Banquet tickets are $100. The Gannett Foundation, CCNMA’s major supporter during its 15 years of existence, will be honored ■
For more information on the black-tie event, contact its executive director, Suzanne Man-riquez, at (213) 743-7158.
AIDS EDUCATION: San Antonio-based Sosa& Associates has launched its national public service advertising campaign to help educate U.S. Hispanics on the AIDS threat.
CHICAGO COLLEGES: The civil rights monthly Chicago Reporterfound in a survey of eight area schools that only three Hispanics and 36 blacks worked actively on the institutions’ student newspapers last spring.
Hispanics accounted for less than 1% of the papers’ 483 staffers.
: None of the 39 Latinos and blacks were involved in direct editorial management The article listed an alternative newspaper, the Queondeesola, as circulating to Latino students at Northwestern University.
Other schools included in the survey: Loyola, Roosevelt DePaul, Columbia, Northeastern, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle.
The Chicago Reporter recently picked up a new H ispanic affairs reporter, Jennifer Robles, from an Illinois daily. _ c„ar/(e Ericksen
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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OCT5 ._ Making The News This Week U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett announces that -Erlinda PalzArchuleta, the principal of McMeen Elementary School in Denver, is the National Distinguished Principal for Colorado . Archuleta , along with the other state winners, will be honored at a Washington , D.C., banquet. . . Denver Mayor Federico Pel'la names Captain Arlstedes Zavaras as the new chief of the city's police department. .. San Antonio lawyer Roy Barrera, after a meeting with Texas Gov . Bill Clements, says he is not interested in being the chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court . Barrera , who initially expressed no interest in the position and later said he would consider it, says he would like to seek an elected office in the near future . . . Rafael Cortada assumes his duties as president of the University of the District of Columbia ... American Bar Association President Robert McCrate reappoints Gilbert Casellas, past national president of the Hispanic National Bar Association , to the ABA's Special Committee on Delivery of Legal Services. Casellas practices in Philadelphia ... Nilo Menendez, 84, the Cuba-born bandleader whose song Green Eyes achieved wide popularity during World War II, dies in Burbank, Calif. The cause of death was not reported. . . George Bell, the Dominican baseball player who plays left field for the Toronto Blue Jays , breaks Sept. 23 the record for the most home runs hit by a Latin American in the majors-47. Bell had 48 home runs at press time ... Benito Santiago, catcher for the San Diego Padres baseball team, extends his rookie record consecutive game-hitting record to 32, also at press time ... !!Vo!!l. S!!No!!. Oct. 5 • 1987 F'!nner Chair, N.Y. Mayor Report Review Mixed Olivarez, DieS at Age 59 New York City Mayor Edward Koch released all precincts with populations that are more Gracie Ia Olivarez, the first and only female Sept. 16 the first of what he promised to be than 30% Hispanic; to chair the board of directors of the Mexican annual status reports on Hispanic concerns • the appointment of Herminia Ramos American Legal Defense and Educational in the city. Reception by Hispanic leaders Donovan as assistant commissioner for the Fund, died Sept. 19 in Albuquerque, N.M . , there ranged from cautious acceptance to newly established Division of Economic Op after a long bout with cancer . She was 59 derision. continued on page 2 years old . The 176-page document expands on re-N.Y.C. Hispanics-1980* Oiivarez , born and raised in Sonora , N . M., sponses offered by Koch in i Marchtto recom became in 1970 the first woman to graduate mendations made last December by the now from the Notre Dame law school . She was disbanded Mayor's Commission on Hispanic Puerto Ricans appointed by President Jimmy Carter as diConcerns. It also addresses other city actions Dominicans rector of the Community Services Admin is-aimed at creating greater opportunities and Cubans 61.2% 8.5 4.3 3.1 1 . 6 tration from 1977 until 1980. more efficientcityservice sforthe city's Latinos. Colombians "Graciela was an inspiration to Latinas and The mayor's report announced the appoint-Mexicans all women," said MALDEF president Antonia ment of two Hispanics to key positions within Other Hispanics 21.4 Hernandez. " She was in the forefront a an his administration but acknowledges that much • According to 1980 census; Percentages may not add to attorney and a community leader." remains to be done to improve city aervices. 100 because ot rounding . Olivarez was majority owner of KLUZ-TV in The report highlighted 15 initiatives that Albuquerque, a Spanish-language station, and are presently underway . Among those: co-ownerofamanagementconsultantfirmin • the computation of dropout rates by that city. She was re-elected to MALDEPs ethnic and racial groups; • board of directors four months ago . She served • the .creation of an Equal Employment as MALDEPs chairwoman during 1976-77. Opportunity Office to coordinate recruitment Olivarez is survived by her son, Victor, 28, efforts for city employment; her mother, Eloisa Gil, three sisters and a e an expansion of the city police departbrother . menfs bilingual receptionist program, including Wash. Apple Pickers Suffer Hardships Now in the midst of this year's bumper apple crop in Washington state, many migrant workers are finding the short-lived season offers fewer jobs than expected and many may find it economically impossible to return home . Unseasonably warm weather delayed the harvest until the first two weeks of October, straining the meager resources of workers lured there in mid-August to September by a massive advertising campaign bythe Wash . ington Apple Commission. The commission's ads drew migrant workers from California, other western states and Mexico to what is possibly the nation's largest ever apple harvest, with more than 2.9 billion pounds of apples-25% more than 1986. Fear of a labor shortage led the commission to continue advertising for workers until late September, said United Farm Workers of Washington board member George Finch. Finch said the state usually needs 38,000 pickers, half of whom already reside in Wash ington. There are now 45,000 pickers, mainly from out of state. Many are living along river banks and in orchards and eating at food banks, Finch said. The state has allocated approximately$50,000 in emergency aid and growers have donated almost $20,000. The state has also provided gas vouchers to workers . Even if all the workers do find jobs, Finch says many will not earn enough to return home because of this year's two-week harvest The season usually runs a month but because of the late start , the apples will have to be picked before the weather turns too cold. Melinda Machado N PRC, to Meet The director of the U .S. Census Bureau agreed Sept 25 to meet with the National Puerto Rican Coalition to discuss NPRC concerns about the recentiy released His panic census survey which reported 278,000 fewer Puerto Ricans on the U.S. mainland in 1987 than in 1985. The survey, " The Hispanic Population in the United States : ' March 19861 and 1987," projected that there are 2,284,000 Puerto Ricans on the mainland compared with 2,562,000 in 1985. In a Sept. 16 letter to Census Director John Keane, NPRC President ,Louis Nunez said that a discrepency"of this magnitude" . in the upcoming 1990 decennial census could adversely affect Puerto Ricans. He pointed to the distribution of federal funds allocated to service organizations on the basis of population, as well as the effect it could have on how political district lines will be drawn. No date for the meeting has been set The Washington-based coalition represents 59 organizations nationally . The census, in its report, admitted to not finding a satisfactory explanation for the pattern changes.

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Ex-Director Calls USCCR Funding Cuts 'Appropriate' The U.S . Commission on Civil Rights is no longer an important entity and a Senate panel's proposed budget cuts for the body are "appropriate," Louis Nunez, its staff director from 1979-1981, said Sept. 28. Nunez, currently the president of the Na tional Puerto Rican Coalition, told Weekly Report that while the commission still has potential, "it is not moving ahead in terms of studies and research on civil rights issues." The Senate Appropriations Committee proposed Sept. 23 a $5.9 million budget for the commission for fiscal year 1988, a re duction from $7.5 million allocated in 1987. When Nunez was staff director, the commis sion was funded at about $13 million. The Senate committee charged USCCR with failing to investigate patterns of dis crimination and evaluating laws and govern mental policies on civil rights. The committee also requested the General Accounting Office audit the commission on a quarterly basis . In July, the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut off all funding for the eightCoalition Asks for Ezell's Resignation Charging that Western Region U.S . Im migration and Naturalization Commissioner Harold Ezell's remarks and actions have dis couraged undocumented persons from applying for legalization, a coalition of Latino and other civil rights groups in California is calling for his ouster. Attorney Bob Gnaizda, legal counsel to the Latino Issues Forum, alleged that the western region has approved only 6,000 temporary resident applicants out of a potential 2 million qualified undocumented residents. As of Sept 28, INS said442,251 apptications have been received in that region, which includes Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Hawaii and Guam . The forum made its demands known at a Sept. 23 press conference in San Francisco. It sent a petition, signed by 14 leaders, including former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, to President Reagan that same day . gating what action he will take regarding comments Ezell made. Ezell's comments, referring to reports of Salvadoran death squad threats against Cen tral Americans in Los Angeles as a "public relations campaign" to promote the legislation , appeared in print July 28-the same day the House considered the bill . On Sept. 18, Moakley received a letter from INS Commissioner Alan Nelson saying Ezell was unaware Congress was considering the bill when he made his comments. Nelson did say he found Ezell's comments too strong and that Ezell had apologized. Melinda Machado Screening Panel Unveiled The New York City Board of Education announced Sept 30 that two Latinos William Diaz, a program officer with the Ford Foundation, and Victor Marrero, former assistant secretary with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-were named to the eight-member screening com mittee to select the new schools chancellor . member commission. Esther Arroyo-Buckley , who was appointed to the commission by President Reagan in 1983, told Weekly Report that those who attack the commission's reports do so without fully analyzing them. Susan Prado, the commission's acting staff director, added, "We're being heavily micro managed by the Congress and told what we can and can not do, which for a supposedly independent commission is pretty appalling . " -Julio Laboy Federal Judge Berated by Puerto Rico Senate Miguel Hernandez Agosto, the president of the Puerto Rico Senate, charged Sept. 25 that decisions made by U . S . District Court Judge Juan Perez Gimenez spanning the last eight years were biased toward parties that were pro-statehood. Agosto Hernandez made his charges at a press conference in San Juan after the Puerto Rico Senate approved a resolution censuring Perez Gimenez for making two speeches this summer urging listeners to opt for statehood. The issue of seeking statehood, total in dependence from the United States or retaining commonwealth status is a volatile matter in Puerto Rico politics. The Senate , controlled by the pro-common wealth Popular Democratic Party , intends to . send its resolution to the U . S . House and Senate Judiciary Committees; the Judicial Conference of the United States, the agency which administers federal courts; and the 1st U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston , the court that hears appeals arising from Perez . Gimenez's court. During the last two years, said a spokesman fort he group, Ezell's insensitive and insulting comments have included references to"wets" and "fry 'em." John Gamboa said the new group was formed following an Aug . 2 article in the San Francisco Examiner which quoted several of Ezell's comments. The press conference was called after the forum received no reply to an Aug . 18 letter it sent to Attorney General Edwin Meese , asking him to fire Ezell . Mayor Admits Much Work Remains U.S . Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass .), .sponsor of legislation to halt deportation of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans for two years while the General Accounting Office studies human rights abuses in those countries, is still investiExile Caravan to D.C. Starts A caravan of Cuban exiles, seeking support for legislation permiting immigration to the United States by thousands of Cubans now living in other countries, is expected to arrive in Washington, D.C . , on Oct. 8. Coordinat ed by the Cuban Exodus Relief Fund and the Cuban-American National Foun dation, the group's arrival may coincide with the Senate's consideration of a proposal by Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) to ease re strictions on immigration by Cubans in other countries. The proposal was approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee Sept. 28. 2 c o ntinu e d from p a g e 1 port unity in the city's Office of Business Develop ment; and • the appointment of Harry Alier as Lan guage Services Coordinator in the Mayor's Office of Operations. The two appointments, according to His panic leaders in the city, were the most promising steps Koch took. Guillermo Linares, founding member of the Asociaci6n Comunal de Dominicanos Pro gresistas-Community Association of Progres sive Dominicans-said that any initiatives addressing the needs of Latinos, particularly Dominicans, is welcome and praised the time lines Koch set. He said, however, that given the history of broken city promises, the report does not generate trust. Dominicans, according to Linares , are the second fastest growing Hispanic group in the city, next to Puerto Ricans . Although Hispanics comprise almost 20% of the city's population, they represent 10% ofcityemployeesand5% of the city's officials and administrators . The mayor's report listed numerous new programs, policy initiatives and descriptions of city services important to the city's more than 1 . 8 million Hispanics . " I'm not that pleased with the report ... It was too long in coming .. . and did not speak to high expectations, " Bronx Borough Presi dent Fernando Ferrer told Weekly Report He said that he would rather have seen the continuation of the Mayor's Commission on H i spanic Concerns. Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy , said that Koch chose to address roughly 24% of the commission' s 178 recommendations. He said the report is an attempt by Koch to avoid monitoring the servicing of Hispanics by city agencies. Falcon also said that the mayor did not meet with Hispanic representatives for their input until two weeks before his report was released, adding that the report"reads like a 176-page press release." -Julio Laboy Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Frank G6mez, guest columnist Did the Press Hear the Pope? Rarely have Hispanic Americans been in the spotlight as during the recent visit of Pope John Paul II. His presence helped focus public attention on the emergence of Hispanics as an increasingly important force in U.S. society. His stops in Miami, San Antonio and Los Angeles, in particular, highlighted Hispanics as major factors not only in the Catholic church but also in the nation and in the hemisphere . John Paulll'svisitcoincidedwith Hispanic Heritage We.ek and came at the end of a summer when Luis Valdez' hit film La Bamba and the recording of the same rocketed to the top of the charts . One might conclude that the Vatican knew just what it was doing. It was a welcome sight-the pope speaking in Spanish, special masses, headlines, the evening news night after night, the movie screens, MTV, radio-everywhere one looked, Hispanics were featured . All this attention contrasts greatly with news earlier in the year-the boxcar suffocation deaths of 18 Mexican nationals in West Texas; campaigns by U . S . English and English First that most Latinos regard as racist and xenophobic; stories of the emergence of a permanent underclass ; the high rate of AIDS among Hispanics . IGNORANCE, INSENSITIVITY REVEALED By and large, the pop& related publicity was positive and accurate. There were reports, however, which revealed both ignorance and insensitivity among the media with respect to Hispanics. , ABC's World News Tonight did a story on santeria in Miami . Intro ducing it, anchor Peter Jennings said the cult, African in origin , is new to the United States. "It came from Cuba," he said. At no time did the reporter, a non-Hispanic, say non-Cubans practice it. Nor did he mention its existence elsewhere in the country. Apparently ABC never learned (or chose not to report) that Dominicans, Colombians, Puerto Ricans and other Latinos practice santeria It's been in New York for decades. For ABC, "the Cubans did it." For ABC, only Cubans live in Miami. Another network, reporting from San Antonio, said papal visit organizers had expected larger numbers of Mexicans to come from northern Mexico. "For Mexican campesinos, " explained the corres. pondent, "even the cost of a trip to San Antonio was more than they could afford . " The correspondent, it seems, concluded either that all Mexicans were campesinos or that the only Mexicans who wanted to travel to see the pope were peasants too impoverished to do so. WELCOME WAVE OF NEWS, INTROSPECTION The Washington Post, which tried recently to become more sensitive, published an excellent editorial on Hispanics in the United States. But it seemed to suggest that U.S. Hispanics are only someplace else . Not only did the newspaper not mention the more than 300 ,000 Hispanics in the metropolitan area, its reporting largely ignored impressive heritage week events carried out right under its nose in the nation ' s capital. What occurred in September was a welcome wave of news and introspection about the fastest growing segment of our population. For the most part, it was shallow , lacking in analysis. It lacked insights that might have been provided by leading Hispanic experts, political figures, journalists, demographers and academics . There is one big "upside," however. Things Hispanic are catching on . There is greater awareness, interest, understanding, popularity and appreciation of so many different manifestations of U.S. Latinos. The pope demonstrated that. Another event on the horizon could give us even more sustained attention than Pope John Paul II' s visit That is the 1988 elections . For the next year, the emergence of Hispanics will be-or should be -a frequent and important theme. Sin pelos en Ia lengua INFERIORITY COMPLEX: Eng lands Economist magazine of Sept. 5 devotes 20 pages to a survey of Mexico. Its final paragraph offers some very British commentary on cultural differences between Mexico and its powerful neighbor to the north : "If only Mexico could see itself as others see it, some of i!s inferiority complex might vanish . . . It could become an economiC powerhouse without losing its distinctive character ... Mexicans have what the United States has lost: a sense of style , grace and argument. Dinners there are almost European; decent wine is served in decent quantity, the conversation does not come to a dead stop at ten o'clock; smokers are not persecuted ... " I'll drink to that. WHO'S BIGGESl? In August, Weekly Report printed its second survey on stat& level Hispanic commissions, reporting that of the 18 still in existence, New York had the one with the greatest annual budget ($345,000) and the largest staff (7). Today's question: What U.S. political entity has an Office of Latino Affairs with 16 employees and a budget of $722,000. It's the District of Columbia Headed by puertorriquena Arlene Gillespie, the D.C. Office on Latino Affairs reports to Mayor Marion Barry and the city which created it It aggressively advocates a variety of employment, education , health and other services to the district's estimated 80,000 Latino residents. The district wants to be a state some day. I'll vote for that. THE UNFORGIVING CITY: In the predawn hours of Sept 24, as New York Mayor Edward Koch was sound asleep upstairs, his bodyguards discovered a man wandering in the kitchen holding eight forks, two spoons and two knives. " Who are you?" Koch's bodyguards demanded . "I'm a burglar," the man replied . As they led him away, Juan Suilrez, the 33-year-old intruder, offered the cops a deal: "I' ll put everything back and leave." I'll buy that. LA. LAW: The Los Angeles Times took a recent look at what it calls "The Real LA Law," examining the growth and power of that city's most powerful legal firms. In the second article of the two-part series Sept 28, it reported that L.A.'s leading corporate law firms practiced discrimination freely, allowing Jews to enter "the mainstream of the legal profession in the micF50s, followed by the first significant numbers of women in the late 1960s and blacks a few years later . The first Latinos were hired in 1977 ." The article recounts that O'Melveny and Myers, the first major U.S. law firm to build its own skyscraper headquarters, bought Mexican votes to pass a bond issue bringing the Southern Pacific Railroad to Los Angeles in 1872, when the city was 80% Mexican . Now, it reports, of O'Melveny's 385 lawyers, 13 are Asian, nine are black and five are Latino . That. I won't buy . -Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • BOB MARTINEZ, Florida governor, reacting to "At Least Kirk Was Funny" bumper stickers (referring to the state's last Republican governor) and"Don't Blame Me. I Voted for Pajcic" buttons(referring to Martinez's 1986 opponent, Steve Pajcic) being worn by Florida Democratic legislators: "I guess when you don't have much to say you put a button on." LINDA RON STADT, singer , describing her Arizona Mexican/German roots: "Our family didn't move so much, but the (U.S. -Mexico) border moved from time to time. A huge number of Germans settled in Northern Mexico in the last century. My great-grandfather came in (Frank G6mez is a public affairs consultant in Washington, D.C. ) 1810 and married into a Spanish family." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Oct. 5,1987 3

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COLLECTING CONNECTING N.Y. C. HISPANIC CONCERNS: Fora free copy of NewYorkCity Mayor Edward Koch's 176-page "First Annual Report on Hi$panic .._ ________________________ Concerns," contact the Mayor's Office of Hispanic Affairs, 52 Chambers TEXAS GROUP AIDS APPLICANTS St., New York, N.Y. 10007 (212) 566-1778. LOS ANGELES COUNTY CENSUS: " Central Los Angeles County, California: 1986 Test Census" is a 127-page report that offers population and housing figures. It finds that each city or unincorporated area grew except for East Los Angeles . For a copy send $6.50 to: Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, The executive director of the Texas Legal Services Center in Austin announced recently a program to provide legal assistance to economically disadvantaged Texans who are seeking help with the new immigration law . The center's Immigration Project is funded by a $60-70,000 grant from the Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation. It will provide volunteer help from lawyers and legal aid offices to attorneys representing applicants, Qualified Designated Entities and church and community organizations. Washington, D . C . 20402 (202) 783-3238. CONSUMER TELEPHONE GUIDE: "AT&T Consumer Guide" is a 33-page booklet with numerous tips on handling a wide variety of problems or questions that can arise with telephone service . For a free copy, call 1-800-424-3366 (English language) or 1-800-835For legal assistance or for further information about the program contact Jeff Larsen at the center at (512) 477-4562. 2211 (Spanish) . NEEDS OF ELDERLY EXAMINED BILINGUAL EDUCATION DISSERTATIONS: The N a t ional As sociation for Bilingual Education is seeking dissertations for its 1988 competition. The competition is open to anyone who has complet e d his or her doctoral dissertations in the field of bilingual education between June 1 , 1984, and Aug. 1,1987. The deadline for entries is Nov. 23, and further information can be obtained by contacting: Alfredo de los Santos, NABE Outstanding Dissertation Competition 1988, Maricopa Community Colleges, 3910 E. Washington St. , Phoenix, The Michigan Office of Services to the Aging is currently surveying approximately 300 elderly Hispanics in that state to update a 1985 report on the needs of the elderly. The OSA is using bilingual interviewers in eight cities. The survey will be used to identify the issues facing older Latinos in planning for future generations of Latino elderly. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES Ariz . 85034 (602) 267-4307. LATINOVOTERSINTHECALIFORNIABAYAREA: "Su Voto , Su Derecho: The Untapped Latino Voting Power of the Bay Area " is a 10-page essay by former Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Joaquin Avila . The pamphlet discusses institutional barriers to full participation by Latinos in the electoral system in the area. It also includes the results of a33-city survey on atlarge election systems and Spanish-surnamed elected officials. For a copy, send $10 to: 200 Brown Road, Suite 114, Fremont, Calif . Manuel Jose Villareal became one of the highest ranking Hispanics ir; the U . S . Department of Labor's Employment Standards Adminis tration when appointed deputy assistant administrator for program operations Sept.18 . . . Abel Quintela is installed Oct.4 as president of the U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at the organization's annual convention in Los Angeles. . . Ricardo Fouster De Jesus, formerly with Chicago Mayor Harold Washington's press office, has been named the program developer and public relations director of the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund in San Francisco ... 94539. Calendar THIS WEEK IMMIGRATION SEMINAR Chicago Oct. 7 The Latino Institute will hold its first in a series of seminars to discuss with employers the impact of tne immigration law on them and their employees. The meeting is being sponsored by the Hispanic American Construction Industry Association . Ada Gonzalez (31 2) 6633603 SPANISH AIDS AWARENESS Los Angeles Oct. 7 A bilingual AIDS awareness presentation will provide general information on the disease, i ts transmission and prevention and how it relates to the Latino community. The program is sponsored by the East Los Angeles Rape Hotline. Alva Moreno (213) 260 HISPANI C WOMEN'S HEALTH Wh e at o . M d . Oct. 8 Mujeres Hispanas : iAyudense! is the title of a Spanish-language conference sponsored by the Women ' s Commission of Montgomery County, Md. The conference will cover how diseases can be prevented through exercise and diet. Marta Toruno (301) 565-5700 HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP DINNERS Miami Oct. 8; Denver and Dallas Oct. 9 4 The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will host three dinners this week to raise money for scholar ships for undergraduate and graduate Hispanic students. This is the second year the NHSF sponsors the dinners and eight others are set for the rest of October. JudyChapa(213) 551 HISPANIC BAR CONVENTION Miami Oct. 8 The 12th annual convention of the Hispanic National Bar Association will feature sessions on sports law . criminal law. a session on im migration law, discussions on employer sanctions and ta x law . The American Bar Association will present a panel on minorities in the legal profession and the HN BA will honor achievements of business and professional women during a luncheon. William Mendez at (212) 878-0000 QUINCENTENARY LECTURE SERIES Washington, D.C. Oct. 9 The Academic Association for the Quincentenary will host its third annual celebration commemorating Columbus' discovery of the New Wor1d The Economic Transcendence of the Scientific, Political and Eco nomic Discovery of the Americas and the Modern Age is the lecture being presented by New York City University Emeritus Professor Emilio Gonzalez Lopez. Minnesota University Professor Antonio Ramos w i ll be honored for his efforts to coordinate programs between Spain and U . S . universities . Elda Phillips (202) 342 COLUMBUS DAY CELEBRATION San Antonio Oct. 9-11 Oct. 5 , 1987 -Julio Laboy The first Feria de las Ameri cas . featuring food. entertainment and cultural events . is being sponsored by Los Compadres, a group supporting San Antonio ' s Spanish missions. The group plans to make the fair an international event by the 1992 Quincentennial. Charissa Funaro (512) 922 PUERTO RICO'S POLITICAL STATUS Washington , D . C . Oct. 9 Juan Manuel Garcia Passalacqua, a Puerto Rican political analyst . will speak on Modernization and Dependence: The Political Status of Puerto Rico at a lecture sponsored by the Center for the Advanced Studies of the Americas Student Association. JeanYves Lacascade (202) 333 ARTIST PANEL DISCUSSION New York Oct. 1 0 El Museo del Barrio is sponsoring a panel discussion on the paintings of Carlos Osorio, a New York City painter and community activist. Speaking about Osorio , who died in 1984, will be painter Nancy Wells , who co-founded two New York galleries with Osorio and his former student, Jorge Soto. Rafael Colon Morales (212) 831-7272 AIDS FILM/DISCUSSION Los Angeles Oct. 1 0 Mas Alia del Medio is a film on AI OS being presented by the American Red Cross. Diane Martinez (213) 484-4310 PUBLIC RELATIONS FUND-RAISER Los Angeles Oct. 11 The Hispanic Public Relations Association is sponsor ing a Day at the Races fund-raiser. Martin Quiroz (213) 726-7690 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS FACUL TV POSITION SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY FOR 1988 ACADEMIC YEAR POSITION: Assistant Professor (ladder rank) . Law and Social Welfare/Social Work. RESPONSIBILITIES Include: Leadership in curriculum development, instru c tion of master's and doctoral students, direction of doctoral research. REQUIREMENTS: Doctoral degree w i th background in law / legal studies and knowledge of social welfare , social work, and the social services . APPLICATION DEADLINE January 15, 1988 Send vita and l ist of references to: Dean School of Social Welfare University of Californ i a Berkeley , California 94720 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer. SPAN.ISH WRITER International corporation seeks writer to pre pare L a tin American lan g uage teaching materials (for international professionals) . Native fluency required in writing, reading and conversation . Must have an excellent command of grammar and synta x . Teaching and or foreign language textboo k publishing helpful. Full time position in central New Jersey. Send resume and salary requirem e nt s to : Hispanic Link, Corporate Clas sif ieds, Bo x H , 1420 N St. NW , Washington , D . C . 20005. The following positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College. NURSING (Search Extended) Nursing faculty for MedicaVSurgical Nursing to teach & supervise students in classroom and clinical settings. lnstr.: M.S . in Nursing, currently licensed R.N. , teaching exp. pref. Asst. Prof.: M . S . in Nursing+ 15 appropriate credits beyond Master's or 60 credits above B . S . , 2 yrs . college/clinical teaching exp. ; 5 yrs. related prof . hospital exp. progressively resp. and relevant Excellent benefits package . Beg . Salary: Ins!. $23,035/ A; Asst Prof. $25, 114/ A. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY # 329 a AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 11/20/87. DEVELOPMENTAL SKILLS (Search Extended) Teacher of Reading. Ph.D . Pref. + 5 yrs. teaching adults pref. Rank and salary con tingent upon qualifications. Good benefits. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY #302b AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER BY 11/20/87 TO : Ms . Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street , New York, N . Y . 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTI ON EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED H i spanic Link Weekly Report NEWSCAST PRODUCER Newscast producer will be responsible for producing newscasts , news specials , series , elections and other projects. Prefer applicants with conversational IV news copywriting ability, sharp news judgment and understanding of the in ' s and ouf s of production. The ability to manage people and be a team player is essential . Candidates should have a minimum 3 years experience as a producer i n a commercial IV newsroom, and should have a degree in Journalism Please send resume to: Sharon Buchanan, WPLG/1V ,3900 Biscayne Blvd , Miami, Fl33137. ATTORNEY Attorney with 1 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington , D.C. Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW, Suite 600, Washington , D . C . 20005. APPLE VALLEY BROADCASTING, INC. Yakima, Washington KAPP Telev ision has an immediate opening for an Entry Production Aaalatant. The position requires knowledge of one-inch video tape machines and switchers. An announcer-type voice and experience on newscast technical directing would be preferred . Make all inquires to Craig Woolsey , Production Manager, KAPP Television, 161 0 South 24th Ave., Yakima, Wash. 98902. Deadline for applications is Friday , Oct. 16, 1987. An Equal Opportunity Employer PRESIDENT INDIANA UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION The Board of Directors of the Indiana versity Foundation is currently conducting a national search to fill the position of President of the Foundation. The President is appointed by the Directors of this organization . The Foundation manages the endowmentforthe University and serves as its fundraising arm The Directors invite letters of application and nominations for the position of President. Correspondence should be addressed to : Herman B Wells , Univers ity Chancellor Chair , IUF Presidential Search Committee Indiana University Bloom ington, Indiana 47405 The Presidential Search Committee hopes to submit recommendations to the Board of Directors on February 17, 1987. The Indiana University Foundation is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer . OFFICE MANAGER Washington , . D.C., non-profit policy analysis group seeks experienced indiv.idual tor overall office management and administration. Salary . , . . . 1n low20 s. Bthnguai(Enghsh/Spamsh) preferred Send letter and resumeto: C. Oppenheimer. HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite :no, Washington , D . C . 20036. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. INVEST IN YOUR COMMUNITY, SUPPORT NHSF This year the Nat i onal Hispanic Scholarship Fund will be listed in the Combi ned Federal Campaign (CFC) literature, and all federal employees will be able to designate NHSF as their grantee. To make a pledge, federal employees need to write #505 (NHSF) on the CFC designated pledge form . For those individuals that are non-federal employees, they can send their check directly to NHSF . Checks are to be made payable to the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund . NHSF is a 501-(c)-3 tax exempt organization and all pledges are tax-deductible . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPANIC COMMUNITY NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • necting • Media Report • Arts& Enter talnment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua • Marketplace SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address-----------City, state, zip ----------0 Start 13week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed 0 Bill me 0 Bill my organization Mail to: Hispanic Link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234 5

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Arts & Entertainment (who plays El Maestro) and Robert Vega . Added to the TV production are performances by singer Linda Ronstadt, ballerina Evelyn Cisneros, and actor/singer Daniel Valdl;lz (Luis' brother and the show's musical director). Felipe Cantu, Linda L6pez, Rogelio L6pez and Lakin Valdez complete the cast. ONE MORE TIME, VALDEZ: A new television version of EITeatro Campesino's play Corridos, written and directed by Luis Valdez, premieres this week on some 300 public television stations around the country. Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution is slotted for Oct. 7 at 9 p.m. (check local listingssome public TV and radio stations will simulcast in Dolby stereo). OTHERS: Two upcoming episodes of the new cable,-TV series Likely Stories have Hispanic themes. The show was created in workshops by the California theater troupe at its San Juan Bautista home base . It opened at San Francisco's Marine Memorial Theater in 1983, and a year later the play received 10 Bay Area Theater Critics Circle Awards. Included in the 13-part series of video and film stories are The Cruz Brothers and Mrs. Malloy, a story about the relationship between an aging woman and three Puerto Rican boys , and Clarence and Angel, about a shy black boy who can't read and the Puerto Rican boy who teaches him. ONE LINERS: The La Samba soundtrack fell to the number two spot on the Sept. 26 Billboard "top pop album" charts, pushed by Michael Jackson's Bad. Los Lobos' single La Samba enjoyed its second week as number one in the "Hot Latin 50" chart. .. Beatriz Rodriguez is one of the principals in the Joffrey Ballet revival of Vaslav Nijinsky's "losf' ballet Le Sacre du Printemps, which has performances Oct. 6 and 8 in Los Angeles. .. And the Tex/Mex group La Mafia has joined a "Stay in Schoor• TV and radio campaign in Texas.. . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas The new version is a production of San Francisco's KQED-TV, in association with El Teatro Campesino-a presentation ofthe station's series From San Francisco. Funding for the program, produced by Janis Blackschleger, was provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ford Foundation . and the members of KQED. The cast of Corridos includes several members of previous stage casts-Miguel Delgado (who also choreographed), George Galvan , Lettie Ibarra, Sal L6pez, Alma Martinez, Irma Rangel, Luis Valdez Media Report TRIPLE THREAT: James Brady chose talk show hostess Sally Jessy Raphael as his personality page subject for the Sept. 27 Parade magazine. In it. Sally Jessy, born in Easton, Pa, and raised in Puerto Rico, . explained her use of a triple identifier (Raphael was her mother's maiden name): "I lived for years in Puerto Rico. Down there, everyone has three names. If you don't have three names, they think you're strange." MAGAZINE HAS A NAME: The national magazine that former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca plans to launch next spring now has a name: Hispanic. Apodaca, who'll be publisher, has hired his first aide. Randy Belcher Torres, who worked for another past New Mexico governor, Toney HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 2 -34-Q280 or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado. Julio Laboy. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias . No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission An'nual subscription (50 issuest $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issuest S26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads plac<>d by Tuesday will run i n Weekly Reports mailed Frida y of same week. Multiple use rates on reQuest. 6 Anaya, as Washingto representative, will carry the title of assistant to the publisher . FIERRO ELECTED: The California Cht cano News Media Association, which will conduct its seventh annual scholarship banquet at Los Angeles' Sheraton Grande Hotel Oct. 16, has its first woman president. KNBC-TV news producer Evelyn Fierro was elected by CCNMA's board of directors to complete the '87 term of Los Angeles Times' editorial columnist Frank del Olmo, who started a one-year Neiman fellowship. Banquet tickets are $1 00. The Gannett Foundation, CCNMA's major supporter during its 15 years of existence , will be honored. For more information on the black-tie event, contact its executive director, Suzanne Man riquez, at (213) 7 43-7158. AIDS EDUCATION: San Sosa& Associates has launched its national public service advertising campaign to help educate U.S. Hispanics on the AIDS threat. Sosa is subcontracting the Centers for Disease Control account through Ogilvy & Mather . CHICAGO COLLEGES: The civil rights monthly Chicago Reporter found in a survey of eight area that only three Hispanics and 36 blacks worked actively on the institu tions ' student newspapers last spring. Hispanics accounted for less than 1% of the papers' 483 staffers. . None of the 39 Latinos and blacks were involved in direct editorial management. The article listed an alternative newspaper, the Queondeesola, as circulating to Latino stu dents at Northwestern University. Other schools included in the survey: Loyola, Roosevelt, DePaul, Columbia, Northeastern, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle. The Chicago Reporter recently picked up a new His panic affairs reporter, Jennifer Robles, from an Illinois daily. Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Report