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Hispanic link weekly report, February 15, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 15, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Making The News This Week
President Reagan nominates Texas state District Judge Emilio Garza to become a U.S. District Court judge in Texas... Hispanic Congressmen Manuel Luj6n(R-N.M.) and SolomdnOrtiz(D-Texas) vote in favor of the contra aid bill rejected by the House of Representatives ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Jaime SepOlveda-Bailey to the state Advisory Committee to the University of California Task Force on Hispanic Population. Sepulveda-Bailey currently serves as Deukmejian’s liaison to the Hispanic community... The National Religious Broadcasters names to its board of directors the Rev. Bob Rodriguez of Puerto Rico, the Rev. Elmer Bueno of California and Bishop Jos6 Reyes of Cleveland, Tenn... U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration Special Agent George Montoya, 34, is killed and Special Agent Jos6 Martinez, 25, wounded when an undercover drug deal they were involved in in Pasadena, Calif., erupted into gunfire. Also killed was a non-Hispanic agent.. . Nancy L6pez wins the $30,000 first prize in the Ladies Professional Golf Association’s Mazda Classic in Boca Raton, Fla. The victory was her first in a season opener... indy car racer Robertp,Gueriierjocrashes into a wall while on a 180-mile-an-hour practr&errdriior a race in Daytona, Fla Guerrero, uninjured from the mishap, suffered a life-threatening head injury last September while testinq~i££jcar aftlWlhdianapolis Motor Speedway... Santeria priest Ernesto Pichardo announces that his beleaguered church in Hialeah, Fla., has been shut down due to the negative publicity it had received for its practice of animal sacrifices...

U.S. Nicaraguans Say New Influx Will Occur
The flow of Nicaraguans immigrating to the United States will dramatically increase as a result of Congress’ Feb. 3 rejection of an aid package to the contras, the president of a Miami-based refugee aid group told Weekly Report Feb. 8.
Cristobal Mendoza, founder and president of the Committee of Poor Nicaraguans in Exile, said he expects about 1,000 refugees a week to stream into the United States within the next six months and that nearly a half a million Nicaraguans will be living in the country by 1990.
“Before the Congress’ denial of aid, the people had some hope of removing the Sandinista regime,” he said. “Now that hope is gone.”
Mendoza said there are about 200,000 Nicaraguans currently living in the United States
Nicolds Lopez-Maltez, editor of the Miami-based monthly newspaper La Estrella de Nicaragua, said between 80,000 and 100,000 Nicaraguans reside in the Miami area.
- Jonathan Higuera
INS’ Legalization Effort Faulted
A “seriously inadequate’’ public information campaign by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will lead to a much lower than projected turnout for legalization if major policy changes are not undertaken in the program’s final three months, concludes a study made public Feb. 9.
The study, conducted by the Washington-based Carnegie Endowment for International Peace says that even with a late surge, the number of people applying is “unlikely to exceed 1.4 million.” The INS had originally estimated that between 2 and 3.9 million people were eligible. Excluding Special Agricultural Worker program applications, approximately 975,000 immigrants had applied through the end of January.
The study makes its recommendations on
the basis of interviews in December and January with INS staff and officials, community leaders, immigration lawyers and others involved in the legalization process.
INS’ public information outreach was sharply criticized for its concentration on print and electronic media only. Schools, churches, community organizations and unions, says the study, are outlets that would have been more effective because of their long-standing relationships with immigrant communities.
Michael Zamba, a legislative analyst at the Washington office of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, says, ‘We agree with the report wholeheartedly. INS has to do a lot more work with community-based organizations as well as the media”
(continued on page 2
Dem. Appointments Dismay Officials
The two leading Hispanic officials of the Democratic National Committee registered rare and strong complaints in January to party Chairman Paul Kirk over his failure to appoint a Hispanic as chairperson of one of
Dade’s Pereira Retains County Post
The Metro-Dade County, Fla, commissioners met Feb. 2 and decided they.would allow County Manager Sergio Pereira to retain his job after the much-in-the-news Pereira promised he would make public his finances.
The decision on the fate of Pereira came following a news story that showed he failed to report his interest in a 1985 land transaction which netted him $119,000 in profit In the packed meeting, Pereira apologized to the nine-member body for the omission and promised to put all his other financial holdings in a blind trust All the commissioners commented after Pereira’s apology and explanation, and none offered a motion to fire the embattled manager.
Also in his statement the 43-year-old Pereira defended his creation of a job for the daughter of one of hisco-investors in the land transaction, saying it was based on the recommendation of former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferr6. Pereira
said he was following the advice of his staff when he recommended the same co-investor for a county contract.
The first Cuba-born county manager of Dade County, Pereira oversees an agency with a $1.5 billion budget and 23,000 employees.
Language Query Cleared
A proposed amendment to the Florida Constitution that would make-English the state's official language was cleared Feb. 4 by the state Supreme Court to be put on the November presidential election ballot.
In its unanimous decision, the court said the proposed ballot question met the requirements of addressing only one subject and not misleading voters.
The Florida English Campaign has collected approximately 123,000 of the nearly343,000 validated signatures it needs by Aug. 9.
the three standing committees for the party’s July 18-21 convention in Atlanta
At the Jan. 16 meeting in Atlanta where Kirk’s appointments were first announced, the only no vote came from Polly Baca, a vice chairwoman of the DNC, who said,“It’sa very serious message because there’s suspicion out there anyway that the Democratic Party takes Hispanics for granted.”
Carmen P6rez, the vice chair of the party for California and the chairwoman of the DNCs Hispanic Caucus, told Weekly Report, “In 1984 we had a chairperson and we have had co-chairs in the past. We had expected to continue to progress, not to lose ground. We are very upset and frustrated about it”
| Kirk appointed 13 Hispanics to the com-| mittees, including one co-chair on each, and | used this as his defense.
“Co-chairs are figureheads,” responded P6rez. “They are not the leaders. They are not in the media”
P6rez also voiced dissatisfaction with the low number of Hispanics on the DNC staff itself - three out of more than 100. She said Hispanic party leaders intend to follow a “watchdog approach” to be sure Hispanics are represented at the 1988 Atlanta convention. “Hispanics will not just roll over (for the party),” P6rez said. - Darryl Figueroa


Hispanics Overrepresented Among Teen-Age Fathers
Ten percent of a nationally representative sample of men 20-27 years old who acknowledged having a child while they were teenagers were Hispanic despite the fact that Latinos accounted for 6% of the overall sample, found a survey released Feb. 8.
Of thosebirths occurring out of wedlock H ispanics were responsible for 8%. Blacks, who comprised 14% of the national sample of 5,550 males, fathered 35% of the children who were born to unmarried teen-age dads.
Whites represented 57% of the children born out of wedlock while making up 80% of the males interviewed.
Of the 858 Latinos interviewed for the study, 7% had a child while not married. The figure for blacks was 14%; for whites, 5%.
The study, “Adolescent Fathers in the United States: Their Initial Living Arrangements, Martial Experience and Educational Outcomes,” appears in the most recent issue of Family Planning Perspectives
magazine. Interviewing the respondents the first five months of each yearfrom 1979 through 1987, the study is credited as being the nation’s first to take a comprehensive look at fertility, marital and educational patterns among teen-age fathers.
Seventy-seven percent of “nondisadvan-taged white” teen-age fathers lived with their first child for at least some length of time. The percentage was 58% for poor whites, 48% for Lati nos and 15% for blacks
Distrust of INS Continues as Problem
continued from page 1
Zamba adds that information campaigns must be targeted to specific immigrant groups such as Dominicans in New York and Mexicans in Los Angeles to be effective.
INS awarded a $ 10.7 m i 11 ion contract to the Justice Group to handle its information campaign. According to the Carnegie study,48% of the money was spent on print media and the remainder on radio and television. About $5 million was allotted for the final phase of the information campaign, which began Jan. 15.
Carmen Lima, a spokeswoman for East Los Angeles Immigration Project, points out that some of the money INS has spent on media outreach could be better spent by going directly to the community institutions. “It is by meeting with the people that the INS will start to do away with the ignorance and rumors that surround the law."
Lima says that the INS has a long way to go before it gains the trust of the people “it has been chasing for so long.”
Carlos Spector-Calderdn, a special advisor to the League of United Latin American Citizens?
immigration council, agrees with Lima’s assessment. “INStellingpeople’Comeonin. We’re your friends’ is a contradiction of its historical function as a law enforcement body,” says Spector-Calderon, from El Paso, Texas.
The Carnegie report credited the INS with improving its image among immigrants over the last several months.
Among some of its recommendations:
• Final decisions on cases should be expedited to provide a positive example to undocumented immigrants who have not applied, waiting to see what happens to others;
• Any changes made by INS in policy must be quickly and expansively communicated; and
• Applicants should be allowed to file skeletal applications initially and granted a postponement on payment of their fees.
Congress is currently considering legislation that would extend the legalization period for a year past its May 4 deadline. But NALEO’s Zamba stresses that people must continue to be pushed for the May deadline. “Otherwise we may be sending the wrong signal,” he
sayS- - Felix Perez
Pena Recall Movement Gains Steam
A recall movement to oust Denver Mayor Federico Pefta from office is gaining momentum, according to its organizer, who says her group has collected nearly 15,000 signatures since the drive began Jan. 23.
Marjorie Doty said her group hopes to collect 80,000 signatures by the April 14
Latino Joblessness Falls
The Hispanic unemployment rate fell for the third consecutive month in January, dropping to 7.2% from 8.1% in December. There were 642,000 unemployed Latinos last month.
The Feb. 6 report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics also indicates that overall unemployment remained virtually constant last month at 5.7%.
Hispanics continue to earn less than non-Hispanics, according to another recently issued report Median weekly earnings in the fourth quarter of 1987 were:
Total
Hispanic $290
Black 306
White 391
2
Males Females $316 $253
334 283
462 312
deadline. Only40,000 signatures are necessary to force a recall election.
“I’ve never seen such a Heinz 57 group in my life,” she said. “Groups composed of blacks, whites, Hispanics are lining up to sign.”
Doty said the main reason people are signing the petition is their dissatisfaction with the delivery of city services, citing inadequate snow removal by the city after a December snowstorm.
“While snow removal is a factor, if s not the main issue,” she said. “If s a long list of things depending on which neighborhood you’re from.”
Richard Castro, director of the city’s Human Rights and Community Relations Department and a Pefia appointee, said the city has been hurt by cutbacks in financial aid at the state and federal level.
“The reality is the mayor has been asked to do more with less money,” he said. “Given the state and national outlook we’re rapidly losing the ability to provide those services.”
Castro said the mayor is taking the recall movement“very seriously.” Pena won a second term as mayor last J u ne with 51 % of the vote.
Lack of Latino Judges Chided by Hispanic Bar
Of 74 Reagan administration nominees to the federal bench in 1987-88, three have been Hispanic, as figures released by Sen. Edward Kennedy(D-Mass.) Febi2 show. Forty-four- including one H ispanic- were appointed last year. The rest are pending Senate confirmation.
Since 1981, 3.9% of the administration’s nominees-13 out of 334- have been Latino.
Officials at the U.S. Department of Justice cited a small pool of qualified Hispanic candidates, with few Republicans among them, as reasons for the low percentage of Hispanic nominees
Mark Gallegos, president-elect of the National Hispanic Bar Association, disagreed.
“There are hundreds of qualified Hispanic candidates- attorneys as well as judges and law professors - ready to move to the federal level,” he told Weekly Report. “Our members cover the political spectrum. There are plenty of Hispanics who are Republican.”
The association plans to publish a national directory of Hispanic judges this summer, he said.
Baltazar Baca, the NHBA’s Washington counsel, laid blame for the failure to identify and recommend top Hispanic candidates“on the doorstep of the Department of Justice more than on the White House.” The department’s leadership throughout the ’80s has been “insensitive” to Hispanics, he said.
- Darryl Figueroa
Latino AIDS in Chi. Grow
The largest number of AIDS cases among Hispanics in Chicago in a single month was reported in January, according to statistics released this month by the city’s health commissioner.
Of 73 new cases reported - the citys highest ever for a month -14 were H ispanic, including a baby boy whose mother was a carrier of the AIDS virus.
Whites accounted for 55% of the new reported cases, blacks 25%, Hispanics 19% and Native Americans 1%.
Since 1981 Hispanics have accounted for 11% of the city’s 1,084 AIDS cases. In 1987, Hispanics accounted for 11% of the city’s 450 reported cases
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Harry Pachdri
TOO FEW FEDERAL JOBS
Raoul Lowery Contreras
Blaming the Bureaucrats
Only one out of even/100 people in the Executive Office of the President is Hispanic.
At the Departments of State, Interior, Transportation and Commerce, just four employees of every 100 are Latino.
Hispanics, now approaching 9% of the nation’s population, are also its fastest growing segment. But you will not gain that impression by examining the civilian federal payroll.
Hispanic underrepresentation in the federal work force, first detailed in a National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ review of the Carter administration, continues unabated. Our 1988 analysis, based on U.S. Office of Personnel Management information, found that it hovers at 5%, still far less than the 7% Hispanics represent in the national work force.
That equates to tens of thousands of jobs denied
While NALEO remains outside the partisan debate over civilian federal employment, it is difficult to understand why only 16 Latinos in the entire United States can be found to fill the more than 1,200 positions in the current Executive Office of the President.
It is also impossible to apologize for any administration that has such a record.
Unfortunately, instead of dealing with the employment problem, some people blarne the victim. Sadderyet,argumentscontinuetobe made that Latinos do not value education or they lack the desire to l work for the federal government or that Hispanic families do not [ emphasize success.
PARENTS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP | This rationale is groundless. Government figures show Latino college enrollment up38% between 1976 and 1986. Thenumberof Hispanics 25 years and older with college degrees increased 35% between 1975 and 1985. A pool of some 25,000 Hispanics are graduating from four-year universities with bachelor of arts degrees j every year.
Given the fact that Latinos are fighting an uphill battle against such problems as growing child poverty-which often means that all family members have to forget school to help support the family- Hispanic parents are demonstrating leadership in encouraging their children to obtain a higher education.
Not only are Hispanics in the federal work force low in number, (■ Latino and Latina white-collar workers on the federal payroll earn | an average of nearly $4,000 a year less than their federal counterparts, NALEO’s analysis shows. And the gap has grown the past two years.
Yet the average Hispanic professional in the federal government earns $33,157, contrasted with $22,705 for his or her Hispanic counterpart in the private sector.
FACELESS MANAGERS RESPONSIBLE
As a community, we need to stress that Hispanic underrepresentation in the federal bureaucracy affects people other than bureaucrats, i Without representation in federal agencies, key domestic policy ; decisions that impact more than 20 million Hispanics are being made j without Latino input- even if that input is limited to asking the simple | question: “How will ‘policy X* affect the Hispanic community?” i Federal officials and Congress should examine why Latinos are j underrepresented in the federal civilian work force, as well as why ) they tend to earn less than other federal civilian employees.
Responsibility for Hispanic recruitment has to be placed on the I shoulders of those thousands of faceless federal managers whose j day-to-day jobs include hiring, promoting and firing.
\ The results could help to lay the cornerstone for developing a truly \ representative federal civil service.
(Harry Pachdn is a Kenan Professor at Claremont Colleges (Pitzer | College) in Claremont, Calif., and national director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.)
i Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Blaming the Parents
Surprise! There’s a lack of Spanish-speaking civil servants and appointive officials in the federal government, specifically in the executive offices of the president.
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials studied the federal civil service and reached these conclusions, as well as discovering there’s a pay gap between Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the government.
As could be expected from this allegedly non-partisan group, most of whom are Democrats, they claim to be “appalled,” implying discrimination by the Reagan administration against those of us who are not blond and blue-eyed.
Well, I’m appalled they didn’t reveal the real reason for the fall off in Spanish-speaking civil servants, i.e. the lack of Hispanic college graduates.
The University of California and State University System of California report that less than 5% of their undergraduates are Hispanics- specifically Mexican Americans- while at the same time controversy rages up and down the state over the high numbers of students of Asiatic origin being admitted. ^
Candidates for federal civil service, particularly for executive positions, are directly reflective of the pool of college graduates.
HISPANIC HOMES TO BLAME
Thus, if there aren’t many Hispanics graduating from college, there won’t be many entering government service. If many don’t enter government service, there won’t be many to choose from for executive and appointive positions.
The problem, then, is not in the federal government, not in the President’s office, not in the executive departments. If s in Hispanic homes, with Hispanic parents who don’t demand more from their children.
If s with groups like NALEO that prefer to whine and point fingers of blame at everyone but those truly responsible.
Of the small number of Hispanic college graduates, many prefer not to enter government service but opt for better-paying jobs in business or pursuing the professions of law and medicine, fields in which we have never been numerous.
How many of us who grew up in Mexican neighborhoods were treated by Mexican American doctors? How many of us consulted with Mexican American lawyers when faced with legal problems, or secured home loans from Spanish-speaking loan officers?
Can Reagan be blamed for our lack of civil servants?
BUY CARS, QUIT SCHOOL
He was making movies while my friends were more interested in buying flashy cars and quitting school to pay for them. He was serving as governor of California and doubling the University of California budget while many Mexican Americans were protesting the plight of migrant farm workers- a worthy cause, especially in light of the fact that most of them were from across the border.
The blame, therefore, is not in Washington or in the administration. It lies with a population which does not strive for academic excellence or, at a minimum, ensure that our children finish high school.
Compare, if you will, children of Asiatic origin in California, who number less than a tenth of Mexican Americans, yet comprise more than a third of entering freshmen at the University of California, Berkeley. That’s ten times the number of entering Mexican Americans.
Better yet, who was the top graduate from the Air Force Academy last June? A Vietnamese refugee, who a dozen years ago was dodging Communist bullets and didn’t speak a word of English.
The 3,000 members of NALEO can study the problem to death, but until they remove their blindfolds, they won’t see the problem, so eloquently stated by comic strip Pogo years ago:
“We have seen the enemy and it is us.”
(Raoul Lowery Contreras is a businessman in La Jolla, Calif.)
3
Feb. 15,1988


COLLECTING
TEEN-AGE FATHERS: Foracopy of the Family Planning Perspectives magazine with the article on the marital, educational and fertility patterns among teen-age dads, send $5 to: The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003. (Specify Vol. 19, No. 6.)
LEGALIZATION ASSESSMENT: “The Legalization Countdown: A Third Quarter Assessment,” a 143-page report by The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, contains observations on the effectiveness of the legalization program and steps that can improve it. For a copy, contact: TCEIP, 11 Dupont Circle NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 797-6424. (Price was not set at press time.)
SMITHSONIAN INTERNS: The Smithsonian Institution is seeking 40 people who will graduate from high school this year for its five-week internship program. In addition to a $500 living allowance, the program offers housing to students from outside the Washington area For information and applications, contact: Intern’88, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Arts and Industries Building, Room 1163, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560 (202) 357-3049.
HERITAGE POSTER COMPETITION: The Washington Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers is seeking entries for its 1988 Hispanic Heritage Week poster contest. The winner will win $100 and be invited to Washington, D.C. Deadline is March 1. For more information contact: Pat Saavedra, Hispanic Employment Program Manager, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E St. NW, Room 1R46, Washington, D.C. 20415 (202) 632-6272.
ORANGE COUNTY, CALIF., DROPOUTS: “School Dropouts in Orange County: Focus on Hispanic Students” is a 64-page booklet with presentations by Latino educational and community leaders. The booklet also includes a series of recommendations.To obtain a free copy, write: Orange County Human Relations Commission, Angelina Veyna, 1300 S. Grand Ave., Building B, Santa Ana, Calif. 92705 (714) 834-4796.
CITIZENSHIP SERVICES: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released its “National Directory of Citizenship Services.” The 181-page directory gives the names, addresses and telephone numbers of organizations that provide citizenship services. For a copy send $10 to:NALEO, 708 G St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
CONNECTING
UTILITIES EXPAND CONTRACTS
Following a call by groups such as the League of United Latin American Citizens and the American G.I. Forum that the salaries of top executives at state utilities be frozen until progress was made on minority hiring and procurement, six of California’s largest utilities agreed Jan. 5 to set as a goal the awarding of 20% of their contracts to minority- and female-owned firms within five years.
The utilities that entered the agreement are Southern California Gas Co, Southern California Edison Co., Pacific Gas & Electric Co, San Diego Gas & Electric Co, Pacific Bell and GTE of California The agreement, announced at a Los Angeles news conference, may mean $1.2 billion in annual business for the firms selected. The civil rights groups dropped their demands for the frozen salaries and said they will seek similar agreements with other industriea
LEGALIZATION ADS PUSHED A coalition of immigrants’ rights groups, dissatisfied with the effort of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to inform prospective legalization applicants about the law, are staging a $50,000 publicity campaign through February in Los Angeles and Orange counties to encourage immigrants to apply.
The Coalition for Humane Immigration Rights of Los Angeles, whose campaign is funded by foundation grants, will use radio and newspaper ads, posters, newspaper inserts and signs on public transit systems.
IMMIGRATION AIDERS FUNDED The Ford Foundation has granted more than $2 million to a dozen national and regional organizations that are publicizing and clarifying to legalization applicants the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.
The organizations have been publicizing IRCA provisions and helping legalization applicants obtain documentation. They have also identified problems surrounding the application process Among the groups to receive Ford Foundation grants relating to the law: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund ($325,000), the Center for Immigrants Rights in New York, ($55,000), and the Farmworker Justice Fund in Washington, D.C. ($75,000).
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SEXUAL/SUBSTANCE ABUSE Washington, D.C. Feb. 17 This conference, exploring the connection between the sexual abuse of children and substance abuse of adults, will also examine abuse patterns among the metro area’s Hispanic population. The event is sponsored by the Comprehensive Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center.
P. Morningstar (202) 373-7488
CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP Miami Feb. 18,19
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials will sponsor this workshop on several facets of obtaining citizenship, including the second step of legalization under the immigration law.
Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES
Washington, D.C. Feb. 18-20
The Howard University School of Communications
will hold its annual media conference, with a job fair
attended by newspaper and broadcast recruiters.
There Will also be an audio/film competition on
4
integrating the media
Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491
HISPANIC PUBLICATIONS Las Vegas, Nev. Feb. 18-20 The National Association of Hispanic Publications will draw owners, publishers and editors to its conference which will highlight Hispanic publications as an investment and the role of Hispanic media in the U.S. market.
Fred Flores (702) 384-1514
ALCOHOL AND DRUG PROBLEMS Miami Feb. 18-21
Presenting the newest programs, research and activities in the treatment of alcohol and drug problems among Hispanics is the goal of this conference by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations.
Tom Blackburn-Rodriguez (202) 371-2100
HISPANAS IN THE WORK PLACE Los Angeles Feb. 19
The 12th annual National Hispanic Women’s Conference, sponsored by the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation, will assess the progress of Latinas in the work place and develop strategies for improvement The event will also include a corporate job fair.
Verdnica Alvarez-Tostado (818) 289-2000 ARTS FESTIVAL
Feb. 15,1988
Laredo, Texas Feb. 20
The American G.l. Forum’s Daniel Tdllez Youth Chapter will sponsor an arts festival that will include a plastic arts exhibit a style show for youths and poetry readings. Donations for the event will go to to the Forum’s scholarship fund.
Juan Josd Gloria (512) 722-0591
INSTALLATION BANQUET San Antonio Feb. 20
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will be the guest speaker at the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 59th annual banquet where it will install its new officers.
Ramiro Cavazos (512) 225-0462
PUBLIC RELATIONS Los Angeles Feb. 20
Eighteen public relations professionals will discuss four areas of their profession - corporate, agency, minority agencies and non-profit - at a conference sponsored by the Hispanic Public Relations Association.
John Echeveste (213) 721-1655
COMING SOON
CAREER CONFERENCE
Association of Hispanic Professionals for Education
Orange, Calif. Feb. 23
Mary Esquivel (714) 773-2086
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO
The following positions are with the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
LINGUISTICS: Tenure-track, Assistant Professor. Ph.D. in linguistics, Spanish linguistics, or related field required. Demonstrated abilities in Spanish linguistics of the Southwest, and native or near-native proficiency in Spanish required. Joint appointment in Linguistics and the Southwest Hispanic Research Institute (SHRI) to commence in Fall 1988 contingent upon funding. Reduced teaching (.50 FTE) with release time for research on Southwest Hispanic topics.
Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Application deadline: March 18,1988. Send letter, vitae, names of three references to: Alan Hundson-Edwards, Chair, Linguistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131.
ECONOMICS: Tenure-track, Assistant or Associate Professor, joint appointment in Economics and the Southwest Hispanic Research Institute (SHRI) to commence in Fall 1988 contingent upon funding; reduced teaching load (.50 FTE) with release time for applied research on Southwest Hispanic topics. Ph.D. in Economics required with teaching abilities in resource economics, regional economics, labor economics, or economic development.
Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Application deadline: March 18,1988. Send letter, vitae to: Alfred L. Parker, Chair, Economics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NeW Mexico 87131. ‘
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Department of Psychology at Southwest Texas State University anticipates filling a tenure-track, assistant professor position (Ph.D. required) beginning fall 1988. Applicants should be effective teachers with a broad psychology background and the ability to teach a variety of undergraduate courses. Anticipated areas of particular need include Quantitative and Cognitive/Developmental Psychology.
Resumes, support materials, and three letters of reference should be submitted to Dr. Shirley Rosenwasser, Faculty Search Committee, Psychology Dept, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, TX. 78666-4616.
Application deadline is March 15, 1988. All positions contingent upon budget approval. The University reserves the right not to proceed with any appointments for financial or programmatic reasons.
Southwest Texas State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
-Dean, College of Liberal Arts& Sciences The University of Colorado at Denver seeks a person to provide vigorous academic leadership and direction for the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in an I institution committed to excellence in research/ creative work and teaching. Appointment is I planned for no later than the fall of 1988. Please send nominations and applications which include a letter and an up-to-date I curriculum vita by March 4, 1988, to: Dr.
| Bruce W. Bergland, Chair, CLAS Dean Search f Committee, University of Colorado at Denver, 1200 Larimer Street, Campus Box 168-E,
! Denver, CO 80204-5300.
The University of Colorado at Denver is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
REVISED POSITION LISTING (Final Filing Date Extended to 3/15/88)
UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The I Department of Sociology invites applications | for an Assistant Professor, tenure track position I in sociology of organizations beginning Sep-i tember1988. Some expertise in international j organizations or international development is required. Areas of research might include the I comparative analysis of public or private sector j organizations or the organization of development i agencies. Teaching responsibilities include I courses in complex organizations and a course | in the International Agricultural Development 1 program. Ph.D. required by September, 1988. ' : Salary range for nine-month appointment j $31,500-$33,900.
Applicants should send letter of application,
| curriculum vitae, and names of three references j to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Com-| mittee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Closing j date for applications is extended to March 15, 1988.
The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women ] and minorities are encouraged to apply.
I TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY
CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track | appointment, contingent upon available fund-I ing, beginning September 1,1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with summer employment generally available, depend-I ing on need. Ph.D. essential; professional ! experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred
Teach four classes per semester; recruit and j! advise students; university committees and I other professional duties as needed; i nterest I in professional research and publications encouraged.
Send letter of interest, vita, official tran-I scripts, three letters of recommendation and/ I or placement file on or before April 15,1988,
| °* Tarleton State University
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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for professional Los Angeles Hispanic-American theatre to manage all administrative aspects of the theater, e.g. fund-raising, marketing, personnel, and public relations. Salary mid-30s. Send resume to: Chairman, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, 421 N. Avenue 19, Los Angeles, Calif. 90031.
. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the University. Call (202) 635-LAND.
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MORE NOMINATION NEWS: Candidates for this year’s Academy Awards are announced this week, and some Latinos may be in the running.
Nominations for the Oscar closed Feb. 5. During the weeks preceding the deadline, Hollywood trade papers carried studio advertising promoting the products that qualified “for consideration.”
Columbia Pictures took ads in both Daily Variety and the Hollywood Reporter promoting the three Hispanic leads in La Bamba - Esai Morales, Rosana De Soto and Elizabeth Pefta- all for" best supporting” acting consideration.
Ads were also taken for La Bamba for consideration in “best director" (Luis Valdez) and “best film” categories.
Another Latina with Oscar probabilities is Norma Aleandro, promoted as “best supporting actress” for her role in Tri Star Pictures’ Gaby (for which she won a Golden Globe nomination this year). Ads for Island Pictures’ River's Edge promoted Neil Jimenez for a “best screenplay nomination. Taft Entertainment promoted Brazilian Hector Babenco as “best director" for Ironweed.
The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences announces
the nominees at a Beverly Hills ceremony Feb. 17.
On the other coast, New York’s Asociacidn de Cronistas de Espect&culos has announced nominations for its Premios ACE (not to be confused with the Awards for Cable Excellence, handed out in Los Angeles last month.)
The New York ACEs - in more than 40 film, recording, television, night club, radio and theater categories- will be presented March 12.
This year’s awards ceremony is dedicated to the cinema’s rumberas - and a Premio Extraordinario de Cine will be presented collectively to BlanquitaAmaro, Amalia Aguilar, RosaCarmino, Mary Esquivel, Maria Antonieta Pons and Nin6n Sevilla
Non-competitive awards will be presented to singer Brenda Feliciano and to salsa promoter Ralph Mercado. The Premio Artista Internacional del Aho, previously non-competitive, has three nominees this yean Emmanuel, Vicente Fernandez and Paloma San Basilio.
Awards are voted by members of the ACE, entertainment journalists working in the New York area.
ONE LINER: The British rock group Def Leppard cancels its Feb. 15 concert in El Paso, Texas, because of death threats it received arising from anti-Mexican comments it had made in 1983. In an appearance after performing in El Paso, the group’s lead singer referred to El Paso as “that place with all those greasy Mexicans”
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HERALD DEFIED: The Miami Herald, which seems to make as much news as it covers, urged in a Feb. 2 editorial that tainted Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira- resign, or if he refused to do so, the county commissioners give, him a shove.
The next day the commissioners accepted Pereira’s apology for a list of embarrassing “omissions and oversights!.” Several critics followed with salvos at “the local media in general and the Herald in particular,” the newspaper itself reported in its headline story.
One commissioner labeled the paper -which is regularly attacked as “anti-Cuban” -“Dade Countys worst enemy.” Another said that to ask Pereira to resign “would be a surrender to the media.”
CENSUS ADJUSTMENT ASKED: In a Jan.
30 editorial, “When the Census Is Precisely Wrong,” The New York Times asked the U.S. Census Bureau to reconsider its refusal to adjust the 1990 Census for any undercounts it could identify.
It pointed out that millions in federal funds for cities-where the undercounts occur- are at stake and that many professionals who opposed any adjustments in 1980 now believe a 1990 adjustment is feasible.
It added that the Commerce Department “disclaims any partisan interest the Republican administration might have in holding down the count in Democratic cities” while moving too slowly on research which could provide a trustworthy adjustment for 1990.
REAGAN ‘SOFT ON CASTRO: Four Florida state legislators placed a half-page ad in the conservative Washington Times Feb. 3, expressing “deep disappointment” in the Reagan administration’s progress “in the cause to free Cuba from Castrofscommunist oppression.”
Sponsoring the ad were state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Reps. Javier Souto, Luis Morse and Roberto Casas, all Republicans from Dade County.
The ad, framed as an open letter, implored: “The very least you can do as the Nation’s Chief Executive is to make sure the U.S. Government, particularly the State Department, does not obstruct efforts to liberate Cuba”
An anonymous State Department official was quoted in The Miami Herald as describing the ad as, among other things, “stupid” and “paranoid.”
NOGALES NAMED: Stanford University,i where Luis Nogales founded and presided over the student activist group MEChA between 1966-1969, has elected him to its Board of Trustees. With the Feb. 8 vote, Nogales, now president of Univision, became the first Hispanic ever to be elected as a Stanford trustee. Nogales graduated from law school there in - Charlie Ericksen
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Secretary Bennett’s Latino Dropout Plan
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Making The News This Week Administration Special Agent George Montoya, 34, is killed and Special Agent Jose Martinez, 25, wounded when an undercover drug deal they were involved in in Pasadena, Calif , erupted into gunfire . Also killed was a non-Hispanic agent.. . Nancy L6pez wins the $30,000 first prize in the Ladies Professional Golf Association's Mazda Classic in Boca Raton, Fla . The victory was . her first in a season opener ... Indy car racer into a wall while on a 180-mile-an-hpur pract ic Endri16r a race in Daytona, Fla Guerrero , uninjured from the a head injury last September while testin g itfiS:a l aJJtHt N H dianapolis Motor Speedway . . . Santeria priest Ernesto Pichardo announces that h i s beleaguered church in Hialeah, Fla . , has been shut down due to the negative publicity it had received for its practice of animal sacrifices. .. President Reagan nominates Texas state District Judge Emilio Garza to become a U.S. District Court judge in Texas . . . Hispan i c Congressmen Manuel Lujan(R-N.M.) and Solom6n Ortiz(D-Texas) vote in favor of the contra aid bill rejected by the House of Representatives ... California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints Jaime Sepulveda Bailey to the state Advisory Committee to the University of California Task Force on Hispanic Population. Sepulveda-Bailey currently serves as Deukmejian ' s liaison to the Hispan i c community ... The National Religious Broadcasters names to its board of directors the Rev . Bob Rodriguez of Puerto Rico , the Rev . Elmer Bueno of California and B i shop Jose Reyes of Cleveland, Tenn . . . U.S. Drug Enforcement 6 C!!!i!!!!!!!!L!!!!!I N!!!!!K!!!!!!!!W!!!E!!!E!!!!!K!!!!!L!!!!!Y!!!R!!!!!E!!!!!P!!!!!O!!!!!R!!!!!T!!!!!!!!!!I .... 1" 1988 U.S. Nicaragua . ns Say New Influx i \Vill Occur The flow of Nicaraguans i mmigrat i ng to the United States w i ll dramatically increase as a result of Congress ' Feb . 3 rejection of an aid package to the contras, the president of a Miami-based refugee aid group told Weekly Report Feb . 8. Crist6bal Mendoza, founder and president of the Committee of Poor Nicaraguans in Exile, said he expects about 1 ,000 refugees a week to stream into the United States within the next six months and that near l y a ha l f a million Nicaraguans will be living in the country by 1990. " Before the Congress' denial of aid , the people had some hope of removing the Sandin i sta regime," he said . " Now that hope is gone." Mendoza said there are about 200,000 Nicaraguans currently living in the United States. N i colas L6pez-Maltez, editor of the Miami based monthly newspaper La Estrella de Nicaragua, said between 80,000 and 100,000 Nicaraguans reside in the Miami area Jonathan Higuera INS' Legalization Effort Faulted A " seriously inadequate " public information campaign by the U . S . Imm i gration and Natu ralization Service will lead to a much lower than projected turnout for legalization if major pol icy changes are not undertaken in the program ' s final three months , concludes a study made public Feb. 9. The study , conducted by the Washington based Carnegie Endowment for International Peace , says that even with a late surge, the number of people apply i ng is " unlikely to exceed 1 . 4 m i llion." The INS had ori ginally est i mated that between 2 and 3.9 million people were eligible . Excluding Special Agri cultural Worker program applications , ap proximately 975,000 i mmigrants had applied through the end of January. The study makes its recommendations on the basis of interviews i n December and January with INS staff and officials, community leaders, imm i gration lawyers and others in volved in the legalization process . INS' publ i c information outreach was sharply criticized for its concentration on print and electronic med i a only . Schools, churches, . community organizations and unions, says the study, are outlets that would have been more effective because of their long-standing relationships with immigrant communities. Michael Zamba, a legislative analyst at the' Washington office of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, says, "We agree with the report wholeheartedly. INS has to do a lot more work with community based organizations as weHas. the , continued on page 2 Dem. Appointments Dismay Officials The two leading Hispanic officials of the Democratic National Committee . registered rare and strong complaints in January to party Chairman Paul Kirk over his failure to appoint a Hispanic as chairperson of one of the three s tanding committees fort he party's July 18-21 convention in Atlanta. Dade's Pereira Retains County Post At the Jan . 16 meeting in Atlanta where Kirk's appointments were first announced, the only no vote came from Polly Baca, a vice chairwoman of the DNC , who said , "lfs a very serious message because there's suspicion out there anyway that the Democratic Party takes Hispanics for granted . " The Metro-Dade County, Fla, comm i ssioners met Feb . 2 and decided they. would allow County Manager Sergio Pereira to retain his job after the much-in-the-news Pereira pro mised he would make public his finances . The decision on the fate of Pereira came following a news story that showed he failed to report his interest i n a 1985 land transaction which netted him $119,000 in profit. In the packed meeting, Pereira apologized to the nine-member body for the omission and promised to put all h i s other financial holdings in a blind trust All the commissioners commented after Pereira's a pology and ex planation, and none offered a motion to fire . the embattled manager . Also in his statement the43-year-old Pereira defended his creat i on of a j ob for the daughter of one of his co-investors in the land transaction , saying it was based on the recommendation of former Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre. Pereira said . he was following the advice of his staff when he recommended the same co-investor for a county contract. The first Cuba-born county manager of Dade County, Pereira oversees an agency with a $1. 5 !>illion budget and 23,000 em ployees . Language Query Cleared A proposed amendment to the Florida Constitut i on that would make Eng l ish the stale ' s official language was cleared Feb . 4 by the state Supreme Court to be put on the November presidential election ballot. In its unanimous decision, the court said the proposed ballot question met the re quirements of addressing only one subject and not misleading voters . The Florida English Campaign has collected approximately 123 ,000 of the nearly343 ,000 validated signatures it needs by Aug . 9 . Carmen Perez, the vice chair of the party for California and the chairwoman of the DNC's Hispanic Caucus , told Weekly Report, " In 1984 we had a chairperson and we have had co-cha irs in the past. We had expected to continue to progress, not to lose ground. We are very upset and frustrated about it" I . Kirk appointed 13 Hispanics to the corn' mittees, includ ing one co-chair on each, and used this as his defense. "Co-chairs are figureheads," responded Perez. " They are not the leaders. They are not in the media." Perez also voiced dissatisfaction with the low number of Hispanics on the DNC staff itself-three out of more than 100. She said Hispanic party leaders intend to follow a "watchdog approach" to be sure Hispanics are represented at the 1988 Atlanta convention. "Hispanics will not just roll over (for the party)," Perez said . -Darryl Figueroa

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Hispanics Overrepresented Teen-Age Fathers Ten percent of a nationally representative sample of men 2Q-27 years old who acknow ledged having a child while they were teen agers were Hispanic despite the fact that Latinos accounted for 6% of the overall sample, fpund a survey released Feb. 8. Of those ; births occur : rjng out of wedlock, Hispanics were responsible for 8%. Blacks, who comprised 14% of the national sample of 5,550 males, fathered 35% of the children who were born to unmarried teen-age dads. Whites represented 57% of the children born out of wedlock while making up80% of the males interviewed. Of the 858 Latinos interviewed for the study, 7% had a child while not married . The figure for blacks was 14%; for whites, 5%. The study, "Adolescent Fathers in the United States: Their Initial Living Arrange ments, Martial Experience and Educational Outcomes," appears in the most recent issue of Family Planning Perspectives Distrust of INS Continues as Problem continued from page 1 Zamba adds that information campaigns must be targeted to specific immigrant groups, such as Dominicans in New York and Mexicans in Los Angeles, to be effective. INS awarded a $10.7 million contract to the Justice Group to handle its information cam paign. According to the Carnegie study, 48% of the money was spent on print media and the remainder on radio and television. About $5 million was allotted for the final phase of the information campaign, which began Jan. 15. Carmen Lima, a spokeswoman for East Los Angeles Immigration Project, points out that some of the money INS has spent on media outreach could be better spent by going directly to the community institutions. "It is by meeting with the people that the INS will start to do away with the ignorance and rumors that surround the law." Lima says that the INS has a long way to go before it gains the trust of the people" it has been chasing for so long." Carlos SpectorCalder6n, a special advisor to the League of United Latin American Citizens' immigration council, agrees with Lima's assess ment. "INStellingpeople'Comeonin. We're your friends.' is a contradiction of its historical function as a law enforcement body," says Spector-Calder6n, from El Paso, Texas. The Carnegie report credited the INS with improving its image among immigrants over the last several months . Among some of its recommendations: • Final decisions on cases should be ex pedited to provide a positive example to undocumented immigrants who have not ap plied, waiting to see what happens to others; • Any changes made by INS in policy must be quickly and expansively communicated; and • Applicants should be allowed to file skeletal applications initially and granted a postponement on payment of their fees. Congress is currently considering legislation that would extend the legalization period for a year past its May 4 deadline . But NALEO's Zamba stresses that people must continue to be pushed for the May deadline . "Otherwise we may be sending the wrong signal," he says. Felix Perez Peiia Recall Movement Gains Steam A recall movement to oust Denver Mayor Federico Peiia from office is gaining momentum, according to its organizer, who says her group has collected nearly 15,000 signatures since the drive began Jan. 23. Marjorie Doty said her group hopes to collect 80,000 signatures by the April 14 Latino Joblessness Falls The Hispanic unemployment rate fell for the third consecutive month in January, drop ping to 7.2% from 8.1% in December. There were 642,000 unemployed Latinos last month. The Feb . 6 report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics also indicates that overall unemployment remained virtually constant last month at 5 . 7%. Hispanics continue to earn less than non Hispanics, according to another recently issued report. Median weekly earnings in the fourth quarter of 1987 were: Hispanic Black White 2 Total $290 306 391 Males $316 334 462 Females $253 283 312 deadline. Only 40,000 signatures are neces sary to force a recall election . "I've never seen such a Heinz 57 group in my life," she said. "Groups composed of blacks, whites , Hispanics are lining up to sign . " Doty said the main reason people are signing the petition is their dissatisfaction with the delivery of city services, citing inadequate snow removal by the city after a December snowstorm. "While snow removal is a factor, it's not the main issue," she said . "It's along list of things depending on which neighborhood you're from." Richard Castro, director of the citYs Human Rights and Community Relations Department and a Peiia appointee, said the city has been hurt by cutbacks in financial aid at the state and federal level. "The reality is the mayor has been asked to do more with less money," he said. "Given the state and national outlook, we're rapidly losing the ability to provide those services." Castro said the mayor is taking the recal . l movement"very seriously." Peiia won a second term as mayor last June with 51% of the vote. magazine. Interviewing the respondents the first five months of each year from 1979 through 1987, the study is credited as being the nation's first to take a compre hensive look at fertility, marital and educational patterns among teen-age fathers. Seventy-seven percent of "nondisadvan taged white" teen-age fathers lived wi t h their first child for at least some length of time. The percentage was 58% for poor whites , 48% for Latinos and 15% for blacks. Lack of Latino Judges Chided by Hispanic Bar Of 74 Reagan administration nominees to the federal bench in 1987-88, three have been Hispanic , as figures released by Sen. Edward Kennedy(D-Mass.) Feb.2 show. Forty fourincluding one Hispanicwere appointed last year. The r est are pending Senate con fi r mation. Since 1981, 3 .9% of the administration ' s nominees-13 out of 334-have been Latino . Officials at the U . S . Department of Justice cited a small pool of qualified Hispani c candi dates, with few Republicans among them , as reasons for the low percentage of Hispanic nominees. Mark Gallegos, president-elect of the National Hispanic Bar Association, disagreed . "There are hundreds of qualified Hispanic candidates-attorneys as well as judges and law professors-ready to move to the federal level," he told Weekly Report. "Our members cover the political spectrum. There are plenty of Hispanics who are Republican." The association plans to publish a nat i onal directory of Hispanic judges this summer, he said. Baltazar Baca, the NHBA's Washington counsel, laid blame for the failure to identify and recommend top Hispanic candidates"on the doorstep of the Department of Justice more than on the White House." The depart ment's leadership throughout the '80s has been " insensitive" to Hispanics, he s aid . Darryl Figueroa Latino AIDS in Chi. Grow The largest number of AIDS cases among Hispanics in Chicago in a single month was reported in January, according to statistics released this month by the city's health com missioner. Of 73 new cases reportedthe city's highest ever for a month-14 were Hispanic, including a baby boy whose mother was a carrie• of the AIDS virus. Whites accounted for 55% of the new re ported cases, blacks 25%, Hispanics 19% and Native Americans 1%. Since 1981 His panics have accounted for 11% of the city's 1,084 AIDS cases. In 1 .987, Hispanics accounted for 11% of the city's 450 reported cases. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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TOO FEW FEDERAL JOBS Harry Pach6n Raoul Lowery Contreras the Bureaucrats Blaming the Parents Only one out of every1 00 people in the Executive Office of the President is Hispanic. At the Departments ol State, Interior, Transportation and Commerce, just four employees Qf E•very 100 are Latino. Hispanics, now approaching 9% of the nation's population, are also its fastest growing But you will not gain that impression by exam the civi l ian federal payroll. Hispanic underrepresentation in the federal work force, first detailed in a National As sociation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials ' review of the Carter administration, continues unabated . Our 1988 analysis, based on U.S. Office of Personnel Manage ment information, found that it hovers at5%, still far less than the 7% Hispanics represent in the national work force. That equates to tens of thousands of jobs denied. While NALEO remains outside the partisan debate over civilian 1 federal employment, it is difficult to understand why only 16 Latinos in the entire United States can be found to fill the more than 1,200 positions in the current Executive Office of the President. It is also impossible to apologize for any administration that has such a record. Unfortunately, inst ead of dealing with the employment problem , some people blarnH the victim . Sadder yet, argumentscontinueto be made that Latinos do not value education or they lack the desire to work for the federa l government or that Hispanic families do not emphasize success . PARENITS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP This rationale is: groundless. Government figures show Latino college enrollment up 38% between 1976 and 1986. The number of , Hispanics 25 years and older with college degrees increased 35% between 1975 and 1985. A pool of some 25,000 Hispanics are 1 graduating from four-year universities with bachelor of arts degrees every year. Given the fact that Latinos are fighting an uphill battle against such problems as growing child poverty-which often means that all family ' members have to forget school to help support the family-Hispanic parents are demonstrating leadership in encouraging their children to obtain a higher education. Not only are Hispanics in the federal work force low in number, Latino and Latina white-collar workers on the federal payroll earn an average of nearly $4,000 a year less than their federal counterparts, NALEOs analysis shows. And the gap has grown the past two years. Yet the average Hispanic professional in the federal government earns $33,157, contrasted with $22,705 for his or her Hispanic counterpart in the private sector. FACELESS MANAGERS RESPONSIBLE As a community , we need to stress that Hispanic underrepresentation in the federal bureaucracy affects people other than bureaucrats. Without representation in federal agencies , key domestic policy decisions that impact more than 20 million Hispanics are being made without Latino input-even if that input is limited to asking the simple question: "How will 'policy X: affect the Hispanic community?'' Federal officials and Congress should examine why Latinos are underrepresented in the federal civilian work force, as well as why they tend to earn less than other federal civilian employees. Responsibility for Hispanic recruitment has to be placed on the shoulders of those thousands of faceless federal managers whose day-to-day jobs include hiring , promoting and firing. The results could help to lay the cornerstone for developing a truly representative federal civil service. Surprise! There's a lack of Spanish-speaking civil servants and appointive officials in the federal government, specifically in the executive offices of the president. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials studied the federal civil service and reached these conclusions, as well as discovering there's a pay gap between Hispanics and non Hispanics in the government. As could be expected from this allegedly non-partisan group, most of whom are Demo crats, they claim to be "appalled," implying discrimination by the Reagan administration ' against those of us who are not blond and I blue-eyed. . . Well, I'm appalled they didn't reveal the real reason for the fall off in Spanish-speaking civil servants, i.e. the lack of Hispanic college graduates. The University of California and State Uni versity System of California report that less than 5% of their under graduates are Hispanics-specifically Mexican Americanswhile at the same time controversy rages up and down the state overt he high numbers of students of Asiatic origin being admitted. Candidates for federal civil service, particularly for executive positions , are directly reflective of the pool of college graduates. HISPANIC HOMES TO BLAME Thus, if there aren't many Hispanics graduating from college, there won ' t be many entering government service . If many don't enter government service, there won't be many to choose from for executive and appointive positions . The problem, then, is not in the federal government, not in the Presidenfs office, not in the executive departments. lfs in Hispanic homes , with Hispanic parents who don't demand more from their children. lfs with groups like NALEO that prefer to whine and point fingers of blame at everyone but those truly responsible. Of the small number of Hispanic college graduates, many prefer not t o enter government service but opt for better-paying jobs in business or pursuing the professions of law and medicine, fields in which we have never been numerous. How many of us who grew up in Mexican neighborhoods were treated by Mexican American doctors? How many of us consulted with Mexican American lawyers when faced with legal problems, or secured home loans from Spanish-speaking loan officers? Can Reagan be blamed for our lack of civil servants? BUY CARS, QUIT SCHOOL He was making movies while my friends were more interested in buying flashy cars and quitting school to pay for them. He was serving as governor of California and doubling the University of California budget while many Mexican Americans were protesting the plight of migrant farm workers-a worthy cause, especially in light of the fact that most of them were from across the border. The blame, therefore, is not in Washington or in the administration. It lies with a population which does not strive for academic excellence or, at a minimum, ensure that our children finish high school. Compare, if you will, children of Asiatic origin in California, who number less than a tenth of Mexican Americans, yet comprise more than a third of entering freshmen at the University of California, Berkeley. Thafs ten times the number of entering Mexican Americans. Better yet, who was the top graduate from the Air Force Academy last June? A Vietnamese refugee, who a dozen years ago was dodging Communist bullets and didn't speak a word of English. The 3,000 members of NALEO can study the problem to death, but until they remove their blindfolds, they won't see the problem, so eloquently stated by comic strip Pogo years ago: "We have seen the enemy and it is us." (Harry Pach6n is a Kenan Professor at Claremont Colleges (Pitzer College) in Claremont, Calif., and national director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.) (Raoul Lowery Contreras is a businessman in La Jolla, Calif. ) Feb. 15, 1988 H ispa nic Link Weekl y Report 3

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COLLE CTING TEEN-AGE FA THERS: Foracopyofthe Family Planning Perspectives magazine with the article on the marital, educational and fertility patterns among teen-age dads, send $5 to: The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003 . (Specify Vol. 19, No.6.) LEGALIZATION ASSESSMENT: "The Legalization Countdo;_..n: A Third Quarter Assessment," a 143-page report by The Carnegie Endo wment for International Peace, contains observations on the effectiveness of the legalization program and steps that can improve it. For a copy, contact: TCEIP, 11 Dupont Circle NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 797. (Price was not set at press time.) SMITHSONIAN INTERNS: The Smithsonian Institution is seeking 40 people who will graduate from high school this year for its five week internship program. In addition to a $500 living allowance, the program offers housing to students from outside the Washington area For information and applications, contact: Intern '88, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Arts and Industries Building, Room 1163, Smiths onian Institution, Washington, D .C. 20560 (202) 357. HERITAGE POSTE R COMPETITION: The Washington Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers is seeking entries for its 1988 Hispanic Heritage Week poster contest. The winner will win $100 and be invited to Washington, D.C. Deadline is March 1 . For more informatio n contact: Pat Saavedra, Hispanic Employment Pro gram Manager, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E St. NW, Room 1 R46 , Washington, D.C. 20415 (202) 632. ORANGE COUNTY, CALIF., DROPOUTS: "School Dropouts in Orange County: Focus on Hispanic Students" is a 64-page booklet w it h presentations by Latino educational and community leaders. The booklet also in cludes a series of recommendations.'To ob.tain a free copy, write: Orange County Human Relations Commission, Angelina Veyna, 1'300 S. Grand Ave., Building B , Santa Ana, Calif. 92705 (714) 834. CITIZENSHIP SERV ICES: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released its" National Directory of Citizenship Services." The 181-page directory gives the names, addresses and telephone numbers of organizations that provide citizenship services. For a copy send $10 to:NALEO, 708 G St. NE , Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546. integrating the media . CONNECTING UTILITIES EXPAND CONTRACTS Following a call by groups such as the League of United Latin American Citizens and the American G. I . Forum that the salaries of top executives at state utilities be frozen until progress was made on minority hiring and procurement, six of California's largest utilities agreed Jan. 5 to set as a goal the awarding of 20% of their contracts to minority and female-owned firms within five years. The utilities that entered the agreement are Southern California Gas Co., Southern California Edison Co., Pacific Gas & Electric Co., San Diego Gas & Electric Co., Pacific Bell and GTE of California The agreement, announced at a Los Angeles news conference, may mean $1.2 billion in annual business for the firms selected. The civil rights groups dropped their demands for the frozen salaries and said they will seek similar agreements with other industries. LEGALIZATION ADS PUSHED A coalition of immigrants' rights groups, dissatisfied with the effort of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to inform prospective legalization applicants about the law , are staging a$50,000 publicity campaign through February in Los Angeles and Orange counties to encourage immigrants to apply. The Coalition for Humane Immigration Rights of Los Angeles, whose campaign is funded by foundation grants, will use radio and newspaper ads, posters, newspaper inserts and signs on public transit systems. IMMIGRATION AlDERS FUNDED The Ford Foundation has granted more than $2 million to a dozen national and regional organizations that are publicizing and clarifYing to legalization applicants the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The organizations have been publicizing IRCA provisions and helping legalization applicants obtain documentation. They have . also identified problems surrounding the application process. Among the groups to receive Ford Foundation grants relating to : the law: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund ($325,000), the Center for Immigrants Rights in New York, ($55,000), and the Farmworker Justice Fund in Washington, D.C. ($75,000) . Laredo , Texas Feb. 20 Calendar Mary Carter-Will i ams (202) 636-7491 The American G .l. Forum ' s Daniel Tellez Youth Chapter will sponsor an arts festival that will include a plastic arts exhibit , a style show for youths and poetry readings . Donations for tl)e event will go to THIS WEEK SEXUAL/SUBSTANCE ABUSE Washington, D . C . Feb. 17 This conference, exploring the connection between the sexual abuse of children and substance abuse of adults, will also examine abuse. patterns among the metro area 's Hispanic population . The event is sponsored by the Comprehensive Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center . P. Morningstar(202) 373-7488 CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP Miami Feb. 18, 19 The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials will sponsor this workshop on several facets of obtaining citizenship , including the second step of legalization under the immigration law . Kelly Parks (202) 546 JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES . Washington , D .C. Feb. 18-20 The Howard University School of Communications will hold its annual media conference, with a Job fair attended by newspaper and broadcast recruiters. There Will also be an audio/film competition on 4 HISPANIC PUBLICATIONS Las Vegas , Nev. Feb. 18 The National Association of Hispanic Publications will draw owners , publishers and editors to its con ference which will highlight Hispanic publications as an investment and the role of Hispanic media in the U.S. market. Fred Flores (702) 384 1514 ALCOHOL AND DRUG PROBLEMS Miami Feb .1 8 Presenting the newest programs , research and activities in the treatment of alcohol and drug problems among Hispanics is the goal of this conference by . the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations . Tom Blackburn-Rodriguez (202) 371-2100 HISPANAS IN THE WORK PLACE Los Angeles Feb . 19 The 12th annual National Hispanic Women's Con ference , sponsored by the Mexican American Op portunity Foundation , will assess the progress of Latin as in the work place and develop strategies for improvement. The event will also include a corporate job fair. Ver6nica Alvarez Tostado (818) 289-2000 ARTS FESTIVAL Feb. 15 , 1988 to the Forum's scholarship fund . Juan Jose Gloria (512) 722 INSTALLATION BANQUET San Antonio Feb . 20 San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will be the guest speaker at the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce's 59th annual banquet where it will install its new officers . Cavazos (512) 225 PUBLIC RELATIONS Los Angeles Feb. 20 E i ghteen public relations professionals will discuss four areas of their profession-corporate , agency , minority agencies and non-profit-at a conference sponsored by the Hispanic Public Relations As sociation . . John Echeveste (213) 721-1655 COMING SOON CAREER CONFERENCE Association of Hispanic Professionals for Education Orange, Calif . Feb . 23 Mary Esquivel (714) 773 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER Dean, College of Liberal Arts& Sciences The University of Colorado at Denver seeks a person to prov ide vigorous academic leadel' ship and direction for the facu lty of the ; College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in an institution committed to excellence in research/ creative work and teaching. Appointment is plann ed for no later than the fall of 1 988. Please send nominations and applications which include a letter and an up-to-date curriculum vita by March 4, 1988, to: Dr . Bruce W. Bergland, Chair, CLAS Dean Search Committee , University of Colorado at Denver, 1200 Larimer Street , Campus Box 168-E. Denver , CO 80204. The University of Colorado at Denver is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. REVISED POSITION LISTING (Final Filing Date Extended to 3/15/88) UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS . The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure trackpositior. in sociology of organizations beginning Sep tember 1988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required. Areas of research might include th e comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies . Teaching respons ibilit ies include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricu ltural Development program. Ph.D. required by September, 1988. ; Salary range for nine-month appointment $31,500 $33,900. Applicants should send letter of application, UNIVE RSITY OF NEW MEXICO The' following positions are with the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. LINGUISTICS: Tenure-track, Assistant Professor. Ph.D. in linguistics,Spanishllnguistics,or related field required . Demonstrated abilities in Spanish linguistics of the Southwest, and native or near native profic i ency in Spanish required . Joint appointment in Linguistics and the Southwest Hispanic Research Institute (SHRI) to commence in Fall1988 contingent upon funding. Reduced teaching (.50 FTE) with release time for research on Southwest Hispanic topics. Minorities and women encouraged to apply . Applicat i on deadline : March 18 , 1988 . Send letter, vitae, names of three references to: Alan HundsonEdwards , Chair, Linguistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque , New Mexico 87131 . ECONOMICS: Tenure-track , Assistant or Associate Professor, joint appointment in Economics and the Southwest Hispanic Research Institute (SHRI) to commence i n Fall 1988 continge nt upon funding ; re duced teaching load (.50 FTE) with release time for applied res earc h on Southwest Hispanic topics. Ph. D . in Economics required with teaching abilities in resource economics, regional economics, labor economics , or economic development. Minor ities and women encouraged to apply. Application deadline : March 18,.1988. Send letter, vitae to: Alfred L Parker , Chair, Economics, University of New Mexico , Albuquerque , New Mexico 87131. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY ASSISTANT PROFESSOR : The Department of Psychology at Southwest Texas State University anticipa tes filling a tenure-track, assistant professor position (Ph, D . r equired) beginning fall 1988. Applicants should be effective teachers with a broad psychology background and the ability to teach a variety of undergraduate courses. Anticipated areas of particular need include Quantitative and Cognitive/Developmental Psychology . Resumes, supp ort materials , and three letters of reference should be submitted to Dr. Shirley Rosenwasser, Faculty Search Committee, Psychology Dept. , Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos. TX. 78666. Application deadline is ' March 15 , 1 988. All positions contingent upon budget approval. The University reserves the right not to proceed w it h any appo i ntments for financial or programmatic reasons . Southwest Texas State University is an Equal Opportun i ty/Affirmative Action Employer. curr i culum vitae , and names of three references '-----------------------------------1 to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Com mittee , Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is extended to March 15, 1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Actio n/Equa l Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply . TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment contingent upon available fund ing, beginning September 1, 1988 . Assistant Professor level , salary competitive with sum mer employment generally available, depend ing on need. Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred Teach four classes per semester, recruit and advise students; university c ommi ttees and other professional duties as needed ; interest in professiona l research and publications encouraged. Send letter of interest, vita, official tran scripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April15, 1988, to: Tarleton State University Dr . W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. , AA!EEO/MF Hispanic Link Weekly Report PUBLIC AFFAIRS PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST. To plan and develop information and promotion programs for Census Bureau activities and reports, espe cially with regard to the Hispanic media Must have college degree and three years of relevant experience. Must be fluent in Spanish , GS 11/12 , salary $27,172-$32,567. Contact Maury Cagle, Assistant Chief, Public Information Office, Bureau of the Census, Washi ngton, D . C . 20233 (301) 763. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR . for professional Los Angeles Hispanic-American theatre to manage all administrative aspects of the theater, e . g. fund-raising, marketing , personnel, and public relations. Salary mid-30s. Send resume to: Chairman, Bilingual Foundation oft he Arts,421 N . Avenue 19, Los Angeles, Calif . 90031 . , THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D . C , has prerecorded job listings, updated Mon days, for positions atthe Univers ity. Call (202) 635LAND. DEAR PERSONNE L DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you tarQet a , national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an aci in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 120005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street --------------City, State & Zip--------Area Code & Phone ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment the nominees at a Beverly Hills ceremony Feb. 17. On the other coast, New York's Asociaci6n de Cronistas de Espectaculos has announced nominations for its Premios ACE(not to be confused with the Awards for Cable Excellence, handed out in Los Angeles last month.) MORE NOMINATION NEWS: Candidatesforthisyear'sAcademy Awards are announced this week, and some Latinos may be in the running. Nominations for the Oscar closed Feb. 5. During the weeks preceding the deadline, Hollywood trade papers carried studio advertising promoting the products that qualified "for consideration." The New York ACEs-in more than 40 film, recording, television, night club, radio and theater categorieswill be presented March 12. Columbia Pictures took ads in both Daily Variety and the Hollywood Reporter promoting the three Hispanic leads in La Bamba-Esai Morales, Rosana De Sotoand Elizabeth Peiiaall for" best supporting" acting consideration. This year's awards ceremony is dedicated to the cinema's rumberas -and a Premio Extraordinario de Cine will be presented collectivelyto Blanquita Amaro, Amalia Aguilar, Rosa Carmi no, Mary Esquivel, Maria Antonieta Pons and Nin6n Sevilla Non-competitive awards will be presented to singer Brenda Feliciano and to salsa promoter Ralph Mercado. The Premio Artist a Jnternacional del Ano, previously non-competitive, has three nominees this year. Emmanuel, Vicente Fernandez and Paloma San Basilio. Ads were also taken for La Bamba for consideration in "best director" (Luis Valdez) and "best film" categories. Another Latina with Oscar probabilities is Norma A leandro, promoted as "best supporting actress" for her role in Tri Star Pictures' Gaby (for which she won a Golden Globe nomination this year) . Ads for Island Pictures' River's Edge promoted Neil Jimenez for a "best screenplay" nomination. Taft Entertainment promoted Brazilian Hector Babenco as "best director'' for Ironweed. Awards are voted by members of the ACE, entertainment journalists working in the New York area. The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences announces ONE LINER: The British rock group Def Leppard cancels its Feb. 15 concert in El Paso, Texas, because of death threats it received arising from anti-Mexican comments it had made in 1983. In an appearance after performing in El Paso, the group's lead singer referred to El Paso as "that place with all those greasy Mexicans." -Antonio Media Report HERALD DEFIED: The Miami Herald, which seems to make as much news as it covers, urged in a Feb. 2 editorial that tainted Dade County Manager Sergio Pereiraresign, or if he refused to do so, the county commis sioners give . him a shove . The next day the commissioners accepted Pereira's apology for a list of embarrassing "omission ' s and oversights '." Several critics followed with salvos at "the local media in general and the Herald in particular," the newspaper itself reported in its headline story. One commissioner labeled the paper which is regularly attacked as "anti-Cuban""Dade County's worst enemy." Another said that to ask Pereira to resign "would be a surrender to the media." CENSUS ADJUSTMENT ASKED: In a Jan. HISPANIC Ll N K WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Darryl Figueroa GraphicS/Production : Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form .without advance permission . Annual subscription (50 Issues): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 30 editorial, "When the Census Is Precisely Wrong," The New York Times asked the U.S. Census Bureau to reconsider its refusal to adjust the 1990 Census for any undercounts it could identify. It pointed out that millions in federal funds for cities-where the undercounts occur-are at stake and that many professionals who opposed any adjustments in 1980 now believe a 1990 adjustment is feasible. It added that the Commerce Department " disclaims any partisan interest the Republican administration might have in holding down the count in Democratic cities'' while moving too slowly on research which could provide a trustworthy adjustment for 1990. REAGAN 'SOFT' ON CASTRO: Four Florida state legislators placed a half-page ad in the conservative Washington Times Feb. 3, ex pressing "deep disappointmenr in the Reagan administration's progress "in the cause to free Cuba from Castrd s communist oppression:' Sponsoring the ad were state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Reps. Javier Souto, Luis Morse and Roberto Casas, all Republicans from Dade County. The ad, framed as an open letter, implored: "The very least you can do as the Nation's Chief Executive is to make sure the U.S. Government particularly the State Department, does not obstruct efforts to liberate Cuba" An anonymous State Department official was quoted in The Miami Herald as describing the ad as, among other things, "stupid' and "paranoid." NOGALES NAMED: Stanford University, where Luis Nogales founded and presided over the student activist group MEChA between 1966-1969, has elected him to its Board of Trustees . With the Feb. 8 vote, Nogales, now president of Univision, became the first His panic ever to be elected as a Stanford trustee. Nogales graduated from law school there in '69. -Charlie Ericksen Secretary Bennett's Latino Dropout Plan ••• Hispanic Link Weekly Report