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Hispanic link weekly report, January 4, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 4, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Senators Alfonse D’Amato of New York, William Armstrong of Colorado and Pete Domenici of New Mexico join the Senate Republican Conference’s Task Force on Hispanic Affairs. The task force has eight members... American City and County Magazine honors San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros as its Local Government Leader of the Year. The award was bestowed in Las Vegas, Nev., at a National League of Cities gathering... Hialeah, Fla, Mayor Raul Martinez says he is considering running in 1988 for the congressional seat being vacated by Florida Sen. Lawton Chiles... William Verity, the secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, appoints Carmela Lacayo, executive director of the Asociacidn Nacional Pro Personas
Mayores - National Association for the Hispanic Elderly - to the Census Advisory Committee on the Hispanic f QQWlation fftC Jjlf 1990 Census. . . The Peace Corps announcesvRWEstrfenowBtinez-Baldivia is the director for quality and productivity improvement for the organization worldwide. Martfnez-Baldivia had been working on loan from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission... Consumer advocate Ralph Nader joins C6sarCh6vez, president of the United Farm Workers, in UFWs boycott of table grapes... Carlos Olvera, a crew supervisor at Industrial Polychemical Co. in Carson, Calif., wins the largest individual jackpot in the two-year history of the state’s lottery - $25 million. A 40-year-old with a wife and three children, Olvera will receive $1,005,600 each year after taxes for the next 20 years...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT (6)-^
’88 Language Battles Building in Three States
Petitioners Push Constitutional Amendments
‘OFFICIAL ENGLISH’
State/Year Enacted
1987 1985
Arkansas Nevada
Mississippi North Dakota 1984
North Carolina Indiana
South Carolina Kentucky Tennessee
1986 1923
California Georgia Illinois
Virginia 1920 Nebraska
Florida, Arizona and Colorado will be the nation’s bellwethers for official-English initiatives this year.
All bypass their legislatures, calling for popular referendums on amending their state constitutions.
In Florida and Arizona, petition-gathering drives are under way to put proposed constitutional amendments on their November ballots. The Colorado Official English Committee, headquartered in Denver, met that state’s Nov. 1,1987, deadline by turning in double the required 50,689 signatures.
Florida English, with an August’88 deadline, has 110,000 of the needed 343,000 valid signatures, says Pat Folton, a spokeswoman
Committee Kills Family Unification
A U.S. House proposal that would have prevented the deportation of undocumented persons whose immediate family members have been legalized under the immigration law was dropped from the Senate spending bill Dec. 17.
The Family Unification Act was sponsored by Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.). It was attached to the $600 billion House appropriations bill, which was passed Dec. 4. It was struck by a congressional joint conference committee at the last-minute urging of Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.).
Simpson argued that Roybal’s bill would be unfair to those seeking residency status out-
More Salvadorans Coming
There will be "an astronomical increase” in U.S. visa applications for Salvadorans in the 1990s, filed by “hundreds of thousands” of close relatives of those gaining legal status now, a confidential cable from the U.S. Embassy in San Salvador projects.
The cable was quoted in The New York Times Dec. 21.
The cable also said that the flow of refugees, which appeared to be falling off last spring, “has risen back to 1984-86 levels.” Employer sanctions in the ’86 immigration law are failing to slow the migration, it noted.
side of the legalization law.
The act would have prohibited the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service from utilizing funds to deport undocumented individuals whose family members have been granted legalization.
Ariz. Voter Purge Nixed
The U.S. Justice Department put off Dec. 21 making a determination on the legality of a proposed Arizona law that would change the way residents are stricken from voter registration roles. The law, argued the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in a letter it sent to the Justice Department would be unduly weighted against His-panics.
The Justice Department remanded the law to Arizona, saying the state did not include sufficient documentation to determine its impact. The Voting Rights Act requires that Arizona submit any proposed change in its voter laws for preclearance. The law was to take effect Jan. 1.
The law would have retroactively purged voters who did not vote in the 1986 general elections and have removed an exemption for voters with valid driver’s licenses from the biannual purge.
for the Tampa-based U.S. English affiliate.
Two groups in Arizona are gathering signatures to have voters there decide the fate of distinct constitutional amendments they hope to place on the presidential-year ballot
Arizonans for Official English, working out of Prescott, seeks an amendment similar to one Californians endorsed overwhelmingly in 1986. It would permit individuals to sue the government if it does not enforce the measure.
The other organization, Arizona English, based in Phoenix, is pushing for an amendment recognizing English as the dominant language but rejecting the need for a statute to make it the “official” language.
Deadline for turning in the mandated 130,048 signatures is July 7. So far, Arizonans for Official English has collected 55,000 signatures; Arizona English 5,000.
Concern that the language issue is being distorted for political and profit motives and is increasing nativist sentiment against U.S. immigrants led Hispanic, educational and civil rights organizations last fall to create the English Plus Information Clearinghouse in Washington, D.C. Known as EPIC, it will coordinate dissemination of information on the issue nationally this year, according to Mary Carol Combs, its director.
In 1987, official-English bills- including 14 calling for constitutional amendments- were
continued on page 2
Santa Gives Green Cards
Santa Claus visited the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service’s legalization center in Harlingen, Texas, Christmas week, handing out temporary residence cards to qualified applicants and candy to all.
He wore his own laminated employment authorization photo card, with his name, “Claus, Santa,” and country of origin,“North Pole.”
Legalization officer Charlie P6rez said he wasn’t sure if it helped business, “but it certainly helped the morale of the people who were waiting.”


NEA Mounts Campaign vs. Official English
With little fanfare, the National Education Association, the nation’s largest teachers’ union with nearly 1.9 million members, is moving into the battle against the official-English movement
It has instructed its affiliates nationwide to work with Hispanic, Asian and other organizations in educating the general public and its own membership on the negative impact the movement can have on students and on the educational process itself.
Additionally, it has encouraged field components to tap into a $1.39 million fund to effect projects and strategies in opposition to the movement
The fund, requested by NEA President Mary Hatwood Futrell and approved by the body’s board, was created last year to aid member-groups in implementing recommendations by NEA’s Hispanic, black, Asian and American Indian study groups to improve their educational opportunities.
It alloted $499,000 for its present budget
year, which runs until August; $602,000 for 1988-89, and $289,000 for 1989-90, according to Mary Sosa, NEA human and civil rights division manager who is coordinating its efforts to counter the official-English movement
The American Federation of Teachers, the nation’s second largest teachers union with 660,000 members, has not taken a position on official-English nor has it set aside any funds to address Hispanic issues, spokesman Scott Tribeitz told Weekly Report.
Because many of its affiliates are in urban areas, AFT is believed to have a higher percentage (but smaller number) of Hispanic teachers and allied school personnel as members than does NEA. An estimated 3% of the nation’s teachers are Hispanic.
NEA’s interest in the language issue has been vigorously nurtured in recent years by its Chicano-Hispano caucus, says Sara Flores, a teacher from Killeen, Texas, and current caucus president
The associations Representative Assembly voted at its June '87 convention in Los Angeles to challenge the official-English movement In September NEA’s board of directors adopted a motion asking its human and civil rights division for strategies to combat it The division’s recommendations, which include formation of coalitions at state and local levels and working in targeted states such as Arizona, were adopted by the board Dec. 3.
At a Dec. 7 meeting in San Francisco involving NEA’s Pacific and Western regions, leaders from 18 states were given an overview of the issue by Sosa and Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund attorney Francisco Garcia The group then worked on additional educational and legislative strategies.
Next month the association plans to publish a. brochure describing the official-English movement and listing resources to oppose its efforts. - Felix Perez
Advertising in Latino Media Increases by 23% in’87
Top Hispanic-Marketing Cities
Market (In Millions) Television Radio Print Total
Los Angeles $58.0 $31.5 $13.5 $103.0
Miami 38.5 28.0 14.8 81.3
New York 34.2 20.0 12.5 66.7
Chicago 17.0 10.0 1.0 28.0
San Francisco/San Jose 12.2 6.0 0.7 18.9
Reprinted with permission of Santa Barbara, Calif, -based Hispanic Business
Hispanic-market advertising expenditures rose 23% last year, going to $490 million from $398 million in 1986, according to Hispanic Business magazine.
A survey, released in its December issue, showed that the top three Latino-market advertisers increased their expenditures $15.6 million. Leading was a major tobacco interest. Numbers three and four were breweries.
In one year, Philip Morris Cos. increased its Hispanic-market spending from $7.5 million to $13.3 million. Procter & Gamble followed, climbing from $8 million to $12 million. The Adolph Coors Co. was third, more than doubling from $4 million to $9.8 million.
The leaders were (spending in millions):
Company Spending
Philip Morris $13.3
Procters Gamble 12.0
Adolph Coors 9.8
Anheuser-Busch 8.0
McDonald’s 7.0
Johnson & Johnson 6.0
Colgate Palmolive 5.0
The magazine reported the next eight com-
panies each had expenditures of $3 million: Ford MotorCo, Goya Foods Inc, Sears Roebuck
Latino Market Expenditures
(In Millions)
Media Spending
Local TV $118.5
Local Radio 114.0
National TV 104.0
National Radio 48.0
Print 47.3
Promotion 39.5
Outdoors 14.4
Transit 4.2
& Co., Nabisco Brands Inc, American Telephone & Telegraph Co., Dart & Kraft Inc, American Home Products Corp. and Lever Bros. Co.
It has reported steady increases in the six years it has been collecting data Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Chicago and San Francisco/San Jose, the top five
continued from page 1
considered in a total of 37 states. That was more than double the number introduced in 1986.
In most instances, they died in committee. A few were voted down or withdrawn. In half a dozen states, including New York, Ohio, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, bills stalled in committee will carry over to this year’s sessions
While none of the constitutional amendment proposals survived, legislatures in five states - Arkansas, Mississippi, North Dakota, North Carolina and South Carolina- passed simple statutes which are expected to have little if any effect on state services.
Fourteen states now have official-English laws or constitutional language. Five years ago, only two did.
In Texas, where legislation calling for a
Hispanic market areas, accounted for57% of the total market spending.
The U.S. Hispanic market comprises 18.8 million consumers with an aggregate annual income of $125.6 billion, reported the Santa Barbara, Calif, -based magazine.
- Julio Laboy
constitutional amendment died in the House last year, the Republican Party has placed on its March 8 primary ballot a non-binding referendum making English the state’s official language.
U.S. English, the four-year-old Washington, D.C.- based official-language advocacy organization headed by Linda Chavez, will concentrate its’88 efforts in Florida and Arizona, says field coordinator Julie Owen.
Leading the drive for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution is English First, housed in Springfield, Va
Currently, four bills are in the House of Representatives and one in the Senate awaiting action by the chambers’ judiciary committees Such bills have been introduced since 1981. None are expected to survive this year.
- Felix PSrez
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Constitutional Amendments Pushed
2


Marta Salinas, guest columnist
The Mexican Elixir
T-shirts on barrel chests of barrio youth in the Southwest boast “Menudo - Breakfast of Champions.” Latinos and Latinas on both sides of the U.S. -Mexico border regularly give testimony to its curative powers - particularly on such critical dates as Jan. 1, the morning after the night before.
Menudds roots reportedly reach back to the Aztecs. Mexicans and their cultural descendants are addicted to it.
When I was growing up in Yancey, Texas, south of San Antonio, Mama prepared it on Saturday night for our version of Sunday brunch.
When she first served it to me, I had no idea what it was made of- beef tripe simmered for long hours in the company of oregano, garlic, onions, red pepper and hominy.
I didn’t question it. I just liked it My parents, both teetotalers, never informed us children that menudo had a reputation as a sure - possibly the only - cure for hangovers. I just thought that menudo on Sunday was a family tradition. I ate bowls of it.
Sometimes I wondered, as I let my tongue slide over the many grooves and ridges in the tender pieces of meat, what I was chewing on. I meant to ask my mother, but I always forgot.
EAT FIRST, ASK LATER
Even when I took courses in anatomy and physiology in my freshman year of nursing and had to handle the cold and slippery intestines of a cat with their formaldehyde odor, I didn’t make the connection: Thankfully. I don’t think my love for menudo could have survived the association.
Since then, I have converted a few non-Latinos to menudo simply by saying, “Eat some first. Then I’ll tell you what’s in it.”
After a bowl or two, they don’t care.
For centuries, I guess, after the fiesta on Saturday night, menudo has been administered to the revelers when they awaken on Sunday as a cure for la cruda, that peculiar state of existence that follows a bad drunk
I didn’t experience menudo’s magical powers until I left my parents’ protective custody. It happened at a Mexican dance in Fresno, Calif., a few years ago. Much tequila and rum was consumed, a lot by me.
I watched an entire club full of boisterous, swaying, dancing people mellow when large ceramic bowls of the steaming red stew were placed on their tables.
The manic glow of hilarity left their faces in direct proportion to the amount of menudo they consumed. When the last piece of corn tortilla was dunked and the last spoonful of menudo was eaten, a look of contentment settled in their eyes.
PIECE OF LATINO PUZZLE
All ages and strata of the community were there. Local Latino dignitaries and reporters sat shoulder to shoulder with migrant workers and “homeboys and homegirls.” Only menudo could have united them.
About 3 a.m., the mariachis shifted to soft, mournful love songs, El Reloj, Crei, and other requested favorites.
I felt the change taking place in my own body. It was like finding myself unexpectedly in the middle of a family reunion at my Abuelita’s with a bowl of fresh tamales on the table and the smell of anis or canela coming from the stack of still-warm-from-the-oven empanadas It was pihatas and dulce de leche all at once. I shared a closeness and cultural pride with everyone there.
Had my mother known all along of menudds sedative and restorative powers? Is there a receptive gene in the blood of Latinos?
No answers came that night, but I left the dance happy and thoughtful and surprisingly sober.
Another piece fit snugly into the puzzle of my Latino heritage. Ifs not Dunkin’ Donuts; I have Menudo Sunday.
(Marta Salinas works as a registered nurse at a migrant farm labor clinic in Woodburn, Ore. She is writing an autobiographical novel.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
SANTA EZELL: On Christmas Eve, The Los Angeles Times played the story generously on page 3, with a three-column photo of priests and Central American refugee children.
“Christmas Gift From INS: Freedom,” the Times told its million subscribers.
The day before, at a Los Angeles press conference, Harold Ezell, the notorious Western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Service, freed 24 youngsters who had been picked up by INS and locked in federal jails- excuse me, detention centers - for periods ranging from a few days to more than a year.
It is INS policy to keep unaccompanied children it captures under lock and key unless their parents personally come and pick them up. In the past, Hispanic Link has run articles in which the agency stood accused of using the children as “bait’ to capture their parents, too - a charge quickly denied.
Usually, there are a hundred or more undocumented children being held apart from their families by INS in Southern California facilities alone.
The two dozen whom Ezell f reed(after lengthy negotiations with the Catholic Church) were turned over to friends and relatives. The normal $2,000 bail was waived. Ezell delivered a compassionate speech and his wife handed out Christmas presents to the cute little trespassers.
I don’t know how other Southern California media sucked up Harold’s performance, but I presume the smiling faces of Mama and Papa Ezell made the 6 o’clock news on most channels.
As a propaganda piece, it was a diabolical success.
How did the church allow itself to become involved in such a cynical show?
In her story, Times reporter Marita Hernftndez suggested that the children might still be locked up if Harold wasn’t given an ironclad guarantee of a good propaganda event
Wrote Hernandez: “The press conference... was a condition for the children’s release, according to church sources who asked to remain anonymous. They said Ezell insisted that (Los Angeles Archbishop Roger Mahoney) and the children join him in making the announcement at the downtown Federal Building.”
If I may paraphrase Harold Ezell in his more natural moments, anyone who still believes in Santa Claus should be cleaned and fried.
GRINCH SIMPSON: Before Harold pulled his stunt we were prepared to give the 1987 Sin Pelos hypocrisy award to Sen. Alan Simpson, father of the ’86 immigration legislation.
As we read daily, the bill’s failure to address family unification is threatening to separate mother and child, husband and wife, keeping numerous eligible legalization applicants from applying, and generally tearing at the heart of Hispanic families here and south of our border.
To address the problem, Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) successfully attached his family unification act onto the House appropriations bill which was approved Dec. 4.
But Senator Simpson (R-Wyo.), who’s so good at oozing brotherly love in public, stormed into the Senate-House conference committee Dec. 17 and pounded on the table until his colleagues agreed to dump the Roybal measure. _ Kay Bdfbam
WILLIAM BENNETT, U.S. Secretary of Education, responding to a teacher’s criticism of decreasing federal support for inner-city schools while he was visiting a classroom of high-achievers at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles last month:
“Ifs a shame. . . that someone has to put kitty litter in the punchbowl.”
Jan. 4,1988


COLLECTING
NEA HISPANIC PROJECTS: Individuals or organizations interested in learning more about the National Education Association’s projects which involve Hispanics may contact Mary Sosa, Human and Civil Rights Division, NEA, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7700.
ENGLISH PLUS INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE: This new project collects and provides information on language rights and public policy. Contact Mary Carol Combs, director, EPIC, 227 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 120, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0004.
ARIZONANS FOR OFFICIAL ENGLISH: For a copy of this groups initiative to make English the official language of Arizona, contact Robert Park, chairman, Arizonans for Official English, P.O. Box 25518, Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (602) 778-5811.
ARIZONA ENGLISH: This group has proposed an alternative constitutional amendment, supported by many Hispanic groups, which recognizes English as the state’s “dominant” language. Fora copy, contact Julianne Holroyd, Arizona English, P.O. Box 2989, Phoenix, AZ 85062 (602) 829-8062.
COLORADO UNITY: This group opposes the proposed constitutional amendment to make English the state’s official language. For more information, contact Ken Salazar, director, Colorado Unity, c/o Office of the Governor, 136 State Capitol, Denver, CO 80203 (303) 866-2471.
U.S. SALVADORAN IMMIGRANTS: To receive a copy of $egundo Montes’ 263-page Spanish-language study, “El Salvador 1987: Salvadoran Refugees in the United States” (See Weekly Report, Vol. 5, No. 50), send $8.00, plus $1.50 for postage and handling, to the Central American Refugee Center, 3112 Mt. Pleasant St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 328-9799.
HISPANIC MARKET ADVERTISING: Hispanic Business is a monthly publication. Its annual subscription rate is $18. To subscribe contact: Hispanic Business Inc.,360 S. Hope Ave., Suite300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843.
TEEN IMPROVEMENT MAGAZINE: To receive the Worldwide Church of God magazine Youth 87 free, request from: Youth 87,300 W. Green St., Pasadena, Calif. 91123.
CONNECTING
WOMEN’S GROUP FORMED
The Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas will meet Jan. 24 to plan greater participation for Latinas in the state’s economic, political and social spheres. The group was established in November at a meeting of more than 200 professional Hispanas in Dallas. Maria Luisa Mercado, an assistant state attorney general, was elected as its president.
The network will draft an agenda for the next year.
“This is a historic moment because within ourselves we realize that we have the power to effectuate change,” Antonia Hem&ndez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, told the group at its inaugural meeting.
NALEO ANNOUNCES POSTER CONTEST
In an effort to highlight citizenship, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials is offering more than $7,000 in a contest that will award scholarships to students who design posters encouraging immigrants to seek citizenship.
NALEO seeks high school and junior college students to design a poster that reflects an immigrant’s transition from permanent residency to citizenship.
The contest which is funded by a grant from the Kraft Corp., will provide two $2,500 scholarships for the best designs. One of the two first-place designs will be used in NALEO’s nationwide campaign. Second- and third-place winners will receive $1,500 and $500.
Deadline for entries is March 1. For further information and guidelines, call NALEO’s toll free information number, 1-800-44-NALEO. Selections will be made in April.
TRANSLATION SERVICE OPENS
New York City’s Queens College announced Dec. 15 the formation of its Translation Center, which will make its services available to Queens government and non-government agencies serving Spanish-, Korean^ and Chinese-speaking residents.
Partial funding was provided by a $30,000 start-up grant from the city of New York.
For further information or to request services, contact Louise Raymond at (718) 520-3343. - Julio Laboy
Calendar
As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published this month. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
THIS WEEK
DM DE LOS REYES Immaculata, Pa. Jan. 9
Immaculata College will sponsor this event celebrating the popular Latino holiday of the arrival of the Wise Men in Bethlehem. There will be traditional music and foods.
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
WASHINGTON’S HISPANAS Washington, D.C. Jan. 9
The National Museum of American History will show a documentary on working women in Latin America The film will be followed by a round-table discussion on the everyday concerns of Hispanas in Washington, 4
D.C., and the circumstances that drove them there. Maria Luz Prieto (202) 357-4185
COMING SOON
HIGHER EDUCATION PARTICIPATION American Council on Education Washington, D.C. Jan. 17-20 Shanda Ivory (202) 939-9365
TEACHING THE ETHNICALLY DIVERSE Cooperative Urban Teacher Education Miami Jan. 22-24 James Abbott (202) 232-8777
CHICAGO’S HISPANIC MEDIA The Media Institute Chicago Jan. 27 Cindy Bisset (202) 298-7512
MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY Third Coast Global Alliance San Antonio Jan. 27,28 Robert Gonz&lez 1-800-338-4074
HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS National Religious Broadcasters Washington, D.C. Jan. 30-Feb. 3 Bruce Bates (201) 428-5400
CUBAN AMERICANS
Cuban American National Council
Miami Jan. 31-Feb. 3
Jan. 4,1988
Alina Becker (305) 642-3484
ALASKA BILINGUAL CONFERENCE Alaska Department of Education Anchorage Feb. 3-5 Mike Travis (907) 465-2970
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES California Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Feb. 5,6 Lourdes C6rdova Martinez (213) 743-7158
BILINGUAL EDUCATION California Association for Bilingual Education San Francisco Feb. 10-13 Mary Jew (415) 239-0697
COMMUNICATIONS JOB FAIR
Howard University School of Communications
Washington, D.C. Feb. 18-20
Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC ENGINEERS: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold its 10th annual conference in Los Angeles Feb. 5-6. Some of the workshops to be included are: stress management career women and economic transition. There will also be a job expo at the conference. For further information contact Ana or Ratil Romero at (818) 338-8877.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


PROGRAM COORDINATOR
Program Coordinator for New England-wide Hispanic AIDS Prevention, Education and Outreach Project Bilingual/bicultural mandatory. Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Salary negotiable depending on experience. $20 - $23,000.
Send resume: AIDS Search Committee, Hispanic Health Council 98, Cedar Street Hartford, Conn. 06106.No phone inquiries please.
TENURE TRACK POSITION: ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN PUERTO RICAN HISTORY
*To teach undergraduate Pre-Colombian, Colonial and Contemporary Puerto Rican History.
* To develop courses in Puerto Rican History in relation to the rest of the Caribbean, United States, Central and South America, and the international community.
* To serve in committees within the department and intra-college.
. *To advise and guide students in pursuance of their career interests
QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. required Strong interest in research and scholarship and commitment to excellence in teaching.
SALARY: competitive.
Send detailed resume to: Professor Jos6 Manuel Torres-Santiago, Chairman, Department of Black & Puerto Rican Studies Hunter College, Box 372, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10021.
Deadline: January 31,1988.
ASSISTANT REGISTRAR
Responsible for supervision of Graduation Audit and Certification Unit, involvement in all areas of office. Bachelor's degree plus two years appropriate experience required Knowledge of computer applications essential; familiarity with SPSSX desirable. Salary $23,035- $30,224. Send resume with names of three references by January 18,1988 to: Mr. Steven Berenback Office of the Registrar Lehman College The City University of New York Bedford Park Blvd. West Bronx, New York 10468
NEW MEXICO DIRECTOR OF TOURISM
Exempt position in New Mexico Economic Development & Tourism Department. Five years progressive experience in tourism or tourism related field B.A. preferred in marketing, business administration, or tourism related field. Salary: $40* s.
Director Vacancy/HL Tourism and Travel Division NM Economic Development & Tourism Department 1100 St. Francis Drive Santa Fe, New Mexico 87503 An Equal Opportunity Employer
SITUATION WANTED
Professional writer (Spanish/English) seeks press/legislative position on Capitol Hill or public affairs/media relations management position for business, association or non-profit organization.
Robert J. Riccio, 1444 Rhode Island Ave. NW, #1011, Wash., D.C. 20005 (202) 387- 6853.
Â¥ W Wl IIT LEHMAN COLLEGE
Mmtwamm the c,ty un,vers,ty °f new y°rk
Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, N.Y. 10468-1589
Faculty positions anticipated for September 1,1988
Lehman College, a senior college of The City University of New York, is a liberal arts
college of approximately 10,000 students, located on a beautiful 37-acre campus in the
Northwest Bronx, a short distance from Westchester County.
Anthropology - one tenure-track position in urban anthropology/language culture.
Economics - Accounting - substitute positions in economics and accounting.
Health Services- one senior appointment in health policy and health administration for Director of the Health Professions Institute, and one tenure-track position in foods services management in the dietetics, foods, and nutrition program.
History- tenure-track position in one of the folowing fields: the Soviet Union, the Middle East, Africa, or Anglo-American constitutional history.
Mathematics and Computer Science-two tenure-track positions.
Nursing - substitute positions for clinical and classroom instruction in various speciality areas
Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance - one tenure-track position in recreation.
Physics and Astronomy - one tenure-track position, with preferred specialization in condensed matter theory and statistical mechanics
Puerto Rican Studies- one tenure-track position for a political scientist or sociologist with a specialization in Latin America and the Caribbean; substitute positions in ESL and in the bilingual program.
Romance Languages- one tenure-track position in Spanish and one substitute position in Spanish.
Speech and Theatre - one tenure-track position for Director of Theatre.
Candidates for faculty positions must have strong records of commitment to teaching and
research. Ph.D. required.
Applications should be submitted to the Chair of the Department by February 1,1988.
Late applications will be considered until positions are filled.
An Equal Opportunlty/Affirmatlve Action Employer
The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs University of Texas at Austin FACULTY POSITION
The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin, announces recruitment for an assistant professor. The LBJ School, consisting of 22 faculty and approximately 200 graduate students, offers a two-year, multi-disciplinary curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Public Affairs. The addition of a doctoral program in public affairs is currently under consideration.
Applicants must have earned a doctorate in an academic discipline or allied professional field, and show strong evidence of potential for carrying out significant research. Women and ethnic minority candidates- especially Hispanics- and those with work experience in the public or non-profit sector are especially encouraged to apply.
In keeping with its multi-disciplinary orientation, the School seeks applicants from fields including, but not limited to, anthropology, economics, history, political science, public management, psychology, and sociology. Ability to teach quantitative skills, such as statistics, econometrics, operations research, or other professional skills, also is highly desired.
Applicants should send a copy of their current curriculum vitae and names of three references to:
Chair, Faculty Recruitment Committee Office of the Dean, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs Drawer Y, University Station, Austin, Texas 78713-7450 An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
DEAR PERSONNEL.DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
1987 REVISITED: The Sallaberry and Melendez brothers, original members of Menudo, reunited last year to form the group XCHANGE.
“With the specter of manhood upon them,” a press release informed, “and no early retirement clause in this concept, (the group) combines the teen-age heart-melting charisma of Menudo and a show-biz savvy and musical maturity.”
Three other ex-members of Menudo - Xavier, Johnny and Ren6-toured Venezuela and Mexico as Proyecto M. Earlier in the year, Xavier had sued his ex-managers for $3.9 million in a dispute over earnings.
Menudo went on with business as usual. In May, 12-year-old Ru b6n G6mez took over a spot vacated by 17-year-old Charlie Masso and set out on a national tour which began in El Paso, Texas, July 4.
The nation’s favorite letter-turner ’fessed-up to the world that she is half Hispanic in the autobiography Vanna Speaks: “Momma... left her hometown and moved to Miami, where... she met my father,
Miguel Angel Rosich, or Mike, as he was called. Mike’s father was German and his mother was Spanish; he was born in Puerto Rico.”
Vanna White’s parents became estranged shortly after her birth, and her mother remarried.
The “hip-hop” craze went legit in 1987 when the Library of Congress published in its Folklife Annual 1986 the article Breakdancing: A Reporter’s Story, by Sally Banes.
“To study breakdancing,” Banes wrote, “is to study an entire energetic urban adolescent sub-culture called hip-hop, that has spread from New York City black and Latin ghettos across the United States and beyond the Americas to Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia”
REALLY? A federal judge ruled that Puerto Rico could not use a Commonwealth obscenity law to bar island cable franchises from airing the Playboy Channel... And Diamond Productions announced the Christmas release of Aerobics Latina, featuring “Gabriela, a beautiful Peruvian-born Flamenco dancer, Maria Elena, a sultry Latin beauty (and) Carmen, the Puerto Rican bombshell...”
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HISPANIC MEDIA SEMINAR: The Media Institute is sponsoring a one-day seminar in Chicago Jan. 27 to examine the impact of Hispanic print and broadcast outlets on that city s community, business and cultural affairs.
“Hispanic Media: Influence and Opportunity’ will feature panel discussions on Hispanic radio and television in Chicago, Hispanic print media and community relations.
Panelists include Jos& Lamas, general manager of WSNS-TV (Ch. 44); Gorki T6llez, publisher of ElMahana Daily News; and Eze-quiel Montes, president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications.
The registration fee is $90 and the deadline is Jan. 20. For further information contact the Media Institute at 3017 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 298-7512.
BROADCAST SCHOLARSHIP: The School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Minnesota is seeking His-
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Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrion, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
panic, black and other minority college students for its WCCOTV and Radio Minority Broadcast Scholarship Program.
The program offers up to $2,500 a year in financial aid for work toward a bachelor’s degree and up to $2,700 a year toward a graduate degree. Awards are contingent on admission to the university.
Application deadline is April 1. Contact Linda Wilson, WCCO program coordinator, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, 111 Murphy Hall, 206 Church St SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 55455.
EDUCATION WRITING CONTEST: The Education Writers Association is accepting entries for its 1987 National Awards for Education Reporting to honor the best education reporting in print and broadcast •
Awards will be offered in 15 categories. A prize of $250 will be given to each category winner. Grand prize is $1,000.
Fee for a single entry form is $30.
Deadline for entries is Jan. 11. For further information contact the Education Writers Association, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Wash-
ington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-9680.
IN AND AROUND THE MEDIA: Dallas area students will produce a convention newspaper for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ annual conference to be held in that city April 6-9. It will be distributed daily and will report on speakers panel sessions workshops and other events. Maggie Rivas, reporter with The Dallas Morning News, is coordinating the publication. She seeks media professionals to assist with the paper. She can be reached at The Dallas Morning News (214) 977-8222. . . John Silva has been appointed assistant managing editor for metro/ state news at The Arizona Daily Star in Tucson... Manuel Galvan, a reporter with the Chicrgo Tribune and president of NAHJ, moves to the paper’s editorial board... Joe Rodriguez, a reporter with The Hartford Courant, joins the paper’s editorial board... Joe Sosa, a regional sales coordinator for Smithkline Beckman Corp. of Philadelphia, has been appointed by New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean to the state’s Public Broadcasting Authority board. -Julio Laboy
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Making The News This Week Mayores-National Association for the Hispanic Elderly-to the Census Advisory Committee on the Hispanic i'llqiJiatiqf.l 1 990 Census. . . The Peace Corps Baldivia is the director for quality and productivity improvement for the organization worldwide . Martinez-Baldivia had been working on loan from the U.S . Equal Employment Opportunity Commission . . . Consumer advocate Ralph Nader joins Cesar Chavez, president of the United Farm Wo rkers, in UFWs boycott of table grapes ... Carlos Olvera, a crew supervisor at Industrial Polychemical Co. in Carson, Calif., wins the largest individual jackpot in the two-year history of the state' . s lottery-$25 million. A 40-year-old with a wife and three children, Olvera will receive $1,005,600 each year after taxes fort he next 20 years ... Senators Alfonse D'Amato of New York, William Armstrong of Colorado and Pete Domenici of New Mexico join the Senate Republican Conference's Task Force on Hispanic Affairs. The task force has eight members. . . American City and County Magazine honors San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros as its Local Government Leader of the Year . The award was bestowed in Las Vegas , Nev., at a National League of Cities gathering. . . Hialeah , Fla., Mayor Raul Martinez says he is considering running in 1988 fort he congressional seat being vacated by Florida Sen. Lawton Chiles ... William Verity, the secretary of the U .S. Department of Commerce, appoints Carmela Lacayo, executive director of the Asociaci6n Nacional Pro Personas voLsNo.11 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Jan. 4, 1988 '88 Language Battles Building in Three States 'OFFICIAL ENGLISH' State/Year Enacted 1987 1985 Arkansas Nevada Mississippi 1984 North Dakota North Carolina Indiana South Carolina Kentucky Tennessee 1986 1923 California Illinois Georgia 1920 Virginia Nebraska Petitioners Push Constitutional Amendments Florida, Arizona and Colorado will be the nation's bellwethers for initia tives this year. All bypass their legislatures, calling for popular referendums on amending their state constitutions. In Florida and Arizona , petition-gathering drives are under way to put proposed con stitutional amendments on their November ballots . The Colorado Official English Com mittee, headquartered in Denver , met that state's Nov. 1, 1987, deadline by turning in double the required 50,689 signatures. Florida English , with an August '88 deadline, has 110,000 of the needed 343,000 valid signatures, says Pat Felton, a spokeswoman for the Tampa-based U.S. English affiliate. Two groups in Arizona are gathering signa tures to have voters there decide the fate of distinct constitutional amendments they hope to place on the ballot. Arizonans for Official English, working out of Prescott, seeks an amendment similar to one Californians endorsed overwhelmingly in 1986. It would permit individuals to sue the gove rnment if it does not enforce the measure. The other organization, Arizona English , based in Phoenix, is pushing for an amendment recognizing English as the dominant language but rejecting the need for a statute to make it the "offi cial" language. Committee Kills Family Unification Deadline for turning in the mandated 130,048 signatures is July 7. So far, Arizonans for Official English has collected 55,000 signatures; Ar izo na English 5,000. A U.S . House proposal that would have prevented the deportation of undocumented persons whose immediate family members have been legalized under the immigration law was dropped from the Senate spending bill Dec. 17 . The Family Un i fication Act was sponsored by Rep . Edward Roybal (D-Calif.). It was attached to the $600 billion House appropria tions bill , which was passed Dec. 4. It was struck by a congressional joint conference committee at the last-minute urging of Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.). Simpson argued that Roybal's bill would be unfair to those seeking residency sta tus outMore Salvadorans Coming There will be " an astronomical increase" in U.S. visa applications for Salvadorans in the 1990s, filed by "hundreds of thousands" of close relatives of those gaining legal status now, a confident i al cable from the U.S. Embassy in San Salvador projects. The cable was quoted in The New York Times Dec. 21. The cable also said that the flow of refugees, which appeared to be falling off last spring, • has risen back to 1984-86 levels." Employer sanctions in the '86 immigration law are failing to slow the migration , it noted. side of the legalization law. The act would have prohibited the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service from utilizing funds to deport undocumented viduals whose family members have been granted legalization : Ariz. Voter Purge Nixed The U.S . Justice Department put off Dec. 21 making a determination on the legality of a proposed Arizona law that would change the way residents are stricken from voter regis tration roles. Th e law, argued the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education a l Fund in a letter it sent to the Justice Depart ment , would be unduly weighted against His panics. The Justice Department remanded the law to Arizona, saying the state did not include sufficient documentation to determine its impact. The Voting Rights Act requires that Arizona submit any proposed change in its voter laws for preclearance. The law was to take effect Jan. 1 . The law would have retroactively purged voters who did not vote in the 1986 general elections and have removed an exemption for voters with valid driver's licenses from the biannual purge. Concern that the language issue is being distorted for political and profit motives and is increasi ng nativist sentiment against U . S . immigrants led Hispanic, educational and civil rights organizations last fall to create the Engli sh Plus Information Clearinghouse in Was hington, D.C. Known as EPIC, it will co ordinate dissemination of information on the issue nationally this year, according to Mary Carol Combs, its director. In 1987, billsincluding 14 ca lling for constitutional amendments-were c ontinued on page 2 Santa Gives Green Cards Santa Claus visited the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service's legalization center in Harlingen, Texas, Christmas week, handing out temporary residence cards to qualified applicants and candy to a ll . He wore his own laminated employment authorization photo card , with his name, "Claus, Santa, " and countryoforigin, "North Pole." Legalization officer Charlie Perez said he wasn't sure if it helped business, "but it certainly helped the morale of the people who were waiting."

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N EA Campaign vs. Official English With little fanfare , the National Education Association, the nation's largest teachers' union with nearly 1.9 million members, is moving into the battle against the official English movement. It has instructed its affiliates nationwide to work with Hispanic, Asian and other zations in educating the general public and its own membership on the negative impact the movement can have on students and on the educational process itself. Additionally , it has encouraged field com ponents to tap into a $1.39 million fund to effect projects and strategies in opposition to the movement. The fund, requested by NEA President Mary Hatwood Futrell and approved by the body's board , was created last year to aid member-groups in implementing recom mendations by NEA's Hispanic, black, Asian and American Indian study groups to improve their educational opportunities. It alloted $499,000 for its present budget year, which runs until August; $602,000 for 1988-89, and $289,000 for 1989-90, accord ing to Mary Sosa, NEA human and civil rights division manager who is coordinating its . efforts to counter the official English move ment. The American Federation ofTeachers , the nation's second largest teachers union with 660,000 members, has not taken a position on official-English nor has it set aside any funds to address Hispanic issues, spokesman Scott Tribeitz told Weekly Report. Because many of its affiliates are in urban areas, AFT is believed to have a higher percentage (but smaller number) of Hispanic teachers and allied school personnel as members than does NEA An estimated 3% of the nation's teachers are Hispanic. NEA's interest in the language issue has been vigorously nurtured in recent years by its Chicano-Hispano caucus, says Sara Flores, a teacher from Killeen, Texas , and current caucus president. The association's Representative Assembly voted at its June '87 convention in Los Angeles to challenge the official-English movement. In September NEA's board of directors adopted a motion asking its human and civil rights division for strategies to combat it. The division's recommendations, which include formation of coalitions at state and local levels and working in targeted states such as Arizona , were adopted by the board Dec. 3 . At a Dec. 7 meeting in San Francisco involving NEA's Pacific and Western regions, leaders from 18 states were given an overview of the issue by Sosa and Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund attorney Francisco Garcia The group then worked on additional educational and legislative strategies. Next month the association plans to publish a . brochure describing the official-English movement and listing resources to oppose its efforts. Felix Perez Advertising in Latino Media Increases by 23o/o in '87 Hispanic-market advertising expenditures rose 23% last year, going to $490 million from $398 million in 1986, according to Hispanic Business magazine . A survey, released in its December issue, showed that the top three Latino-markel advertisers increased their expenditures $15. 6 million . Leading was a major tobacco interest. Numbers three and four were breweries. 1 none year , Philip Morris Cos . increased its Hispanic-market spending from $7.5 million to $13.3 million . Procter & Gamble followed, climbing from $8 million to $12 million . The Adolph Coors Co. was third, more than doubling from $4 million to $9.8 million. The leaders were (spending in millions): Company Philip Morris Procter & Gamble Adolph Coors Anheuser Busch McDonald's Johnson & Johnson Colgate Palmolive Spending $13.3 12.0 9.8 8.0 7 . 0 6.0 5.0 The magazine reported the next eight com panies each had expenditures of $3 million: Ford MotorCo, Goya Foods Inc., Sears Roebuck Latino Market Expenditures (In Millions) 2 Media Local TV Local Radio National TV National Radio Print Promotion Outdoors Transit Spending $118.5 114.0 104.0 48.0 47. 3 39.5 14.4 4.2 Top Hispanic-Marketing Cities (In Millions) Market Los Angeles Miami New York Chicago San Francisco/San Jose Television $58.0 38. 5 34.2 17.0 12. 2 Radio $31.5 28.0 20.0 10. 0 6 . 0 Print $13. 5 14.8 12. 5 1 . 0 0 . 7 Total $103.0 81 . 3 66.7 28.0 18. 9 Reprinted with permission of Santa Barbara. Calif. base d Hispanic Business. & Co., Nabisco Brands Inc., American Telephone & Telegraph Co., Dart & Kraft Inc., American Home Products Corp. and Lever Bros . Co. It has reported steady increases in the six years it has been collecting data . Los Angeles , Miami , New York, Chicago and San Francisco/San Jose, the top five Hispanic market areas, accounted for 57% of the total market spending. The U .S. Hispanic market comprises 18.8 million consumers with an aggregate annual income of $125. 6 b i llion, reported the Santa Barbara , Calif. -based magazine. -Julio Laboy Constitutional Amendments Pushed continued from page 1 considered in a total of 37 states. That was more than double the number introduced in 1986. In most instances, they died in committee. A few were voted down or withdrawn. In half a dozen states , including New York, Ohio, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, bills stalled in committee will carryover to this yea(s sessions. While none of the constitutional amendment proposals survived , legislatures in five states -Arkansas. Mississippi, North Dakota, North Carolina and South Carolina-passed simple statutes which are expected to have little if any effect on state services . Fourteen states now have official-English laws or constitutional language . Five years ago , only two did. In Texas. where legislation calling for a constitutional amendment died in the House last year , the Republican Party has placed on its March 8 primary ballot a non-binding re ferendum making English the state's official language . U.S. English, the four-year-old Washington, D.C.-based official-language advocacy or ganization headed by Linda Chavez, will con centrate its '88 efforts in Florida and Arizona , says field coordinator Julie Owen . Leading the drive for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution is English First, housed in Springfield, Va Currently, four bills are in the House of Representatives and one in the Senate awaiting action by the chambers' judiciary committees. Such bills have been introduced since 1981. None are expected to survive this year. -Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Marta " Salinas, guest columnist The Mexican Elixir T-shirts on barrel chests of barrio youth in the Southwest boast "Menudo -Breakfast of Champions." Latinos and Latinas on both sides of the U.S. -Mexico border regularly give testimony to its curative powersparticularly on such critical dates as Jan. 1, the morning after the night before. Menudd s roots reportedly reach back to the Aztecs. Mexicans and their cultural descendants are addicted to it. When I was growing up in Yancey, Texas, south of San Antonio, Mama prepared it on Saturday night for our version of Sunday brunch. When she first served it to me, I had no idea what it was made of-beef tripe simmered for long hours in the company of oregano, garlic, onions, red pepper and hominy. I didn't question it. I just liked it. My parents, both teetotalers, never informed us children that menudo had a reputation as a sure-possibly the onlycure for hangovers. I just thought that menudo on Sunday was a family tradition. I ate bowls of it. Sometimes I wondered , as I let my tongue slide over the man y grooves and ridges in the tender pieces of meat, what I was chewing on. I meant to ask my mother, but I always forgot. EAT FIRST, ASK LATER Even when I took courses in anatomy and physiology in my freshman year of nursing and had to handle the cold and slippery intestines of a cat, with their forma ldehyde odor, I didn't make the connection: Thankfully. I don't think my love for menudo could have survived the association. Sinc. e then, I have converted a few nonLatinos to menu do simply by saying, "Eat some first. Then I'll tell you whafs in it." After a bowl or two, they don't care. For centuries, I guess, after the fiesta on Saturday night , menudo has been administered to the revelers when they awaken on Sunday as a cure for Ia cruda, that peculia r state of existence that follows a bad drunk. I didn't experience menudo's magical powers until lief! my parents' pf0tective custody. It happened at a Mexican dance in Fresno , Calif., a few years ago . Much tequila and rum was consumed, a lot by me. I watched an entire club full of boisterous, swaying, dancing people mellow when large ceramic bowls of the steaming red stew were placed on their tables. The manic glow of hilarity left their faces in direct proportion to the amount of menudo they consumed. When the last p iece of corn tortilla was dunked and the last spoonful of menudowas ea ten , a look of contentment settled in their eyes. PIECE OF LATINO PUZZLE All ages and strata of the community were there. L oca l Latino dignitaries and reporters sat shoulder to shoulder with migrant workers and "homeboys and homegirls." Only menudo could. have united them . About 3 a.m., the mariachis shifted to soft, mournful love so ngs, El Reloj, Crei, and other requested favorites . I felt the change taking place in my own body. It was like finding myself unexpectedly in the middle of a family reunion at my Abuelita's with a bowl of fresh tamales on the table and the smell of anis or Sin pelos en Ia lengua SANTA EZELL: On Christmas Eve, The Los Angeles Times played the story generously on page 3, with a three-column photo of priests and Central American refugee children. "Christmas Gift From INS: Freedom," the Times told its million subscribers. The day before , at a Los Angeles press conference, Harold Ezell, the notorious Western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Service, freed 24 youngsters who had been picked up by INS and locked in federal jails-excuse me, dete ntion centers-for periods ranging from a few days to more than a year. It is INS policy to keep unaccompanied children it captures under lock and key unless their parents personally come and pick them up. In the past, Hispanic Link has run articles in which the agency stood accused of using the children as "baif' to capture their parents, too-a charge quickly denied. Usually , there are a hundred or more undocumented children being held apart from their families by INS in Southern California facilities alone. The two dozen who m Ezell freed(after lengthy negotiations with the Catholic Church) were turned over to friends and relatives. The normal $2,000 bail was waived. Ezell delivered a compassionate speech and his wife handed out Christmas presents to the cute little trespassers. I don't know how other Southern California media sucked up Harold's performance, but I presume the smiling faces of Mama and Papa Ezell made the 6 o'clock news on most channels. As a propaganda piece, it was a diabolical success. How did the church allow itself to become involved in such a cynic a l show? In her story, Times reporter Marlta Hernilndez suggested that the chi ldren might still be locked up if Harold wasn't given an ironclad guarantee of a good propaganda event. Wrote Hernandez: "The press conference . .. was a condition for the children's release, according to church sources who asked to remain anonymous. They said Ezell insisted that (Los Angeles Archbishop Roger Mahoney) and the children join him in making the announcement at the downtown Federal Building." If I may paraphrase Harold Ezell in his more natural moments, anyone who sti ll believes in Santa Claus should be cleaned and fried. GRINCH SIMPSON: Before Ha r old pulled his stunt, we were prepared to give the 1987 Sin Pelos hypocrisy award to Sen. Alan Simpson, father of the '86 immigration legislation. As we read daily, the bill's failure to address family unification is threatening to separate mother and child, husband and wife, keeping numerous eligible legalization applicants from applying, and genera lly tearing at the heart of Hispanic families here and south of our border. To address the problem , Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) suc cessfully attached his family unification act onto the House appropriations bi ll which was approved Dec. 4. But Senator Simpson (R-Wyo.), who's so good at oozing brotherly love in publ ic, stormed into the Senate-House conference committee Dec. 17 and pounded on the table until his colleagues agreed to dump the Roybal measure. Kay Barbaro cane/a coming from the stack of empanadas. It --------------------------...1 was pinatas and dulce de leche all at once. I shared a closeness and cultural pride with everyone there. Had my mother known all along of menudo's sedative and restorative powers? Is there a receptive gene in the blood of Latinos? No answers came t hat night , but I left the dance happy and thoughtful and surprisingly sober. Another piece fit snugly into the puzzle of my Latino heritage. lfs not Dunkin' Donuts; I have Menudo Sunday. (Marta Salinas works as a registered nurse at a migrant farm labor clinic in Woodburn, Ore. She is writing an autobiographical novel.) Quoting. • • WILLIAM BENNETT, U.S. Secretary of Education, responding to a teacher's criticism of decreasing federal support for inner-city schools while he wa s v isiting a classroom of high-achievers at Garfield High Schoo l in East Los Angeles last month: "It's a shame. that so meone has to put kitty litter in the punchbowl." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Jan. 4, 1988 3

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COLLECTING N EA HISPANIC PROJECTS: Individuals or organizations interested in learning more about the National Education Association's projects which involve Hispanics may contact Mary Sosa, Human and Civil RightsDivision, NEA , 1201 16th St. NW , Washington , D .C. 20036 (202) 822-7700. ENGLISH PLUS INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE: This new project collects and provides information on language rights and public p o licy. Contact Mary Carol Combs, director, EPIC , 227 Mas sachusetts Ave. NE , Suite 120, Washington , D.C. 20002 (202) 5440004. ARIZONANS FOR OFFICIAL ENGLISH: For a copy of this group ' s initiative to make English the official language of Arizona, contact Robert Park, chairman , Arizonans for Official English, P.O. Box 25518, Prescott Valley , AZ 86312 (602) 778-5811 . ARIZONA ENGLISH: This group has proposed an alternative constitutional amendment, supported by many Hispanic groups , which recognizes English as the state's "dominant" language. For a copy, contact Julianne Holroyd , Arizona English , P . O . Bo x 2989, Phoenix, AZ 85062 (602) 829-8062. COLORADO UNITY: This group opposes the proposed constitutional amendment to make English the state ' s official language . For more information, contact Ken Salazar , director, Colorado Unity , c/ o Office of the Governor, 136 State Capitol , Denver , CO 80203 (303) 8662471 . U.S . SALVADORAN IMMIGRANTS: Toreceiveacopyof$egundo Montes' 263-page Spanish-language study, "EI Salvador 1987: vado r an Refugees in the United States" (See Weekly Report , Vol. 5 , No. 50) , send $ 8 .00, plus $1.50 for postage and handling . to the Central American Refugee Center, 3112 MI. Pleasant St. NW , Wash ington , D.C. 20010 (202) 328-9799. HISPANI C M AR KET ADVERTISING: Hispanic Business is a monthly publication . Its annual subscription rate is $18 . To subscribe contact: Hispanic Business lnc. ,360 S. Hope Ave., Suite300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 931 05 (805) 682-5843. TEEN IMPROVEMENT MAGAZINE: To receive the Worldwide Church of God magazine Youth 87 free , request from : Youth 87,300 W. Green St., Pasadena , Calif. 91123. CONNECTING WOMEN'S GROUP FORMED The Hispanic Women's Network of Texas will meet Jan . 24 to plan greater participation for Latin as in the state's economic, political and social spheres. The group was established in November at a meeting of more than 200 professional Hispanas in Dallas. Maria Luisa Mercado , an assistant state attorney general, was elected as its president. The network will draft an agenda for the next year. " This is a historic moment because within ourselves we realize that we have the power to effectuate change," Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educat i onal Fund, told the group at its inaugural meeting . NALEO ANNOUNCES POSTER CONTEST In an effort to highlight citizenship, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials is offering more than $7,000 in a contest that will award scholarships to students who design posters encouraging immigrants to seek citizenship . NALEO seeks high school and junior college students to des ign a poster that reflects an immigranfs transition from permanent residency to citizenship. The contest, which is funded by a grant from the Kraft Corp . , w ill provide two $2 ,500 scholarships for the best designs . One of the two first-place designs will be used in NALEO's nationwide campaign . Secondand third-place winners will receive $1 ,500 and $500. Deadline for entries is March 1 . For further information and guide lines , call NALEO's toll free information number, 1-800-44-NALEO . Selections will be made in April. TRANSLATION SERVICE OPENS New York City's Queens College announced Dec . 15 the formation of its Translation Center , which will make its services availabl e t o Queens government and non-government agencies serving Spanish-, Koreanand Chinese-speaking residents . Partial funding was provid ed by a $30,000 start up grant from the city of New York. For further information or to request services , contact Louise Raymond at (718) 5 2 0 3343. -Julio Laboy Calendar D.C., and the circumstances that drov e them there. Maria Lu z Prieto (202) 357 Alina Be c ker (305) 642 ALASKA BILINGUAL CONFERENCE Alask a Department of Education Ancho rage Feb. 3 As it has in the past, Weekl y Report will compile a lis t of ma jo r 1988 co nferences. se minars and banquets sc hedul e d b y Hispani c organizations . The list will be published this month . Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or send t he f ollo wing information : date, place , brief description o f e v ent a nd nam e and telephon e number of contact p e rson . Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 ( 2 02) 2 34-0280. THIS WEEK DIA DE LOS REYES Imm acu l a ta, Pa. Jan . 9 Imm acu l ata C ollege will s ponsor this event celebrating t h e p o pul ar Latino holida y of the arrival o f the Wis e M e n i n B ethlehe m . There w ill b e tradition a l musi c a nd foo ds. Sister Ma ry Con s u e l a (215 ) 647-4400 WASHINGTON' S HISPANAS Was hingt o n , D . C . Jan. 9 The Na ti o n a l M u seu m o f A m erica n H i story wi ll show a documentary on wo r k ing wo m e n in Latin Amer i ca . The f ilm w ill b e foll owed by a round-table discussion on t h e everyday co n cerns of His panas in Washington , 4 COMING SOON HIGHER EDUCATION PARTICIPATION American Council on Education Washington , D . C . J a n . 17-20 Shanda Ivory (202) 939-9365 TEACHING THE ETHNICALLY DIVERSE Cooperative Urban Teacher Educat i on Miami Jan. 22 James Abbott (202) 232-8777 CHICAGO'S H ISPANIC MEDIA The Medi a Institute Chica g o Jan . 27 Cindy Bisset (202) 298-7512 MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY Third Coast Global Alliance San Antonio Jan . 27 , 28 Robert Gonzalez 1-800-338-407 4 HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Nat ional Religious Broadcasters Washington, D.C. Jan. 30-Feb. 3 Bruce Bat e s (201) 428-5400 CUBAN AMERICANS Cuban American National Coun ci l Miami Jan . 31-Feb. 3 Jan . 4, 1988 Mike Travis (907) 465-2970 JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES Californ i a Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Feb . 5 , 6 Lourdes C6rdova Martinez (213) 743 BILINGUAL EDUCATION California Association for Bilingual Education San Francisco Feb .10 Mary Jew (415) 239-0697 COMMUNICATIONS JOB FAIR Howard University School of Communications Washington, D.C. Feb. 18 Mary CarterWilliams (202) 636 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC ENGINEERS: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold its 1Oth annual conference in Los Angeles Feb. 5. Some of the workshops to be included are : stress management c aree r women and economic transition. There will also be a job expo at the conference. For further i nformation contact Ana or Raul Romero at (818) 338-8877. H i spanic Link Weekly Report

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: 0 "' ol ni .n PROGRAM COORDINATOR Program Coordinator for New England-wide Hispanic AIDS Prevention , Education and Out reach Project BilinguaVbicultural mandatory . Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Salary negotiable depending on experience. $20$23,000. Send resume: AIDS Search Committee, Hi& panic Health Council98, Cedar Street Hartford , Conn . 061 06.No phone inquiries please . TENURE TRACK POSITION: ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN PUERTO RICAN HISTORY • To teach undergraduate Colonial and Contemporary Puerto Rican History. • To develop courses in Puerto Rican History i n relation to the rest of the Caribbean , United States, Central and South America , and the international community. • To serve in committees within the department and intra-college. _ •.Io advise and guide. students in pursuance of their career interests. QUALIFICATIONS : Ph.D. required Strong interest in research and scholarship and commitment to excellence in teaching. SALARY: competitive. Send detailed resume to: Professor Jose Manuel Torres--Santiago, Chairman , Department of Black& Puerto Rican Studies. Hunter College, Box 372, 695 Park Avenue , New York, New York 10021. Deadline: January 31, 1988 . ASSISTANT REGISTRAR Responsible for supervision of Graduation Audit and Certification Unit ; involvement in all areas of office. degree plus two years appropriate experience required. Knowledge of computer applications essent iat familiarity with SPSSX desirable . Salary $23 ,035-$30, 224 . Send resume with names of three references by January 18, 1988 to: Mr. Steven Berenback Office of the Registrar Lehman College The City University of New York Bedford Park Blvd . West Bronx, New York 10468 NEW MEXICO DIRECTOR OF TOURISM Exempt position in New Mexico Economic Development & Tourism Department. Five years progressive experience in tourism or tourism related field . B.A preferred in market ing. business administration, or tourism related field . Salary: $40's. Director Vacancy/HL Tourism and Travel Div is ion NM Economic Development & Tourism Department 11 00 St. Francis Drive Santa Fe, New Mexico 87503 An Equal Opportunity Employer SITUATION WANTED q Professional writer (Spanish/English) seeks e1 presS/legislative position on Capitol Hill or !u public affairS/media relations management position for business, association or non-profit Rt r organization. '! Robert J. Riccio , 1444 Rhode Island Ave. NW , 1t j;1011, Wash., D . C . 20005 (202) 387 6853. Hlepanlc Link Weekly Report LEHMAN COLLEGE LEIBIAN THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, N.Y . 10468-1589 Faculty positions anticipated for Septell)ber 1, 1988 Lehman College, a senior college of The City University of New York. is a liberal arts college of approximately 10,000 students, located on a beautiful37acre campus in the Northwest Bronx. a short distance from Westchester County. Anthropology -one tenure-track position in urban anthropology/language culture . Economics-Accounting-substitute positions in economics and accounting. Health Servicesone senior appointment in health policy and health administration for Director of the Health Professions Institute, and one tenure-track position in foods services management in the dietetics, foods, and nutrition program. History-tenure-track position in one of the folowing fields: the Soviet Union , the Middle East, Africa, or Anglo-American constitutional history. Mathematics and Computer Science -two tenure-track positions . Nursing-substitute positions for clinical and classroom instructi on in various speciality areas. Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance-one tenure-track position in recreation. Physics and Astronomy -one tenure-track position, with preferred specialization in condensed matter theory and statisti c al mechanics. Puerto Rican Studiesone tenure-track position for a political scientist or sociologist with a specialization in Latin America and th e Caribbean; substitute positions in ESL and in the bilingual program. Romance Languages-one tenure-track position in Spanish and one substitute position in Spanish . Speech and Theatre-one tenure-tra c k position for Director of Theatre . Candidates forfaculty positions must have strong records of commitment to teaching and research . Ph.D. required . Applications should be submitted to the Chair of the Department by February 1, 1988. Late applications will be considered until positions are filled. An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs University of Texas at Austin FACUL TV POSITION The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. University ofTexasatAustin, announces recruitm e nt for an assistant profes so r . The LBJ School , consisting of 22 faculty and approximately 200 graduate students, off e rs a two-year, multi-disciplinary curriculum leading to the degree o f Master of Publi c Affairs . The addition of a doctoral program in public a ffairs is currently under consideration. Appli ca nt s must have earned a doctorate in an academic discipline or allied professional field , and show strong evidence of potential for carrying out significant research. Women and ethni c minority candidatesespecially Hispanics-and those with work experience in the public or non-profit sector are especially encouraged to apply. In keeping with it s multi-disciplinary orientation, the S c hool seeks applicants from fields including, but not limited to, anthropology, economics, history, political science, public management , psychology , and sociology . Abilfty to t e ach quantitative skills, such as statistics, econometrics, operations research , or other professional skills, also is highly desired . Applicants should send a copy of their current curriculum vitae and names of three references to: Chair , Facult y Recruitment Committee Off ice of th e Dean , Lyndon B . Johnson School of Public Affairs Draw e r Y, Uni vers i ty Sta ti o n . Austin , Texa s 78713-7450 An Affirmative Acti o n/Equal Opportunity Employer DEAR PERSONNEL.DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link. 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234. Ad copy r eceived (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number , 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Ordered by Organization Street-------------City, State & Zip----------$45 per column inch . Area Code & Phone ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment Miguel Angel Rosich, or Mike, as he was called. Mike's father was German and his mother was Spanish; he was born in Puerto Rico." 1987 REVISITED: The Sallaberry and Melendez brothers, original members of Menudo, reunited last year to form the group XCHANGE. Vanna White's parents became estranged shortly after her birth, and her mother remarried. " With the specter of manhood upon them," a press release informed, "and no early retirement clause in this concept, (the group) combines the teen-age heart-melting charisma of Menudo and a show-biz savvy and musical maturity. " The "hip-hop" craze went legit in 1987 when the Library of Congress published in its Folk life Annual1986 the article Breakdancing : A Reporter's Story, by Sally Banes. Three other ex-members of Menudo-Xavier, Johnny and Rene toured Venezuela and Mexico as Proyecto M. Earlier in the year, Xavier had sued his ex-managers for $3.9 million in a dispute over earnings. "To study breakdancing, " Banes wrote, "is to study an entire energetic urban adolescent sub-culture called hip-hop, that has spread from New York City black and Latin ghettos across the United States and beyond the Americas to Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia" REALLY? A federal judge ruled that Puerto Rico could not use a Commonwealth obscenity law to bar island cable franchises from airing the Playboy Channel ... And Diamond Productions announced the Christmas release of Aerobics Latina, featuring "Gabriela, a beautiful Peruvian-born Flamenco dancer, Maria Elena, a sultry Latin beauty (and) Carmen, the Puerto Rican bombshell ... " Menudo went on with business as usual. In May, 12-year-old Ruben Gomez took over a spot vacated by17-year-old Charlie Masso and set out on a national tour which began in El Paso, Texas, July4. The nation's favorite letter-turner 'fessed-up to the world that she is half Hispanic in the autobiography Vanna Speaks: "Momma ... left her hometown and moved to Miami , where ... she met my father , Media Report HISPANIC MEDIA SEMINAR: The Media Institute is sponsoring a one-day seminar in Chicago Jan. 27 to examine the impact of Hispanic print and broadcast outlets on that citys community, business and cultural affairs. "Hispanic Media: Influence and Oppor tunity" will feature panel discussions on His panic radio and television in Chicago, Hispanic print media and community relations . Panelists include Jose Lamas , general manager of WSNSTV (Ch . 44); Gorki Tellez, publisher of E/Mailana Dally News; and Ezequiel Montes, president of the National As sociation of Hispanic Publications . The registration fee is $90 and the deadline is Jan. 20. For further information contact the Media Institute at 3017 M St. NW, Wash ington, D.C. 20007 (202) 298-7512. BROADCAST SCHOLARSHIP: The School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Minnesota is seeking His-6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publisher. Hector E ricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Melinda Mac hado, Juli o L a boy. Graphics/Prod u c tion: Carlo s Arri a n , Zoila Elia s No portion of Hispanic Lin k Weekl y Report may be reproduced o r broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $ 30 CORPO R ATE C LA SS IFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. D i sp l ay ad s are $45 per colum n inch . Ads placed by Tuesday wilt run in Weekly R eports m ailed Frid ay of same week. Multiple use rates on reQue st. panic, black and other minority college students for its WCCQTV and Radio Minority Broad cast Scholarship Program . The program offers up to $2 ,500 a year in financial aid for work toward a degree and up to $2,700 a year toward a graduate degree . Awards are contingent on admission to the university . Application deadline is April1. Contact Linda Wilson , WCCO program coordinator, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, 111 Murphy Hall, 206 Church St. SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis , Minn . 55455. EDUCATION WRITING CONTEST: The Education Writers Association is accepting entries for its 1 987 National Awards for Education Reporting to honor the best edu cation reporting in print and broadcast . Awards will be offered in 15 categories . A prize of $250 will be given to each category winner. Grand prize is $1,000 . Fee for a single entry form is $30. Deadline for entries is Jan . 11. For further information contact the Education Writers Association, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Wash--Antonio Mejias-Rentas ington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-9680. IN AND AROUND THE MEDIA: Dallas area students will produce a convention news paper for the National Association of His panic Journalists' annual conference to be held in that city April6-9 . It will be distributed daily and will report on speakers, panel sessions, workshops and other events. Maggie Rivas, reporter with The Dallas Morning News, is coordinating the publication. She seeks media professionals to assist with the paper . She can be reached at The Dallas Morning News (214) 977-8222. . . John Silva has been appointed assistant managing editor for metro/ state news at The Arizona Dally Star in Tucson ... Manuel Galvan, a reporter with the ChicPgo Tribune and president of NAHJ, movo, to the editorial board ... Joe Rodriguez, a reporter with The Hartford Courant, joins the editorial board ... Joe Sosa, a regional sales coordinator for Smithkline Beckman Corp. of Philadelphia, has been appointed by New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean to the state's Public Broad casting Authority board. _Julio Laboy Hispanic Link Weekly Report