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Hispanic link weekly report, September 21, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 21, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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HRIO
Making The News This Week
New York City Mayor Edward Koch announces that the Rev. Raul del Valle, chancellor of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, and Isaura Santiago-Santiago, president of Hostos Community College in the Bronx, will accompany him on a fact-finding tour to Nicaragua... Denver Mayor Federico Peha appoints Richard Lee Gonzales as chief of the Denver Fire Department... Marla Torres steps down as executive director of the Chicago Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs. . . P. Gus Cdrdenas, national liaison for Hispanic Affairs for Xerox Corp., succeeds Olga Aros, a regional marketing manager for USA Today, as president of the National Hispanic Corporate Council. . . Paul Peyton, an 18-year-old of Mexican descent from Roswell, N.M., competes as one of five finalists for the
title of Boy’s Club of America’s National Yottf lioitlje XP9ffS^Wlrc*■ *^e winner will be installed at a White House c§fp|on$ plesrdea over by President Reagan... Ren6 Ramirez wins a $750,000 settlement for going blind as a result of medications he was given in 1985 as a juvenile offender in the custody of the California Youth Authority. Ramirez is now 19 year old... California pie magnate Sam Apodaca buys the3,200-square-foot home of Jim and Tammy Bakker in Palm Springs, Calif., for $600,000... Michael Zapata, a 15-year-old from Tyler, Texas, is one of seven high school players stricken by a bolt of lightning during a game Sept. 9. Zapata was the most seriously injured. He suffered cardiac arrest and remains in serious but stable condition... John Avila, 17, captain of the football team at Stuart High School in Falls Church, Va., suffers a brain injury during a game Sept. 11. Avila remains in a coma and is being kept alive by life-support machines...
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U.S. Salvadoran Community Begins to Emerge
Since the beginning of the 1980s, the Salvadoran community in the United States has catapulted itself into the fourth-largest Hispanic subgroup in the nation. Despite this growth, little is known about it, except for the plight of its refugee segment.
Some half-million refugees who migrated to the United States after the escalation of violence in late 1979 have joined their estimated
400,000 compatriots in cities across the nation.
These numbers put Salvadorans behind only Mexican Americans (11,762,000), Puerto Ricans (2,284,000) and Cuban Americans
CHC Elects Bustamante
U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) was elected chairman of the 13- member Congressional Hispanic Caucus Sept 15, succeeding Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.). He will serve for one year.
The former county judge and migrant worker is in his second term representing Texas’ 23rd District. The district spans from San Antonio to Del Rio on the Mexican border.
Also elected for the 1987-88 term were: Jaime Fuster(D-Puerto Rico), vice chairman; and Ben Blaz(R-Guam), secretary-treasurer.
Results of the election were announced Sept 16 at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s 10th anniversary fund-raising dinner.
Law Rejected by Clergy
A group of mostly Catholic priests and nuns in Los Angeles announced Sept. 11 that they will not comply with the 1986 immigration law’s requirement that employers j prove their workers are in the United States legally or have filed for legalization.
“Yes, a country should deal with its borders There is also another right.. people should be able to live without the fear of war, without the fear of starvation,” the Rev. Tom Smolich, a spokesperson for the group of more than 20 churches and 50 members, told Weekly Report.
The group, which has no official name, is seeking jobs for undocumented workers by encouraging parishes and other institutions to hire them.
(1.017.000) .
The bulk of the population is in Los Angeles
(300.000) , New York City (150,000), Washington, D.C., and San Francisco (each having at least 100,000).
Boston, Miami, Chicago and Houston have sizable but smaller communities.
Most of the refugees who came in the early ’80s are from El Salvador's eastern and northern provinces, where the fighting has been most fierce, said Alfredo Mi Man, an official with El Salvador's embassy in Washington, D.C. Nearly all were young men. Theirarrival coincided with a period when death squads were most active, Milian pointed out
Later whole families made the trek.
Once here, many accepted low-wage jobs working long hours, primarily in the service and construction industries. Part of their pay went home to help their families or assist their migration north.
Others found agricultural work. Humberto Gomez, a United Farm Workers official in Salinas, Calif., said that 80% of the melon
Chicagoans Seek
A coalition of Chicago Latinos called a press conference Sept. 14 to urge Mayor Harold Washington to appoint Deputy Police Superintendent Matt Rodriguez to head that department the nation’s second largest when the current superintendent quits Nov. 1.
Among the coalition organizations are the Puerto Rican Police Association, the Latin American Police Association and the Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce.
The city’s nine-member police board is currently reviewing applications and will submit at least three names to the mayor, who will make the final selection. Traditionally, the superintendent has been chosen from within department ranks.
Rodriguez, who heads the Bureau of Operational Services, is one of the top contenders for the position, along with one black and one white. If he is selected, he will be the first Hispanic department head in Washington’s administration. Chicago is almost20% Hispanic.
This lack of Latinos in top administrative
harvesters in that state’s San Joaquin valley are either Salvadoran or Guatemalan. G6mez noted that there has been a “huge influx” of Central Americans to the California fields since 1980.
Many of the more affluent Salvadorans live in Miami. It is home to their upper- and middle-class, those who had enough resources to leave the country when the violence erupted. Many work in banks, insurance firms and in clerical and other white-collar jobs, said Milian.
Wherever they reside, Salvadorans are starting to climb the economic ladder. “Some of the earlier restaurant and service workers now own their own restaurants and small construction companies and are moving into the American middle class,” Milian said.
Others- resident and undocumented- are working in scores of local organizations with other Hispanics and non-Hispanics to help resolve the housing, health, employment and immigration status problems faced by refugees
The U.S. House of Representatives passed
continued on page 2
Latino Police Chief
positions and frustration over city employment overall prompted a group representing 50 Latino organizations to meet with Washington Sept. 11.
The Latino Coalition in Defense of Affirmative Action contends the mayor has not kept campaign promises to increase Hispanic hiring. Six percent - or 2,508- of Chicago’s 41,583 employees are Latino. “It will take years to achieve parity with our percentage in the population,” said spokesperson Dora Arechiga, an associate counsel for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
Washington said the percentage of Latinos has doubled, from 3% to6%, under his administration and added that low numbers of Hispanic job applicants is one of the problems. The coalition contends almost 20,000 eligible Latinos have applied for positions.
The mayor referred the coalition, which includes MALDEF and the Latino Institute, to the personnel commissioner.
- Melinda Machado


Report Says Latino Business Owners Least Educated
Of all U.S. business owners, Hispanics have the lowest percentage of high school graduates, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau Sept. 16. The report also found that less than 15% of the Hispanics borrowed money to start their businesses and eight out of 10 hired no outside employees
The study, based on 1982 data, profiles minority, white and female business owners in terms of marital status, education, work experience, percentage of income from business yearand how the business was founded or acquired and sources of starting capital. It provides specific breakdowns on Hispanics blacks and Asians
Lack of access to capital and lack of business management skills and experience are
two obstacles which continue to hinder Hispanic businesses, National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre said. Yzaguirre made his comments at a Sept. 17 press conference announcing NCLR’s release of its analysis of Hispanic business owners.
Hispanics owned 248,141 businesses in 1982, the last year such statistics were collected. Both reports further refine data released last year. (See Weekly Report, Nov. 3,1986.)
The bureau’s new report details characteristics of minorities and women who own businesses The report does not separate minority businesses by male and female ownership because of an inadequate sample size and budget constraints, said Peggy Allen, the project manager for the survey.
It found these educational levels for business
entrepreneurs: Group High School College
Grads or More I
Women 86% 19%
White Male 83 34 1
Asian/Other 82 42
Black 71 25
Hispanic 66 19 1
Other facts about Latino owners:
• Fifty-four percent were under age 45, while less than half of white male owners and black owners were.
• Thirty-seven percent of Hispanic owners - or almost 92,000- began their businesses with at least $5,000, while almost 70,000 Latinos started their firms with no capital.
- Melinda Machado
Latinos Advance in Cities’ Primaries
Interim Bronx borough president Fernando Ferrer celebrated a decisive victory in New York City’s Sept. 15 Democratic primary elections, receiving 85% of the vote.
With 99% of the vote counted, Ferrer, 37, the youngest member of New York City’s powerful Board of Estimate, received38,568 votes to psychologist Rafael Mendez’s 6,687.
The Nov.3 general elections will determine whether Ferrer will continue to serve the remainder of former borough president Stanley Simon’sterm. Ferrerwasappointedborough president in April after Simon stepped down in the face of indictment on charges of extortion and perjury. Simon’s term expires Dec. 31, 1989.
San Diego attorney Mike Aguirre will face fellow Democrat Bob Filnerin acitywide Nov. 3 election for the 8th District City Council seat available when appointed member Celia
Ballesteros’ term expires Dec. 7. She had agreed not to seek election to a full term when appointed to complete the unexpired term of Uvaldo Martinez, who resigned Nov. 12,1986, after his felony conviction for misusing his city credit card.
Filner was the top vote-getter in the Sept. 15 primary, limited to District 8 voters, with 3,300 votes. Aguirre was second with 3,049. Republican Bob Castaneda received 1,116 votes; Danny Martinez had 111.
In Seattle, Ricardo S&nchez, publisher of La Voz magazine, has an uphill battle in his bid to become Seattle’s first Latino city councilman. In a Sept. 15 election-with the two top vote-getters to face off Nov. 3 - he polled 17,904 votes - 33.1% - to incumbent Paul Kraabel’s 32,633 - 60.4% of the vote. A third candidate received 6.4%. Seattle is 2% Hispanic.
U.S. Salvadoran Community Builds
continued from poye I
a bill July 28 that would grant Salvadoran and Nicaraguan refugees a two-year deportation reprieve until the U.S. General Accounting Office verifies human rights abuses in their countries. The Senate is expected to consider the measure before its Thanksgiving recess
When the eight-year-old civil war ends, the refugees will have to decide whether to stay or return home.
Roberto Alfaro, president of the Central American Refugee Network, or CARNET, a predominantly Salvadoran organization which recently moved from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., thinks the Salvadoran community will split along generational lines. The older refugees will go back, he said, while the younger members of the community and those with businesses and good jobs will likely stay.
Alfaro saw how rapid and powerful the acculturation process is during eight years as a teacher in Pasadena, Calif., public schools j “When the Salvadoran kids first came to class, they were shy and quiet and usually wore the clothes they brought from El Salvador,”' 2
he said. “But within a month or two, they had sneakers, Dallas Cowboys T-shirts and were more outgoing, totally immersed in the society,” he noted.
However, Frank Sharry, co-director of Centro Presente, a social-service organization that aids the roughly 15,000 Salvadorans in the Boston area, disagreed. He said he has never seen a group so scorned by the federal government Denied legal status as refugees and pushed to leave the country by last year1 s immigration law, Boston’s Salvadorans also suffer more from loneliness and isolation due to the dispersed nature of the community there. Consequently, Sharry said,“I’ve never seen a group so intent on going home.”
The influx of Salvadorans has already left a significant cultural and economic impact in several U.S. cities The end of the war and the decisions of hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans to stay or return to El Salvador will not spell life or death in those cities That presence will remain.
- Richard Sayre
Flores-Hughes Tapped for High Post at Justice
President Reagan announced Sept. 11 his intention to nominate Grace Flores-Hughes of the Small Business Administration as director of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Community Relations Service.
Reagan made the announcement at a White House ceremony.
Flores-Hughes, a native of Taft, Texas, currently serves as a special assistant to the associate administrator for SBA’s office of Minority Small Business. The 41-year-old former Reagan-George Bush campaign worker has been with the SBA for two years.
Flores-Hughes, of Mexican ancestry, said she was” very honored’ that Reagan considered her for the post. The nomination, which must be confirmed by the Senate, will be made following a routine FBI investigation.
Community Relations Service, a troubleshooting agency for community problems nationwide, has been without a permanent leader since former director Gil Pompa died of a heart attack April 28, 1986.
Latino Bar Rejects Bork
The board of directors of the Hispanic National Bar Association unanimously agreed Sept. 11 to oppose the nomination of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork and are prepared to testify, if chosen, before the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings that began Sept. 15.
The leaders of the 3,200-member organization postponed taking a stand on Bork in August until its judicial screening committee analyzed his voting record. Chaired by University of Utah law professor John Martinez, the committee found Bork unqualified and held that the District of Columbia U.S. Court of Appeals judge appears to “adjust his views opportunistically.”
HNBA President William Mendez said the 17-member board’s position was based on Borks qualifications and not on political ideologies.
f The court's new term begins Oct. 1.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Richard Sayre, guest columnist
Look Who’s No. 4
In 1980, U.S. Salvadorans weren’t counted and didn’t count. They were buried in a census statistic called “other Hispanics*’ and barely noticed by the Latino “big three” of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans.
Today, the Salvadoran embassy in Washington, D.C., estimates that as many as 900,000 men, women and children of Salvadoran birth or heritage may be living here.
They make up the fourth-largest of more than 20 Hispanic-origin groups inthiscountry.
But still they remain on the fringes- even in the U.S. Latino community.
A survey of some major U.S. Latino organizations shows:
• A staff member of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed officials in Washington, D.C., is not aware of a single Salvadoran among the nation’s 3,202 Hispanic elected office-holders.
• Ruben Jauregui, president of the Latin Business Association in Los Angeles, home of the largest U.S. Salvadoran community -
300,000 - says that only a small percentage of his membership is Salvadoran. Salvadorans “have not made great inroads” among the manufacturers, contractors and professionals who constitute the bulk of the LBA membership, he says.
• The League of United Latin American Citizens, despite adding Uruguayan, Nicaraguan, Dominican, Colombian and Portuguese councils to its 355 councils spread across the nation, still has no Salvadoran unit. While some councils have recruited Salvadoran members, none of LULACs national officers or board members is Salvadoran.
LEGAL STATUS ISSUE CRITICAL
Salvadorans in the United States will continue to have minimal impact on the U.S. Hispanic community- and little control over their own destiny- until the legal status of some half-million refugees who arrived here since 1980 is resolved, says Dr. Carlos Cordova, a professor#of ethnic studies at San Francisco State University.
C6rdova, a U.S. citizen who emigrated from El Salvador as a teenager in 1965, explains why the more recent arrivals have not made greater efforts to integrate into the broader community.
“First most still hope to go home when the war ends.
“Second, most live marginal lives, with no time for outside activities
“Third and most importantly, those without papers fear being caught by immigration. They do their best to remain inconspicuous.” CONTACT BEST AT LOCAL LEVEL
Across the country, many non-Salvadoran Latinos can be found working within refugee-aid groups at the local level, helping them fight deportation and addressing problems common in poor, underserved communities For example, Ayuda, a legal services organization in Washington, D.C.’s. Adams-Morgan section which serves a 75%-Salvadoran clientele, has among its paid and volunteer staff Puerto Ricans, Mexican Americans, Dominicans and Cubans
National organizations such as the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Council of La Raza and LULAC have consistently supported legislation to give refugee status to Salvadorans
Another encouraging sign is the action taken in July by organizers of the annua! Washington, D.C., Hispanic Festival. Instead of choosing its customary celebrity as grand marshal this year, it picked an anonymous undocumented Salvadoran refugee, his identity shielded by a bandana across his face.
Sylvia Rosales, a founder of the new national Salvadoran umbrella group CARNET, characterizes Latino organizations as “understanding and supportive” when help is sought. But she adds, “We have many emergencies” It would be nice, she suggests, if Latino organizations took greater initiative to help “the new kid on the block.”
(Richard Sayre is a reporter with Hispanic Link.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept 21
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE HORDES ARE BACK: A week after the Census Bureau issued its ’87 update on U.S. Hispanics, giving its estimate of between 2.5 and 3.5 million undocumented persons among us, The Washington Post shoved the figure up to “as many as 11 million.”
It did so in its headline story on the pope’s visit to San Antonio after pointing out that Pope John Paul II spoke to the crowd in |both Spanish and English “and virtually endorsed the Sanctuary movement that provides haven for illegal immigrants.”
In case you don’t have your pocket calculator handy, 11 million would mean that only 42.5% of all Hispanics in this country are here legally.
HELP ME, TEACHER: The Washington, D.C., Taxicab Commission voted this month to make applicants for hacker licenses prove that they can converse in English. Presently, they are just required to pass a written test.
Also in Washington this month, U.S. English sent out a press release promising that its sort-of-new president, Linda Ch£vez, will “increase the profile of the 300,000-member group and strengthen its current campaign to place official English provisions on the ballot in Colorado, Arizona and Florida next year.”
Then, in rapid succession, if offered three quotes by Chavez (who, in her less notorious days, edited a quarterly journal, American Educator, for the American Federation of Teachers) with spelling that would flunk a fourth grader “English, our comon language...”
“What we were seeing was the begining of a policy...”
And: “I belive most Americans recognize the many problems posed by bilingualism...”
Next time U.S. English recruits a president, maybe it should include a written test. Or supply a proofreader.
‘PHYSICAL YEAR’: To the south, the learned legislators of iNorth Carolina were busy debating their own “official English” Ibills this summer.
At the same time, according to the Associated Press:
One lawmaker there blamed a misnumbered amendment on a “typographical area.”
Another told the House, “I preference my remarks..
A senator, discussing how to insulate shareholders from hostile takeover bids, asked about the impact on “big cooperations.”
“ Nearly every day,” the AP reported, “the fiscal year is called the ‘ physical year* and references are made to the ‘statue of limitations' ” Come to think of it these days that’s not a bad name for the lady in New York Harbor.________ - Kay B£rbaro
Quoting. . .
From recent reviews of the motion picture “Born in East LA” -
KEVIN THOMAS, Los Angeles Times: " 'Born in East LA’ is an across-the-board winner, an exuberant crowd-pleaser that marks its writer-director-star Cheech Marin's first effort apart from his longtime partner Tommy Chong.
“It has more drive and energy than' La Bamba,’ which also examines Latino life, and comes as a happy revelation to one who always found Cheech and Chong's pot humor puerile and tedious...
RICARDO SANCHEZ, San Antonio Express-News: "Cheech Marin, whose work previously has been an absurdist manifesto on ‘mota’ (pot) in films and club routines, has created a farce that speaks to issues afflicting the diverse worlds of Hispanics...
"Marin, a brilliant performer, has dared to create a film that speaks volumes about the injudicious nature of power when it is wielded by paper shufflers just doing their job..."
CHRISTOPHER TRICARCIO, Los Angeles Herald-Examiner “ ‘Born in East LA' is a raucous, disrespectful and hysterically funny film thafs a major step for half of the'70s super-comedic duo Cheech and Chong.
1987
children of Salvadoran
3


COLLECTING
Below are addresses and contact persons for some key organizations In the Central American Refugee Network. For a complete listing of the 34 organizations in CARNET, send a self-addressed envelope with 22^ postage to Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CARECEN, Joaquin Dominguez, 1050 S. Van Ness, San Francisco, Calif. 94110(415) 824-2330
CARECEN, Linton Joaquin, 1434 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90015 (213) 381-5666
CARECEN, Sylvia Rosales, 3112 Mt. Pleasant St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 328-9799 (CARNET is temporarily located here.)
CRECEN, Francisco Lopez, 2901 W. Dallas, Houston, Texas 77019 (713) 522-2245
Centro Cristiano Monsehor Romero, Ricardo Cornejo,>1545 W. Morse Ave., Chicago, III. 60626 (312) 465-4827
Centro Presente, Frank Sharry, 10 Essex St., Cambridge, Mass. 02139 (617) 497-9125
PROFILES OF HISPANIC BUSINESS: A 30-page booklet describing the types and characteristics of Latino businesses and trends between 1977 and 1982 has been published by the National Council of La Raza. Copies of the $3 “Hispanic Business Ownership: A Profile” are available by writing to the council at 20 FSt. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202)628-9600.
BUSINESS OWNER CHARACTERISTICS: The “1982 Characteristics of Business Owners,” released Sept. 16, is the first report by the U.S. Census Bureau to present data on minority- and women-owned businesses It offers comparisons to non-minority businesses The 150-page report (No. CB082-1) is available by writing to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
INS’ LOS ANGELES OFFICE: The U.S. General Accounting Office recently issued a nine-page report, “Immigration: How INS’ Los Angeles District Office Responds to Enquiries.” It covers among other things, the ability of INS’ Los Angeles office to handle a multilingual clientele. For a free copy of the report, write: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
HISPANIC COLORADANS: “Hispanic Agenda: 1990 and Beyond” is a social and economic blueprint for the future of Colorado’s Hispanic community. The 21-page report is available for $10 by writing to: Latin American Research and Service Agency, 303 W. Colfax Ave., Suite 950, Denver, Colo. 80204.
CONNECTING
COLUMBIA TO AID MINORITIES Columbia University announced Sept. 8 that it will begin paying the undergraduate loans of its minority-group graduates who go on to earn doctorates.
The university agreed to pay, starting this year, three-quarters of the debt of seniors who go on to earn their doctorates at Columbia in arts and sciences and half if they do so at other accredited coHen** Of the 18,000 students attending Columbia, 587 (3.3%) reported themselves to be Hispanic.
MATH/SCIENCE PROJECT LAUNCHED The National Urban Coalition announced Sept. 11a pilot program to develop mathematics and science skills of minority students in Houston and Washington, D.C.
The two-year program, called Say Yes to a Youngster's Future, began this month at eight public elementary schools in Washington and six in Houston. Of the schools participating in Washington, two are 50% or more Latino. In Houston, one is 99% Latino, another is 60%.
The program involves students, parents and community organizations through special science and math lessons, field trips, tutoring, family and math science programs and career counseling.
It is funded by a $1 million grant from the Shell Oil Company Foundation.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES The AFL-CIO Immigrant Assistance Project, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Asian Pacific American Legal Center of Southern California sponsored a special screening of John Sayles’ newest movie, Matewan, Aug. 31 to raise money for documentation assistance for undocumented workers. The screening attracted about 400 people, including speakers Antonia Hernandez, president of MALDEF, and La Bamba's writer/director Luis Valdez. The event raised roughly $7,000 for the organizations’ documentation assistance programs... The Chicago Public Library has announced the appointment of a new Hispanic services coordinator. Hector Hernandez is the highest ranking Hispanic Spanish-speaking librarian at the Chicago’s library system...
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MARKETING LA BAMBA Los Angeles Sept. 21
Santiago Pozo, manager of special markets for MCA/Universal Pictures, will discuss, at a Hispanic Public Relations Association meeting, the marketing strategies for La Bamba and how marketing movies to Hispanics is expected to change.
Martin Quiroz (213) 726-7690
CONTRACT COMPLIANCE CONFERENCE Atlantic City, N.J. Sept. 21 -25 The Atlantic Contract Compliance Association’s national conference, aimed at affirmative action and minority business professionals, will feature workshops on Hispanic perspectives on affirmative action and contract compliance, resolving discrimination complaints, fraudulent minority firms and support systems for minority business students.
Luis Molina (609) 343-2390
HISPANIC ARCHIVES CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Sept. 22-25 A conference on Hispanic archives and records covering U.S. Hispanics from 1492-1850 will address 4
the need to identify omissions in U.S. Hispanic archival records along with the legal barriers to reproducing foreign archival materials. The conference will be sponsored by the Library of Congress, the American Historic Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Olga Padilla (202) 287-5108
OHIO LATINA CONFERENCE Cleveland Sept. 25
The Women’s Action Committee of the National Image Northeast Ohio Chapter is hosting a one-day statewide conference titled “Defining the Hispanic Woman.” Guadalupe Quintanilla, assistant vice president at the University of Houston, will be the keynote speaker.
Betty Ortiz (216) 522-7514
TORRES BARBECUE FUND-RAISER Clarksburg, Calif. Sept. 26 The Friends of ArtTorres are sponsoring a“Summer Afternoon by the River” featuring a barbecue dinner and dancing with proceeds going to the California state senator’s campaign.
Linda Macias (916) 731-8026
COMING SOON
HISPANIC COLLEGES MEETING Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 28-29 Sept. 21,1987
Pamela Eoff Salazar (512) 434-6711 ext. 368
HISPANIC MEDIA INFLUENCE CONFERENCE The Media Institute Los Angeles Sept. 30 Edith Torres (202) 298-7512
LATINO INSTITUTE CELEBRATION The Latino Institute Chicago Oct. 1
Edwin Claudio (312) 663-3603
MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Minority Enterprise Development Washington, D.C. Oct. 4-7 Hattie Bickmore (202) 377-5196
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC CHAMBER CONFERENCE: The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is holding its eighth annual convention and international trade exchange in Los Angeles Sept. 30-0ct. 4. More than 300 exhibitors, including representatives from private industry, U.S. and foreign governments, will participate in the trade fair. Among featured speakers are Roger Enrico, president of Pepsi-Cola, USA; Alfredo Phillips Olmedo, director of Banco Nacional de Comercio Exterior; and Mexican Secretary of Commerce H6ctorHern&ndez Cervantes. For information contact Carlos Guevara at (202) 789-2717.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
The following positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY.
PART-TIME POSITIONS
PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR Allied Health Program Assist the Coordinator of Academic Affairs in supervising the Allied Health Program at SUNY-EOCM; serve as liaison between AH P and community health agencies; assist in purchasing, processing personnel records and preparation of reports for AH P. Min. B.S., NYS Nursing License, some admin, exp. in health field. Salary; $22.80/ph. Vac. #G-168.
INSTRUCTORS Mathematics/Science (Day and Evening)
Instruct and guide students to overcome their skills deficiencies in mathematics/science and perform any other instructional duties as assigned by the Coordinator of Academic Affairs. Mia BA in teaching discipline, Master’s pref. with 2 yrs. teaching exp. Salary; $38.01 / ph. Vac. #G-169
ADJUNCT LECTURER Health Occupation Instruct and guide students in the health and personal care of patients. Assess and evaluate students’ progress pursuant to program goals and objectives. Perform other instructional duties as assigned by the Coordinator of Academic Affairs. NYS licensed, Registered professional nurse. Minimum of 2 yrs prof, and teaching exp., with some background in public health. Master’s degree pref. Salary: $38.01/ph. Vac. #G-170
TV PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Capitol Hill Republican news bureau. Basic TV knowledge, flexible, willing to learn, 15K. Write: SRC, Washington, D.C. 20510.
The Montgomery County, Maryland, Department of Police is currently accepting applications for the position of:
POLICE OFFICER CANDIDATE
• Starting salary. $21,804 with increase to $22,895 upon completion of twenty weeks of training.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
• 60 college credit hours
• Not less than 21 years of age
• U.S. citizenship
• Possession of valid motor vehicle operator’s license
• Clear police record
Montgomery County provides its employees with liberal fringe benefits.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Montgomery County Police Personnel Recruitment Office (301) 840-2525
Monday thru Friday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOON 1ST, Washington, D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
P/T SCHOOL NURSE (DAY) Immediate and temporary care of anyone in the school who becomes the victim of an accident or sudden illness. To keep daily records of all visits and activities of the Health Service. Daily records to counselors of absences due to illness. Conduct health seminars. NYC License, BS pref. & 3-5 yrs. exp. Salary $13.76/ph. Vac. #G-171
FULL-TIME POSITIONS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Overall management and implementation of financial controls and policy matters; supervision of small accounting and clerical staff; heavy involvement with student government activities. BA req. M A pref.; 3 yrs. related exp. Financial background an asset Salary range: $25-35 K. Vac. # G-174.
BOOKKEEPER
Assist accountant with cash receipts, disbursements, heavy check preparation, payroll, etc. Posting to G/L T/B, department reports. Assoc, degree and bookkeeping exp. Knowledge of computer accounting systems helpful. Competitive salary. Vac.# G-173.
REFER TO BMCC VACANCY # ABOVE AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETTER FOR THESE NON-TAX LEVY POSITIONS BY 10/2/87 TO:
Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel
Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED
ATTORNEY
Attorney with 1 -3 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington, D.C.
Please send resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW, Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20005.
OFFICE MANAGER
Washington, D.C., non-profit policy analysis group seeks experienced individual for overall office management and administration. Salary in Iow20’s. Bilingual(English/Spanish) preferred. Send letter and resume to: C. Oppenheimer, HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036.
MENTAL HEALTH WORKER
Clinical Psychologist/Social Worker. Fulltime position. Involves prevention of mental health problems with infants and families. Clinical experience in assessment and intervention with young children and their families, parent guidance, group and family therapy is desirable. LLP, MSW or Psychiatric Nursing master’s required. Send resume to:
Ann Trost, Director Infant Development Program Grand Rapids Child Guidance Clinic 1101 Ball Avenue, N.E Grand Rapids, Ml 49505 Salary to be negotiated. EOE/Affirmative Action Employer.
ASSOCIATE DEAN
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in ALBANY, N.Y., a leader in non-tradl higher educ, seeks Associate Dean to begin 1/88. Students work one-to-one w/faculty to develop degree programs & eval experiential learning. Responsible for Academic program including: academic/assessment qual & sys; prog/faculty development. Doctorate, substan coil-level teaching, Admin exp& intkvadult educ. Salary low to mid 40’s.
Letter & resume by 10/23/87 to: Janet Zimmer, Dir/pers/AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm802,1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. jFor more info call Dean DeLong (518) 447-6746. AA/EOE.
GAO EVALUATOR
The U.S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelor’s (2.9 GPA or higher) or master’s degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities.
We are interested in business, economics, computer science, government or public administration majors to work in Washington, D.C., or one of our 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you.
To obtain an application (deadline to apply is Nov. 13) contact U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington, D.C. 20548, Attn: Laura Talbott (202) 275-8904.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
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Arts & Entertainment
FALL COUNT: Two new Hispanic characters premiere on network television this week as the “big three” get on with their fall season schedule.
A preview of / Married Dora, a new ABC sitcom about a Central American refugee who marries her employer to avoid deportation, airs Sept. 22 at 9:30 p.m. (ET). Elizabeth Pena stars as Dora, a housemaid.
The series will premiere at its regular time slot- Fridays at 8:30 p.m. - Sept. 25.
A critically acclaimed new drama about the Vietnam War, Tour of Duty, includes actor Ramon Franco in its ensemble cast. Franco plays Pvt. Alberto Ruiz in the hourlong program which premieres on CBS Sept. 24 at 8 p.m.
A third new Hispanic character on network TV debuts on Ohara Oct. 7. Rachel Ticotin, a New York actress who gained fame as a young dancer with the city’s Ballet Hispanico, will play Teresa Storm, the leader of a special anti-crime task force, on the hourlong drama.
Ohara returns for its second season on ABC, with an all-new supporting cast The title character, played by Pat Morita, is reassigned to the special task force and moved away from last season’s environment.
Richard Yhiguez played officer Jesse Guerrera on the show last year.
Among new syndicated television programs this fall, Paramount Television’s Marblehead Manor has a couple of Latinos in starring roles. Dyana Ortelli plays Lupe, an extravagant cook, and Humberto Ortiz plays her son, Elvis. Ortelli and Ortiz are mother and son in real life.
Marblehead Manor premiered Sept. 14 as the Monday entry in a new “checkerboard” schedule on all five NBC-owned and-operated stations in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Cleveland. Independent stations in some 160 television markets across the country will also carry the show.
A daily syndicated talk show, Geraldo, is now airing on some 60 stations nationally. Geraldo Rivera hosts the show, which combines pre-taped news stories with a studio audience format.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NOGALES PROMOTED: Univision executive Luis Nogales, formerly chief executive officer with United Press International, was promoted to president of Univision Sept. 15. He had been vice president for news since December 1986.
Jaime Ddvila, whom he replaces, becomes chairman of Univision’s nine-member internal board.
GUIDE FOR YOUNG JOURNALISTS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, which has been preparing journalism career guides for more than 26 years, has released its latest.
The 1987 Journalism Career and Scholar ship Guide is a 164-page soft-cover source for information about financial aid, how to get media jobs, college research services and where to study journalism.
The guide is divided into three sections: A Newspaper Career and You, Universities that Offer Journalism Majors and a Directory of
Journalism Scholarships
The Fund also has a Minority Journalism Career Guide which is available at no cost. Write: Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P.O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08543-0300 (609) 520-7938. The first copy of each guide is free. Additional copies of the 1987 career book are $2 each and extra copies of the minority career guide are available at 75 WHATELSE? OnSept26,Images/Imagenes host Mauricio Gerson looks at English as a second language and the problem of illiteracy in that state’s Hispanic community on the New Jersey Television Network...
Pushed by advertisers to have a New York presence, Vista, the weekend newspaper supplement, begins doorknob distribution of
100,000 copies there in October. Vista, now carried by newspapers in 27 cities, will begin 1988 with a circulation in excess of 1.2 million...
Jose Lozano, publisher of Los Angeles’ La Opinion, Ana Veciana-Suarez, Miami Herald reporter who authored “Hispanic Media USA” and Felix Gutierrez, University of Southern
Calif, journalism professor, share the stage at the Sept. 30 conference on “Hispanic Media: Influence and Opportunity” in Los Angeles. It’s put on by the Washington, D.C.-based Media Institute...
New York Newsday reporter Evelyn Hernandez, vice president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, coordinated a Sept 16 conference on “Minorities in the Newsroom: Progress or Impasse?” in Manhattan. NAHJ sponsored the Region II session with the New York Association of Black Journalists.
It was spurred by the recent discrimination settlement againstthe New York Daily News. Executives from Newsday, the Daily News, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times participated.
ON THE MOVE: WSNS-TV(Ch.44) reporter David Cbrdova became news director of the Chicago Spanish-language station Sept 11 ... Minerva P6rez moved from her anchor/ jreporter position at KPNX-TV in Phoenix, Ariz., to weekend anchor at KTLA-TV in Los Angeles Sept. 12...
- Charlie Ericksen and Julio Laboy
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Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Richard Sayre. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
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rtRIGtMaking The News This Week title of Boy's Club of America's National YJ!a( tW!rfrd. The winner will be installed at a White House over by President Reagan... Rene Ramirez wins a $750,000 settlement for going blind as a result of medications he was given in 1985 as a juvenile offender in the custody of the California Youth Authority. Ramirez is now 19 year old ... California pie magnate Sam Apodaca buys the3,200square-foot home of Jim and Tammy Bakker in Palm Springs, Calif., for $600,000 ... Michael Zapata, a 15-yearold from Tyler, Texas, is one of seven high school players stricken by a bolt of lightning during a game Sept. 9 . Zapata was the most seriously injured. He suffered cardiac arrest and remains in serious but stable condition ... John Avila, 17, captain of the football team at Stuart High School in Falls Church , Va., suffers a brain injury during a game Sept. 11. Avila remains in a coma and is being kept alive by life support machines ... New York City Mayor Edward Koch announces that the Rev. Raul del Valle, chancellor of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, and lsaura Santiago-Santiago, president of Hostos Community College in the Bronx, will accompany him on a fact-finding tour to Nicaragua . .. Denver Mayor Federico Pel'la appoints Richard Lee Gonzales as chief of the Denver Fire Department. .. Marla Torres steps down as executive director of the Chicago Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs . . . P. Gus Cardenas, national liaison for Hispanic Affairs for Xerox Corp., succeeds Olga Aros, a regional marketing manager for USA Today, as president of the National Hispanic Corporate Council. . . Paul Peyton, an 18-yearold of Mexican descent from Roswell, N.M., competes as one of five finalists for the votsNo371 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ll Sept 21, 1987 U.S. Salvadoran Community Begins to Emerge Since the beginning of the 1980s, the Salva doran community in the United States has catapulted itself into the fourth-largest His panic subgroup in the nation . Despite this growth, little is known about it, except for the plight of its refugee segment. Some half-million refugees who migrated to the United States after the escalation of violence in late 1979 have joined their estimated 400,000 compatriots in cities across the nation . These numbers put Salvadorans behind only Mexican Americans (11 ,762,000), Puerto Ricans (2, 284,000) and Cuban Americans CHC Elects Bustamante U . S . Rep. Albert Bustamante(DTexas) was elected chairman of the 13 member Congres sional Hispanic Caucus Sept. 15, succeeding Rep. Esteban Torres (DCalif.) . He will serve for one year . The former county judge and migrant worker is in his second term representing Texas' 23rd District. The district spans from San Antonio to Del Rio on the Mexican border. Also elected for the 1987-88 term were: Jaime Fuster(D-Puerto Rico) , vice chairman ; and Ben Blaz ( RGuam), secretary-treasurer . Results of the election were announced Sept. 16 at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's 1Oth anniversary fund-raising dinner . Law Rejected by Clergy A group of mostly Catholic priests and nuns in Los Angeles announced Sept. 11 that they will not comply with the 1986 immigration law's requirement that employers prove their workers are in the United States legally or have filed for legalization. "Yes, a country should deal with its borders. There is also another right. .. people should be able to live without the fear of war, without the fear of starvation," the Rev. Tom Smolich , a spokesperson for the group of more than 20 churches and 50 members, told Weekly Report . The group, which has no official name, is seeking jobs for undocumented workers by encouraging parishes and other institutions to hire them. (1 ,017,000). harvesters in that state's San Joaquin Valley The bulk of the population is in Los Angeles are either Salvadoran or Guatemalan . G6mez (300,000) , New York City (150,000), Washnoted that there has been a "huge influx'' of ington, D .C., and San Francisco (each having Central Americans to the California fields at least 1 00,000) . since 1980. Boston, Miami , Chicago and Houston have • Many of the more affluent Salvadorans live sizable but smaller communities . in Miami. It is home to their upper and middleMost of the refugees who came in the early class , those who had enough resources to '80s are from El Salvador's eastern and northleave the country when the violence erupted. ern provinces, where the fighting has been Many work in banks, insurance firms and in most fierce, said Alfredo Milian, an official clerical and other white-collar jobs, said Milian . with El Salvador's embassy in Washington, Wherever they reside, Salvadorans are start D.C. Nearly all were young men . Their arrival ing to climb the economic ladder. "Some of coincided with a period when death squads the earlier restaurant and service workers were most active , Milian pointed out. now own their own restaurants and small Later whole families made the trek. construction companies and are moving into Once here, many accepted low-wage jobs the American middle class," Milian said. working long hours ; primarily in the service Others-resident and undocumented-are and construction industries . Part of their pay working in scores of local organizations with went home to help their families or assist other Hispanics and nonHispanics to help their migration north . resolve the housing, health, employment and Others found agricultural work. Humberto immigration status problems faced by refugees. G6mez , a United Farm Workers official in The U.S. House of Representatives passed Salinas, Calif . , said that 80% of the melon continued on page 2 Chicagoans Seek Latino Police Chief A coalition of Chicago Latinos called a press conference Sept. 14 to urge Mayor Harold Washington to appoint Deputy Police Superintendent Matt Rodriguez to head that department the nation's second largest when the current superintendent quits Nov. 1 . Among the coalition organizations are the Puerto Rican Police Association , the Latin American Police Association and the Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce . The city's nine-member police board is currently reviewing applications and will sub mit at least three names to the mayor, who will make the final selection. Traditionally , the superintendent has been chosen from within department ranks . Rodriguez, who heads the Bureau of Opera tional Services, is one of the top contenders for the position, along with one black and one white . If he is selected, he will be the first Hispanic department head in Washington's administration. Chicago is almost20% Hispanic . This lack of Latinos in top administrative . positions and frustration over city employ ment overall prompted a group represen . tlng 50 Latino organizations to meet with Wash ington Sept. 11. The Latino Coalition in Defense of Affirmative Action contends the mayor has not kept campaign promises to increase Hispanic hiring. . Six percent-or 2,508of Chicago's 41 ,583 employees are Latino. "It will take years to achieve parity with our percentage in the population," said spokesperson Dora Arechiga, an associate counsel fort he Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Washington said the percentage of Latinos has doubled, from 3% to 6%, under his adminis tration and added that low numbers of His panic job applicants is one of the problems. The coalition contends almost 20 ,000 eligible Latinos have applied for positions. The mayor referred the coalition, which includes MALDEF and the Latino Institute, to the personnel commissioner. Melinda Machado

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'f ., .... Silys Latino Business Owners Least Educated Of all U.S. business owners, Hispanics have the lowest percentage of high school graduates, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau Sept. 16. The report also found that less than 15% of the Hispanics borrowed money to start their businesses and eight out of 10 hired no outside employees. The study, based on 1982 data, profiles minority, white and female business owners tn terms of marital status, education, work experience, percentage of income from busi ness. year and how the business was founded or acquired and sources of starting capital. It provides specific breakdowns on Hispanics, blacks and Asians. Lack of access to capital and lack of busi ness management skills and experience are two obstacles which continue to hinder His panic businesses, National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre said . Yzaguirre made his comments at a Sept. 17 press conference announcing NCLR's release of its analysis of Hispanic business owners. Hispanics owned 248,141 businesses in 1982, the last year such statistics were collected. Both reports further refine data released last year . (See Weekly Report, Nov. 3, 1986. ) The bureau's new report details character istics of minorities and women who own businesses. The report does not separate minority businesses by male and female ownership because of an inadequate sample size and budget constraints, said Peggy Allen, the project manager for the survey. Latinos Advance in Cities' Primaries Interim Bronx borough president Fernando Ferrer celebrated a decisive victory in New York City's Sept. 15 Democratic primary elec tions, receiving 85% of the vote. With 99% of the vote counted, Ferrer, 37, the youngest member of New York City's powerful Board of Estimate , received 38,568 votes to psychologist Rafael Mendez's 6,687 . The Nov. 3 general elections will determine whether Ferrer will continue to serve the remainder of former borough president Stanley Simon's term. Ferrer was appointed borough president in April after Simon stepped down in the face of indictment on charges of extortion and perjury. Simon' s term expires Dec. 31, 1989. San Diego attorney Mike Aguirre will face fellow Democrat Bob Filner in a citywide Nov . 3 election for the 8th District City Council seat available when appointed member Celia . Ballesteros' term expires Dec. 7 . She had agreed not to seek election to a full term when appointed to complete the unexpired term of Uvaldo Martinez, who resigned Nov . 12, 1986, after his felony conviction for misusing his city credit card. Filner was the top vote-getter in the Sept. 15 primary, limited to District 8 voters, with 3,300 votes. Aguirre was second with 3,049. Republican Bob Castaneda received 1,116 votes ; Danny Martinez had 111. In Seattle, Ricardo Sanchez, publisher of La Voz magazine, has an uphill battle in his bid to become Seattle ' s first Latino city council man . In a Sept. 15 electionwith the two top vote-getters to face off Nov. 3 he polled 17,904 votes-33.1%-to incumbent Paul Kraabel ' s 32,633-60. 4% of the vote . A third candidate received 6 . 4%. Seattle is 2% His panic. U.S. Salvadoran Community Builds continued from p::OJ G I a bill July28 that would grant Salvadoran and Nicaraguan refugees a two-year deportation reprieve until the U .S. General Accounting Office verifies human rights abuses in their countries. The Senate is expected to consider the measure before its Thanksgiving recess. When the eight-year-old civil war ends, the refugees will have to decide whether to stay or return home. Roberto Alfaro, president of the Central American Refugee Network, or GARNET , a predominantly Salvadoran organization which recently moved from Los Angeles to Wash. ington, D.C., thinks the Salvadoran community will split along generational lines. The older refugees will go back, he said, while the younger members of the community and those with businesses and good jobs will likely stay. Alfaro saw how rapid and powerful the acculturation process is during eight years as a teacher in Pasadena, Calif., public schools. : " When the Salvadoran kids first came to class they were shy and quiet and usually wore the clothes they brought from El Salvador," ' 2 he said. "But within a month or two, they had sneakers, Dallas Cowboys T-shirts and were more outgoing, totally immersed in the sOciety , " he noted. However, Frank Sharry, co-director of Centro Presente, a social-service organization that aids the rough , ly 15,000 Salvadorans in the Boston area, disagreed. He said he has never seen a group so scorned by the federal government. Denied legal status as refugees and pushed to leave the country by last year's immigration law , Boston's Salvadorans also suffer more from loneliness and isolation due to the dispersed nature of the community there. Consequently, Sharry said, " I've never seen a group so intent on going home. " The influx of Salvadorans has a lready left a signif icant cultural and economic impact in several U.S. cities. The end of the war and the decisions of hundreds of thousands of Salva dorans to stay or return to El Salvador will not spell life or death in those cities. That presence will remain . -Richard Sayre ltfound these educational levels for business entrepreneurs: Group High School College Grads or More Women 86% 19% White Male 83 34 Asian/Other 82 42 Black 71 25 Hispanic 66 19 Other facts about Latino owners: e Fifty-four percent were under age 45, while less than half of white male owners and black owners were. e Thirty-seven percent of Hispanic owners -or almost 92,000began their businesses with at least $5,000, while almost 70,000 Latinos started their firms with no capital. Melinda Machado Flores-Hughes Tapped for High Post at Justice President Reagan announced Sept. 11 his intention to nominate Grace Flores-Hughes of the Small Business Administration as direc tor of the U.S . Department of Justice' s Com munity Relations Service. Reagan made the announcement at a White iHouse ceremony. FloresHughes, a native of Taft , Texas, cur rently serves as a special assistant to the associate administrator for SBA ' s office of Minority Small Business. The 41-year-old for mer Reagan:George Bush campaign work er has been with the SBA for two years . Flores-Hughes , of Mexican ancestry, said she was"very honored' that Reagan considered her for the post. The nomination, which must be confirmed by the Senate, will be made following a routine FBI investigation . Community Relations Service , a trouble shooting agency for community problems nationwide, has been without a permanent leader since former director Gil Pompa died of a heart attack April 28, 1986. Latino Bar Rejects Bork The board of directors of the Hispanic National Bar Association unanimously agreed Sept. 11 to oppose the nomination of U .S. Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork and are prepared to testify, if chosen, before the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings that began Sept. 15. The leaders of the 3 ,200member organi zation postponed taking a stand on Bork i n August until its judicial screening committee analyzed his voting record. Chaired by University of Utah law professor John Martinez, the committee found Bork unqualified and held that the District of Columbia U.S. Court of Appeals judge appears to "adjust h i s views opportunistically." HNBA President William Mendez said the 17-member boards position was based on Bork's qualifications and not on political ,ideologies. The court's new term begins Oct. 1 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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; Richard Sayre, guest columnist Look Who's No.4 In U.S. Salvadorans weren't counted and didn't count. , They were buried in a census statistic called "other Hispanics" and barely noticed by the Latino "big three" of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans. Today, the Salvadoran embassy in Washington, D.C., estimates that as many as 900,000 men, women birth or heritage may be living here. They make up the fourth-largest of more than 20 Hispanic-origin groups in this country. But still they remain on the fringes-even in the U.S. Latino community. A survey of some major U.S . Latino zations shows: • A staff member of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed officials in Washington, D.C., is not aware of a single Salvadoran among the nation's 3,202 His panic elected office-holders. e Ruben Jauregui, president of the Latin Business Association in Los Angeles , home of the largest U . S . Salvadoran community 300,000says that only a small percentage of his membership is Salvadoran. Salvadorans "have not made great inroads " among the manufacturers, contractors and professionals who constitute the bulk of the LBA membership, he says . • The League of United Latin American Citizens, despite adding Uruguayan, Nicaraguan , Dominican , Colombian and Portuguese councils to its 355 councils spread across the nation , still has no Salvadoran unit. While some councils have recruited Salvadoran members, none of LULAC's national officers or board members is Salvadoran . Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE HORDES ARE BACK: A week after the Census Bureau issued its '87 update on U.S . Hispanics, giving its estimate of between 2 . 5 and 3 . 5 million undocumented persons among us, The Washington Post shoved the figure up to "as many as 11 million. " It did so in its headline story on the pope's visit to San Antonio after pointing out that Pope John Paul II spoke to the crowd in [both Spanish and English "and virtually endorsed the Sanctuary movement that provides haven for illegal immigrants." In case you don' t have your pocket calculator handy, 11 million would mean that only 42. 5% of all Hispanics in this country are here legally. HELP ME, TEACHER: The Washington, D.C., Taxicab Com mission voted this month to make applicants for hacker licenses prove that they can converse in English. Presently, they are just required to pass a written test. Also in Washington this month, U.S . English sent out a press release promising that its sort-of-new president, Linda Chavez, will "increase the profile of the 300,000-member group and strengthen its current campaign to place official English provisions on the ballot in Colorado, Arizona and Florida next year." Then, in rapid succession, if offered three quotes by Chavez (who, in her less notorious days , edited a quarterly journal, American Educator, fort he American Federation ofTeachers) with spelling that would flunk a fourth grader: " English , our comon language ... " " What we were seeing was the begining of a policy ... " And: "I belive most Americans recognize the many problems posed by bilingualism ... " Next time U.S . English recruits a president, maybe it should LEGAL STATUS ISSUE CRITICAL include a written test. Or supply a proofreader. Salvadorans in the United States will continue to have minimal 'PHYSICAL YEAR': To the south, the learned legislators of impact on the U.S . Hispanic community-and little control over their !North Carolina were busy debating their own "official English" own destinyuntil the legal status of some half-million refugees who [ bills this summer. arrived here since 1980 is resolved , says Dr. C&rlos Cordova , a At the same time, according to the Associated Press : professor.of ethnic studies at San Francisco State University. One lawmaker there blamed a misnumbered amendment on a Cordova, a U.S . citizen who emigrated from El Salvador as a teen"typographical area." ager in 1965, explains why the more recent arrivals have not made Another told the House, "I preference my remarks. .. " greater efforts to integrate into the broader community. A senator, discussing how to insulate shareholders from hostile " First , most still hope to go home when the war ends. takeover bids, asked about the impact on "big cooperations." "Second, most live marginal lives, with no time for outside activi"Nearly every day," the AP reported, "the fiscal year is called the ties. 'physical year' and references are made to the ' statue of limitations.' " " Third and most importantly, those without papers fear being Come to think of it, these days ttiafs not a bad name for the lady caught by immigration. They do their best to remain inconspicuous." ••••••••••••-IKiaiiiyliiiBiaiirbiiiaiiirlio•l CONTACT BEST AT LOCAL LEVEL r Across the country, many non-Salvadoran Latinos can be found QUOtl•ng working within refugee-aid groups at the local level , helping them • • • fight deportation and addressing problems common in poor, under served communities. For example, Ayuda, a legal services organization in Washington, D.C.'s. Adams-Morgan section which serves a 75% Salvadoran clientele, has among its paid and volunteer staff Puerto Ricans , Mexican Americans, Dominicans and Cubans. National organizations such as the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Council of La Raza and LULAC have consistently supported legislation to give refugee status to Salvadorans. Another encouraging sign is the action taken in July by organizers of the annua l Washington , D . C . , Hispanic Festival. Instead of choosing its customary c elebrity as grand marshal this year, it picked an anonymous undocumented Salvadoran refugee, his identity shielded by a bandana across his face. Sylvia Rosales , a founder of the new national Salvadoran umbrella group GARNET, characterizes Latino organizations as "understanding and supportive" when help is sought. But, she adds, "We have many emergencies." It would be nice, she suggests, if Latino organizations took greater initiative to help "the new kid on the block." (Richard Sayre is a reporter with Hispanic Link.) From recent reviews of the motion picture" Born in East L.A.'' KEVIN THOMAS, Los Angeles Times: "'Born in East LA' is an across-the-board winner, an exuberant crowd-pleaser that marks its writer-director-star Cheech Marin's first effort apart from his longtime partner Tommy Chong. "It has more drive and energy than' La Samba,' which also examines Latino life, and comes as a happy revelation to one who always found Cheech and Chong's pot humor puerile and tedious . . . RICARDO SANCHEZ, San Antonio Express-News: " Cheech Marin , whose work previously has been an absurdist manifesto on 'mota' (pot) in films and club routines, has created a farce that speaks to issues afflicting the diverse worlds of Hispanics. .. " Marin, a brilliant performer, has dared to create a film that speaks volumes about the injudicious nature of power when it is wielded by paper shufflers just doing their job ... " CHRISTOPHER TRICARCIO, Los Angeles Herald-Examiner: "'Born in East LA' is a raucous, disrespectful and hysterically funny film that's a major step for half of the '70s super-comedic duo Cheech and Chong." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept. 21, 1987 3

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COLLECTING . Below are addresses and contact persons for , some key organizations 1n the Central Amencan Refugee Network For a complete listing of the 34 organizations in CARNET, send a self-addressed envelope with 22 postage to Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. CARECEN. Joaquin Dominguez, 1050 S. Van Ness , San Francisco , Calif . 9411 0 (41 5) 824-2330 CARECEN, Linton Joaquin, 1434 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90015 (21 3) 381-5666 CARECEN, Sylvia Rosales , 3112 Mt. Pleasant St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 328-9799 (GARNET is temporarily located here . ) CRECEN, Francisco Lopez, 2901 W . Dallas , Houston, Texas 77019 (713) 522-2245 Centro Cristiano Monsenor Romero, Ricardo Cornejo,-1 545 W. Morse Ave. , Chicago, Ill. 60626 (312) 465-4827 Centro Presente, Frank Sharry, 10 Essex St., Cambridge, Mass.02139 (617) 497-9125 PROFILES OF HISPANIC BUSINESS: A 30-page booklet describ ing the types and characteristics of Latino businesses and trends between 1977 and 1982 has been published by the National Council of La Raza Copies of the $3 "Hispanic Business Ownership: A Profile" are available by writing to the council at 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. BUSINESS OWNER CHARACTERISTICS: The "1982 Characteristics of Business Owners," released Sept. 16, is the first report by the U.S. Census Bureau to present data on minorityand women-owned businesses. It offers comparisons to non-minority businesses. The 150-page report (No. C8082-1) is available by writing to: Super intendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) INS' LOS ANGELES OFFICE: The U . S . General Accounting Office recently issued a nine-page report, "Immigration: How INS' Los Angeles District Office Responds to Enquiries." It covers, among other things, the ability of INS' Los Angeles office to handle a multilingual clientele. For a free copy of the report, write: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md . 20877 (202) 275-6241. HISPANIC COLORADANS: "Hispanic Agenda: 1990 and Beyond' is a social and economic blueprint for the future of Colorado' s Hispanic community. The 21-page report is available for $10 by writing to: Latin American Research and Service Agency, 303 W. Colfax Ave . , Suite 950, Denver, Colo. 80204. CONNECTING COLUMBIA TO AID MINORITIES Columbia University announced Sept. 8 that it will begin paying the undergraduate loans of its minority-group graduates who go on to earn doctorates. The university agreed to pay, starting this year, three-quarters of the debt of seniors who go on to earn their doctorates at Columbia in arts and sciences and half if they do so at other accredited cniiPn"'" Of the 18,000 students attending Columbia, 587 (3 . 3%) reported themselves to be Hispanic. MATH/SCIENCE PROJECT LAUNCHED The National Urban Coalition announced Sept. 11 a pilot program to develop mathematics and science skills of minority students in Houston and Washington, D.C. The two-year program, called Say Yes to a Youngster's Future, began this month at eight public elementary schools in Washington and six in Houston. Of the schools participating in Washington, two are 50% or more Latino. In Houston, one is 99% Latino, another is 60% . The program involves students, parents and community organizations through special science and math lessons, field trips, tutoring, family and math science programs and career counseling. It is funded by a $1 million grant from the Shell Oil Company Foundation. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES The AFL-CIO Immigrant Assistance Project , the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Asian Pacific American Legal Center of Southern California sponsored a special screening of John Sayles' newest movie, Matewan, Aug. 31 to raise money for documentation assistance for undocumented workers . The screening attracted about 400 people, including speakers Antonia Hernandez, president of MALDEF, and La Bamba's writer/director Luis Valdez. The event raised roughly $7,000 for the organizations' documentation assistance programs ... The Chicago Public Library has announced the appointment of a new Hispanic services coordinator. Hector Hernandez is the highest ranking Hispanic Spanish-speaking librari. an at the Chicago's library system .. . -Julio Laboy Calendar THIS WEEK the need to identify omissions in U.S. Hispanic archival records along with the legal barriers to reproducing foreign archival materials . The con ference will be sponsored by the Library of Congress, the American Historic Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Pamela Eoff Salazar (512) 434-6711 ext. 368 HISPANIC MEDIA INFLUENCE CONFERENCE The Media Institute Los Angeles Sept. 30 Edith Torres (202) 298-7 512 MARKETING LA SAMBA Los Angeles Sept. 21 Santiago Pozo, manager of special markets for MCA/Universal Pictures, will discuss, at a Hispanic Public Relations Association meeting, the marketing strategies for La Bamba and how marketing movies to Hispanics is expected to change. Martin Quiroz (213) 726-7690 CONTRACT COMPLIANCE CONFERENCE Atlantic City, N.J. Sept. 21-25 The Atlantic Contract Compliance Association's n ational conference, aimed at affirmative action and m inority business professionals, will feature work shops on Hispanic perspectives on affirmative action a nd contract compliance, resolving discrimination complaints, fraudulent minority firms and support sys t e ms for minority business students. Lu is M o lina (609) 343-2390 HISPANIC ARCHIVES CONFERENCE Was hinoton, D . C . Sept. 22-25 A conference on Hispanic archives and records c overing U .S. Hispanics from 1492-1850willaddress 4 Olga Padilla(202) 287-5108 OHIO LATINA CONFERENCE Cleveland Sept. 25 The Women's Action Committee of the National Image Northeast Ohio Chapter is hosting a one-day statewide conference titled" Defining the Hispanic Woman . " Guadalupe Quintanilla, assistant vice president at the University of Houston, will be the keynote speaker. Betty Ortiz (21 6) 522-7 514 TORRES BARBECUE FUND-RAISER Clarksburg, Calif . Sept. 26 The Friends of Art Torres are sponsoring a" Summer Afternoon by the River" featuring a barbecue dinner and dancing with proceeds going to the California state senator's campaign. Linda Macias (916) 731-8026 COMING SOON HISPANIC COLLEGES MEETING Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Albuquerque, N.M . Sept. 28-29 Sept. 21, 1987 LATINO INSTITUTE CELEBRATION The Latino Institute Chicago Oct. 1 Edwin Claudio (312) 663-3603 MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Minority Enterprise Development Washington, D.C. Oct. 4-7 Hattie Bickmore (202) 377-5196 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC CHAMBER CONFERENCE: The U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is holding its eighth annual convention and international trade exchange in Los Angeles Sept. 30-0ct. 4 . More than 300 exhibitors, including representatives from private industry, U.S. and foreign governments , will participate in the trade fair. Among featured speakers are Roger Enrico , president of Pepsi-Cola , USA; Alfredo Phillips Olmedo, director of Banco Naciona/ de Comercio Exterior; and Mexican Secretary of Com merce Hector Hernandez Cervantes. For information contact Carlos Guevara at (202) 789-2717. Hispanic Link Weekly R , eport

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS The following positions are with the Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY. PARTTIME POSITIONS PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR : Allied Health Program I Assist the Coordinator of Academic Affairs in supervising the Allied Health Program at SUNYEOCM ; serve as liaison between AHP and community health agencies; assist in purchasing, processing personnel records and preparation of reports for AHP . Min . B . S., NYS Nursing License, some admin. exp. in health field . Salary: $22.80/ph. Vac. #G. INSTRUCTORS Mathematics/Science (Day and Evening) Instruct and guide students to overcome their skills deficiencies in mathematicS/science and perform any other instructional duties as assigr.ed by the Coordinator of Academi c Affairs. Min . BA in teaching discipline , Master's pref . with 2 yrs. teaching exp. Salary: $38.01 I ph. Vac. #G-169 ADJUNCT LECTURER Health Occupation Instruct and guide students in the health and personal care of patients. Assess and evaluate students' progress pursuant to pro gram goals and objectives. Perform other instruction al duties as assigned by the Co ordinator of Academic Affairs . NYS licensed , Registered professional nurse . Minimum of 2 yrs prof. and teaching exp. , with some background in public health . Master's degree pref . Salary: $38.01/ph. Vac. #G TV PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Capitol Hill Republican news bureau . Basic TV knowledge, flexible , willing to learn, 15 K Write : SRC , Washington , D . C . 20510. The Montgomery County , Maryland, Depart ment of Police is currently accepting appli cations for the position of: POLICE OFFICER CANDIDATE • Starting salary: $21 ,804 with increase to $22,895 upon completion of twenty weeks of training. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS • • 60 college credit hours e Not less than 21 years of age • U.S. citizenship e Possession of valid motor vehicle oper ator's license • Clear police record Montgomery County provides its employees with liberal fringe benefits. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION , CONTACT : Montgomery County Police Personnel Recruitment Office (301) 840 Monday thru Friday, 8 :00 am to 4:00 pm ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md. , are available on a continuous basis . Call (301) 251. ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington , D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385, or Hispanic Link (202) 234. Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report P/T SCHOOL NURSE (DAY) Immediate and temporary care of anyone in the school who becomes the victim of an accident or sudden illness . To keep daily records of all visits and activities of the Health Service . Daily records to counselors of absences due to illness. Conduct health seminars. NYC License, BS pref. & 3 yrs . exp. Salary: $13.76/ph. Vac . #G FULL TIME POSITIONS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Overall management and implementation of financial controls and policy matters; super vision of small accounting and clerical staff; heavy involvement with student government activities. BA req . MA pref.; 3 yrs. related exp . Financial background an asset. Salary range: $25 K. Vac. # G. BOOKKEEPER Assist accountant with cash receipts, dis bursements, heavy check preparation , payroll , etc. Posting to G / L T / B , department reports . Assoc . degree and bookkeeping exp. Know ledge of computer accounting systems helpful. Competitive salary. Vac . # G. REFER TO BMCC VACANCY # ABOVE AND SEND RESUME WITH COVER LETIER FORTH ESE NON TAX LEVY POSITIONS BY 10/2/87 TO : Ms. Alyne Holm es Coy Director of Perso nnel B o rough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED ATTORNEY Attorney with 1 years litigation experience. General Practice law firm (50 persons) located downtown Washington , D.C. Please send . resume to: 1250 Eye Street NW , Suite 600, Washington , D.C. 20005. OFFICE MANAGER Washington , D .C., policy analysis group seeks experienced individual for overall office management and administration . Salary in low 20's. Bilinguai(English/Spanish) preferred Send letter and resume to: C . Oppenheimer, HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW , Suite 310, Washington, D .C. 20036. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR INDISPENSABLE UPDATE ON WHOS MOVING AND SHAKING THE U.S. HISPAN[C COMMUNITY .NOW6 PAGES NOW 12 FEATURES Headline story • National News Round up • Calendar • Names Making News • Guest Column • Collecting • Con necting • Media Report • Arts& talnment • Editorial Cartoon • Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua • Marketplace :MENTAL HEALTH WORKER Clinical Psychologist/Social Worker. Full time position. Involves . prevention of mental health problems with infants and families. Clinical experience in assessment and intervention w i th young ch i ldren and their families, parent guid ance, group and family therapy is desirable. LLP, MSW or Psychiatric Nursing master's re quired . Send resume to: Ann Trost , Director Infant Development Program Grand Rapids Child Guidance Clinic 1101 Ball Avenue, N .E. Grand Rapids , Ml 49505 Salary to be negotiated EOE/ Affirmative Action Employer. ASSOCIATE DEAN SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in ; ALBANY, N . Y., a leader in higher educ, seeks Associate Dean to begin 1/88. Stu dents work oneto-one w /faculty to develop degree programs & eval experiential learning. Responsible for Academic program including: academic/assessment qual & sys; prog/faculty development. Doctorate, substan colllevel teaching , Admin exp& adult educ. Salary: low to mid 40's. Letter & resume by 10/23/87 to : Janet Zimmer, Dir/pers/AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm802, 1 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N . Y . 12866. j For more info call Dean Delo;{g ' (518) 44 7. 6746. ANEOE. .. . GAO EVALUATOR The U .S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelor's (2. 9 GPA or higher) or master's degree to examine the ef fectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities. We are interested in business , economics, computer science, government or public ad ministration majors to work in Washington, D .C., or one of our 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills , we would like to hear from you . To obtain an application (deadline to apply is Nov . 13) contact U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington , D . C . 20548, Attn: Laura Talbott (202) 275. An Equal Opportunity Employer SUBSCRIBE TO THE NATION'S HISPANIC NEWSWEEKLY: Name Organization----------Address-----------City, state, zip ----------0 Start 13week trial subscription $26 0 Start annual (50 weeks) subscription $96 0 Check enclosed o Bill me 0 Bill my organization Mall to: Hispanic link News Service 1420 N Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234 5

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A rts & Entertainment Ohara returns for its second season on ABC, with an all-new supporting cast. The title character, played by Pat Morita, is reassigned to the special task force and moved away from last season's environ ment. FALL COUNT: Two new Hispanic characters premiere on net work television this week as the "big three" get on with their fall season schedule. Richard Yniguez played officer Jesse Guerrera on the show last year. A preview of I Married Dora , a new ABC sitcom about a Central American refugee who marries her employer to avoid deportation, airs Sept. 22 at 9:30 p .m. (El). Elizabeth Pena stars as Dora, a housemaid. Among new syndicated television programs this fall , Paramount Television' s Marblehead Manor has a couple of Latinos in starring roles. Dyana Ortelli plays Lupe, an extravagant cook, and Humberto Ortiz plays her son , Elvis. Ortelli and Ortiz are mother and son in real life . The series will premiere at its regular time slot-Fridays at 8 :30 p.m. -Sept. 25. Marblehead Manor premiered Sept. 14 as the Monday entry in a new "checkerboard" schedule on all five NBC-owned and -operated stations in New York, Los Angeles , Chicago, Washington , D .C., and Cleveland. Independent stations in some 160 television markets across the country will also carry the show. A critically acclaimed new drama about the Vietnam War, Tour of Duty , includes actor Ramon Franco in its ensemble cast. Franco plays Pvt. Alberto Ruiz in the hourlong program which premieres on CBS Sept. 24 at 8 p . m . A third new Hispanic character on network TV debuts on Ohara Oct. 7. Rachel Ticotin, a New York actress who gained fame as a young dancer with the city's Ballet Hisptwico, will play Teresa Storm , the leader of a special anti-crime task force, on the hourlong drama. A daily syndicated talk show, Geraldo, is now airing on some 60 stations nationally. Geraldo Rivera hosts the show, which combines pre-taped news stories with a studio audience format. Media Report NOGALES PROMOTED: Univision exe cutive Luis Nogales, formerly chief executive officer with United Press International, was promoted to president of Univision Sept. 15. He had been vice president for news since December 1986. Jaime Davila , whom he replaces, becomes chairman of Univision's nine-member internal board . GUIDE FOR YOUNG JOURNALISTS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, which has been preparing journalism career guides for more than 26 years , has released its latest. The 1987 Journalism Career and Scholarship Guide is a 164-page soft-cover source for information about financial aid, how to get media jobs, college research services and where to study journalism. The guide is divided into three sections: A Newspaper Career and You , Universities that Offer Journalism Majors and a Directory of HISPANIC LINK -WEEKLY REPORT a natio nal publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publ isher Hecto r E ric ksenMendoza Editor F elix Perez Reporting: Char l i e E rickse n , Antonio Mejias Ren t as , Meli nda Machado. Julio L aboy, R ic hard Sayre. Graphics/ Pr oductio n : Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias . N o portion of Hispanic Weekly Rep ort may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance per mission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPO RATE C L ASSIF I ED : Ad r a tes 75 cents per word . Disp lay ad s a r e $35 per column inc h . Ads placPd by Tu'!sday w1ll r u n in Weekly Report s mailed Frida y o f same Multipl e use rates on request. 6 Journalism Scholarships. The Fund also has a Minority Journalism Career Guide which is available at no cost. Write : Dow Jones Newspaper Fund , P . O . Box 300, Princeton, N.J . 08543-0300 (609) 5207938. The first copy of each guide is free. Additional copies of the 1987 career book are $2 each and extra copies of the minority career guide are available at 75 each . WHAT ELSE? OnSept26, lmages'lmagenes host Mauricio Gerson looks at English as a second language and the problem of illiteracy in that state's Hispanic community on the New Jersey Television Network ... Pushed by advertisers to have a New York presence, Vista, the weekend newspaper supplement, begins doorknob distribution of 100,000 copies there in October. Vista, now carried by newspapers in 27 cities, will begin 1988 with a circulation in excess of 1 . 2 million . . . Jose Lozano , publisher of Los Angeles ' La Opinion, Ana Veciana-Suarez, Miami Herald reporter who authored" Hispanic Media USA," and Felix Gutierrez, University of Southern -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Calif . journalism professor, share the stage at the Sept. 30 conference on "Hispani c Media: Influence and Opportunity'' in Los Angeles. lfs put on by the Washington, D.C. based Media Institute ... New York Newsday reporter Evelyn Hernan dez, vice president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, coordinated a Sept. 16 conference on" Minorities in the Newsroom: Progress or Impasse?" in Manhattan. NAHJ sponsored the Region II session with the New York Association of Black Journalists. It was spurred by the recent discrimination settlement againstthe New York Daily News. Executives from Newsday, the Daily News, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times participated. ON THE MOVE: WSNS.TV(Ch.44) reporter David Cordova became news director of the Chicago Spanish-language station Sept. 11 . . . Minerva Perez moved from her anchor/ ireporter position at KPNX-TV in Phoenix, Ariz . , to weekend anchor at KTLA-TV in Los Angeles Sept. 12 ... Charlie Ericksen and Julio Laboy EL SALVADOR'THE NEW KID ON THE BLOCK' .....-, Mexican American 11,762,000 . \ n Salvadoran 900,000 --Hispanic Link Weekly Report