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Hispanic link weekly report, January 25, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 25, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
President Reagan names Florida Gov. Bob Martinez to the White House Conference for a Drug Free America . . Edward Lu|An resigns from his position as chairman of the New Mexico Republican Party to run for the congressional seat being vacated by his brother, Manuel. Rep. Lujdn decided to step down after 10 terms in office... New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean signs into law a bill that will create the nation’s first state-level training and development centers catering specifically to Latinas... The Brighton, Colo., City Council elects Councilor Samuel G6mez to a two-year term as mayor. Gom6z,41, is the first Hispanic mayor in the city’s 101 -year history... Dade County,
Fla., Public Schools Superintendent JosepnTernftndez will receive the Cuban American National Council's Leadership Award in education at the group’s national conference. The Dade school district is the nation’s fourth largest... The members of the Washington, D.C., Commission on Latino Development elect Pedro Aviles, a native of El Salvador, as its chairman... The head of the Immigration and Naturalization Service’s Baltimore office will reconsider the request of Dr. Hacib Aoun, a Venezuela-born cardiologist, to be given permanent residency so that he may continue treatment for AIDS. Aoun contracted AIDS while working as a medical resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, piercing his finger with a tube of tainted blood...

Daily Press Losing Ground in Hispanic Hiring
The percentage of Hispanics employed in newsrooms of the nation’? daily newspapers has nqt even kept pace with the increasing percentage of Latinos in the overall population, despite a 1978 American Society of Newspaper Editors goal that set parity for minorities in the newsroom by the year 2000 as its major objective.
Between 1982 and 1987, the Latino population increased 1.7%, Hispanics in the news room increased just 0.4%.
In1982, Hispanics were 6.2% of the population and 1.3% of those working in the news room. They were 7.9% of the population in 1987 and comprised 1.7% of the newsroom.
Overall, minorities comprise 6.6% of news room staff, compared with 6.5% in 1982. They I are about 21% of the population.
Francisco Newton, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, underlined the importance of Hispanics in the media by saying, “The press has limited perception as to what’s going on. With more Hispanics in the media, there will be a broader, better journalism - Increased sensitivity." ' .Denise Johnson, ASNE minority affairs director, said that ASNE has been documenting the number of minorities in the newsroom ( through annual employment surveys since 1978. She said ASHE'S continuing education program for minority faculty, internships and
scholarships for minority youth and its professional residence program, which enables minority professionals to serve as mentors for college students, are ways ASNE is working to increase the pool of minority journalists. But she acknowledged that at the present rate parity will not be achieved in this century.
ASNE has approximately 1,000 members representing 400 of the country’s 1,650 daily newspapers , according to Johnson. “We cannot make them do anything... we can
HISPANIC REPRESENTATION
Newsroom Population
1987 1.7% 7.9%
1982 1.3% 6.2%
40.4% 41.7%
recommend ideas. . .we can do things to encourage them to hire, like make it easier for them through job fairs,” said Johnson. She said ASNE spent roughly $300,000 last year for minority affairs projects.
I n 1985, the American Newspaper Publishers Association, working closely with ASNE, established the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business, a coalition of 37 national newspaper associations seeking to increase newspaper opportunities for minorities.
Hispanic media activists have been critical of both groups for their failure until this month
Ex-Census Official Berates Agency
A former high-ranking U.S. Census Bureau official announced Jan. 14 she stepped down from her post last month because she felt U.S. Commerce Department officials had political motives for rejecting a plan to adjust an expected undercount of Hispanics and blacks in the 1990 census.
Barbara Bailar, now president of the American Statistical Association, charged Republicans in the Commerce Department struck the plan because they felt it would benefit Democrats in redistricting of congressional and state legislative districts. Hispanics and blacks usually vote Democratic.
Redistricting and the allocation of billions of dollars in federal funds are based on census figures.
Bailar, who was associate director of the Census Bureau, said Undersecretary of Commerce Robert Ortner’s Oct. 30 announcement against the adjustment “was dressed up like a technical decision, when everyone knew it was a political decision.”
Ortner said the charge was “nonsense.” “I felt her rather sudden resignation further indicates that the announcement against undercount corrections was politically motivated,” Terri Anne Lowenthal, staff director of the U.S. House Subcommittee on the Census and Population, told Weekly Report.
In 1980, according to Census studies, there was a 1-2% undercount for the U.S. population. The undercount for Hispanics and blacks was estimated at 5-6%.
to hire a Hispanic on their staffs or give any financial support to Hispanic media organizations.
NAHJ’s Newton stated that Latino media organizations play a vital role, along with ASNE, ANPA and national job fairs, to sensitize media employers.
Newton singled out two newspaperchains, Hearst and Harte-Hanks, for lack of support “To the best of my knowledge, they have never given any support at all” to Hispanic media groups, despite their having newspapers in major Hispanic population areas.
Newton cited the Gannett Foundation and the Times-Mirror newspaper chain as frequent supporters of Latino media organizations.
Among other national Latino media groups, two, the National Association of Hispanic Publishers, based in Chicago, and the Hispanic Public Relations Association, headquartered in Los Angeles, have no resources, other than from membership, and no staff. The recently formed, Los-Angeles based Hispanic Media Coalition, a grouping of more than 40 primarily community-based organizations, receives less than $75,000 in funding and has one full-time worker.
“I think ASNE realizes that there is no way parity is going to be reached by 2000,” Lourdes C6rdova Martinez, the executive director of the California Chicano News Media Association, told Weekly Report
She said editors in California are now bringing more Latinos into the newsrooms, but added, “ It may have to do with selfish reasons. If you have to cover a community as large as the
continued on page 2
Vets’ Memorial Dedicated
U.S. Latino Vietnam War veterans were honored Jan. 13 in the Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights when residents dedicated what is reported to be the nation’s first memorial in their honor.
More than 300 people, including several Latino veterans, participated in the unveiling of a bronze plaque and the dedication of a new pedestrian mall.
Paseo de las Flores Pedestrian Promenade was funded with $450,000 in public and private money.


30% of Latino Children Live With One Parent Only
Compared to blacks and whites, Hispanics experienced the steepest decline from 1980 to 1986 in the number of children under 18 years of age who lived with both parents, according to a report by the U.S. Census Bureau released Jan. 21.
Of the nation’s6.4 million Hispanic children under 18 in 1986, excluding those in Puerto Rico,67% livedwith both parents. Thiscom-pares with 75% in 1980.
Nearly 15 million children across the United States lived with only one parent in 1986, The percentages of children 17 years old
or less and living with both parents were:
1980 1986
HISPANICS 75.4% 66.5%
BLACKS 42.2 40.6
WHITES 82.7 79.9
The number of Hispanic children living with one parent grew by800,000 from 1980 to 1986, going to 1.9 million. Overall, 30% of Hispanic children lived with one parent.
Unlike blacks and whites, the largest portion of Hispanic children who lived with one parent came from homes where the spouse was absent (37%). The largest number of
black children lived with a parent who never martied (49%). Being divorced was the most common marital status in white households where there was one parent (53%).
Other report findings:
• Sixty-three percent of the Hispanic parents raising children on their own did not have a high school education, compared with 35% for blacks and 30% for whites; and
• Only 21 % of the Hispanic children raised
by one parent lived in a house owned by that parent. The figure for blacks was 26%, for whites, 44%. - Felix Pirez
Poor Latinos Found Largely Illiterate
Press Falters in Year 2000 Goal
continued from page 1
of school and they exhibited a stronger sense of responsibility toward theirfamily, especially children. Thirty-two percent had four or more children.
Undocumented immigrants were excluded because they are not eligible for most state and federal assistance programs considered in the study.
Of the four sites, San Antonio was the poorest. Forty percent of the people had incomes equal to or less than 50% of the poverty level. Roughly 14% were that poor at the other sites.
In San Antonio, people were critical of policies which allowed employers to hire undocumented workers at below miniinum wage. Said one respondent:
“I’m not prejudiced. My grandfather came from Mexico in 1891, but I just can’t see why we let a!) those Mexicans come out here. There are so many and not enough jobs.”
- Felix P6rez
staff of 280. None of its reporters are Hispanic. The newsroom has one Latino supervisor and four Latinos in its photo and art departments.
- Julio Laboy
Latinos Earn 34 Grammy Nominations
The inability to read, write, compute and communicate orally in English was the most common indicator among impoverished Hispanics in San Antonio, found a study released Jan. 13.
The study, conducted by the Washington, D.C.-based Coalition on Human Needs, used the responses of poor people in Aliquippa, Pa, northeastern North Carolina Washington, D.C, as well as San Antonio, to record what the respondents felt had tp be done to remedy poverty. San Antonio was chosen because Hispanics account for 54% of its 850,000 inhabitants. Of the 202 people interviewed at the four sites, 50 were in San Antonio, and 41 of these were Hispanic.
Overall, the people interviewed considered providing decent paying jobs and ensuring effective training and education the keys to remedying poverty.
Two factors separated the San Antonians from the other sites: more had dropped out
Latino community in California and acquire theiradvertisement dollars, sure you’re going to be dedicated,” she said.
Eugene Patterson, publisher of the St Petersburg Times in Florida, was president of ASNE when it adopted parity as its goal. Contacted by Weekly Report, he said, “We’re going to have to pull up our socks."
He acknowledged that direct financial support to Hispanic media organizations from groups such as ASNE could prove worthwhile.
The St. Petersburg Times has a newsroom
Martinez Race Shelved
Hialeah, Fla, Mayor Raul Martinez announced Jan. 14 he had decided not to seek the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by fellow Democrat Lawton Chiles.
Martinez, mayor since November 1981, had thrown his name out as a possible candidate last month when Chiles announced he was stepping down. The first Cuba-born mayor of Hialeah, Martinez, 38, said he decided not to run because of the lack of support from the Democratic Party.
Latino recording artists garnered a record 34 nominations in 14 categories for this year's Grammy Awards, including nods in the top three categories.
Nominated for “record of the year" - top among the yearly awards given by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences- is the single La Bamba by Los Lobos The song, recorded forthe Luis Valdez film, won the late Ritchie Valens his first-ever Grammy nomination -“song of the year.” Valens, on whose life the film is based, is nominated as the song’s adapter.
Nominated for “album of the year" is Trio, recorded by Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris. % {
Suzanne Vega - stepdaughter of a Puerto Rican novelist- is nominated in the" record of the year" and “song of the year" categories for her Luka. She is also nominated in the
Head of INS Says No to Deadline Extension
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Alan Nelson said Jan. 13 he sees no need to extend the legalization period under the immigration law. He characterized recently introduced legislation that would do so “ill-advised and shortsighted.”
Nelson said the legislation, introduced by Rep. Charles Schumer(D-N.Y.) and 23 other congressmen, and the talk of an extension beyond the May 4 deadline could mislead potential legalization applicants-
“They will either think an extension has been granted or will be granted. . said Nelson at INS’ national headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Schumer's bill would move the application deadline to May 1989.
Charles Kamasaki, policy analyst for the National Council of La Raza, said Nelson’s characterization of the bill was “defensive and a knee-jerk reaction.” He added, “Even people who believe the law has worked support an extension."
Approximately 1.17 million people have applied for legalization. Thirty-three percent of the applications have been approved so far. Nelson said INS continued to stick with its low estimate of 2 million applicants.
“ best pop vocal performance, female” category.
Los Lobos and Linda Ronstadt are nominated this year in three categories each, including “best pop vocal performance by a duo or group with vocal.” The band is nominated for La Bamba; Rondstadt, along with James Ingram, for the single Somewhere Out There
Los Lobos are nominated for “best rock performance by a duo or group with vocal” for their album By The Light of the Moon, while Ronstadt got her third nomination in the “ best country performance by a duo or group with vocaf category for Trio. (See Arts and Entertainment.)
Twenty-eight Latino artists and/or musical acts share the 34 nominations. Since the three “Latin” categories were established in 1984, the highest number of Latino nominations was 25 in 1986.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


COLLECTING
REMEDYING POVERTY: Through interviews with poor people in four cities, including San Antonio, “How the Poor Would Remedy Poverty’ offers a snapshot of poverty. Effective training and education are recommendations made by the respondents. For a copy of the 111 -page book, send $11.95 to: Coalition on Human Needs, 1000 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 342-0726.
CENSUS REPORT: Copies of the U.S. Census Bureau’s report “Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1896,” which includes the percentages of Hispanic, black and white children living with both parents and divorce ratios, are available from the Superintendent of Documents (specify Series P-20, No. 418), U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (The price was not available by press time).
JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION CALENDAR: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has made available its 1988 photo calendar, with pictures by Hispanic photojoumalistsfrom around the country and the dates and contacts of events held by Hispanic organizations. To receive a copy, send $10 to: NAH J, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
IMMIGRATION REFORM ACT: The American Civil Liberties Union has published a 24-page pamphlet examining, in a question-and-answer format, the employer sanctions and anti-discrimination provisions of the immigration reform law. To obtain a free English- or Spanish-language copy, send a self-addressed envelope with 390 postage to: ACLU, Immigration and Aliens’ RightsTask Force, 132 W. 43 rd St, New York, N.Y. 10036 (212) 944-9800.
NEBRASKA HISPANICS: The Mexican American Commission of Nebraska puts out a free quarterly newsletter on that state’s Hispanic population. To be put on the commission’s mailing list write: Newsletter, Mexican American Commission, P.O. Box 94965, Lincoln, Neb. 68509-4965.
CONNECTING
LATINA LEADERS MOLDED
The Adolph Coors Company will launch Jan. 26 a nine-month program designed for Latina leaders in business, government education and a variety of other fields.
The National Hispana Leadership Program is bringing together 21 Latinas who have made significant contributions to their local communities. The project’s goal, according to its coordinator, Juana Bordas, is to develop women who have the potential to make a national impact for the Hispanic community.
The program includes courses at Harvard and Rutgers University. The women will also serve as mentors to at least two other Latinas.
The training phase is funded by Coors at more than $100,000.
Among the women selected for this year’s program: Audrey Alvarado, from Denver, Colo., the executive director of La Rasa; Alda Marla Galarza, director of the National Puerto Rican Forum in Chicago; and Gloria Bonilla-Santiago, chair of the Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey.
CALIF. MEDICAL STUDENTS AIDED
A newly formed 11-member foundation appointed by Calif. Gov. George Deukmejian and the state Legislature is soliciting private-sector funds to provide financial assistance to underrepresented Hispanic, black and other minority students who are accepted into schools of medicine, dentistry and nursing.
The Minority Health Professions Foundation was established by state statute Jan. 1. It will make recommendations to the state for scholarships and loans to minority students who, in return for the support, would agree to practice in medically underserved areas of
Cali,ornia - Julio Laboy
■ ■— '■ —-
Calendar
Following are major state and regional conferences, conventions, seminars and events of interest to Hispanics for 1988.
1988 EVENTS
MEXICAN AMERICAN LEGAL DEFENSE AND EDUCATIONAL FUND j Immigration Law Seminars | Los Angeles Feb. 2 Chicago Feb. 9 j Washington, D.C. Feb. 11 San Antonio Feb. 18 J. Dean Licitra (213) 385-7730
LATIN BUSINESS ASSOCIATION \ Awards Banquet [ Los Angeles Feb. 5
Candy Alderete (213) 721-4000
CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION
Journalism Opportunities Conference Los Angeles Feb. 5, 6
Lourdes Cdrdova Martinez (213) 743-7158
CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL
EDUCATION
Conference
San Francisco Feb. 10-13 Janet Lou (415) 834-9455
S NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LATINO ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS Citizenship Workshop Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Miami Feb. 18,19 Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536
UNITEDTEACHERSOFLOSANGELESCHICANO/ LATINO EDUCATION COMMITTEE Conference
Los Angeles March 11,12
Mark Meza Overstreet (213) 560-1323
NEW YORK STATE ASSEMBLY PUERTO RICAN/
HISPANIC TASK FORCE
Legislative Conference
Albany, N.Y. March 13-15
Roberto Calderin (518) 455-5253
NATIONAL SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIATION
HISPANIC CAUCUS
Annual Luncheon
New Orleans March 27
Philip Smith (703) 838-NSBA
DIRECTORY495-THE HISPANIC YELLOW PAGES
Annual Luncheon
Falls Church, Va. June 24
Francisco Vega (703) 820-GUIA
CHICANO AND LATINO YOUTH LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
Conference
Sacramento, Calif. Aug. 14-20 Roberto Gracia (916) 445-7777
THIS WEEK
CHICAGO HISPANIC MEDIA Chicago Jan. 27
The Media Institute will sponsor a one-day seminar on the impact of Hispanic print and broadcast outlets on community, business and cultural affairs. Cindy Bisset (202) 298-7512
Jan. 25,1988
ENTERTAINER RECOGNITION BANQUET Hollywood Jan. 28
La Clinica Familiar del Barrio Foundation will hold a fiesta in recognition of C&sar Romero, Hector Elizondo and Luis Avalos for their achievements and community service.
Eileen Schlef (213) 728-0156
ARTS 9
Albuquerque, N.M. Jan. 29, 30 The Hispanic Culture Foundation will sponsor a symposium for Hispanic artists and cultural organizations on how they can promote and market their work.
Carol Guzmdn (505) 831-8360
THEATER AND HISPANIC YOUTH Washington, D.C. Jan. 30
An afternoon of lecture, film and live theater performance at the Smithsonian Institution will examine the experiences of Hispanic youth, particularly those who are immigrants.
Gabriela Frings(202) 357-2627
RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS CONFERENCE
Washington, D.C. Jan. 30-Feb. 3
The Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters will
hold several workshops, including ones on initiating
stations and special programming for women and
children, at the National Religious Broadcasters’
convention.
Bruce Bates (201) 428-5400 CUBANS
Miami Jan. 31-Feb. 3
Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira will speak at the fourth annual conference of the Cuban American National Council. There will also be a workshop titled Bilingualism and a National Language Policy. Alina Becker (305) 642-3484.
3


Jim SflQdl) guest columnist
Viva Spanglish!
iQue aguite! Los profesores are at it otra vez.
Those who speak half English and half Spanish are illiterate in both languages, they pronounce from their torreones de ivory.
This “Spanglish,” they cry, will be the death of both lenguajes. Stop saying “brecas” before ifs too late.
What these linguistic purists fail to comprender is that we bilinguos have a legitimate reason for applying the brecas in our vehicles instead of los frenos.
El freno is what we put in our horse’s mouth, and though it stops the caballo pretty efficiently, we have a difficult time imagining how it could hold back our trocas. We need our brecas for that, and though a lot of ’61 Ford owners have to pump esas brecas pretty hard, they haven’t yet failed for not appearing in Velasquez’s dictionary.
The point is that language is not, and never has been, a static phenomenon. Si no fuera verdad eso, we’d all be speaking Latin.
But we’re not We’re speaking hundreds of languages and dialects in the Western world, each one with its own legitimate grammar and its oral, if not written, literature.
C6mo es, entonces, that a number of scholars and self-appointed experts decry the use of what they pejoratively term Spanglish? Why are they telling hundreds of thousands of code-switching speakers that they speak “incorrectly”? Why do these experts ignore the fact that there is already a developing oral literature in this bilingual dialect and a written literature not too far around the vuelta?
LANGUAGE IS QUICKSILVER
Hay dos razones, it seems to me. The first is built into the very nature of the academic pursuit. Once one has invested so much time and sudor to become an expert in a certain field, one hardly wants the field to undergo constant change.
Yet, language is quicksilver, a barometer of our shifting vidas. The only way to remain an expert on it is to keep up with it, but there are some who lack the energy and desire to do so.
The second reason esfos profesores gaze down on code-switching involves motivos mis escondidos.
Language is a mirror of culture. The reason the Southwestern espejo currently reflects a double image is precisely because we have increasingly become a bicultural region.
People don’t talk bilingually because they consciously decide to. Nosotros hablamos la mitadespahol and half English because we live in an area where Hispanic and Anglo cultures are in daily collision and collusion.
Those, I suspect, who so vocally oppose bilingual expressions are those who most object to bicultural intermingling.
LET PURISTS WEEP
What is most ironic is that such linguistic and cultural elitism can itself be the death of the very culture and language it is trying to protect.
Isn’t that the biggest danger of all? Not that young Hispanics will speak Spanglish, but that they will end up monolingual in English, thereby losing all contact and connection with their historia e identidacP Doesn’t “Vamos a comer un Big Mac” retain more cultural flavor than “Lets go to McDonald’s"?
Today’s Hispanic is a member of a minority culture in a fiercely homogenizing melting pot. He must be truly creative if he is going to tread those waters and yet hold onto his ethnic and cultural identity.
De modo que no se aguiten, Spanglish speakers Let the linguistic purists weep in their dictionaries
The Southwestern United States in evolving into one of the most exciting and uniquely bicultural civilizations en el mundo.Vamos a tirade un cruise.
(Jim Sagel, who lives in Esparto la, N.M., is a bilingual poet and novelist)
Sin pelos en la lengua
HERE WE GO AGAIN: The year 1988 isn’t off to the best of starts Already tongues are twisting and typewriters self-destructing as our New Year's resolutions to be nice fall by the wayside.
WASHINGTON, D.C.: Of course you heard Jimmy the Greeks explanation to a television reporter as to why black players dominate the sports of football and basketball: They were bred big and strong by white slave owners who foresaw the day when the NFL and NBA would need such hulks.
That has my comadre Katy Imports perplexed.
She wants to know Jimmy’s explanation for why Latino jockeys-with their cute little naigas sticking up in the air as they drive winners across the finish .line day after day after day - are so dominant in horse racing.,:
MILWAUKEE: Reporter Melita Garza of the Milwaukee Journal reports on a major slip of the tongue there by Federal Judge Robert Warren.
In sentencing a Colombian drug dealer to prison the other day, he wondered out loud from the bench why Colombians couldn’t be “just like the best South Side Polacks or Krauts in Germantown,” who overcame their environment to be law-abiding folks.
Naturally, Jimmy the Greek had his microphone taken away by CBS-TV, but the judge still has his robe.
MIAMI: Inthe Jan.4 Miami Herald, expatriot Cuban writer and columnist Carlos Alberto Montaher pens from Madrid:
“Why hide it? In Miami, in Dade, there is a silent war between Anglos and Hispanics.
“The ‘Hispanics* are short, mulattoes, noisy, disorderly, lazy, deceitful, aggressive, vulgar, dangerous, greasy, and untrustworthy. Generally, they wear ridiculous white guayabera shirts and huge gold jewelry that they hang around their necks or screw onto their fingers.
“They do not take care of their yards, they litter the ground... They have lots of children and do not work much, which explains why they are poor and live on welfare.
“Finally, they make no effort to speak English, preferring to prattle all day long in that incomprehensible salsa and bolero dialect.
“And, he asks, “what are Anglos like? They are dull, lacking in imagination, unfriendly, ignorant of events outside the United States, confidants of the police, superficial, informers, blond, blueeyed, tall, gullible, and disheartingly naive politically.
“The women do not hesitate to make cuckolds of their men, who grin and bear it because they are not’very moraf in matters of sex or respect for the family. They are merciless to their old people-they shut them up in cruel institutions. They are implacable in money matters and capable... of lending one another money subject to signing receipts and notes. They are'colcf and incapable of loving passionately, which drives them to alcoholism, loneliness and woe...”
Montaher is then careful to explain that while this is how the groups see each other, time will heal their hate. He promises: “Ethnic prejudices will end up in bed. This old cure never fails.”
Such hyperbole and simplistic writing certainly won’t speed the day. The Herald has some home-grown columnists, like Ana Veciana-Sudrez, who can take the same cultural dilemma and look up, not down, clearing a path for readers to follow.
Why bother to import a writer who uses a shovel?
- Kay Birbaro
Quoting. |.
RAUL MARTINEZ, Democratic Mayor of Hialeah, Fla, explaining his withdrawal as a candidate for the U.S. Senate: .
“With the negative rating the governor (Republican Bob Martinez) has, I’d have to spend a lot of time convincing people that there are I two Martinezes."
Jan. 25,1988
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

. I I,! I i Making The News This Week _ h\ 2 5 '\S s_ . Preslde.nt Reagan names F . lorida Gov. Bob Marth'lez to the White ; Conference for a Drug Free America . . . Edward LuJ6n resigns from his position as cha i rman of the New Mexico Republican Party to run for the congressional seat being vacated by his brother, Manuel. Rep . Lujan decided to step down after 1 0 terms in office . . . New Jersey Gov . Thomas Kean signs into law a bill that will create the nation's first state-level training and development centers catering specifically to Latinas . . : The Brighton, Colo. , City Counc i l elects Councilor Samuel G6i1'1ez to a two-year term as mayor. Gomez , 41, is t he f i rs t Hispanic mayor In the city's 1 01-year history . . . Dade County , Fla., Public Schools Superintendent Jose Fern6ndez wrll recerve the Cuban American National Councirs Leadership Award in education at the group's national conference. The Dade school district is the nation's fourth largest. . . The members of the Washington, D . C., . Commission on Latino Development elect Pedro Aviles, a native of El Salvador, as its chairman ... The head of the Immigration and Nat uralization Service's Baltimore office will . reconsider the request of Dr. Haclb Aoun, a Venezuela-born cardiologist, to be given permanent res idency so that he may continue treatment for AIDS. Aoun contracted AIDS wh i le working as a medical resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore , pie r cing his finger with a tube of tainted blood ... Voi.ONo•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REP1QRT IJ••25•1988 Daily Press Losing Ground in Hispanic Hiring The percentage of H i spanics employed in newsrooms of the nation 'l? daily newspapers has nqt even kept pace with the increasing pe rcentage of Latinos i n the overall population , despite a 1978 Amer i can Society of News paper Editors' goal that set parity for minorit i es in the newsroom by the year 2000 as its major objective . Between 1982 and 1987, the Lat i no popu lation increased 1.7% , Hispanics in the news room increased just 0.4% . ln1982, Hispanic s were 6 . 2% of the popu lation and 1.3% of those working in the news room . They were 7.'9% of the population in 1987 and c . omprised 1 . 7% of the newsroom . Ove r all , minorities compr i se 6 . 6% of news room s t aff , compared with 5.5% in 1982. They are about 21% of the population. Francisco Newton, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, under_lined the importan c e of Hispanics in the media by saying, "The press has limited per ceptici o as to whafs going . on. With more Hispanics in the media, there will be a broader , better journalism i ncreased sensitivity." . Denise Johnsiin, ASNE minority affairs direc tor, said that ASNE tia a been documenting th . e . . IJU. moer o f minorities in the newsroom through employment surveys since 1978 : She said ASNE's conti nuing education p r ogram for minority faculty , internships and scholarships for minority youth and its profes sional residence program , which . enables minority professionals to serve as mentors for college students, are ways ASN E is work ing to increase the pool of minority journalists. But she acknowledged that at the present rate par ity will not be achieved in this century . ASN E has approx i mately 1 ,000 members representing 400 of the country's 1 ,650 daily newspapers, according to Johnson. "We cannot make them do anything .. . we can HISPANIC REPRESENTATION 1987 1982 Newsroom 1.7% ' 1.3% +0.4% Population 7.9% 6.2% +1.7% recommend ideas ... we can do things to encourage them to hire , like make it easier for them through job fairs , " said Johnson . She said ASN E spent roughly $300,000 last year for minority affairs projects. In 1985, the American Newspaper Publishers Assoc i ation, working closely with ASNE, estab lished the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business, a coalition of 37 national newspaper associations seeking to increase newspaper opportunities for minorities . Hispanic media activists have been critical of both groups for their failure until this month to hire a Hispanic on their staffs or give any financial support to Hispanic media organi zations. NAHJ ' s Newton stated that Latino media organizations play a vital role, along with ASNE, ANPA and national job fairs, to sensitize media employers. Newton singled out two newspaper cha ins, Hearst and Harte-Hanks , for lack of support . " To the best of my knowledge, they have never given any support at air' to Hispanic media groups, despite their having news papers in major Hispanic population areas. Newton cited the .Gannett Foundation and the Times-Mirror newspaper chain as frequent supporters of Latino media organizations. Among other national Latino media groups, two , the National Association of Hispanic Publishers, based in Chicago , and the His panic Public Relations Association , head quartered in Los Angeles , have no resources, other than from membership, and no staff . The recently formed, Los-Angeles based His panic Media Coalition , a grouping of more than 40 primarily community-based organi zations, receives less than $75,000 in funding and has one full-time worker. "I think ASNE realizes that'there is no way parity is going to be reached by 2000," Lour des C6rdova Martinez, the executive director of the California Chicano News Media As Report . .. e .nsus Offi.CIa l Berates Agency shesaideditorsincanfomiaarenowbnnging A more Latinos into the newsrooms, but added, A former high-ranK i ng U .S. Census Bureau official announced Jan. 14 she stepped dowri'fr'om her post last month because she felt U . S . Commerce Department officials had political motives for rejecting a plan to adjust an expected undercount of Hispanics and blacks in the 1990 census. Barbara Bailar , riow president of the Ame rican Statistical Association, charged Re publicans in the Commerce Department _ struck the pla rt because they felt it would benefit Democrats in redistrict i ng of congres sional and state legislative districts. His panics and blacks usually vote Democratic . Fiedistrictil'lg and the allocation of billions of dollars ih federal funds are based on census figures . Bailar, who was associate director of the Census Bureau, said Undersecretary of Com merce Robert Ortner's Oct. 30 announce ment against the adjustment " was dressed up like a technical decision , when everyone knew it was a pol i tical decision . " Ortner said the charge was "nonsense. " "I felt her rather sudden resignation further i ndicates that the announcement against undercount corrections was politically moti vated, " Terri Anne Lowenthal, staff director of the U.S. House Subcommittee on the Census and Population , told Weekly Report . In 1980, according to Census stud i es, there was a 1% undercount for the U . S . population . The . undercount for Hispanics and blacks was estimated at 5%. "It may have to do with selfish reasons. If you have to cover a community as large as the conlinued on pag e 2 Vetsi Memorial Dedicated U .S. Latino Vietnam War veterans were honored Jan . 13 in the Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights when residents dedicated what is reported to be the nation's first me morial in their honor. More than 300 people , i ncluding several Latino veterans , participated in the unveiling of a bronze plaque and the dedication of a new pedestrian mall . Paseo de las Flores Pedestrian Promenade was funded with $450,000 in public and private money .

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30/o of Lati _ n o Childre n Live With One Parent Only Co mpared to blacks and whites, Hispa n ic s or less and living with both parents were: exp erienced the steepest decline fro m 1 980 1980 1986 to 1986 in the number of children under 18 H ISPANICS 75.4% 66.5% year s of age who lived with both pa r e nts , BLACKS 42.2 40. 6 ac cording to a r eport by the U.S. Cens us WHI TES 82.7 79.9 B ureau released Jan. 21. The number of Hispanic children living O f the nation's 6.4 million H i spanic chi ldren w ith one parent grew by 800,000 from 1980 under 18 in 1986, exc l uding those in Puerto to 1986, going to 1 . 9 million. Overall, 30% of Ric o , 67% lived wi t h both parents. This com Hispanic children lived with one parent. pa res with 75% in 1980. : unlike t:i(acks and whites, the largest portion Nearly 15 million children across the U n i t e d of His panic . children who lived with one State s l ived wi t h only one parent in 1 9 8 6 . . paren t came from homes where the spouse The percenta g es of ct'tildren 17 year s old ahsent (37%) . The largest number of Poor Latinos Found L ar g ely Illi terate black children lived with a parent who never married (49%) . Being divorced was the most common marital status in white households where there was one parent (53%). Other report findings: • Sixty-three percent of the Hispanic parents raising children on their own did not have a high school education, compared with 35% for blacks and 30% for whites; and • Only 21% of the Hispanic children raised by one parent lived in a house owned by that _ parent. The figure for blacks was 26% , for whites , 44% . Felix Perez T h e inability to read, w r ite, compute an d com municate orally in English was the most com m o n indicator among impov e rished His pa nics i n San Antonio, found a stu dy r&leased Jan. 13 : of school and they exhibited a stronger sense . of responsibility toward theirfamily, especially children. Thirty-two percent had four or more Head of INS Says No to Deadline Extension . U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Comm i ssioner Alan Nelson said Jan. 13 he sees no need to extend the legalization period under the immigration law . He characterized recently introduced legislation that would do so "il.,advised and shortsighted." T he study, co n ducted by the Was!'ling t on, D.C. based Coali t ion on Human N eeds, u sed the responses of poor people in Aliquippa , Pa , n ortheast ern North Carolina, Washington , D . C., as we ll as San Antonio, to r eco r d what the respondents felt had to be done to reme dy po verty. San Anton i o was chosen beca u s e Hi s p anics accoun t for 54% of its 850,00 0 inh a bi tants. Of the 202 people interviewe d at the four sites, 50 w ere in San Antonio, an d 41 o f these were Hispanic . O verall, the people interviewed conside . r ed p r o viding decent pay ing jobs and ensuring effective tra i n ing and education the k eys t o reme dying rjoverty . T w ofactors separated the San Ant o n i ans from t he other sites: more had droppe d out c hildren . 1 Undocumented immigrants were excluded be ca u s e they are not eligible for most state and federal assistance programs considered in the study. Of the four sites , San Antonio was the poorest. Forty percent of the people had incomes equ a l to or less than 50% of the poverty level. Roughly14% were that poor at the other sites. In San Antonio, people were critical of policies which allowed employers to hire undocumented workers at below minif!tum wage. Said one respondent: " I'm not prejudiced. My grandfather came from Mexico in 1891 , but I just can ' t see why we let all those Mexicans come out here. There are so many and not enough jobs." Felix Perez P ress Falters in Ye ar 2000 Goal contin u ed fr o m page ' 1 Lat i no c o mmunity in Cal i fornia and ac quire the i r ad vert i sement dol lars, sure you're g o ing to be dedi c ated," she said. staffof280. Noneofitsreporters are Hispanic . T he newsroom has one Latino supervisor and four Latinos in its photo and art departments. -Julio Laboy Nelson said the legislation, introduced by Rep . Charles Schumer (DN.Y . ) and 23 other congressmen, and the talk of an extension beyond the May 4 deadline could mislead potential legalization applicants. "They will either think an extension has been granted or will be granted . . . ," said Nelson at 1 NS' national headquarters in Wash ington, D.C. Schumer's bill would move the application deadline to May 1989. Charles Kamasaki, policy analyst for the National Council of La Raza, said Nelson's characterization of the bill was "defensive and a knee-jerk reaction . " He added , " Even people who believe the law has worked sup port an extension . " Approximately 1.17 million people have applied for legalization . Thirty-three percent of the applications have been approved so far. Nelson said INS continued to stick with its low estimate of 2 million applicants. Euge n e Patterson, p ub lisher o f the St Peters bur g Tim es in Florida, w a s p r e side n t o f ASNE when i t a do pted par i ty as i ts goal . C o nta c t ed by Wee k l y Report , he said , "We 're g o i n g to have to p ull up o u r soc ks." Lat i nos Earn 34 Gram my Nominations He ac k no wledg e d tha t d irect f ina ncial sup por t to H i spanic me d ia o r g aniz a t ions from g r ou p s suchasASN Ec o u l d p r o ve wor t hwhile. The St. Petersburg Times h as a newsroom Martinez Race Shelve d Hial ea h , F l a . , Mayor R au l Martinez an noun ced Jan. 1 4 he had decid e d not to seek the U .S. Se na te s e at b eing vacated by fellow Democrat L a wt o n Chiles . Ma rtinez, mayor si nc e N o vemb e r 1981 , had th rown his name out as a possible candida t e l as t m onth when Chil e s announced he was s te pp in g dow n . T h e fi r s t Cub a born mayo r o f Hia leah , M art ine z , 38, said he decided no t t o run because o f t h e l a c k of support from th e Democratic Part y . 2 Latino recording art i sts garnered a record 34 nominations in . 14 categories for this year's Grammy Awards, including nods in the top three categories . Nominated for "record of the year'' top among the yearly awards given by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciencesis the single La Bamba by Los Lobos. The song, recorded for the Luis Valdez film , won the late Ritchie Valens his first-ever Grammy nomination " song of the year . " Valens, on whose life the film is based , is nominated as the song's adapter. Nominated for "album of the year'' is Trio , recorded by Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harr is. ! Suzanne Vega.,. stepdaughter of a Puerto Rican novelist-is nominated in the"record of the year'' and "song of the year" categories for her Luka She is also nominated in the "best pop vocal performance, female" category . Los Lobos and Linda Ronstadt are nominated this year in three categories each, including "best pop vocal performance by a duo or group with vocal." The band is nominated for La Bamba; Rondstadt, along with James Ingram, for the single Somewhere Out There . Los Lobos are nominated for "best rock performance by a duo or group with vocal" for their album By The Light of the Moon, while Ronstadt got her third nomination in the "best country performance by a duo or group with vocar• category for Trio . (See Arts and Entertainment.) . Twenty-eight Latino artists and/or musical acts share the 34 nominations. Since the three "Latin" categories were established in 1984, the highest number of Latino nominations was25 in 1986. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Hispanic Link Weekly Repor t

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COLLECTING REMEDYIIIIG POVERTV! Through interviews with poor people in four cities, including San Antonio, "How the Poor Would Remedy Poverty" offers a snapshot of poverty. Effective training and education are recommendations made by the respondents. For a copy of the 111-page book, send $11.95 to: Coalition on Human Needs, 1000 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, D.C . 20007 (202) 342-0726. CENSUS REPORT: Copies of the U.S. Census Bureau's report " Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1896," which includes the percentages of Hispanic ; black and white children living with both parents and divorce ratios, are available from the Superintendent of Documents (specify Series P-20, No.418), U.S. Govel'nment Printing Office , Washington, D.C. 20402. (The price was not available by pre ss time). JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION CALENDAR: The National As sociation of Hispanic Journalists has made available its 1988 photo calendar, with pictures by Hispanic photojournalists from around the country arid the dates and contacts of events held by Hispanic organizations. To receive a copy, send $1 0 to: NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634; Washington, D .C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. IMMIGRATION REFORM ACT: The American Civil Liberties Union has published a 24-page pamphlet examining, in a question-and answer format, the employer sanctions and anti-discrimination pro visions of the immigration reform law. To obtain a free English-or Spanish-langu _ age copy, send a self-addressed envelope with 39 postage to: ACLU, Immigration and Aliens' Rights Task Force, 132 W . 43rd St., New York, N.Y , 10036 (212) 944. NEBRASKA HISPANICS: The Mexican American Commission of Nebraska puts out a free quarterly newsletter on that state ' s Hispanic population. To be put on the commission's mailing list, write: Newsletter, Mexican American Commission, P .O. Box 94965, Lincoln, Neb. 68509-4965. Miami Feb . 18 , 19 CONNECTING LATINA LEADERS MOLDED The Adolph Coors Company will launch Jan. 26 a nine-month program designed for Latina leaders in business , government, edu cation and a variety of other fields. The National Hispana Leadership Program is bringing together21 Latinas who have made significant contributions to their local com munities. The projecrs goal, according to its coordinator, Juana Bordas, is to develop women who have the potential to make a national impact for the Hispanic community. The program includes courses at Harvard and Rutgers University . The women will also serve as mentors to at least two other Latinas. The training phase is funded by Coors at more than $100,000. Among the women selected for this year's program : Audrey Alvarado, from Denver, Colo., the executive director of La Rasa; Aida Maria Galarza, director of the National Puerto Ricah Forum in Chicago; and Gloria Bon ilia-Santiago, chair of the Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey. CALIF. MEDICAL STUDENTS AIDED A newly formed 11-member foundation appointed by Calif . Gov . George Deukmejian and the state Legislature is soliciting private sector funds to provide financial assistance to underrepresented Hispanic, black and other minority students who are accepted into schools of medicine, dentistry and nursing . The Minority Health Professions Foundation was established by state statute Jan. 1 . It will make recommendations to the state for scholarships and loans to minority students who, in return for the support, would agree to practice in medically underserved areas of California. _ Julio Laboy Calendar Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536 ENTERTAINER RECOGNITION BANQUET Hollywood Jan. 28 Following are major state and regional conferences, conventions , seminars and events of interest to Hispanics for 1988. 1988 EVENTS ' -. MEXICAN A .MERICAN LEGAL DEFENSE AND EDUCATIONAL i=.UN. D Immigration Law Seminars Los Angeles Feb. 2 Chicago Feb . 9 Washington , D.C. Feb. 11 San Antonio Feb . 18 J . Dean Licitra (213) 385-7730 LATI N BUSINESS"ASSOCIATION Awards Banquet Los Angeles Feb. 5 Candy Alderete (213) 721-4000 CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION Journalism Opportunities Conference Los Angeles Feb . 5, 6 Lourdes C6rdova Martinez (213) 7 43-7158 CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION Conference San Francisco Feb . 10-13 Janet Lou (415) 834-9455 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LATINO ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS Citizenship Workshop Hispani c Link Weekly Report UNITED TEACHERS OF LOS ANGELESCHICANOI LATINO EDUCATION COMMITTEE Conference Los Angeles March 11, 1 2 Mark Meza Overstreet (213) 560-1323 NEWYORKSTATEASSEMBLYPUERTORICAN/ HISPANIC TASK FORCE Legislative Conference Albany, N.Y . March 13-15 Roberto Calderin (518) 455-5253 NATIONAL SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIATION HISPANIC CAUCUS Annual Luncheon New Orleans March 27 Philip Smith (703) 838-NSBA DIRECTORY 495-THE HISPANIC YELLOW PAGES Annual Luncheon Falls Church, Va. June 24 Francisco Vega (703) 820-GUIA CHICANO AND LATINO YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Conference Sacramento , Calif . Aug . 14-20 Roberto Gracia (916) 445-7777 THIS WEEK CHICAGO HISPANIC MEDIA Chicago Jan. 27 The Media Institute will sponsor a one-day seminar on the impact of Hispanic print and broadcast outlets on community, business and cultural affairs. Cindy Bisset (202) 298-7512 Jan. 25, 1988 La Clinica Familiar del Barrio Foundation will hold a fiesta in recognition of Cesar Romero , Hector Elizondo and Luis Avalos for .their achievements and com munity service . Eileen Schiel (213) 728-0156 ARTS Albuquerque, N.M . Jan. 29, 30 The Hispanic Culture Foundation will sponsor a symposium for Hispanic artists and cultural zations on how they can promote and market their work . Carol Guzman (505) 831-8360 THEATER AND HISPANIC YOUTH Washington , D.C. Jan . 30 An afternoon of lecture, film and live theater per formance at the Smithsonian Institution will examine the experiences of Hispanic youth, particularly those who are immigrants. Gabriela Frings (202) 357-2627 RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Jan. 30-Feb. 3 The Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters will hold several workshops, including ones on initiating stations and special programming for women and children , at the National Religious Broadcasters ' convention . Bruce Bates (201) 428-5400 CUBANS Miami Jan. 31Feb . 3 Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira will speak at the fourth annual conference of the Cuban American National Council . There will also be a workshop titled B i lingualism and a National Language Policy . Alina Becker (305) 642-3484. 3

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Jim Sagel, guest columnist Viva Spanglish! iOue agiiite! Los profesores are at it otra vez. Those who speak half English and half Spanish are illiterate in both languages, they pronounce from their torreones de ivory. This" Spanglish,'' they cry, will be the death of both lenguajes. Stop saying "brecas" before ifs too late . What these linguistic purists fail to comprender is that we bilingiios have a legitimate reason for applying the brecas in our vehicles instead of /os frenos. El freno is what we put in our horse's mouth, and though it stops the caballo pretty efficiently, we have a difficult time imagining how it could hold back our trocas. We need our brecas for that, and though a lot of '61 Ford owners have to pump esas brecas pretty hard, they haven't yet failed for not appearing in Velasquets dictionary. The point is that language is not, and never has been, a static phenomenon. Sino fuera verdad eso, we'd all be speaking Latin. But we're not. We're speaking hundreds of languages and dialects in the Western world, each one with its own legitimate grammar and its oral, if not written, literature. C6mo es, entonces, that a number of scholars and self-appointed experts decry the use of what they pejoratively term Spang I ish? Why are they telling hundreds of thousands of code-switching speakers that they speak "incorrectly"? Why do these experts ignore the fact that there is already a developing oral literature in this bilingual dialect and a written literature not too far around the vuelta? LANGUAGE IS QUICKSILVER Hay dos razones, it seems to me. The first is built into the very nature of the academic pursuit. Once one has invested so much time and sudorto become an expert in a certain field, one hardly wants the field to undergo constant change. Yet, language is quicksilver, a barometer of our shifting vidas. The only way to remain an expert on it is to keep up with it, but there are some who lack the energy and desire to do so. The second reason estos profesores gaze down on code-switching involves motivos mas escondidos. Language is a mirror of culture. The reason the Southwestern espejo currently reflects a double image is precisely because we have increasingly become a bicultural region. People don't talk bilingually because they consciously decide to . Nosotros hablamos Ia mitadespai'loland half English because we live in an area where Hispanic and Anglo cultures are in daily colli sion and collusion. Those, I suspect, who so vocally oppose bilingual expressions are those who most object to bicultural intermingling. Sin pelos en Ia lengua HERE WE GO AGAIN: The year 1988 isn't off to the best of starts. Already tongues are twisting and typewriters self-destructing as our New Year's resolutions to be nice fall by thewayside. WASHINGTON, o.c;: Of course you heard Jimmy the Greek's explanation to a television reporter as to why black players dominate the sports of football and basketball: They were bred big and strong by white slave owners who foresaw the day when the NFL and NBA would need such hulks. That has my comadre Katy lmporta perplexed. She wants to know Jimmy's explanation for why Latino jockeyswith their cute ' little nalgas sticking up in the air as they drive winners across the finish line day after day after day-are so dominant in horse _ racing. _ MILWAUKEE: Reporter Melita Garza of the Milwaukee Journal reports on a major slip of the tongue there by Federal Judge Robert Warren. In sentencing a Colombian drug dealer to prison the day, he wondered out loud from the bench why Colombians couldn't be "just like the best South Side Polacks or Krauts in Germantown," who overcame their environment to be law-abiding folks. Naturally, Jimmy the Greek had his microphone taken away by CB& TV, but the judge still has his robe. MIAMI: In the Jan. 4 Miami Herald, expatriot Cuban writer and columnist Carlos Alberto Montal'ler pens from Madrid: "Why hide it? In Miami, in Dade, there is a silent war between Anglos and Hispanics. "The 'Hispanics' are short, mulattoes, noisy, disorderly, lazy, deceitful, . aggressive, vulgar, dangerous, greasy, and untrustworthy. Generally, they wear ridiculous white guayabera shirts and huge gold jewelry that they hang around their necks or screw onto their fingers. "They do not take care of their yards, they litter the ground ... They have lots of children and do not work much, which explains why they are poor and live on welfare. "Finally, they make no effort to speak English, preferring to prattle all day long in that incomprehensible sa/sa and bolero dialect. "And, he asks, "what are Anglos like? They are dull, lacking in imagination; unfriendly, ignorant of events outside the United States, confidants of the police, superficial, informers, blond, blue eyed, tall, gullible, and disheartingly naive politically . "The women do not hesitate make cuckolds of their men, who grin and bear it because they are not'very morar in matters of sex or respect for the family. They are merciless 16 their old people they shut them up in cruel institutions. They are implacable in money matters and capable. . . of lending one another money subject to signing receipts and notes. They are'cold and incapable of loving passionately, which drives them to alcoholism, loneliness and woe ... " What is most ironic is that such linguistic and cultural elitism can Montaner is then careful to explain that while this is how the itself be the death of the very culture and language it is trying to groups see each other, time will heal their hate. He promises: LET PURISTS WEEP protect. "Ethnic prejudices will end up in bed. This old cure never fails." Isn't that the biggest danger of all? Not that young Hispanics will Such hyperbole and simplistic writing certainly won't speed the day. The Herald has some home-grown columnists, like Ana speak Spang I ish, but that they will end up monolingual in English, Veclana-Suarez, who can take the same cultural dilemma and thereby losing all contact and connection with their historia e look up, not down, clearing a path for readers to follow. identidacf? Doesn't "Vamos a comer un Big Mac" retain more cultural Why bother to import a writer who uses a shovel? flavor than "Lefs go to McDonald's"? Today's Hispanic is a member of a minority culture in a fiercely --------------------..1Kiiiial.y.ii8iiaiirii.baiiir.iio homogenizing melting pot. He must be truly creative if he is going to, tread those waters and yet hold onto his ethnic and cultural identity. De modo que nose agiiiten, Spanglish speakers. Let the linguistic purists weep in their dictionaries . The Southwestern United States in evolving into one of the most exciting and uniquely bicultural civilizations en el mundo. Vamos a tirarle un cruise. (Jim Sage/, who lives in Espanola, N.M., is a bilingual poet andl novelist) Quoting .. • RAUL MARTINEZ, Democratic Mayor of Hialeah, Fla, explaining his withdrawal as a candidate for the U.S. Senate: "With the negative rating the governor (Republican Bob Martinez) has, I'd have to spend a lot of time convincing people that there are two Martinezes." 4 Jan. 25, 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report