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Hispanic link weekly report, February 8, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 8, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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FEB 8 886
Making The News
Texas Gov. Bill Clements names Max Castillo, president of San Antonio College, and Leo Sayavedra, president of Laredo State University, to a nine*member panel that will formulate a plan to increase minority enrollment at state colleges and universities... Texas House Speaker Gib Lewis names state Rep. Gregory Luna of San Antonio, Maria Elena Flood, a member of the state Board of Education, and William Ortego, superintendent of the Azle Independent School District, to a 15-member panel to study the state’s system of school finance. The panel was created as a result of a court ruling that found the current system unconstitutional because it did not equitably finance districts that did not have a large tax base,
particularly Hispanic ones... Annabelle Jaramillo, former head of National IMAGE, announces that she will run for a seat in the Oregon state Assembly... Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer appoints Arturo Vazquez as acting director of the Mayor's Office of Employment and Training... Golfer Chi Chi Rodriguez wins $300,000 of a $360,000 purse at the first Senior Skins Game in Honolulu. His two-day earnings are almost a third of what he won in 26 years on the Professional Golfers’ Association Tour... Miguel de Grandy, the former zarzuela and opera director in the Cuban National Theater, dies in Miami of a cardiac arrest at the age of 78... Inglewood, Calif., resident Hector Gutierrez, 36, is among eight people injured - one died - when a parking garage grate they were standing on collapsed, dropping them 25 feet. Most of the nine had just completed a 10K Super Bowl race in Redondo Beach, Calif...
2^®HISPANICUN^WEEKLYREP0^^^^^
Hispartics Projected to Gain in Congress Remap
California, Texas and Florida, key Hispanic states politically, will gain U.S. House seats as a result of the 1990 census if current population trends continue, according to projections released Jan. 25 by the Washington, D.C.-based Election Data Services.
According to the EDS report, if Congress were reapportioned today, California would pick up six seats, Texas four seats and Florida, three. This reflects their growth since 1980.
Florida’s population grew by 2,227,000, a 23.3% increase. Texas gained 2,560,000 people, a 17.9% jump, and California grew by 3,995,000, 16.8%.
Kimball Brace, president of EDS, a private consulting firm, said two states with substantial percentages of Latinos- New York and Illinois - stand to lose congressional representation.
New York is expected to lose three seats and Illinois, two. At present California has four Hispanic representatives, Texas, four, Florida, none, New York, one, and Illinois, none.
Census population estimates are used to determine the reapportionment of congressional seats. Thirty-three of the nation’s 37 congressional districts with a Hispanic population of at least 20% gained population between 1980 and 1987, the study showed.
All Hispanics presently holding seats are not in danger of losing them. Of those Latino representatives, New Mexico has two and Puerto Rico, one.
“Clearly the numbers indicate that Hispanics will be gaining representation. Given the historical trend, this should mean more Hispanic representatives',” Harry Pachon, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, told Weekly Report. The number of Hispanics elected to Congress doubled from five voting members to 10 after reapportionment of districts following the 1980 census.
Districts presently average 560,000 people. Following the next reapportionment, each district will have approximately 573,900 people.
Norberto Salinas, chairman of the Mexican American Democrats of Texas, also told Weekly Report the EDS figures indicate a potential for more Latino representatives.
“This will especially apply in South Texas,” said Salinas. “MAD is most influential there. Our heaviest membership and broadest network is in South Texas. We will have more districts and possibly MAD members running to represent them,” he added.
Because the House is limited to435 seats, some states must lose representation for others to gain seats. Fearing a loss of districts, some representatives of projected “loser” states are proposing legislation that would exclude undocumented aliens from the census count that determines reapportionment.
U.S. Rep. Thomas Ridge(D-Penn.) introduced legislation Dec. 18 that directs the Census Bureau to exclude undocumented persons from its reapportionment count. Ridge asserts that historical references indicate the intent of the law was to do just that.
“We do want to quantify the illegal population, but they hold citizenship and allegiance to a different country,” said his press secretary, Peggy Peterson.
Terri Ann Lowenthal, staff director of the U.S. House Subcommittee on the Census and Population, disagrees. “They haven’t been reading their history. Congress did debate (in the 1860s) whether or not to base reap-
continued on page 2
Union Chooses Sandoval
Alicia Sandoval, long active in Southern California union and broadcast circles, will join the nation’s largest teachers’ union in Washington, D.C., early next month as its director of communications.
The union, the National Education Association, has nearly 1.9 million members and had a budget of $118 million for 1986-87.
S&ndoval was selected Feb. 1 from more than 300 candidates. She becomes NEA’s highest level Hispanic.
For 12 years Sandoval hosted the daily Los Angeles television interview show “Let’s Rap.”
She served as director of communications for the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor(AFL-CIO) between 1985 and 1987.
Voting-Age Population Estimated
Hispanics are expected to represent 7% of the nation’s 183 million residents of voting age - or 13 million - by Nov. 1,1988, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau Feb. 3.
Data from the 1980 Census showed that Hispanics accounted for 8.9 million of the nation’s 164.6 million voting-age population in November of that year. Hispanics were then 5.4% of U.S. residents 18 years and older. Overall, the number of residents 18 years and older is projected to have increased to 183 million by November 1988 from 175 million during the same time four years earlier.
Nearly two-thirds of the Hispanic voting-age population resided in California, Texas and New York, found the study. Forty-five percent of Latinos who will be of voting age in November 1988 are expected to be living in the Western region of the United States, which includes California, New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado.
Included in the Census Bureau’s projections are an estimated 2.5 million undocumented aliens, the majority of whom are Hispanic. It did not project how many legal Hispanic residents of voting age are citizens.
- Felix Perez
VOTING-AGE POPULATION
(November 1, 1988)*
Total Hisp. %
N.M. 1,101 396 36.0
Calif. 20,875 4,514 21.6
Texas 12,270 2,584 21.1
Ariz. 2,605 379 14.5
Colo. 2,489 264 10.6
N.Y. 13,480 1,388 10.3
Fla. 9,614 907 9.4
Nev. 780 57 7.3
N.J. 5,943 436 7.3
III. 8,550 568 6.6
* Numbers in thousands
Source: “Projections of the Population of Voting Age for States, November 1988"


Calif. Latinos Predicted to Grow30% from’87 to’95
The Hispanic population in California will grow to 7.6 million in 1995 from 5.9 million in 1987 - an increase of 30%, estimates a study released Jan. 27 by a private research group in Palo Alto, Calif.
The Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy concludes that this increase in the state’s H ispanic population will push their representation in the overall population from 21.5% to 23.9%. California Latinos and Asian Americans will comprise nearly 70% of the state’s growth during the eight-year period, says the study. It predicts the state will grow from last year’s level of 27 ____________________________________________
million to 32 million in 1995.
Following are the population increases for the state’s major groups for 1987 and 1995 (the numbers are in thousands):
1987 1995 +
Hispanic 5,879 7,632 30%
Asian 2,549 3,850 51%
Black 1,933 2,113 9%
White 16,930 18,382 9%
The study attributes the Hispanic growth
to their high fertility rate, the influx of documented and undocumented immigrants
and the large number of Latinas in their peak child-bearing years. Because Latinos account for 30% of the state’s residents who are 17 years old or younger, the study notes that Hispanics will continue to augment their numbers for the next several years.
Despite their increasing representation, Hispanics may face employment problems if their educational attainment level is not improved, warns the study. While the California job market will increasingly demand better education and skills, Hispanics continue to suffer a high dropout rate and are increasingly relegated to laborer jobs. _ fe//x Perez
Senate Passes Civil Rights Legislation
The U.S. Senate passed legislation Jan. 28 cutting off federal funds to institutions if any of their departments discriminate because of sex, age, race or handicap, broadening a 1984 Supreme Court decision limiting the government’s ability to withhold aid.
The 75-14 vote is in reaction to the 1984 Grove City College vs. Bell decision. That decision held that the federal government could withhold funding only from those programs within the institutions found to discriminate.
The bill, the Civil Rights Restoration Act, was described by its backers as one of the most significant pieces of civil rights legislation to come before Congress in several years.
continued from page 1
portionment on citizenship and it was examined again in the early part of this century... They knew what they were doing,” she said.
“I fear that the motive behind the legislation is a reaction to what is perceived to be a growing number of persons of Hispanic origin who are in this country illegally,” Lowenthal commented.
A correction in the population projection method used by Washington state, causing Hispanics to re-emerge as the state’s largest minority group, accounted for Latinos growing 24% more in 1987 than was estimated in 1986, explained a state official in Seattle Jan. 26.
As a result of the correction, there were an estimated 159,504 Hispanics in Washington
CORRECTION
The Jan. 25,1988, issue of Weekly Report incorrectly listed the number of Hispanic staffers at the American Newspaper Publishers Association. AN PA has four Hispanics on a staff of 165. The American Society of Newspaper Editors has no Hispanics on its six-member staff.
But Mario Moreno, director of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s Washington, D.C., office, told Weekly Report that an attached amendment greatly diminishes the legislation’s appeal for civil rights groups.
The amendment would allow universities and hospitals that receive federal funds to refuse to pay for or perform abortions.
“We wanted a clean bill,” said Moreno,“but we’ve been fighting for this for so long and hard that we’ll take what we’ve got.”
The bill is expected to pass in the House. If President Reagan vetoes it, as promised, a two-thirds vote by both chambers will be necessary for it to become law.
- Julio Laboy
She said that operationally it would be nearly impossible to count undocumented persons. Undocumented persons would have to check a box; they will either lie or be discouraged from filling out the entire census form, she commented.
Ridge’s bill is awaiting action in the House Post Office and Civil Service Committee.
- Julio Laboy
last year, said Gary Robinson, assistant director of the staters Office of Financial Management. This represents a 33% increase from 1980 census figures.
The Hispanic population in Thurston County, in the Southwestern portion of the state, grew 64% from 1986 to 1987, largely as a result of the adjustment.
Prior to Jan. 1, the state had classified only those persons who identified themselves as Mexican or Chicano on death and birth certH ficates as Hispanics.
The unexpected growth in the state’s Latino population should increase the number of jobs available through refigured affirmative action goals, said Robinson. Funding for Hispanic programs doled out by the state and local governments on the basis of population representation should also grow, he added.
Latino Leaders Advise Against Aiding Contras
A group of U.S. Hispanic leaders, back from a fact-finding mission to Costa Rica and Nicaragua sponsored by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, spoke out Feb. 2 in Washington, D.C, against U.S. government aid to the contraa
Among the delegation’s members were SVREP President William Velasquez, former New Mexico Governor Toney Anaya, former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Julian Nava and former President of the League of United Latin American Citizens Mario Obledo. Also speaking out against aid to the Nicaraguan insurgency group at the Capitol Hill press conference were Reps. Albert Bustamante of Texas and Esteban Torres and Matthew Martinez of California
Bustamante, head of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, had voted for contra aid the last time an aid package came before Congress
The groups Jan. 27-Feb. 1 trip was sponsored by SVREP as part of its three-year program to have U.S. Hispanics play a more active role in the formulation of U.S. government policy in Latin America. Last July Velasquez visited opposition party leaders in Chile.
English-Only Rule Nixed
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled Jan. 27 that a rule requiring Los Angeles municipal court employees to speak only English appeared to violate laws prohibiting discrimination based on national origin.
The court, on a 3-0 vote, rejected the reasons on which the rule was based, including that it was mandated by an amendment making English the state’s official language.
Judge Stephen Reinhardt, in the court's opinion, wrote that the rule “has contributed to a work place atmosphere that derogates Hispanics... and heightens racial animosity.”
The ruling upheld an injunction in 1985 by a U.S. District Court judge. The English-only rule was implemented the year before in the Municipal Court of the Southeast District of Los Angeles in Huntington Park.
Calif. Texas, Fla. to Gain Most Seats
Hispanics Grow 33% in Wash. State
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Marta Salinas, guest columnist
Bruised Valentine
I remember my first experience with a Latin lover. It was on the midnight shift in a quiet hospital, Catholic, as I recall, which made the emergency-room diagnosis that much funnier “Bruised, boozed and contused.”
It obviously was not the ward clerk’s writing amphetamines could have written it.
Patty, the other R.N., looked at me and smiled “That’s your department. You take him and I’ll take the other seven.”
“OK” I read the chart. How much trouble could this guy be? He had 66 stitches in one calf and a dozen more on his face. I saw the orderlies wheeling the gurney away and the sheets were a bright off-pink.
“Gonzales, Humberto,” the name plaque read. I stamped all the forms and tiptoed in with my flashlight. I reeled from the odor. A brewery would have been milder. This explained the “boozed” part. I turned on the light.
Two dark slits and a massive, distended expanse of purple greeted me. Definitely bruised.
‘YOU MARRIED?’ HE CROAKED His vital signs were good. One of the slits moved and a sliver of white showed. The other slit strained but was unable to open. “You married,” he croaked. It’s a temporary dementia, I told myself.
As I checked his pulse, one hand grabbed my wrist. The mouth tried a smile. Something like a laugh came out of his throat. “God, you’re pretty. Did I luck out! A foxy nurse. You married?”
“Yes,” I lied.
His fingers groped for mine. “Where’s the ring?” He had a jump on Braille. “How old are you?”
I checked his dressing. I had been a nurse for four years. Nothing like this had ever happened. “I think you need a pain shot.”
I left the room. Patty was curled in a chair reading. She looked up. “How is he?” I drew the Demerol in the syringe. “You wanna trade?” He was waiting for me, tapping his fingers on the steel rail. “You’re spunky- I like that in my women.”
“Listen to me, Mr. Gonzales.” I leaned over him. “You have been seriously hurt. You almost bled to death.”
He smiled, a better one this time. Both corners of his mouth lifted. “This is my lucky night. I’ve waited for a woman like you all my life. Hey, all the others, I was just marking time.” His fingers were tracing a slow pattern up the inside of my arm. I pulled away.
“If you don’t keep quiet, I’m not coming in here anymore and-.” He waved one hand and put a finger to his lips. I started laughing. I checked his blood pressure again, the stethoscope in my ears. One of his hands fell off the edge of the bed, brushing my thigh.
IT WILL HURT-‘LIKE LOVE’
“Listen, I’m not married or engaged, I’m24 and I think you’re cute,” I said all in one breath. “And I don’t know why I’m telling you this.” His fingers found mine. “Cause I’m irresistible.”
“I suppose it’s none of my business, but what happened?”
He shook his head. “I was pretty drunk. I said something to some guys standing next to my car and next think I know they’re cutting me.”
I prepared to give him the injection. He pushed up his pajama sleeve for me. “Will it hurt?” he asked like a child.
I wiped it with an alcohol pad. “Only for a moment.”
“Like love,” he answered, and I found myself smiling again.
I checked him frequently for the rest of my shift. He was sleeping when I left at 7:30. When I came back the next night he was gone. Checked himself out against medical advice, Patty told me. “Can’t keep those Latins down.”
We hadn’t exchanged phone numbers, there was no address on the chart, and I never saw him again.
Maybe it was better that way. Bruised, boozed and contused. My Latin lover.
(Marta Salinas is a registered nurse at a migrant farm labor camp in Woodburn, Ore.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
DID SUCCESS SPOIL LUIS? Playwright Luis Valdez’s road to commercial success has had more potholes in it than the California farm byways he traveled those many lean years with El Teatro Campesino.
But as his hits Zoot Suit, Corridos and most recently La Bamba attest, the man has successfully bounced over and swerved around them all.
His targets and critics in the old days were greedy growers and heartless, faceless agribusinessmen.
Then his stage production of Corridos changed that a bit. It drew some protest from fellow Latinos, including a critical review from respected writer Jose Antonio Burciaga. Burciaga challenged its stereotyping and demeaning cultural portrayals
The television adaptation drew more criticism. Another respected Latino critic, Ricardo S6nchez of the San Antonio Express News, jumped all over it.
Now Valdez is feeling the Latino heat again. When he visited the University of California at Santa Barbara a couple of weeks ago, a group of about 20 Chicanos who claimed to be from UCLA lay in waiting.
As he attempted to lecture on unity, they heckled him continually and engaged others in the predominantly Chicano audience in what reporters Doug Arellanos and Jess Lerma described as “a verbal free-for-all that at times threatened to turn violent.”
Writing in UCLA’s Daily Bruin, Arellanes and Lerma reported that the group accused him of selling out his heritage to make it in Hollywood.
The reporters captured some dialogue worthy of Teatro Campesino itself:
VALDEZ: “You call me a sellout? Then you don’t understand the system... I have had to fight harder, longer hours and more intensely to get plays like Zoot Suit and La Bamba in the mass audience..
HECKLER: “You’re riding the tide of all the people that fought to get Chicanos in the institutions that denied..
VALDEZ: “How old are you, brother?”
HECKLER: “I’m 26, sir.”
VALDEZ: “When I was 25,1 was on the picket lines with C6sar Ch&vez, and I have continued to stay on the picket lines. The picket lines have shifted, brother.”
HECKLER: “He’s another vendido.”
AUDIENCE: Boos and hisses.
VALDEZ (to audience): “I’m glad I can still provoke a little controversy.”
HECKLER: “That’s a typical comment from someone in a shirt and tie.”
VALDEZ: “Do you think that huaraches or workshirts are going to make me any more human? Whaf s the matter with you? This is just a costume... ”
Host Mario Garcia, chairman of UCSB’s Chicano Studies Department, offered this review of the theatrics:
“While I may be somewhat sympathetic to the comments (the hecklers) were making, their tactics undermined their efforts to educate the audience.” Valdez, he told the reporters, has made “certain artistic and ultimately political compromises in his effort
to try to break into the mainstream. .L
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
JESSE JACKSON, Democratic presidential candidate, talking to black business leaders and politicians in Sacramento Jan. 19, lists the “five deadly ways” the media portrays minorities:
“It projects us as less intelligent than we are, as less hard working than we work, as less patriotic than we are, as less universal than we are, and as more violent than we are - in ways designed to poison the minds of the common people.”
. Only a tired doctor on
Feb. 8, 1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
TEATRO CHICANO: Entries for the Teatro Chicano de Tucson (see Arts& Entertainment) should be postmarked no later than Feb. 14 and mailed to: Playwrights Competition, Teatro El Sol, 308 E. Congress St., Tucson, Ariz. 85701. Contact Elizabeth Siqueiros at (602) 884-6821.
DRAMATIC PITCH: Entries for HAMAS' Dramatized Pitch (see Arts & Entertainment) should be accompanied by a $25 entry fee ($75 fee for non-members includes membership). Send submissions, postmarked no later than Feb. 10, to: HAMAS, 956 N. Seward St., Suite 234 A&B, Hollywood, Calif. 90038. Contact Carlos H. Cantu at (213) 838-9772.
DISTRICT POPULATION REPORT: For a copy of Election Data Services’ 35-page report on the nation’s congressional district population, forecasting which states stand to gain or lose representation in the House, send a $20 check to: EDS, 1522 K St. NW, Suite 626, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 789-2004.
VOTING AGE REPORT: The U.S. Census Bureau has released a report on voting-age population that includes projections by broad agegroups, sex, race and Hispanic origin. For a copy of “Projections of the Population of Voting Age for States, November 1988” (specify series P-25, No. f 1019), write: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (A price was not set by press time.)
CALIFORNIA POPULATION STUDY: To request a copy of the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy’s report, “California Population Characteristics: Regional Market Update & Projections,” which includes projections of the state's population growth, the ethnic composition of the population and information on recent immigrants, write: CCSCE, 610 University Ave, Palo Alto, Calif. 94301 (415) 321-8550. (Cost of the study is $145.)
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID: The summer 1987 issue of Educational Record, a magazine published by the American Council on Education, is entirely dedicated to financial aid: the increasing indebtedness of students, the future of programs and their importance. For a copy of the 54-page publication, send $7.50 to: ACE Publications Department, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036.
UNITED WAY MANAGEMENT: United Way of America is seeking candidates for its yearlong management training program. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree. The lowest salary is $18,000 and deadline for applications is Feb. 26. For more information and applications, contact: Personnel Development Division, UWA, 701 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, Va. 22314-2045 (703) 836-7100.
CONNECTING
IMMIGRANT RELATIONS TO BE STUDIED
The Ford Foundation is funding a $1 million research project to study how U.S. immigrants and residents adjust to each other in multiethnic communities nationally, it was announced Jan. 28.
The two-year project will observe and interview longtime residents at work school, church and community events and in local organizations in Chicago, Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Houston and Garden City, Kan.
The study, “Changing Relations: Newcomers and Established Residents in U.S. Communities,” will collect the data and identify the emerging relationships, positive and negative.
LATINA PROGRAM SUPPORTED
The Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program at the University of Texas at El Paso, which helps girls and their mothers learn about careers, computers and life planning, has been granted $144,000 by the Gannett Foundation, it was announced Jan. 19.
The program, started in 1986, brings girls and their mothers to meetings once a month for a year to help them develop positive self images.
Latino girls are the least likely of any ethnic group to finish school and usually begin to consider dropping out in the sixth grade, according to UTEP.
YOUTH CENTER TACKLES AIDS
The Latin American Youth Center of Washington, D.C., announced recently an initiative to provide AIDS education and outreach to Latino youth in the metropolitan area
The center's AIDS awareness campaign will target education arid outreach to sexually active youth to help reverse the overall disproportionate incidence of AIDS in the Hispanic community.
The initiative, which is funded with $10,000 in private donations, includes the distribution of 10,000 condoms and culturally adapted educational materials in Spanish.
DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ student poster contest, with more than $7,000 in scholarships and prizes, has been extended to March 31.
The annual contest seeks designs that promote an immigrant’s transition from permanent resident status to U.S. citizenship.
For information call NALEOs toll-free number, 1-800-44-NALEO.
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
BILINGUAL EDUCATION
San Francisco Feb. 10-13
“Bilingual Education: English Plus for a Productive
Economy" isthe theme forthe 13th annual conference
of the California Association for Bilingual Education.
The conference’s goal is to enhance the skills of
educators.
Janet Lou (415) 834-9455
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Feb. 11
The University of Southern California’s Mexican American Alumni Association will hold its 14th annual scholarship dinner. Since 1973 the association has awarded more than $2 million in scholarships. Raul Vargas (213) 743-2456
INSTALLATION BANQUET Las Vegas, Nev. Feb. 12
Las Vegas Mayor Ron Lurie will be the main speaker at the installation banquet of the Nevada Latin 4
Chamber of Commerce.
Otto Mdrida (702) 385-7367
ALUMNI REUNION Los Angeles Feb. 12-14
The Yale Club of Southern California will sponsor a reunion for Latino graduates from throughout the cou ntry. I ncluded at the function will be workshops on Latino participation in graduate school, politics, medicine, education, business, law and the public sector.
Fernando Inzunza (213) 663-6065
COMING SOON
CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP
National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed
Officials
Miami Feb. 18,19 Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536
PUBLICATIONS
National Association of Hispanic Publications Las Vegas, Nev. Feb. 18-20 Fred Flores (702) 384-1514
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES Howard University School of Communications Feb. 8,1988
Washington, D.C. Feb. 18-20 Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491
ALCOHOL AND DRUG PROBLEMS National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations Miami Feb. 18-21
Tom Blackburn-Rodrtguez (202) 371-2100
INSTALLATION BANQUET
San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
San Antonio Feb. 20
Ramiro Cavazos (512) 225-0462
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANASINTHEWORKPLACE: TheMexican American Opportunity Foundation will sponsor the 12th annual National HispanicWomerfsConference in Los Angeles Feb. 19. Approximately4,000 people are expected to attend this year's conference, which will include workshops on such topics as negotiating, non-traditional employment future of the job market and financing careers. I n addition to 100 corporate recruiters on hand, five Latinas will be presented with the Woman of the Year award. For further information call Verdnica Alvarez-Tostado at (818) 289-2000.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
GS-1035-11/12
Salary Range: $27,716-$33,218 Closing Date: Indefinite Promotion Potential: GS-12 Competitive Service
Public Information Office Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census Suitland, Maryland
DUTIES: Incumbent participates in the planning and development of information and promotion programs with regard to specific activities and reports instituted by the Census Bureau. Incumbent has specific responsibility for planning and carrying out such efforts with regard to the Hispanic media, taking into account the needs and facilities of the specialized media outlets. Writes press releases, features, and speeches. Prepares audio/ visual materials for use by electronic media, and such other materials as radio and video scripts for use by PIO or Bureau officials. Coordinates monthly Commerce Department radio spot service to Spanish-language radio stations throughout the country. Reviews Bureau press releases and reports for public affairs implication, specialized data user interests such as minority groups, and general public interest in order to recommend public affairs strategies and specialized dissemination efforts. Performs a variety of other related duties as required and assigned by the Public Information Officer or the Assistant Public Information Officer. Ability to develop written materials for use in a variety of media with the aim of promoting both understanding and acceptance of the Census Bureau’s often-times controversial and complex programs. Ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with media representatives, as well as members of the business community, other government agencies, and the general public who may be responsive, indifferent or even hostile toward Bureau programs.
QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED: The incumbent must possess 3 years of experience in an occupational field where the work required demonstrated possession of skills necessary to learn and perform the work characteristics of this position. Successful completion of a 4-year degree ir. any field provided that the education demonstrated was in a related area. One year of the required experience must be equivalent to the next lower grade in the Federal Service.
Must be fluent in Spanish.
U.S. Citizenship required.
For further information on this vacancy, please contact Maury Cagle, Assistant Chief, Public Information Office, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233,(301)763-4051.
The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunities Employer
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for professional Los Angeles Hispanic-American theatre to manage all administrative aspects of the theater, e.g. fund-raising, marketing, personnel, and public relations. Salary mid-30s. Send resume to: Chairman, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, 421 N. Avenue 19, Los Angeles, Calif. 90031.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-7755.
GAO EVALUATOR
The U.S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelor's (2.9 GPA or higher) or master's degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency, and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities.
We are interested in business, economics, computer science, government, or public administration majors to work in Washington, D.C., or one of our 14 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you.
To obtain an application (deadline to apply is April 8,1988) contact U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington, D.C., Attn: Eileen Marek (202) 275-8904.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER CITY OF DALLAS
City of Dallas Assistant City Manager. This position reports to the city manager and is responsible for executive level management of several departments. Bachelor's degree plus graduate study in public administration and at least seven years of management experience and multi-function operations including municipal administration, major staff or line function, budget and financial management. An MTA or other related advance degree is preferred. Salary range is based on education, experience and previous earnings.
Submit a letter of introduction and resume (including salary history detailing management and professional experience by Feb. 29,1988 to the Director of Personnel, Personnel Department 1500 Marilla, City Hall, Room 6 AN, Dallas, Texas, 75201.
Latino Public Policy Fellowships for 1988
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announces three competitions for Latinos
# Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the IUP Centers or a public policy institution. One year stipend. Deadline: April 15,1988.
# Summer Workshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Transportation and living expenses for four-week summer program. Eligibility: faculty, researchers and advanced graduate students. Deadline: April 24,1988.
# Graduate Student Training Seminar. Transportation and living expenses for two-week summer program. Deadline: April 15, 1988.
For more information contact Raquel Ovryn Rivers Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10158, (212) 661-0280, or Harriet Romo, IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies Student Services Bldg. 4.120, Austin, TX 78712,(512)471-1817.
CRS GRADUATE RECRUIT PROGRAM FOR
SUMMER 1988 Congressional Research Service Library of Congress
The Congressional Research Service (CRS), the department of the Library of Congress with the responsibility for providing Congress with research, analysis and reference assistance, announces its summer employment programs for 1988. These programs are designed to recruit the nation’s best graduate students- particularly minority students- for career opportunities in a public policy organization. In addition to temporary summer employment, they offer the possibility of non-competitive permanent placement or an indefinite 13-month position following successful completion of the summer appointment and receipt of a graduate degree.
Appointments will be made fora period of90-120 daysatGS-7 ($18,726 peranum),GS-9 ($22,907 peranum), GS-11 ($27,716 peranum) depending upon the selectee’s educational qualifications at the time of the appointment. For more information concerning this program and application materials, which are due February 29,1988, please call:
Bessie E.H. Alkisswani CRS Administration Office (202) 287-8803
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
DEADLINE EXTENDED: Entriesforthe Teatro Chicano de Tucsorfs new Playwrights’ Competition wilt be accepted through Feb. 14.
The company, founded in 1981, has a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to conduct a search for new plays that “deal with the Chicano-Hispano experience in the Southwest” The winning play will be produced at the group's Teatro El Sol in Tucson and presented at the TENAZ (Teatro Nacional de Aztldn) theater festival, to be held at San Antonio’s Guadalupe Theater July 5-10.
Original, unproduced works- in English, Spanish or bilingual- will be accepted. The selected playwright will receive $350 plus transportation expenses to Tucson and San Antonio.
Another deadline this week is for the Dramatized Pitch, sponsored by the writers’ committee of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences. Entries, postmarked no later than February 10, should include one full script for television, a two-page synopsis and a 15-minute presentation script.
Three of the 15-minute scripts will be produced and staged for an audience of television development personnel. Entries must have at least two leading Hispanic characters and contain positive Hispanic
role models. (See Collecting for detaila)
MAS AMERICA: The Spanish-language TV news magazine America began airing weekly last month on Unlvlaidn. The30-minute program is hosted by Jorge Ramos and Marla Elena Salinas, anchors of the nightly news broadcast.
America, produced in Washington, D.C., by ZGS Productions, is Univlsidn’s only weekly program done by an independent U.S. producer.
The programs airs on Thursdays at 10:30 p.m. (EST).
This week’s edition features segments on smoking trends and “love in the ’80s.”
Also airing on Unlvisidn this week is a variety special featuring singer Marla Conchita Alonso - Feb. 13, 10:30 p.m. (EST). The Cuban/Venezuelan singer/actress is one of nine performers nominated this year for a Grammy in the “Best Latin Pop” category.
SIMULCAST NEWS: The national pay-per-view network Request Television has just experimented with the cablecasting of a film with a Spanish-language radio simulcast.
The movie, Columbia Pictures’ La Bamba, aired Jan. 22 and Feb. 1 insome175 Request subscriber markets across the nation. Spanish simulcasts were offered in 37 of those markets- mostly in California, Texas and Florida. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
STUDENTS TUTORED ON ELECTIONS: Classline, USA Todays educational services department, and El Diario-La Prensa, a New York City daily Spanish-language newspaper owned by the Gannett newspaper chain, are5** working together to produce a Spanish-Ian-®* guage publication on the 1988 presidential election.
Modeled after USA Decision ’88, it is a 24-: page, full-color tabloid for Classline’s classroom program. It includes interviews, quizzes, statistics, graphics and tips, and will be distributed with a 40-page teaching guide and issues of USA Today.
Students in California, Texas, Florida and New York will be targeted. They can expect to see the publication by the end of February or early March. Super Tuesday is March 8.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen- Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Julio Laboy. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
The main subscribers to the paper are expected to be elementary and secondary schools, adult education programs and bilingual programs.
Classline is also working with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials to identify ways it can be included in NALEOs programs to help immigrants obtain .citizenship.
MINORITY JOB FAIR: The American Newspaper Publishers Association and the American Society of Newspaper Editors are staging a Minority Job Fair in Atlanta Feb. 11-13 as part of their effort to increase minority representation on newspaper staffs.
The event will be held at the Atlanta Hyatt Regency Hotel. Registration is $20. For further information call (404) 526-5692.
NAHJ GETS GANNETT GRANT: The Gannett Foundation has renewed its general support for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, granting NAHJ
$100,000 for 1988.
It is the fourth consecutive year that Gannett has funded NAHJ at that level.
MEDIA MOVES: Ricardo Pimentel joins The Sacramento Bee as an assistant metro editor Feb. 15. He had been a Washington correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers for the past two years... Rosalind Soliz, a reporter with KERA-TV, Dallas, was awarded first place in the TV News Feature category of the Women at Work Broadcast Awards. The awards are sponsored by the National Commission on Working Women... Ray Chdvez, a former journalism professor at the University of Texas at El Paso, leaves his job to become an assistant city editor for The El Paso Herald Post.. Virginia Escalante, a former reporter with the Los Angeles Times, has joined the faculty of the University of Arizona at Tucson She will advise a bilingual newspaper published by journalism students...
- Julio Laboy
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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FEB 81988 Making The News This Week p art icu l arly Hi spanic ones ... Annabelle Jaramillo, former head of National IMAGE, announces that she will run for a seat in the Oregon state Assembly ... Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer appoints Arturo Vazquez as acting director of the Mayor's Office of Employment and Training . . . Golfer Chi Chi Rodriguez wins $300,000 of a $360,000 purse at the first Senior Skins Game in Honolulu. His two-day earnings are almos t a thi rd of what he won in 26 years on the Profes sional Golfers' Association Tour . . . Miguel de Grandy, the former zarzuela and opera director in the Cuban National Theater, di e s in M i ami of a cardiac arrest at the age of 78 .. . Inglewood, Calif. , resident Hector Gutierrez, 36, is among eight people injured-one died-when a pa r king garage grate they were standing on collapsed, dropp ing them 25 feet. Most of the nine had just completed a 1 OK Super Bowl race in Redondo Beach, Calif ... Texas Gov . Bill Clements names Max Castillo, pres ident of San Antonio College, and Leo Sayavedra, president of La redo State University, to a nine-member panel that will formulate a plan to increase minority enrollment at state colleges and universities . . . Texas House Spe a ker Gib Lewis names state Rep . Gregory Luna of San Antonio, Marla Elena Flood, a member of the state Board of Education, and William Ortego, superintendent of the Azle Inde pendent School District, to a 15-member pan el to study the state's system of school finance. The panel was created as a result of a court rulin g that found the current system unconstitutional because it did not equitably finance districts that did not have a large tax base, vol.sNo.•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Feb. 8,1988 Hispa nics Projected to Gain in Congress Remap California , Texas and Florida , key Hispanic states politically, will gain U.S. House seats as a resul t of the 1990 census if current population trends continue, according t o pro jections released Jan . 25 by the Washington, D . C.based Election Data Services . According to the EDS report , if Congress were reapportioned today, Cal i fornia would pick up six seats, Texas f our seats and Florida, three. This reflects their growth since 1980. Florida ' s population grew by 2 , 227,000, a 23.3% increase . Texas gained 2 ,560,000 people, a 17.9% jump , and California grew by 3,995,000, 16.8%. Kimball Brace, president of EDS, a private consulting firm , said two states with su bstantial percentages of Latinos-New York and Illinois -stand to lose congressional representation. New York is expected to lose three seats and illinois, two. At present California has four Hispanic representatives , Texas , four, Florida, none, New York, one, and Illinois , none. Census population estimates are used t o deter mine the reapportionment of congres sional seats. Thirty-three of the nation's 37 congressional districts with a Hispanic popu lation of at least 20% gained popula t ion be tween 1980 and 1987, the study showed. All Hispanics presently holding seats are not in danger of losing them . Of those Latino representatives , New Mexico has two and Puerto Rico, one. " Clearly the numbers indicate that Hi s panics will be gaining representation . Given th e his torical trend, this should mean more Hispan i c representativ e , " Harry Pach6n , executive director of the N ational A ssociation of Latino Elected a nd Appointed Offic ia ls , told Weekly Report. The number of His pa nics elected to Congress doubled from fiv e voting members to 10 after reapportionment of districts follow ing the 1980 census . Districts presently average 560,000 people. Following the ne xt rea pportionment, each district will have appro x imately 573 ,900 peo p le . Voting-Age Population Estimated Hispanics are expected t o represent 7% of the nation's 183 million residents of voting age-or 13 million-by Nov. 1 , 1988, according to a report released by the U.S . Census Bureau Feb . 3 . Data from the 1980 Census showed that Hispanics accounted for 8.9 million of the nation's 164.6 million population in November of that year. Hispanics were then 5.4% of U .S. residents 18 years and older. Overall, the number of residents 18 years and older is projected to have increased to 183 million by November 1988 from 175 m i llion during the same time four years earlier. Nearly two-thirds of the Hispanic voting age population resided in California, Texas and New York, found the study. Forty-five percent o . f Latinos who will be of voting age in November 1988 are expected to be living in the Western region of the United States, which includes California, New Mexico, Ari zona and Colorado. Included in the Census Bureau's projections are an estimated 2 . 5 million undocumented aliens, the majority of whom are Hispanic. It did not project how many legal Hispanic residents of voting age are citizens. Felix Perez VOTING-AGE POPULATION (November 1, 1988)* Total Hisp. % N.M. 1 , 101 396 36. 0 Calif. 20,875 4,514 21. 6 Texas 12,270 2,584 21.1 Ariz. 2 ,605 379 14.5 Colo. 2,489 264 10. 6 N.Y. 13,480 1,388 10. 3 Fla. 9 ,614 907 9 . 4 Nev. 780 57 7 . 3 N.J. 5,943 436 7.3 Ill. 8,550 568 6.6 • Numbers in thousands Source: "Projec tion s oft he Population of Voting Age tor States, November 1988'" Norberta Sali nas, chairman of the Mexican American Democrats of Texas, also told Weekly Report the EDS figures indicate a potential for mo re Latino representatives . " T his w ill especially apply in South Texas ; " said Sa lina s . " MAD is most influential there. Our he avi est membership and broadest net work is in South Texas. We will have more districts and possibly MAD members running to r eprese nt them," he added . . Because the House is limited to435 seats, som e states must lose representation for o thers to gain seats. Fearing a loss of districts, som e representatives of projected "loser" states ar e proposing legislation that would exclud e u ndocume nted aliens from the census count that determines reapportionment. U.S. Rep. Thomas Ridge(D-Penn.) introduced l egislation Dec . 18 that directs the Census Bureau to exclude undocumented persons from its reapportionment count. R i dge asserts that hist ori c al references indicate the intent of the law was to do just that. " We do want to quantify the illegal population, but they h o ld citizenship and allegiance to a different country, " said his press secretary, Peggy Peterson. Terri Ann Lowenthal, staff director of the U .S. Hou se Subcommittee on the Census an d Population, disagrees. " They haven't been reading their history. Congress did debate ( in the 1860s) whether or not to base reapcontinued on page 2 Union Chooses Sandoval Alicia Sandoval , long active in Southern California union and broadcast circles, will joi n the nation's largest teachers' union in Washington, D . C., early next month as its director of communications. The union, the National Education Association , has nearly 1.9 million members and had a budget of $118 million for 1986. Sandova l was selected Feb. 1 from more than 300 candid ates. She becomes NEA's highest level Hispanic. For 12 years Sandoval hosted the daily Los Angeles television interview show "Lefs Rap." She served as director of communications for the los Angeles County Federation of Labor(AFLCIO) between 1985 and 1987.

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Calif. Latinos Predict ed to Grow300/o from '87 to'95 The Hispanic population in California will grow to 7.6 million in 1995 from 5 . 9 million in 1987 an increase of 30%, estimates a study released Jan. 27 by a private research group in Palo Alto, Calif. The Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy concludes that this in crease in the state's Hispan ic population will push their representation in the overall popu lation from 21.5% to 23.9%. California Latinos and Asian Americans will comprise nearly 70% of the state's growth during the eight year period, says the study. It predicts the state will grow from last year's level of 27 million t o 32 m i llion in 1995. Following a r e the population increases for the state's m ajo r groups for 1987 and 1995 ( the numbers a r e in thousands) : Hispanic Asian Black White 1987 5 ,879 2 ,549 1 ,933 16,930 1995 7,632 3 ,850 2 ,113 18,382 + 30% 51% 9% 9% The stud y attri butes the Hispanic growth to th eir high f e rtility rate , the influx of do cumented an d undocumented immigrants and the large numberofLatinasin their peak child-bearing years. Because Latinos account for 30% of the state's residents who are 17 years old or younger, the study notes that Hispanics will continue to augment their numbers for the next several years . Despite their increasing representation , Hispan ics may face employment problems if their educational attainment level is not im proved, warns the study. While the California job market will increasingly demand better education and skills, Hispanics conti nue to suffer a high dropout rate and are increasingly relegated to laborer jobs . Felix Perez Senate Passes Civil Righ ts Legislation Lati!'o The u .s. Senate passed legislation Jan . 28 But Mario More no , d i rector of the Mexican Agal nst AidIng Contras cutti ng oft-federal funds to institutions if any American Legal D efense and Educational A group of U . S . Hispanic leaders , back from of their departments discrirr,inate btc.;c wse of Fund's Washin g t on , D.C., office , told Weekly a fact-finding m i ssion to Costa Rica and Nica sex, age, race or handicap, broa den ing a Report that an at tached amendment greatly ragua sponsored by the Southwest Voter 1984 Supreme Court decision limiting th e diminish es the l egislation's appeal for civil Registration Education Project, spoke out governmenfs ability to withhold aid. rights groups . Feb. 2 i n Washington, D . C., against U . S . The 75-14 vote is in reaction to the 1984 The amendment would allow universit i es ment aid to the contras. Grove City College vs. Bell decision. That and hospitals th at r eceive federal funds to Among the de l egation's members we r e decision held that the federal gove rnment refuse to pay for o r perform abortions. SVREP President William Velasquez , former could withhold funding only f rom those pro"We wanted a c l e an bill," said Moreno, "but New Mexico Governor Toney Anaya, former grams within the institutions found to discri we've be en fight ing f or t his for so long and U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Julian Nava and minate . hard that we'll take w hat we've got." former President of the League of United The bill, the Civil Rights Restoration Act, The bill is expected t o pass i n the House . If Latin American Citizens Mario Obledo. Also was described by its backers as one of the Presi dent Rea ga n vet o e s it, as promised, a speaking out against aid to the Nicaraguan most sign ificant pieces of civil rights legistwo-thir ds vote by both c h ambers will be insurgency group at the Capitol Hill press lation to come before Congress in severa l neces sary for it to be c om e law. conference were Reps. Albert Bustamante of years. -Julio Laboy Texas and Esteban Torres and Matthew MarCalif. Texas, Fla. to G ain M ost Seats continued from page 1 portionment on citizenship and it was examined again in the early part of this century ... They knew what they were doing," she said. "I fear that the motive behind the legislation is a reaction to what is perceived to be a growing number of persons of Hispanic origin who are in this country illegally," Lowenthal commented. She sai d tha t operationally it would be nearly i m p ossible t o count undocumented pers ons. U ndocumented persons would have to check a b ox ; they will either lie or be disco uraged fr om filling out the entire census form, she com mented . R idge's bill is awaiting action in the House Pos t Offic e and Civil Service Committee . -Julio Laboy _ Hispanics Grow 33/o in Wash. State A correction in the population projection method used by Washington state, causin g Hispanics to re-emerge as the state's largest minority group, accounted for Latinos growing 24% more in 1987 than was estimated in 1986, explained a state official in Seattle Jan. 26. As a result of the correction, there were an estimated 159,504 Hispanics in Washington CORRECTION T h e Jan. 25, 1988, issue of Weekly Report incorrectly listed the numbe r of Hispanic staffers at the American Newspaper Publis hers Association. ANPA has four Hispanics on a staff of 165. The American Society of News paper Editors has no Hispanics on its six member staff . 2 last year , said Gary Robinson, assistant director of the s t at e ' s Off i ce of Financial Management. This represents a 33% increase from 1980 census fi gures . The Hispanic population in Thurston County, in the S ou t hwestern portion of the state, grew 64% f r om 1986 to 1987, largely as a resu l t o f th e adjustment. Prior t o Jan . 1 , the state had classified only those p e r s ons who identified themselves as Mexican or Chicano on death and birth certi ficate s a s Hispanics. The une x pected growth in the state's Latino popula tio n should i ncrease the number of jobs a vailable through refigured affirmative action go a ls , said Robinson. Funding for His panic p rogra m s doled out by the state and loca l gov ernments on the basis of population repre sen t at i on should also grow, he added . tinez of California Bustamante , head of the Congressional His panic Caucus, had voted for contra aid the last t ime an aid package came before Congress. Thegroup'sJan.27-Feb . 1 tripwassponsored by SVREP as part of its three-year program to have U . S . Hispanics play a more active role in the formulation of U.S. government policy in Latin America. Last July Velasquez vis ited opposition party leaders in Ch i le . Rule Nixed The 9th U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled Jan . 27 that a rule requ i ring Los Angeles munic i pal court empioyees to speak only English appeared to violate laws prohibiting discrimination based on national origin . The court, on a 3 0 vote, rejected the reasons on which the rule was based , in cluding that it was mandated by an amend ment making English the state's official language. Judge Stephen Reinhardt, in the courfs opinion , wrote that the rule"has contributed to a work place atmosphere that derogates Hispanics. .. and heightens racial animosity." The ruling upheld an injunction in 1985 by a U.S. District Court judge. The English only rule was implemented the year before in the Municipal Court of the Southeast District of Los Angeles in Huntington Park. H ispanic Link Weekly Report

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Marta Salinas, guest columnist Bruised Valentine I remember my first experience with a Latin lover . It was on the midnight shift in a quiet hospital, Catholic, as I recall, which made the emergency-room diagnosis that much funnier. "Bruised, boozed and contused." It obviously was not the ward clerk's writing. Only a tired doctor on amphetamines could have written it. Patty, the other R.N., looked at me and smiled. "That's your department. You take him and I'll take the other seven." "OK" I read the chart. How much trouble could this guy be? He had 66 stitches in one calf and a dozen more on his face. I saw the orderlies wheeling the gurney away and the sheets were a bright off-pink. "Gonzales, Humberto," the name plaque read. I stamped all the forms and tiptoed in with my flashlight. I reeled from the odor. A brewery would have been milder. This explained the "boozed" part . I turned on the light. Two dark slits and a massive, distended expanse of purple greeted me. Definitely bruised. 'YOU MARRIED?' HE CROAKED His vital signs were good. One of the slits moved and a sliver of white showed. The other slit strained but was unable to open. "You married," he croaked . It's a temporary dementia, I told myself. As I checked his pulse, one hand grabbed my wrist. The mouth tried a smile. Something like a laugh came out of his throat. "God, you're pretty. Did I luck out! A foxy nurse. You married?" "Yes," I lied. His fingers groped for mine . "Where's the ring?" He had a jump on Braille . "How old are you?" I checked his dressing . I had been a nurse for four years . Nothing like this had ever happened. "I think you need a pain shot." I left the room. Patty was curled in a chair reading . She looked up. "How is he?" I drew the Demerol in the syringe . "You wanna trade?" He was waiting for me, tapping his fingers on the steel rail. "You're spunkyI like that in my women." "Listen to me, Mr. Gonzales." I leaned over him. "You have been seriously hurt. You almost bled to death." He smiled, a better one this time. Both corners of his mouth lifted . "This is my lucky night. I've waited for a woman like you all my life . Hey, all the others, I was just marking time." His fingers were tracing a slow pattern up the inside of my arm . I pulled away. "If you don't keep quiet, I'm not coming in here anymore and-. " He waved one hand and put a finger to his lips. I started laughing. I checked his blood pressure again, the stethoscope in my ears. One of his hands fell off the edge of the bed, brushing my thigh. IT WILL HURT-'LIKE LOVE' "Listen, I'm not married or engaged, l'm24 and I think you're cute," I said all in one breath. "And I don't know why I'm telling you this." His fingers found mine. "Cause I'm irresistible." "I suppose it's none of my business, but what happened?" He shook his head. "I was pretty drunk. I said something to some guys standing next to my car and next think I know they're cutting me." I prepared to give him the injection. He pushed up his pajama sleeve for me. "Will it hurt?" he asked like a child. I wiped it with an alcohol pad. "Only for a moment." "Like love," he answered, and I found myself smiling again. I checked him frequently for the rest of my shift. He was sleeping when I left at 7:30. When I came back the next night he was gone. Checked himself out against medical advice, Patty told me. "Can't keep those Latins down." We hadn't exchanged phone numbers, there was no address on the chart, and I never saw him again. Maybe it was better that way. Bruised, boozed and contused. My Latin love r . (Marta Salinas is a registered nurse at a migrant farm labor camp in Woodburn , Ore.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua DID SUCCESS SPOIL LUIS? Playwright Luis Valdez's road to commercial success has had more potholes in it than the California farm byways he traveled those many lean years with El Teatro Campesino. But as his hits Zoot Suit, Corridos and most recently La Bamba attest, the man has successfully bounced over and swerved around them all. His targets and critics in the old days were greedy growers and heartless, faceless agribusinessmen. Then his stage production of Corridos changed that a bit. It drew some protest from fellow Latinos, including a critical review from respected writer Jose Antonio Burciaga. Burciaga challenged its stereotyping and demeaning cultural portrayals. The television adaptation drew more criticism. Another respected Latino critic, Ricardo Sanchez of the San Antonio Express News, jumped all over it. Now Valdez is feeling the Latino heat again. When he visited the University of California at Santa Barbara a couple of weeks ago, a group of about 20 Chicanos who claimed to be from UCLA lay in waiting. As he attempted to lecture on unity, they heckled him continually and engaged others in the predominantly Chicano audience in what reporters Doug Arellanes and Jess Lerma described as"a verbal free-for-all that at times threatened to turn violent." Writing in UCLA's Daily Bruin, Arellanes and Lerma reported that the group accused him of selling out his heritage to make it in Hollywood . The reporters captured some dialogue worthy of Teatro Campe sino itself: VALDEZ: "You call me a sellout? Then you don't understand the system. . . I have had to fight harder, longer hours and more intensely to get plays like Zoot Suit and La Bamba in the mass audience ... " HECKLER: "You're riding the tide of all the people that fought to get Chicanos in the institutions that denied ... " VALDEZ: "How old are you, brother?" HECKLER: "I'm 25, sir." VALDEZ: "When I was 25, I was on the picket lines with Cesar Chavez, and I have continued to stay on the picket lines. The picket lines have shifted, brother." HECKLER: "He's another vendido . " AUDIENCE: Boos and hisses. VALDEZ (to audience): "I'm glad I can still provoke a little controversy." HECKLER: "That's a typical comment from someone in a shirt and tie." VALDEZ: "Do you think that huaraches or workshirts are going to make me any more human? What's the matter with you? This is just a costume . . . " Host Mario Garcia, chairman of UCSB's Chicano Studies Department, offered this review of the theatrics: "While I may be somewhat sympathetic to the comments (the hecklers) were making, their tactics undermined their efforts to educate the audience." Valdez, he told the reporters, has made "certain artistic and ultimately political compromises in his effort to try to break into the mainstream ... " Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • JESSE JACKSON, Democratic presidential candidate, talking to black business leaders and politicians in Sacramento Jan. 19, lists the "five deadly ways" the media portrays minorities: "It projects us as less intelligent than we are, as less hard working than we work, as less patriotic than we are, as less universal than we are, and as more violent than we are-in ways designed to poison the minds of the common people." Hi s panic Link Weekly Report Feb. 8, 1988 3

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COLLECTIN G TE A TRO CHICANO: Entries for t he Teatro Chicano de Tucson ( see A rts & Entertainment) should be po stmar ked no late r than Feb . 1 4 and m a iled to: Playwrigh ts C o mp et i t i on , Teatro E l Sol, 308 E. Congres s St., Tucson, Ariz . 85701. Contact Eli zabeth Siq ueiros at ( 6 0 2 ) 884 -6 821. DRAMATIC PIT C H: E n t rie s f or H AMAS' D r amatized Pit c h (see Arts & E n t ertainment) should be accomp anied by a $25 e ntry fee ($75 fee for non-memb ers in clude s m e m bership). Send submissions, postmarked no late r than F eb. 10 , to: HAMAS , 956 N. S ewa r d St., Suite 234 A&B, Hol ly wood, Cal if . 90038. Contact Carlos H. C a n t u at (213) 8389772. DISTRI C T PO P U LATI O N R EP ORT: For a copy of Elec tion Data Se r vices' 35page repo rt o n t he na tion 's cong ress i onal district population, forecas t ing w hich sta t e s s t a n d to gain or l ose repre sentation in the H ouse, send a $2 0 che c k t o : EDS , 1522 K St. NW, Su ite 626, Washing t on, D.C. 20005 (202) 78 9 -2004. VOTING AGE REP ORT : The U . S . C e n s us Burea u h as released a report on voting-age p opul ation t hat inclu des projection s by broad age groups, sex , rac e and H i s pani c o rigin. For a cop yof"Projections o f the Population of Voting Age f o r S ta tes, November 1988" (specify s er ies P 25 , No . 1 019) , write: Su pe rin te ndent of Docu ments, U .S. Go vern ment Pri n ti n g Office, W a shi ngton, D.C. 20402. (A price was no t set by press time . ) CALIFO RN I A POPU LATION S T UDY : To r equest a cop y of the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy's report, " Cali f ornia Po p ula t ion Characterist ics: Regi o nal Market Update & Projec t ions, " which includes projectio n s of the state's p opulation g r owth , the ethnic com p o s iti o n of the po pulation and i nforma t ion on rece nt immigran ts, writ e : C C SCE , 610 Uni versity Ave., P alo Alto , Calif. 94301 (415) 321-8550. (Cost of t he study is $145. ) STU DENT FINANCIAL AI D : The sum m er 1987 issue of E ducational Record, a magazine published by the Amer ican Counci l on Education, is enti r ely dedicated to financial aid : th e increasing indeb tedness of stud e nts, the future of prog r ams and t hei r importance. For a copy of the 54-p a ge publication , s end $7.50 to: ACE Pub l ications 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036. UNITED WAY MANAGEMENT: United Way of America is seeking candidates for its yearlong managemen t trai ning program. A pplicants must have a bachelor's degree . The low est salary is $18,000 and deadline f or applications is Feb. 26. Fo r more informa tion and applications , contact: Personnel Developm ent Division, U W A , 701 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, Va. 22314-2045 ( 703) 836-7100 . CONNECTING J IMMIGRANT RELATIONS TO BE STUDIED The Ford Foundation is funding a $1 million research project to study how U.S. immigrants and residents adjust to each other in multiethnic communities nationally, it was announced Jan . 28. The two-year project will observe and interview longtime residents at work, church and community events and in local organizations in Chicago, Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Houston and Garden City, Kan. The study , "Changing Relations : Newcomers and Established Residents in U.S. Communities," will collect the data and identify the emerging relationships, positive and negative. LATINA PROGRAM SUPPORTED The Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program at the University of Texas at El Paso, which helps girls and their mothers learn about careers, computers and life planning, has been granted $144,000 by the Gannett Foundation, it was announced Jan. 19. The program, started in 1986, brings girls and their mothers to meetings once a month for a year to help them develop positive self images . Latino girls are the least likely of any ethnic group to finish school and usually begin to consider dropping out in the sixth grade, according to UTEP. YOUTH CENTER TACKLES AIDS The Latin American Youth Center of Washington, D.C., announce . d recently an initiative to provide AIDS education and outreach to Lat i no youth in the metropolitan area. The center's AIDS awareness campaign will target education arid outreach to sexually active youth to help reverse the overall dis proportionate incidence of AIDS in the Hispanic community. The initiative, which is funded with $10,000 in private donations, includes the distribution of 10,000 condoms and culturally adapted educational materials in Spanish. DEADLINE EXTENDED The deadline for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials' student poster contest, with more than $7 ,000 in scholarships and prizes, has been extended to March 31. The annual contest seeks designs that promote an immigrant's transition from permanent resident status to U.S. citizenship. For information call NALEO's toll-free number , 1-SOD-44-NALEO . Julio Laboy Calendar Chamber of C ommerce. Otto Mer i da (702) 385-7367 Washington, D.C. Feb. 18-20 Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491 THIS WEEK BI LINGUAL EDUCATION San Francisco Feb . 10-13 "Bilingual Education : English Plus for a Producti v e Economy" is the theme for the 13th annual conferenc e of the California Association for Bilingual Education . The conference's goal is to enhance the skills o f educators. Janet Lou (415) 834-9455 SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Ang e les Feb. 11 The University of Southern California's Me x ican American Alumni Association will hold its 14th annual scholarship dinner. Since 1973 the association ha s awarded more than $2 m i llion in scholarships. Raul Vargas (213) 743-2456 INSTALLATION BANQUET Las Vegas, Nev . Feb. 12 Las Vegas Mayor Ron Lurie will be the main spea ke r at tl1le installation banquet of the Nevada L a t i n 4 ALUMNI REUNION Lo s Ange l e s Feb . 12-14 The Yale C lub of Southern California will sponsor a r e u nion for Latino graduates from throughout the cou ntr y . I ncluded at the function will be workshops o n Lat i no participation in graduate school, politics , medic i ne , ed ucation , business , law and the public sec tor. Fernandolnzunza(213)663-6065 COMING SOON CITIZENSHI P WORKSHOP N a t ion a l Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Offi ci a l s M i ami Feb . 18, 19 Ke ll y Parks (202) 546-2536 PUBLICATIONS N a t ional Association of Hispanic Publications Las Vegas, Nev. Feb . 18-20 Fred Flo r es (702) 384-1514 JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES How ard U n iversity School of Communications Feb. 8,1988 ALCOHOL AND DRUG PROBLEMS National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations Miami Feb. 18-21 Tom Blackburn-Rodriguez (202) 371-2100 INSTALLATION BANQUET San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce San Antonio Feb. 20 Ramiro Cavazos (512) SPOTLIGHT HISPANAS IN THE WORK PLACE: The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation will sponsor the 12th annual National Hispanic Women's Conference in Los Angeles Feb . 19. Approximately 4,000 people are expected to attend this year's conference, which will include workshops on such topics as negotiating, non-traditional employment, future of the job market and f i nancing careers. In addition to 100 corporate recruiters on hand, five Latinas will be presented with the Woman of the Year award . For further information call Ver6nica AlvarezTostado at (818) 289-2000. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE G8-1035-11/12 Salary Range : $27,716-$33,218 Closing Date: Indefinite Promotion Potential : G8-12 Competitive Service Public Information Office Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census Suitland, Maryland DUTIES: Incumbent participates in the p l anning and development of information and promotion programs with regard to specific activi t ies and reports instituted by the Census Bur e au . Incumbent has specific responsibi lit y for planning and carrying out such efforts with regard to the Hispanic media , taking into account the needs and facilities of the specialized media outlets . Writes press releases , features, and s peeches . Prepares audio/ visual materials for use by electronic media, and such other materials as radio and video scripts for use by PIO or Bureau officials. Coordinates monthly Commerce Department radio spot service to Spanish-language radio stations throughout the country. Reviews Bureau press releases and reports for public affairs implication, specialized data user interests such as minority groups, and general public interest in order to recommend public affairs strategies and specialized disseminati o n efforts. P erfor ms a variety of other related duties as required and assigned by the Pub lic Informatio n Officer or the Assistant Public Information Officer. Ability to develop written materials for use i n a variety of media with the aim of promoting both understanding and acceptance of the Census Bureau ' s often times controversial and complex programs . Abilit y to establish and maintain effective working relationships with media representatives, as well as m e mbers of the business community, other government agencies, and the general p ublic who may be responsive, indifferent or even hostile toward Bureau programs . QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED: The incumbent must possess 3 years of experience in an occupational field where the work required demons trated possession of skills necessary to learn and perform the work characteristics of this position. Su ccessful completion of a4-year degree ir. any field provided that the education demonstrat ed was in a related area . One year of the required experience must be equivalent to the next lower grade in the Federal Service. Must be fluent in Spanish. U .S. Citizenship required. For further information on this vacancy, plea se contact Mau ry Cagle, Assistant Chief, Public Information Office, Bureau of the Census , Washington, D . C . 20233, (301) 763-4051 . The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunities Employer EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for professional Los Angeles Hispanic-American theatre to manage all administrative aspects of the theater, e . g . fund-raising , marketing, personnel , and public relations. Salary mid-30s. Send resume to: Chairman, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, 421 N . Avenue 19, Los Angeles, Calif. 90031. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings , updated Mon days, for positions at the University . Call (202) 635-LAND. GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D .C., provides : e Design • Typesetting e Lay out • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483-7755. CRS GRADUATE RECRUIT PROGRAM FOR SUMMER 1988 Congressional Research Service Library of Congress The Congress i onal Research Service (CRS) , the department of the Library of Congress with the responsibility for providing Congress with research, analysis, and reference assistance , announces its summer employment programs for 1988. These programs are designed to recruit the nation's best graduate students-particularly minority students-for career opportunities in a public policy organization. In addition to temporary summer employment , they offer the possibility of non-competitive permanent placement or an indefinite 13-month position following successful completion of the summer appointment and receipt of a graduate degree. Appointments will be made fora period of90-120 days at GS-7 ($18 ,726 per anum) , GS-9 ($22,907 per anum) , GS-11 ($27,716 per anum) depending upon theselectee'seducational qualifications at the time of the appointment. For more information concerning this program and application materials , which are due February 29, 1988, please call: Hispanic Link Weekly Report Bessie E.H. Alkisswani CRS Administration Office (202) 287-8803 GAO EVALUATOR The U.S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelofs (2.9 GPA or higher) or mastefs degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency, and economy with which federal agencies carry out their res ponsibilities. We are interested in business, economics, computer science, government, or public administration majors to work in Washington, D .C., or one of our 14 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication sk i lls, we would like to hear from you . To obtain an application(deadline to apply is AprilS, 1988) contact U .S. General Account ing Office, Washington, D.C., Attn: Eileen Marek (202) 275-8904. An Equal Opportunity Employer ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER CITY OF DALLAS City of Dallas Assistant City Manager. This position reports to the city manager and is responsible for executive level management of several departments. Bachelofs degree plus graduate study in public administration and at least seven years of management experience and multHunction operations including: municipal administration, major staff or line function, budget and financial management. An MTA or other related advance degree is preferred. Salary range is based on education, experience and previous earnings . Submit a letter of introduction and resume (including salary history! detailing management and professional experience by Feb. 29, 1988 to the Director of Personnel, Personnel Depart1500 Marilla, City Hall, Room 6 AN, Dallas, Texas, 75201 . Latino Public Polley Fellowships for 1988 The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council annouhces three competitions for Latinos. • Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the IUP Centers or a public policy institution. One year stipend. Deadline: April 15, 1988. • Summer Worttahop In Statlatlcal Methode at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor . Transportation and living expenses for four-week summer program . Eligibility: faculty, researchers, and advanced graduate students. Deadline: April 24, 1988. • Graduate Student Training Seminar. Transportation and living expenses for week summer program. Deadline: April 15, 1988. -For more Information contact Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y . 10158, (212) 661-0280, or Harriet Romo, IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Bldg. 4.120, Austin, TX 78712,(512) 471-1817. 5

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Arts & Entertainment DEADLINE EXTENDED: Entries for the Teatro Chicano de Tucsoris new Playwrights' Competition will be accepted through Feb. 14. The company, founded in 1981, has a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to conduct a search for new plays that "deal with the Chicano-Hispano experience in the Southwest." The winning play will be produced at the group's Teatro El Sol in Tucson and presented at the TENAZ (Teatro Nacional de Aztlan) theater festival, to be held at San Antonio's Guadalupe Theater July 5-10. Original, unproduced works in English, Spanish or bilingual-will be accepted . The selected playwright will receive $350 plus trans portation expenses to Tucson and San Antonio. Another deadline this week is for the Dramatized Pitch, sponsored by the writers' committee of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences. Entries, postmarked no later than February 10, should include one full script for television, a two-page synopsis and a 15-minute presentation script. Three of the 15minute scripts will be produced and staged for an audience of television development personnel. Entries must have at least two leading Hispan i c characters and contain positive Hispanic role models. (See Collecting for details.) MAS AMERICA: The Spanish-language TV news magazine America began airing weekly last month on Unlvlsl6n. The30-minute program is hosted by Jorge Ramos and Maria Elena Salinas, anchors of the nightly news broadcast. America, produced in Washington, D.C., by ZGS Productions, is Univlsi6n's only weekly program done by an independent U.S. producer. The programs airs on Thursdays at 10:30 p.m. (ESl). This week's edition features segments on smoking trends and "love in the '80s." Also airing on Unlvisi6n this week is a variety special featuring singer Maria Conchita Alonso Feb. 13, 10:30 p.m. (ESl). The Cuban/Venezuelan singer/actress is one of nine performers nominated this year for a Grammy in the "Best Latin Pop" category. SIMULCAST NEWS: The national pay-per-view network Request Television has just experimented with the cablecasting of a film with a Spanish-language radio simulcast. The movie, Columbia Pictures' La Bamba, aired Jan. 22 and Feb. 1 in some 175 Request subscriber markets across the nation. Spanish simulcasts were offered in 37 of those marketsmostly in California, Texas and Florida. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas The main subscribers to the paper are $1 00,000 for 1988. M e d I . a Rep 0 rt expected to be elementary and secondary schools, adult education programs and gual programs. STUDENTS TUTORED ON ELECTIONS: Classline is also working with the National Class line, USA Today's educational services Association of Latino Elected and Appointed department, and El Diario-La Prensa, a New Officials to identify ways it included York City daily Spanish-language newspaper .programs to help 1mm1grants obtam owned by the Gannett newspaper chain, are ;.:t.c•t•zenshlp. working together to produce a MINORITY JOB FAIR: The American guage publication on the 1988 presidential:f<'Newspaper Publishers Association and the election. ,., American Society of Newspaper Editors are Modeled after USA Decision ' 88, it is a 24. staging a Minority Job Fair in Atlanta Feb. 11page , fulf.color tabloid for Classline's class13 as part of their effort to increase minority room program. It includes interviews, quizzes, representation on newspaper staffs . statistics, graphics and tips, and will be disThe event will be held at the Atlanta Hyatt tributed with a 40-page teaching guide and Regency Hotel. Registration is $20. For furissues of USA Today . ther information call (404) 526-5692. Students in California, Texas, Florida and NAHJ GETS GANNETT GRANT: The New York will be targeted. They can expect Gannett Foundation has renewed its general to see the publication by the end of February support for the National Association of or early March. Super Tuesday is March 8. Hispanic Journalists, granting NAHJ It is the fourth consecutive year that Gannett has funded NAHJ atthat level. MEDIA MOVES: Ricardo Pimentel joins The Sacramento Bee as an assistant metro editor Feb. 15. He had been a Washington correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers for the past two years . . . Rosalind Soliz, a reporter with KERA-TV, Dallas, was awarded first place in the TV News Feature category of the Women at Work Broadcast Awards. The awards are sponsored by the National mission on Working Women ... Ray Chavez, a former journalism professor at the University ofTexasat El Paso, leaves his job to become an assistant city editor for The El Paso Herald Post. .. Virginia Escalante, a former reporter with the Los Angeles Times, has joined the faculty of the University of Arizona at Tucson She wiU advise a bilingual newspaper published by journalism students ... -Julio Laboy HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT COURTING THE HISPANIC VOTE A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Erickser>-Mendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejia&Rentas , Julio Laboy . GraphicS/Production: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias. No porti o n of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast i n any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 Hispanic Link Weekly Report