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Hispanic link weekly report, February 22, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 22, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News
The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs elects Angel Guzman, director of the Hispanic Senior Center in Cleveland, as its chairman and Teodosio Feliciano, associate director of the Commission on Catholic Community Action in Cleveland, as its vice chairman... Joe Baca, past president of the San Bernardino (Calif.) Community College Board, announces he will seek the 66th Assembly District seat in that state... The Houston City Council unanimously approves John Arradondo as the new director of the city’s Health and H uman Services Department Arradondo had headed the Oklahoma City Health Department. . . Federico Gonzales, an associate professor emeritus of cell biology at Northwestern University in
Evanston, III., receives his long-awaited promotion to captain and the Distinguished Flying Cross for being shot down and being the sole survivor of a bomber he was piloting over Germany in 1944 when he was 23 years old... Californian Pablo Morales sets a world’s-best swim record of 24.26 seconds in the final of the 50-meter butterfly in a competition at Bonn, West Germany... Xbchilt Carreto, a senior high school student from Dallas who was refused entry into the U.S. Military Academy because she is not yet a citizen, receives a full scholarship to Texas A&M University... Alfonso Valdes Cobian, an industrialist, banker, politician and member of one of Puerto Rico’s most prominent families, dies of a heart attack at the age of 98 in San Juan... Renown jazz pianist Eddie Cano, who was recently serving as president of the Hispanic Musicians Association, dies in his home in East Los Angeles at age 60 from natural causes...
^^ISPANI^N^WEEK^^EPOR^P^^
Mariel Release Process Assailed
UFW Pledges to Fight Foreign Laborer‘Hoax’
The United Farmworkers passed a resolution Feb. 7 in McAllen, Texas, calling for the union to file lawsuits against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, the U.S. Department of Labor and other parties in an effort to put an end to what it claims are unsubstantiated petitions by growers to import foreign farm workers.
UFW President C6sarChavez told participants at the biennial Texas convention that the union will continue to fight fraud in the H-2A provision of the federal immigration law, which says that agricultural employers may bring in foreign workers if they can certify a labor shortage.
Rebecca Flores Harrington, the director of the Texas UFW, said the labor shortage is “a hoax perpetrated by growers” She and Chavez argue that labor importation is a tactic used to create an oversupply of workers, thereby keeping wages artificially low.
The Reagan administration said Feb. 9 that it opposes a House bill sponsored by Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) that would require federal agencies to report their efforts to comply with equal employment laws.
The chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Clarence Thomas, said that the proposed bill would deprive his
Latino Diet Cuts Cancers
Hispanics suffer breast and colon cancer far less than whites or blacks because of their diet, said the director of the National Cancer Institute in Miami Feb. 10.
“The data suggests that the Hispanic population is much better off than Anglos or blacks,” said Dr. Vincent DeVita. “They have half the incidence of breast and colon cancer... We believe it’s a cultural thing. They eat a low-fat, high-fiber diet.”
The latest figures from the National Cancer Institute show that the colon cancer incidence rate among Hispanics is 16 per 100,000 compared with 35 for whites and 38 for blacks.
In its final stage before implementation, the review process to determine whether Mariel detainees in federal custody should be released or deported to Cuba has been widely assailed as being fraught with Inadequate protections for the Marielitos. The process has also been roundly criticized for what some see as insufficient planning and funding to carry out the proceedings.
“If these were light skinned or blond,Nordic types, there would be so much outrage you couldn’t contain it,” protested Gary Leshaw, a Legal Aid attorney in Atlanta and a member of the Coalition to Support Cuban Detainees.
Leshaw is the lead attorney in three cases filed Jan. 26 seeking to stop the deportation of three Marielitos. Leshaw argues that they should be granted political asylum on the basis of a “well-founded fear of persecution” in their homeland. A decision by the Atlanta immigration court that Marielitos as a social class display a well-founded fearof persecution
office of the flexibility needed to do its job.
“The flexibility to ignore affirmative action” is what is desired, responded Martinez, who heads a House Education and Labor sub* committee. He said the commission previously asked for such legislation in order to get compliance from federal agencies.
“Now that we try to give it to them, they are against it,” Martinez told Weekly Report.-
Thomas also said that government employment regulations should apply to the 38,000 people employed by Congress.
“Moresmoke screens,” said Martinez, “but I have no objections to its application.” He admitted, however, that some congressmen are hesitant. “You can’t stick one congressman with another’s staff, and it’s difficult to regulate when an employee’s position Is dependent on your re-election,” he said.
Harry Pach6n, director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, which recently completed a study on Latino hiring in the federal government, said, “It is easier for a Hispanic to find a job in the private sector than with the federal govern-
men^ - Darryl Figueroa
“could open the door for a large number to be eligible for asylum,” said Leshaw.
As of Feb. 5, there were 3,796 Marielitos in federal custody. The cases of 2,287 had been reviewed under the first step of review proceedings, which are carried out by U.S. Immigration and Naturalization officials. Pat Korten, the U.S. Justice Department’s deputy director of public affairs, said 1,379 had been cleared for release. Of these, 324 had been released.
Many Cuban leaders, including Miami Bishop Augustin Rom&n, who was instrumental in negotiating an end to last year’s Marielito prison uprisings, have expressed their frustration with what they call a slow release rate.
Korten recognized the criticism and said his department has shifted in recent months from releasing almost exclusively to halfway houses to extended family. He also pointed to a contract Justice has with the U.S. Catholic Conference to place 600-700 Marielitos with non-related individuals.
The review process was set up as a result of two prison sieges late last year where 2,400 Cuban detainees took 138 people hostage. The Marielitos rioted out of frustration with the Nov. 20, 1987, renewal of a U.S.-Cuba immigration pact that allows for the deportation of 2,600 Mariel “excludables” to Cuba Among these Marielitos ruled excludable, some were convicted of felonies and misdemeanors since arriving from Cuba in 1980. Others are incarcerated for crimes they committed in Cuba orfor mental problems. Many have completed their sentences but continue to be held in accordance with U.S. immigration law.
If the Marielitos are ordered deported by the INS team, they then have their cases reviewed by Justice Department officials.
The Justice review has come under attack from several sides Said federal Judge Marvin Shoob of Atlanta at hearings in late January before the House Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on the courts, civil liberties and the administration of justice: “You cannot give a man a fair hearing when he does not understand what is going on, he doesn’t speak the language, he’s not aware of the
continued on page 2
Employment Bill Runs Into Opposition


Experts Rap Proposed Repeal of Federal Dropout Aid
Latino educational experts say they are stunned by U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett’s Feb. 9 announcement that he plans to ask Congress to eliminate a provision in the federal law that allows high school dropouts to receive federal aid for college or trade school.
Bennett focused his concern on for-profit proprietary schools and said this provision allows “unscrupulous schools to defraud the taxpayer and to take advantage of vulnerable students."
The repeal would apply to any school that does not require a high school diploma or General Equivalency Diploma for admission.
The secretary also said that he will ask Congress to limit lender reimbursement of
student loans to 90% instead of 100% so that schools and banks will be more forceful in their collection and, according to an Education Department spokesperson, so that schools will “discourage admission of students who won’t be successful.” Antonio Rigual, executive director of the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, said,“Hispanics are more likely to be affected by such legislation than any other group.
'“He(Bennett) knows Hispanics drop out of high school at rates higher than anyone else.”
The Latino dropout rate is about 55% nationally, he said.
Many Latinos later enroll in community
colleges without their GEDs and enter fulltime programs leading to its acquisition, said Pepe Barr6n, president of El Congreso Naciona! de Asuntos Colegiales. Barr6n also defended proprietary schools, saying that some are very good and serve as an alternative to students who need training.
San Antonio College President Max Castillo said he would combat “tooth and naif’ any legislation that limited access to federal funds for community colleges.
Rigual and Castillo said that the focus on loan repayment is misguided. “The issue should not be loan collection but grants and otherforms of financial aid,” said Castillo. “We should be looking at this as a long-term investment.” - Darryl Figueroa
Pereira Quits Amid New Disclosures Purchase of Univision
Metro-Dade County (Fla) Manager Sergio Pereira resigned Feb. 10 amid disclosures that he failed to report on his federal income tax form profits from the sale of two Hialeah houses he and his former wife sold in 1985.
A Miami Herald story revealed the flamboyant 43-year-old Cuba-born county manager allegedly netted a $46,300 profit on the sales. The Herald also reported last month on another land deal involving Pereira in which he made $127,878 without investing any money and failed to list that transaction on a state financial disclosure form.
Osvaldo Soto, chairman of the Miami-based Spanish-American League Against Discrimination, told Weekly Report the Cuban community is “both sorry and angry” at the resignation, effective Feb. 29.
Children in properly designed bilingual education programs acquire English rapidly and, after three to five years, reach or surpass grade-level norms set for other academic areas, according to a study released Feb. 12 by the California Association for Bilingual Education.
Stephen Krashen and Douglas Biber, linguistics professors at the University of Southern California, authored the study, which surveyed more than 25 schools in seven California school districts involving some 7,300 students from kindergarten through sixth and eighth grade.
The three ingredients considered by the study to be key to a successful bilingual 2
“We’re angry because we believe even though he made mistakes, it wasn’t so outrageous that it deserved this type of coverage and scrutiny,” hesaid. “If his name was Smith or Thompson, that kind of attention would not have been given.”
Tom&s Garcia-Fuste, news director of top-rated, Spanish-language radio station WQBA said telephone calls from listeners have been “overwhelmingly in Pereira’s favor.”
Although most of the nine county commissioners have indicated they would like to conduct a national search for a successor, many in the Cuban community are calling for a Hispanic from the area to get the position. Names that have surfaced are Assistant County Manager Joaquin Aviho and Miami City Manager Cesar Odio. - Jonathan Higuera
program are intensive teaching of core subjects in the native language, teaching literacy in the native language, and daily English instruction.
“This is the beginning of demystifying the whole issue,” said Aurora Quevedo, CABE president “In some instances bilingual education surpasses national norms.”
The report was released at CABE’s annual conference in San Francisco, which drew more than 5,000 people. CABE officials challenged California Gov. George Deukmejian to put the program “back on course.” Deukmejian vetoed a bill eight months ago that would have extended and strengthened the state’s bilingual education law.
by Hallmark Finalized
Hallmark Cards announced Feb. 16 that it had finalized its acquisition of Los Angeles-based Univision, the nation’s largest supplier of Spanish-language programming.
Hallmark, headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., made the purchase with its partner First Chicago Venture Capital. The deal was struck with Univisa, Univision’s parent corporation. Negotiations for the sale were announced last November. Hallmark bought the network through its subsidiary that purchased 10 Spanish-language television stations from the Spanish International Communications Corporation last year.
Univision wascreated in 1961.
98-Year-Old Gets Card
Clara Escobedo de Martinez, a 98-year-old from Brownsville, Texas, became Feb. 9 the oldest person to receive a permanent resident card under the legalization program of the federal immigration law. The greatgrandmother was given the green card more than 60 years after first coming to the United States.
At a ceremony in Harlingen, Texas, that drew 50 people, Escobedo said,”.! feel very content and thank all of the people who have gone to this trouble without me deserving it, and I hope the Lord multiplies all of your blessings in all aspects.”
Escobedo, who first came to the United States legally in 1927, had her resident alien card confiscated without explanation by immigration officials upon her return in 1962 from a regular visit to relatives in Mexico. She returned as an undocumented alien in 1979.
Normally, legalization applicants have to wait 18 months before applying for permanent residency. Officials decided they could expedite the process by restoring the permanent resident status Escobedo, who received her temporary card last November, lost in 1962.
Halfway House Dearth Slows Process
continued from page 1
charges against him, he doesn’t have an attorney to represent him and he doesn’t know how to marshal the evidence to disprove the charges.”
A counsel to the civil liberties subcommittee said Rep. Robert Kastenmeier (D-Wis.),chairman of the body, was drafting a letter to be sent to Deputy Attorney General Arnold Bu rns
seeking a review process with more adequate protections for due process rights.
Members of the Coalition to Support Cuban Detainees have enlisted the support of several hundred law students to help represent the Marielitos. Although these student representatives cannot speak for the detainee before the review panel, Leshaw said they provide invaluable assistance. - Felix Perez
Study Finds Bilingual Ed. Beneficial
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Achy Obejas, guest columnist
Bleached Roots
“Hey, did you give up being Third World?”
It was a friend of mine giving me a hard time because of a recent.. er.. “change” in my life.
No, I’m not talking about menopause. I’m a sprightly 31 with only one chin and pretty solid thighs.
However, most people who have laid eyes on me recently think I've gone in the other direction. They think I’ve turned bopper and taken a cue from Madonna
If it was anybody from the rock scene who inspired me, it had to be Annie Lennox, the smoky-voiced, sultry and very adult lead singer of the Eurythmics(“Sweet dreams are made of this/who am I to disagree.. If you’re going to emulate a pop star, you may as well pick one with the edge of danger.
So what have I done?
I bleached my hair.
Yes, you read right I've gone can a- crazy and am now topped off by a shaggy crop of white hair.
Although I did this on an impulse charged with nothing but the specter of mortality, the results have been political: There’s nary a person who hasn’t teased me about being an arrepentida, someone who regrets being Hispanic All because of a little color, or lack thereof, in my hair.
LUSTED FOR DARKER SKIN
The criticism is that now that I’ve bleached my hair, I look white. My response is that, quite frankly, at my most tanned moment, with my hair at its blackest brown, I don’t look much more ethnic than your average Jewish princess. “Looking white” or not doesn’t qualify as an option for me.
I don’t say that with any pride. Long have I lusted for a darker, healthier looking skin. Unfortunately, menalin injections are out of the question. But I can’t in all honesty say I’m ashamed of my coloring, either.
Besides, what I’ve done is clearly cosmetic. No one in her or his right mind could ever look at this shock of white on my head and think it natural. Besides, if s totally offset by a pair of very dark eyebrows which will remain intact during this colorless phase. Thafs a promise.
Ifs not unlike the time I sported a long, thin pony tail on an otherwise short head of hair. Or when I bleached a streak of hair and dyed it an off-blue.
POINTY SHOES AND TIGHT PANTS
Lef s face it. Were I anything but an artsy-fartsy writer, there’s little chance I could get away with this at all. As it is, my friends tell me that the new hair creates a new image necessitating a new wardrobe. They keep mentioning leather and pointy shoes and very tight pants. (The problem with me and those very tight pants is entirely ethnic heritage...)
Obviously, if I were some serious type - you know, a community organizer or alderman or lawyer- I couldn’t afford this frivolity. But hey, thafs why some of us chose to be artists - so we can have a license for silliness.
Which brings us back to this Third World business. Somehow, in some people’s minds, by bleaching my hair I’ve entered a realm exclusively for white folks. Now where, really, does it say Hispanics can’t play around with their appearance? Why in heaven’s name is fun with colors strictly left to the naturally colorless?
The Third World stuff - actually, lefs get away from this Marxist jargon- the Cuban stuff is still intact Even if I were trying deliberately to obliterate it, it wouldn’t work. At any given time, this white-haired kid is going to stick out talking with her hands, dancing at the Pan American test and reacting to the heart
And for those who are too ethnically pure to deal with it, I have only one thing to say: Lighten up.
(Achy Obejas, of Chicago, is a free-lance writer and frequent contributing columnist to Hispanic Link News Service.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Feb. 22,
Sin pelos en la lengua
ACHY IN THE FAST LANE: Why didn’t we run a blonde “AFTER” picture with the brunette “BEFORE” picture of guest columnist Achy Obejas this week?
Truth is, we tried. Achy promised she’d have one taken for u& But when editor F6lix P6rez called to remind her last week, the playwright/actress/writer responded that she had just cut off all her golden tresses.
iQue lastima! She’ll never get a role in a Univision novela.
FELIX IN THE FAST LANE: Heroes are made, not born, and F$llx Perez’s moment of opportunity came - and went - just the other day. While he was laying out Weekly Report at Barrio Graphics, a scream cut through the wall from the next-door office of the Latin American research organization EPICA. A young thug had entered and grabbed the purse of a worker there.
F6lix sped off in pursuit. After a few blocks, the thief tried to scale a five-foot, chain-link fence. He was almost over when our editor grabbed his leg and somehow wove it into the three strands of wire on top. There the man dangled, pleading for his freedom. He dropped the purse to the ground.
F6lix let the man extricate his leg and watched him plop to the asphalt It was a tactical error. The thief and his loot were on the other side of the fence. He snatched up the purse and took off like a rabbit.
Adrenalin pumped F6lix over the barrier and the chase was renewed. This time a short, wide Salvadoran lady briefly blocked the man’s lane of escape by swinging a large bag of laundry at him.
Again, F6lix caught up. He pinned the man to a wall, retrieved the purse. But no one in the gathering crowd wanted to call the police.
After a while, F6lix, a product of the steel-mill town of East Chicago, Ind., loosened his grip and watched the man walk away.
The moral to this story, I guess, is that stories don’t always have to have morals. Not in the big, cold city.
CLARA IN THE LONG LANE: When Clara Escobedo de Martinez, at 98 the oldest legalization candidate in the USA, reaches 100, she will join another highly select group in this country.
The Census Bureau reported recently that, as of the 1980 Census, there were 313 U.S. Hispanic centenarians. Of them, for you statistical buffs, 228 were female and 85 were male.
Once again, society shortchanged us. We accounted for only 2.2% of the nation’s 14,170 residents 100 years and older.
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
REP. HENRY B. GONZALEZ (D-Texas), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Housing and Urban Development, commenting on HUD Secretary Samuel Pierce’s repeated refusals to appear before the committee and discuss the Reagan administration’s housing policy:
“He's been to Russia on housing business more times than he’s been before Congress."
PETER CLAYTON, prominent Miami socialite, quoted in The Miami Herald on the fact that Cubans are becoming socially more palatable to Anglos there:
“They have established themselves economically, and what other criterion is there? We have many rich, wonderfully behaved Latins.”
CHI CHI RODRIGUEZ, whose brother Jesus flew to Florida from Puerto Rico to watch him compete in that state’s PGA Senior Championship last week, told reporters after his second-place finish:
“When you have a guy named Jesus follow you for 18 holes, pulling for you, and you don’t win, something’s wrong.
1988
BEFORE
3


COLLECTING
BILINGUAL EDUCATION: For a copy of the California Association for Bilingual Education report called “On Course,” send a check or money order to CABE, 926 J Street, Suite 810, Sacramento, Calif. 95814. Members pay $12.21 and non-members, $14.44.
IMMIGRATION REFORM: “Immigration Reform in Its First Year" is a 44-page report by the Center for Immigration Studies which concludes that the immigration reform law has produced modest results but less damage than predicted by its opponents. For a copy send $6.95 to: CIS, 1775 T St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 328-7228.
PARENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD SCHOOLS: That 76% of Hispanic parents felt satisfied with the school their children were attending is one of the findings of a report by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, “The American Teacher 1987, Strengthening Links Between Home and School." The report, can be obtained at no charge from: MLIC, The American Teacher Survey 1987, P.O. Box 807, Madison Square Station, New York, N.Y. 10159-0807.
MEXICAN AMERICA: “The Changing Profile of Mexican America; A Sourcebook for Policy Making” examines the demographic changes occurring among Mexican Americans in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. For a copy (institutions pay$30, individuals $25) write: The Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711-3921.
LIBRARYSERVICESTOTHE SPANISH SPEAKING: The National Association to Promote Library Services to the Spanish Speaking publishes a quarterly newsletter on the latest activities of the group, as well as resource materials on issues of interest to Hispanics. To subscribe (individuals are $20, institutions $35) write: REFORMA, NAPLSSS, P.O. Box 27470, Tucson, Ariz. 85726.
SCHOOL SURVEY: The “1986 Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey,” prepared for the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, is a compilation of data on the characteristics of students enrolled in 1986 in public schools. Write: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 330 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 732-1452. (A price was not set by press time.)
GENERAL DEL PINO ANDCUBA: “General del Pino Speaks: An Insight into Elite Corruption and Military Dissension in Castro’s Cuba” is a 72-page booklet on Radio Marti interviews with recent Cuban defector General Rafael del Pino Diaz. For a copy, send $5 to: Cuban American National Foundation, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265-2822.
CONNECTING
COALITIONS TACKLE DROPOUTS
Seven school/community coalitions in cities with sizable Hispanic student populations were granted between $50,000 and $100,000 to reduce the number of dropouts in their areas, the Ford Foundation announced Feb. 11.
The grants, part of $2.3 million awarded to combat the dropout problem in 21 cities, is the second phase of the foundation’s School-Community Leadership Collaboratives. The coalitions of schools, businesses, local governments; social agencies and parent organizations had in the first phase collected data on the causes of dropouts.
The programs will use such methods as training parents to help at-risk students, establishing early childhood-education programs, strengthening links between schools and health and counseling services, and enhancing guidance and counseling programs.
The seven communities are East Los Angeles ($100,000), San Antonio ($90,000), San Diego ($85,000), Albuquerque, N.M„ ($75,000), Tucson, Ariz, ($75,000), Trenton, N.J. ($70,000) and Hartford, Conn. ($50,000).
EAST LA. STUDENTS SUPPORTED
TELACU, a Los Angeles-based community development corporation, will award $67,000 in scholarships to Hispanic college and graduating high school students from the East Los Angeles area this year.
In its fifth year, the program will award scholarships in $500 amounts to students at East Los Angeles Community College and Cal State Universities Los Angeles and Long Beach, and in $1,000 allotments to students at the University of Southern California, the University of California at Los Angeles and UC Irvine.
The deadline is April 4. For applications write TELACU at 5400 E Olympic Blvd, Suite 300, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022(213)721-1655.
HOUSTON STUDENTS HELPED
Students at a predominantly Hispanic Houston elementary school began using this semester a $14,000 computer software system to help them improve their reading and writing skills. The software, was donated by the Houston Metro Ford dealers.
The software system, which can teach up to 120 students a day, will be used to assist kindergarten and first-grade teachers with their instruction.
The dealerships also presented $10,000 in scholarships to eight area Hispanic organizations, including the League of United Latin American Citizens, to improve the opportunities of Houston Hispanic students in higher education.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
CAREER CONFERENCE Orange, Calif. Feb. 23
The Association of Hispanic Professionals for Education is holding its annual career conference. Nearly 50 corporations, including Northrop and Rockwell, local, state, and federal agencies will be represented for students interested in business and technological fields.
Frank Dominguez (714) 971-7300
LATINOS AND AIDS Los Angeles Feb. 24-26
A working symposium for experts in various fields, designed to develop a national strategy for dealing with AIDS among Latinos, is being sponsored by several groups, including the Centers for Disease Control and Kaiser Permanente. Participation is limited.
Lydia Becerra (213) 920-6082
FUENTES LECTURES 4
Faixfax, Va. Feb. 25
As heritage professor at George Mason University, noted author Carlos Fuentes will give lectures on various Latin American topics every Thursday through May 5. This week's planned discussion is titled The Hispanic Tradition in the New World.
University Activities (703) 323-3852
MARIELITOS Washington, D.C. Feb. 25
Panel discussions covering the treatment of Mar/eWfos from the boatlift eight years ago to the current release program are being sponsored by the Cuban Studies Program of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.
M6nica Chac6n (202) 663-5780
HISPANIC HOMELESSNESS New York Feb. 26
A public hearing geared toward determining the scope of Hispanic homelessness will be held at City Hall. Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer and State Senator Olga Mendez, among other officials, will be present. The hearing is sponsored by the New York Hispanic Housing Coalition.
Herndn Hernandez (212) 916-3630 Feb. 22,1988
STANDARDIZED TESTING San Antonio Feb. 26, 27
A public hearing concerned with the role of standardized testing and the Hispanic population will be sponsored by the Intercultural Development Research Association and the National Commission on Testing & Public Policy.
Alicia Salinas Sosa (512) 684-8180
COMING SOON
BILINGUAL EDUCATION
The National Association of Cuban American Women
of New Jersey, HispanicWomen's Resource Center
of Catholic Community Services
North Bergen, N.J. March 3
Marta San Martin (201) 866-3208
FEMINIZATION OF POWER National Latinas Caucus New York March 3 Yolanda SAnchez (212) 673-7320
SOCIOLINGUISTIC RESEARCH ON SPANISH
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis March 4, 5
Deborah Wolfangel (612) 625-5569
Hispanic Link Weekly Report




m
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
DIRECTOR
Student Recruitment and Outreach Services
The University of Colorado at Denver, a growing, urban non-residential campus serving 11,000 students in Liberal Arts, Business, Engineering, Education, Architecture and Planning, Public Affairs and Music at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, is seeking outstanding applicants interested in developing and administering innovative programs in student recruitment and outreach services.
The position is expected to play a key role in attracting students to the campus by developing effective ties with feeder high schools, community colleges, the business community and industry, with particular emphasis on the Denver Metropolitan area The position isexpected to further enhance the Denver campus’ current strengths in serving the adult learner, promote increased contact with potential undergraduate students, and in particular evolve stronger relationships with the ethnic minority communities of the Metropolitan area
In addition to overseeing the recruitment activities of the campus, appointee is responsible for the administration of the student admissions unit and the development of the University's student recruitment/outreach publications. The Director is expected to work closely with the campus’ schools/colleges and departments in the administration of the Universitys admission policies The position reports to the Director of Student Administrative Services, and serves as a member of the Vice Chancellor’s Management Group of the Division of Administration and Finance.
Qualifications: As-a highly visible representative of the University, the incumbent is expected to possess outstanding leadership qualities and effective communication/public speaking skills. Appointee ideally should have demonstrated experience in publications and in media relations. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree (Master’s degree preferred) with at least five years of student recruitment/admissions experience (including involvement with computerized admissions processing) at the director/assistant director level. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Applications and nominations must be postmarked on or before March 1, 1988. A complete application includes a letter describing successful activities that address the major responsibilities of the positions, a current resume, and three letters of reference.
Please direct applications nominations and/or inquiries to:
Chair, Search Committee for Director of Student Recruitment and Outreach Services Office of the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance University of Colorado at Denver; Dravo Building, Suite 850 1250 14th Street; Denver, Colorado 80202
The University of Colorado at Denver is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer
a
ANTICIPATED VACANCIES
9/1/88
ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT
Asst. Prof, of Accounting. Ph.D. or approp. Master’s degree plus CPA required. Ability to teach elementary and advanced accounting courses to students with varied academic backgrounds. Vac. #359.
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT Generalist (2) Asst Prof/Instructor
Ph.D. pref. Ability to teach range of Business Management courses, including Business Communications, Decision Making, Retailing, Sales Management Office & Personnel Management. Vac. # 360.
Real Estate (1) Asst. Prof./lnstructor
Ph.D. pref. Broker's License required. Coordinate RLS concentration, supervise and teach Salesperson’s Qualifying course and Broker’s Qualifying course. Vac. #361. Travel & Tourism (1) Asst. Prof./Instructor
Ph.D. pref. Ability to teach Travel & Tourism courses, coordinate TTA concentration, and teach intro, business courses as necessary. Vac. #362.
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT (2-3) Asst. Prof./lnstructor Positions:
Ph.D. in Math or Math Ed.D. pref. Ability to teach courses from arithmetic to differential equations required. Expertise and experience in several of following areas desirable: Math Learning Lab., Computer Assisted Instruction, Mastery Learning, Cognitive Styles for Math Learning, Obtaining Grants for above. Vac. #363.
Minimum Salary (Eff. 9/1/88) Asst. Prof.: $27,374; Instructor $25,108. Good Benefits. Refer to BMCC Vacancy number above and send cover letter with resume by April 8,1988, t0: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE City University of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York, N.Y. 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER I RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
The following two positions are with RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Whittier, California.
ASSISTANT DEAN, BUSINESS EDUCATION
ASSISTANT DEAN, PHYSICAL EDUCATION
For application procedure, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
EOE-AA/employer
TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY
CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available funding, beginning September 1,1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with summer employment generally available; depending on need. Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred. Teach four classes per semester; recruit and advise students; university committees and other professional duties as needed; interest in professional research and publications encouraged.
Send letter of interest, vita, official transcripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April 15,1988,
° Tarleton State University Dr. W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. AA/EEO/MF
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST. To plan and develop information and promotion programs for Census Bureau activities and reports, especially with regard to the Hispanic media Must have college degree and three years of relevant experience. Must be fluent in Spanish, GS11 /12, salary $27,172 - $32,567. Contact Maury Cagle, Assistant Chief, Public Information Office Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233 (301) 763-4051.
REVISED POSITION LISTING
(Final Filing Date Extended to 3/15/88)
UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure trackposition in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required. Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program. Ph.D. required by September, 1988. Salary range for nine-month appointment $31,500-$33,900.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is extended to March 15, 1988.
The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
Ll_


Arts & Entertainment
LATINO SERIES AIRS: The second season of the nationally syndicated public television series Vistas continued this month with the airing of the award-winning film The New Maid.
Vistas, hosted by Rita Moreno, is composed of Latino programs contributed by public television stationsand independent producers. The anthology series is syndicated by the Los Angeles-based Latino Consortium/KCET. Rosemary Alderete is the producer and Mark Carrefto the executive producer.
The New Maid features Christine Avila as Maria-the title character in a drama about a Guatemalan housekeeper in a U.S. home. The film, which picked up the grand prize at the Aspen Film Festival, was written and directed by Christine Burrill and produced by Randi Johnson.
The drama was satellite-fed to some 60 Public Broadcasting Service stations around the country earlier this month. It airs in Los Angeles Feb. 24 at 10:30 p.m. PBS stations in most Hispanic markets
air Vistas during the third week of the month (check local listings).
The second season of Vistas began in January with the national airing of The Well, a drama about a Vietnam veteran played by Tony Ortega Other titles for’88 are Enough Crying of Tears (fed in March), Felicidad (April), Nicaraguan Women (May) and Ghosts, Goblins and Other Stories (June).
Vistas is made possible by grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and participating public television stations.
In other television news, the Galavision cable network concludes its February Cine Cubano series this week with the airing of Piel canela The cult classic, starring Sarita Montiel and Manolo Fabregas, airs Feb. 26 at 3:30 p.m. EST.
ITS OFFICIAL: The new board of directors of the Hollywood-based Nosotros actors organization is installed this week at a dinner-dance sponsored by the National Hispanic Media Coalition.
Board members are Richard Yftiguez, president; Marc Allen Trujillo, first vice president; Alma Beltran, second vice president; Anthony Cbrdova, treasurer; and Ralph Camarillo, secretary.
Installation will be Feb. 26 in Los Angeles.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
JOURNALISM PROFESSORS: A study to be published next spring has found Hispanic representation among full-time journalism and mass communications professors to be an astoundingly low 0.2%.
Only two of893 respondents in the national survey, conducted last spring, identified themselves as Hispanic, author David Weaver, professor of journalism at Indiana University, Bloomington, told Media Report.
Weaver is president of the Association for Educators In Journalism and Mass Communication. HiS telephone survey of faculty at 303 colleges and universities showed that 5.2% of the journalism and mass communications professors were minorities.
Broken down, they were: blacks, 3.6%; Asians and Asian Indians, 1.3%; Hispanics,0.2% and others, 0.1 %.
Altogether there are about3,600.
His report to be published as a journalism
monograph by the association in May or June, will, in about 100 pages, “provide a portrait" of those in the profession.
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES: Another survey, by Paul Peterson, a journalism professor at Ohio State University, Columbus, has found that Latinos were also badly underrepresented among 1986 journalism and communications graduates.
He reported undergraduate degrees earned by Hispanics that year.
News/editing: 39 out of 2,092 (1.9%).
Public relations: 17 out of 1,708 (1.0%).
Advertising: 27 out of 2,311 (1.2%).
RACIAL HARASSMENT: The February Chicago Reporter detailed an increase in racial harassment in that city for the fourth consecutive year. It counted 364 reported cases in which black, white, Hispanic, Jewish and other groups were victims.
A partial breakdown of victims in those cases investigated by the ChicagoCommission on Human Relations:
B. W. H. J. O. Physical attack 48 19 6 1 4
Major property
damage 15 4 1 13 2
Total 147 57 15 36 9
Only 5.9% of the CCHR cases were directed against H ispanics, but the civil rights monthly quoted CCHR investigator Kelly Sander as saying, “The great majority of Hispanic cases go unreported.”
Sander added, “There is not much harassment of Hispanics in neighborhoods where they predominate. However, when they move into new areas... then the harrassment comes.”
ELSEWHERE: Teresa Rodriguez produced and hosted the one-hourdocumentary Callejdn Sin Salida (Dead End Street) on Hispanic dropouts on Univision Feb. 20... The second annual journalism career day for minority high school students in the Washington, D.C., area will be staged on Saturday, Feb. 27, at the Metro campus of George Mason University in Arlington, Va. It’s put on by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C. i _ . .
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejlas-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues):
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Evanston, Ill. , receives his long-awaited promotion to captain and the Distinguished Flying Cross for being shot down and being the sole survivor of a bomber he was piloting over Germany in 1944 when he was 23 years old ... Californian Pablo Morales sets a world's-best swim record of 24.25 seconds in the final of the 50-meter butterfly in a competition at Bonn, West Germany . . . X6chllt Carreto, a senior high school student from Dallas who was refused entry into the U.S. Military Academy because she is not yet a citizen , receives a full scholarship to Texas A&M University .. . Alfonso Valdes Cobian, an industrialist , banker, politician and member of one of Puerto Rico ' s most prominent families, dies of a heart attack at the age of 98 in San Juan .. . Renown jazz pianist Eddie Cano, who was recently . serving as president of the Hispanic Musicians Association, dies in his home in East Los Angeles at age 60 from natural causes ... The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs elects Angel Guzman, director of .the Hispanic Senior Center in Cleveland , as its chairman and Teodosio Feliciano, associate director of the Com mission on Catholic Community Action in Cleveland, as its vice chairman ... Joe Baca, past president of the San Bernardino (Calif . ) Community College Board, announces he will seek the 66th Assembly District seat in that state ... The Houston City Council unanimously approves John Arradondo as the new director of the city's Health and Human Services Department Arradondo had headed the Ok l ahoma City Health Department. . Federico Gonzales, an associate professor emeritus of cell biology at Northwestern University in ••..• ,l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Feb. 22. 1988 UFW Pledges to Fight Foreign Laborer' Hoax' Mariel Release Process Assailed The United Farm Workers passed a resolution Feb. 7 in McAllen, Texas , calling fort he union to file lawsuits against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, the U .S. Depart ment of Labor and other parties in an effort to put an end to what it claims are unsubstantiated petitions by growers to import foreign farm workers. UFW Presider)t Cesar Chavez told participants at the biennial Texas convention that the union will continue to fight fraud in the H-2A provision of the federal immigration law, which says that agricultural employers may bring in foreign workers if they can certify a labor shortage. Rebecca Flores Harrington, the director of the Texas UFW, said the labor shortage is " a hoax perpetrated by growers." She and Chavez argue that labor importation is a tactic used to create an oversupply of workers, thereby keeping wages artificially low . In its final stage before implementation, the review process to determine whether Mariel detainees in federal custody should be released or deported to Cuba has been widely assailed as being fraught with inadequate protections for the Marielitos . The process has also been roundly criticized for what some see as insuf ficient planning and funding to carry out the proceedings . "If these were light skinned or blond, Nordic types , there would be so much outrage you couldn ' t contain it," protested Gary Leshaw, a Legal Aid attorney in Atlanta and a member of the Coalition to Support Cuban Detainees . Leshaw is the lead attorney in three cases filed Jan . 26 seeking to stop the deportation of three Marielitos . Leshaw argues that they should be granted political asylum on the basis cit a "well-founded fear of persecution " in their homeland . A decision by the Atlanta immigration court that Marielitos as a social class display a well-founded fear of persecution Employment Bill Runs Into Opposition The Reagan administration said Feb . 9 that it opposes a House bill sponsored by Rep . Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) that would require federal agencies to report their efforts to comply with equal employment laws . The chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Clarence Thomas, said that the proposed bill would deprive his Latino Diet Cuts Cancers Hispanics suffer breast and colon cancer far less than whites or blacks because of their diet, said the director of the National Cancer Institute in Miami Feb . 10. "The data suggests that the Hispanic population is much better off than Anglos or blacks, " said Dr . Vincent DeVita. "They have half the incidence of breast and colon cancer . . . We believe ifs a cultural thing . They eat a low-fat, high-fiber diet. " The latest figures from the National Can cer Institute show that the colon cancer incidence rate among Hispanics is 15 per 100,000 compared with 35 for whites and 38 for blacks. office of t he flexibility needed to do its job . "The flexibility to ignore affirmative action" is what is desired , responded Martinez, who heads a House Education and Labor sub committee . He said the commission previously asked for such legislation in order to get compliance from federal agencies . " Now that we try to give it to them , they are against it, " Martinez told Weekly Report. Thomas also said that government employ ment regulations should apply to the 38,000 people employed by Congress . " More smoke screens, " said Martinez, "but I have no objections to its application." He admitted, however, that some congressmen are hesitant. "You can't stick one congressman with another's staff, and ifs difficult to regulate when an employee's pos i tion is dependent on your re-election," he said . Harry Pach6n, director of the National As sociation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials , which recently completed a study on Latino hiring in the federal government , said , " It is easier for a Hispanic to find a job in the private sector than with the federal government. " Darryl Figueroa "could open the door for a large number to be eligible for asylum," said Leshaw . As of Feb . 5 , there were 3,796 Marielitos i n federal custody . The cases of 2,287 had been reviewed under the first step of review pro ceedings, which are carried out by U . S . Im migration and Naturalization officials . Pat Korten, the U .S. Justice Departmenfs deput y director of public affairs, said 1 ,379 had bee n cleared for release. Of these, 324 had been released . Many Cuban leaders, including Miami B ishop Augustin Roman, who was instrumental in negotiating an end to last year's M a r ie/ito prison uprisings, have expressed theirtrus t ra tion with what they call a slow relea s e r a te. Korten recognized the criticism and s ai d his department has shifted in rece n t m onth s from releasing almost exclusively t o h alf w ay houses to extended family. He also pointe d to a contract Justice has with the U.S. Ca t holic Conference to place 600-700 Marielitos with non-related individuals . The review process was set up as a r e s ult of two prison sieges late last year wh e re 2 ,400 Cuban detainees took 138 people hostage. The Marielitos rioted out of frustration w ith the Nov. 20, 1987, renewal of a U.S. -Cuba immigration pact that allows for the deporta tion of 2,600 Mariel "excludables" t o Cuba . Among these Marielitos ruled excludable, some were convicted of felonies a n d m is demeanors since arriving from Cuba in 1980. Others are incarcerated for crimes they com mitted in Cuba or for mental problems . Man y have completed their sentences but continue to be held in accordance with U . S . immig ra tion law . If the Marielitos are ordered deported b y the INS team, they then have thei r c a s es reviewed by Justice Department off i ci a ls . The Justice review has come under attack from several sides. Said federal Judge Marvin Shoob of Atlanta at hearings in late January before the HouseJudiciaryCommittee' s sub committee on the courts, civil libert i e s and the administration of justice: "You can n o t give a man a fair hearing when he does no t understand What is going on, he doesn ' t speak the language, he ' s not aw a r e of the continue d o n page 2

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Experts Rap Proposed Repeal of Federal Dropout Aid Latino educational experts say they are stunned by U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett's Feb. 9 announcement that he plans to ask Congress to eliminate a provision in the federal law that allows high school dropouts to receive federal aid for college or trade school. Bennett focused his concern on for-profit proprietary schools and said this provision allows "unscrupulous schools to defraud the taxpayer and to take advantage of vul nerable students." The repeal would apply to any school that does not require a high school diploma or General Equivalency Diploma for admission. The secretary also said that he will ask Congress to limit lender reimbursement of student loans to 90% instead of 100% so that schools and banks will be more forceful in their and, according to an Education Department spokesperson, so that schools will "discourage admission of students who won't be successful." Antonio Rigual, executive director of the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, said, "Hispanics are more likely to be affected by such legislation than any other group. 1"He(Bennett) knows Hispanics dropout of high school at rates higher than anyone else." The Latino dropout rate is about 55% nationally, he said. Many Latinos later enroll in community Pereira Quits Amid New Disclosures Metro-Dade County (Fia) Manager Sergio Pereira resigned Feb. 1 0 amid disclosures that he failed to report on his federal income tax form profits from the sale of two Hialeah houses he and his former wife sold in 1985. A Miami Herald story revealed the flam boyant, 43-year-old Cuba-born county mana ger allegedly netted a $46,300 profit on the sales. The Herald also reported last month on another land deal involving Pereira in which he made $127,878 without investing any money and failed to list that transaction on a state financial disclosure form. Osvaldo Soto, chairman of the Miami-based Spanish-American League Against Discrimi nation, told Weekly Report the Cuban com munity is "both sorry and angry" at the resignation, effective Feb. 29. "We're angry because we believe even though he made mistakes, it wasn't so out rag eo us that it deserved this type of coverage and scrutiny," he said. "If his name was Smith or Thompson, that kind of attention would not have been given." Tomas GarciaFuste, news director of top rated, Spanish-language radio station WQBA, said telephone calls from listeners have been "overwhelmingly in Pereira's favor." Although most of the nine county commis sioners have indicated they would like to conduct a national search for a successor, many in the Cuban community are calling for a Hispanic from the area to get the position. Names that have surfaced are Assistant County Manager Joaquin Aviiio and Miami City Mana ger Cesar Odio . -Jonathan Higuera Halfway House Dearth Slows Process continued from page 1 charges against him, he doesn't have an attorney to represent him and he doesn't know how to marshal the evidence to disprove the charges." A counsel to the civil liberties subcommittee said . Rep . . Robert Kasten meier (DWis.),chair man of the body, was drafting a letter to be sent to Deputy Attorney General Arnold Burns seeking a review process with more adequate protections for due process rights. Members of the Coalition to Support Cuban Detainees have enlisted the support of several hundred law students to help represent the Marielitos. Although these student represen tatives cannot speak for the detainee before the review panel, Leshaw said they provide invaluable assistance. Felix Perez Study Finds Bilingual Ed. Beneficial Children in properly designed bilingual edu cation programs acquire English rapidly and, after three to five years, reach or surpass grade-level norms set for other academic areas, according to a study released Feb. 12 by the California Association for Bilingual Education. Stephen Krashen and Douglas Biber, linguis tics professors at the University of Southern California, authored the study, which surveyed more than 25 schools in seven California school districts involving some 7,300 students from kindergarten through sixth and eighth grade. The three ingredients considered by the study to be key to a successful bilingual 2 program are intensive teaching of core sub jects in the native language, teaching literacy in the native language, and daily English instruction. "This is the beginning of demystifying the whole issue," said Aurora Quevedo, CABE president. "In some instances bilingual edu cation surpasses national norms." The report was released at CASE's annual conference in San Francisco, which drew more than 5,000 people . CABE officials chal lenged California Gov. George Deukmejian to put the program "back on course." Deuk mejian vetoed a bill eight months ago that would have extended and strengthened the state's bilingual education law. colleges without their GEDs and enter full time programs leading to its acquisition, said Pepe Barr6n, president of El Congreso Nacional de Asuntos Colegiales. Barr6n also defended proprietary schools, saying that some are very good and serve as an alter native to students who need training. San Antonio College President Max Castillo said he would combat "tooth and nail" any legislation that limited access to federal funds for community colleges. Rigual and Castillo said that the focus on loan repayment is misguided. "The issue should not be loan collection but grants and other forms of financial aid," said Castillo. "We should be looking at this as a long-term investment." -Darryl Figueroa Purchase of Univision by Hallmark Finalized Hallmark Cards announced Feb. 16 that it had finalized its acquisition of Los Angeles based Univision, the nation's largest supplier of Spanish-language programming. Hallmark, headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., made the purchase with its partner First Chicago Venture Capital. The deal was struck with Univisa, Univision's parent corporation. Negotiations for the sale were announced last November . Hallmark bought the network through its subsidiary that purchased 10 Spanish-language television stations from the Spanish International Communications Corporation last year. Univision wascreated in 1961. 98Year-Old Gets Card Clara Escobedo de Martinez, a 98-year old from Brownsville, Texas, became Feb. 9 the oldest person to receive a permanent resident card under the legalization program of the federal immigration law. The great grandmother was given the green card more than 60 years after first coming to the United States . At a ceremony in Harlingen, Texas, that drew 50 people, Escobedo said," .I feel very content and thank all of the people who have gone to this trouble without me deserving it, and I hope the Lord multiplies all of your blessings in all aspects." Escobedo, who first came to the United States legally in 1927, had her resident alien card confiscated without explanation by immigration officials upon her return in 1962 from a regular visit to relatives in Mexico. She returned as an undocumented alien in 1979. Normally, legalization applicants have to wait 18 months before applying for permanent residency. Officials decided they could expedite the process by restoring the per manent resident status Escobedo, who re ceived her temporary card last November, lost in 1962. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Achy Obejas, guest columnist Bleached Roots "Hey, did you give up being Third World? " It was a friend of mine giving me a hard time because of a recent. . er ... "change" in my life. No, I ' m not talking about menopause . I'm a sprightly 31 with only one chin and pretty solid thighs. However, most people who have laid eyes on me recently think I've gone in the other direction . They think I've turned bopper and taken a cue from Madonna . If it was anybody from the rock scene who inspired me, it had to be Annie Lennox, the smoky-voiced , sultry and very adult lead s inger of the Eurythmics(" Sweet dreams are made of thiS/who am I to disagree ... "). If you're going to emulate a pop star , you may as well pick one with the edge of danger. So what have I done? I bleached my hair. Yes, you read right I ' ve gone cana-crazy and am now topped off by a shaggy crop of white hair. BEFORE Although I did this on an impulse charged with nothing but the specter of mortality , the results have been political : There ' s nary a person who hasn ' t teased me about being an arrepentida, someone who regrets being Hispanic. All because of a little color , or lack thereof , in my hair. LUSTED FOR DARKER SKIN The criticism is that now that I've bleached my hair , I look white. My response is that , quite frankly , at my most tanned moment , with my hair at its blackest brown, I don ' t look much more ethnic than your average Jewish princess . " Looking white " or not doesn't qualify as an opt i on for me. I don ' t say that with any pride. Long have I lusted for a darker , healthier looking skin. Unfortunately , menalin injections are out of the question. But I can't in all honesty say I'm ashamed of my coloring , either. Besides, what I've done is clearly cosmetic . No one in her or his right mind could ever look at thisshockofwhiteon my head and think it natural . Besides, ifs totally offset by a pair of very dark eyebrows which will remain intact during this colorless phase . Thafs a promise . lfs not unlike the time I sported a long, thin pony tail on an otherwise short head of hair . Or when I bleached a streak of hair and dyed it an off-blue. POINTY SHOES AND TIGHT PANTS Lefs face it. Were I anything but an artsy-fartsy write r , there's little chance I could get away with this at all. As it is , my friends tell me that the new hair creates a new image necess i tating a new wardrobe. They keep mention i ng leather and pointy shoes and very tight pants . (The problem with me and those very tight pants is entirely ethnic heritage . . . ) Obviously , if I were some serious type-you know , a community o rganizer or alderman or lawyerI couldn't afford this frivolity . But hey , thafs why some of us chose to be art ists-so we can have a license for silliness . Which brings us back to this Third World business . Somehow , in some people's minds , by bleaching my hair I 've entered a realm exclus i vely for white folks . Now where , really , does it say Hispanics can't play around with their appearance? Why in heaven's name is fun with colors strictly left to the naturally colorless? The Third World stuff-actually, lefs get away from this Marxist jargon-the Cuban stuff is still intact. Even if I we r e trying deliberately to obliterate it, it wouldn't work. At any given time , this white-haired kid is going to stick out , talking with her hands , dancing at the Pan American fest and reacting to the heart . And for those who are too ethnically pure to deal with it , I have only one thing to say: Lighten up . (Achy Obejas, of Chicago, is a free-lance writer and frequent contributing columnist to H i spanic Link News Service.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua ACHY IN THE FAST LANE: Why didn't we run a blonde " AFTER" picture with the b r unette "BEFORE" picture of guest columnist Achy Obejas this week? Truth is , we tried. Achy promised she'd have one t aken for us. But, when ed itor Felix Perez called to remind her last week, the playwrighVactresS/writer responded that she had j ust cut off all her golden tresses . ;Que lastima! She'll never get a role in a Univisi6n novela . FELIX IN THE FAST LANE: Heroes are made, not born, and Felix Perez's moment o.f opportunity came-and went-just the other day . While he was laying out Weekly Report at Barrio Graphics, a scream cut through the wall from the next -door office of the Lat i n American research organization EPICA . A young thug had entered and grabbed the purse of a worker there. Felix sped off in pursuit. Afte r a few blocks, the thief tried to scale a five-foot, chain-link fence . He was almost over when our ed itor grabbed his leg and somehow wove it into the three strands of wi r e on top . There the man dangled, pleading for his freedom. He dropped the purse to the ground. Felix let the man extricate his leg and watched him plop to the asphalt It was a tactical error . The thief and his loot were on the other side of the fence . He snatched up the purse and took off like a rabbit. Adrenalin pumped Felix over the barrier and the chase was renewed . This time a short , wide Salvadoran lady briefly blocked the man's lane of escape by swinging a large bag of laundry at him. Again , Felix caught up . He pinned the man to a wall , retrieved the purse. But no one in the gathering crowd wanted to call the pol i ce . After a wh i le , Felix , a product of the steel-mill town of East Chicago , Ind., loosened his grip and watched the man walk away. The moral to this story , I guess, is that stories don't always have to have morals . Not in the big, cold city. CLARA IN THE LONG LANE: When Clara Escobedo de Martinez , at 98 the oldest legalization candidate in the USA, reaches 100, she will join another highly select group in this country . The Census Bureau reported recently that , as of the 1980 Census , there were 313 U.S. Hispanic centenarians. Of them, for you statist i cal buffs , 228 were female and 85 were male . Once again , society shortchanged us . We accounted for only 2 .2% of the nation ' s 14 ,170 residents 1 00 years and older . -Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • REP . . HENRY B. GONZALEZ (D-Texas) , chairman of the House Subcommittee on Housing and Urban Development, commenting on HUD Secretary Samuel Pierce ' s repeated refusals to appear before the committee and discuss the Reagan administration's housing policy: "He ' s been to Russia on housing business more times than he ' s been before Congress. " PETER CLAYTON, prominent Miam i socialite , quoted in The Miami Herald on the fact that Cubans are becoming socially more palatable to Anglos there : " They have established themselves econom i cally, and what other criterion is there? We have many rich , wonderfully behaved Latins. " CHI CHI RODRIGUEZ, whose brother Jesus flew to Florida from Puerto Rico to watch him compete in that state ' s PGA Senior Championship last week, told reporters after his second place finish : " When you have a guy named Jesus follow you for 18 holes , pulling for you, and you don't win , something ' s wrong . " Hispan ic link Weekly Report 22 , 1988 3

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COLLECTING BILINGUAL EDUCATION: For a copy of the California Association for Bilingual Education report called "On Course," send a check or money order to CASE, 926 J Street, Suite 810, Sacramento , Calif. 95814. Members pay $12.21 and non-members, $14.44. IMMIGRATION REFORM: "Immigration Reform in Its First Year" is a 44page report by the Center for Immigration Studies which concludes that the immigration reform law has produced modest results but less damage than predicted by its opponents. For a copy send $6.95 to: CIS, 1775 T St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 328. PARENTS' ATTITUDES TOWARD SCHOOLS: That 76% of His panic parents felt satisfied with the school their children were attending is one of the findings of a report by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, "The American Teacher 1987, Strengthening Links Between Home and School." The report, can be obtained at no charge from: MLIC, The American Teacher Survey 1987, P.O. Box 807, Madison Square Station, New York, N.Y. 1 0159. MEXICAN AMERICA: "The Changing Profile of Mexican America; A Sourcebook for Policy Making" examines the demographic changes occurring among Mexican Americans in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. For a copy (institutions pay $30, individuals $25) write: The Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 . LIBRARY SERVICES TO THE SPANISH SPEAKING: The National Association to Promote Library Services to the Spanish Speaking publishes a quarterly newsletter on the latest activities of the group, as well as resource materials on issues of interest to Hispanics . To subscribe (individuals are $20, institutions $35) write : REFORMA, NAPLSSS, P.O. Box 27470, Tucson, Ariz . 85726. SCHOOL SURVEY: The "1986 Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey," prepared fort he U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, is a compilation of data on the characteristics of students enrolled in 1986 in public schools. Write : U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights , 330 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 732. (A price was not set by press time.) GENERAL DEL PINOANDCUBA: "General del PinoSpeaks: An Insight into Elite Corruption and Military Dissension in Castro's Cuba" is a 72page booklet on Radio Marti interviews with recent Cuban defector General Rafael del Pino Dlaz . For a copy, send $5 to : Cuban American National Foundation, 1 000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265. Faixfax, Va. Feb. 25 j g . CONNECTING COALITIONS TACKLE DROPOUTS Seven school/community coalitions in cities with sizable Hispanic student populations were granted between $50,000 and $100,000 to reduce the number of dropouts in their areas, the Ford Foundation announced Feb. 11. The grants, part of $2.3 million awarded to combat the dropout problem in 21 cities, is the second phase of the foundation's School Community Leadership Collaboratives. The coalitions of schools, businesses, local governments, social agencies and parent organizations had in the first phase collected data on the causes of dropouts. The programs will use such methods as training parents to help at risk students, establishing early childhood-education programs, strengthening links between schools and health and counseling services, and enhancing guidance and counseling programs . The seven communities are East Los Angeles ($1 00,000), San Antonio ($90,000), San Diego ($85,000), Albuquerque, N.M., ($75,000), Tucson, Ariz., ($75,000), Trenton, N .J. ($70,000) and Hartford, Conn . ($50,000). EAST LA. STUDENTS SUPPORTED TELACU, a Los Angeles-based community development corporation, will award $67,000 in scholarships to Hispanic college and graduating high school students from the East Los Angeles area this year. In its fifth year, the program will award scholarships in $500 amounts to students at East Los Angeles Community College and Cal State Universities Los Angeles and Long Beach, and in $1,000 allotments to students at the University of Southern California, the University of California at Los Angeles and UC Irvine. The deadline is April4. For applications write TELACU at: 5400 E. Olympic Blvd., Suite 300, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 721. HOUSTON STUDENTS HELPED Students at a predominantly Hispanic Houston elementary school began using this semester a $14,000 computer software system to help them improve their reading and writing skills. The software, was donated by the Houston Metro Ford dealers. The software system, which can teach up to 120 students a day, will be used to assist kindergarten and first-grade teachers with their instruction . The dealerships also presented $10,000 in scholarships to eight area Hispanic organizations, including the League of United Latin American Citizens, to improve the opportunities of Houston Hispanic students in higher education. Calendar THIS WEEK As heritage professor at George Mason u niversity, noted author Carlos Fuentes will give lectures on various Latin American topics every Thursday through May 5. This week's planned discussion is titled The Hispanic Tradition in the New World STANDARDIZED TESTING San Antonio Feb . 26, 27 A public hearing concerned with the role of standar& ized testing and the Hispanic population will be sponsored by the Intercultural Development Research Association and the National Commission on Testing & Public Policy. CAREER CONFERENCE Orange, Calif . Feb . 23 The Association of Hispanic Professionals for Edu cation is holding its annual career conference. Near ly 50 corporations, including Northrop and Rockwell, local, state, and federal agencies will be represented for students interested in business and technological fields. Frank Dominguez (714) 971 LATINOS AND AIDS Los Angeles Feb . 24 A working symposium for experts in various fields, designed to develop a national strategy for dealing with AIDS among Latinos, is being sponsored by several groups, including the Centers for Disease Control and Kaiser Permanente. Participation is limited . Lydia Becerra (213) 920 FUENTES LECTURES 4 University Activities (703) 323 MARIELITOS Washington , D.C. Feb. 25 Panel discussions covering the treatment of Marie/itos from the boatlift eight years ago to the current release program are being sponsored by the Cuban Studies Program of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Monica Chac6n (202) 663 HISPANIC HOMELESSNESS New York Feb . 26 A public hearing geared toward determining the scope of Hispanic homelessness will be held at City Hall . Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer and State Senator Olga Mendez, among other officials, will be present. The hearing is sponsored by the New York Hispanic Housing Coalition . Hernan Hernandez (212) 916 Feb. 22, 1988 Alicia Salinas Sosa (512) 684 COMING SOON BILINGUAL EDUCATION The National Association of Cuban American Women of New Jersey, Hispanic Women's Resource Center of Catholic Community Services North Bergen, N.J. March 3 Marta San Martin (201) 866 FEMINIZATION OF POWER National Latinas Caucus New York March 3 Yolanda Sanchez (212) 673 SOCIOLINGUISTIC RESEARCH ON SPANISH University of Minnesota Minneapolis March 4, 5 Deborah Wolfangel (612) 625 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER DIRECTOR Student Recruitment and Outreach Services The University of Colorado at Denver , a growing , urban non-residential campus serving 11 ,000 students in Liberal Arts, Business, Engineering , Education, Architecture and Planning, Public Affairs and Music at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, Is seeking outstanding applicants interested in developing and administering innovative programs in student recruitment and outreach services. The position is expected to play a key role in attracting students to the campus by developing effective ties with feeder high schools, community colleges, the business community and industry, with particular emphasis on the Denver Metropolitan area . The position is expected to further enhance the Denver campus' current strengths in serving the adult learner, promote increased contact with potential undergraduate students, and in particular evolve stronger relationships with the ethnic minority communities of the Metropolitan area . In addition to overseeing the recruitment activities of the campus , appointee is responsible for the administration of the student admissions unit and the development of the University's student recruitment/outreach publications . The Director is expected to work closely with the campus' schoolS/colleges and departments in the administration of the University's admission policies. The position reports to the Director of Student Administrative Services , and serves as a member of the Vice Management Group of the Division of Administration and Finance. Qualifications : Asa highly visible representative of the University, the incumbent is expected to possess outstanding leadership qualities and effective communication/public speaking skills . Appointee ideally should have demonstrated experience in publications and in media relations . Candidates must possess a degree degree preferred) with at least five years of student recruitment/admissions experience(including involvement with computerized admissions processing) at the director/assistant director level. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience . Applications and nominations must be postmarked on or before March 1, 1988. A complete application includes a letter describing successful activities that address the major responsibilities of the positions , a current resume , and three letters of reference . Please direct applications nominations and/or inquiries to: Chair, Search Committee for Director of Student Recruitment and Outreach Services Office of the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance University of Colorado at Denver; D.ravo Building, Suite 850 1250 14th Street; Denver, Colorado 80202 The University of Colorado at Denver is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer ANTICIPATED VACANCIES 9/1./88 ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT Asst. Prof . of Accounting. Ph.D. or approp. degree plus CPA required . Ability to teach elementary and advanced accounting courses to students with varied academic backgrounds. Vac. #359. BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT Generalist (2) Asst. Prof/Instructor. Ph.D. pref. Ability to teach range of Business Management courses, including Business Communications , Decision Making, Retailing , Sales Management, Office & Personnel Management. Vac . # 360. Real Estate (1) Asst. Prof./ instructor. Ph. D . pref . License required . Coordinate RLS concentration, supervise and teach Salesperson ' s Qualifying course and Qualifying course . Vac . #361. Travel & Tourism (1) Asst. Prof./lnst r uctor. Ph. D . pref . Ability to teach Travel & Tourism courses, coordinate TTA concentration, and teach intro . business courses as necessary. Vac . #362. MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT (2-3) Asst. Prof./lnstructor Positions: Ph. D . in Math or Math Ed. D . pref . Ability to teach courses from arithmetic to differential equations required. Expertise and experience in several of following areas desirable: Math Learning Lab., Computer Assisted Instruction, Mastery Learning, Cognitive Styles for Math Learning, Obtaining Grants for above. Vac. #363. Minimum Salary(Eff . 9/1/88) Asst. Prof. : $27,374 ; Instructor. $25,108. Good Benefits. Refer to BMCC Vacancy number above and send cover letter with resume by AprilS , 1988, to: Ms . Alyne Holmes Coy , Director of Personnel BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE City University of New York 199 Chambers Street , New York, N . Y . 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY / AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER /RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls H ispa nic Link Weekly Report The following two positions are with RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Whittier, California. ASSISTANT DEAN, BUSINESS EDUCATION ASSISTANT DEAN, PHYSICAL EDUCATION For application procedure, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309. EOE-AA!emp/oyer TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available ing, beginning September 1, 1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with sum mer employment generally ava!lable ; ing on need. Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred Teach four classes per semester; recruit and advise students ; university committees and other professional duties as needed ; interest in professional research and publications encouraged. Send letter of interest, vita. official tran scripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April15, 1988, to: Tarleton State University Dr. W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. AAIEEO!MF PUBLIC AFFAIRS PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST. To plan and develop information and promotion programs for Census Bureau activities and reports, espe cially with regard to the Hispanic media Must have college degree and three years of relevant experience . Must be fluent in Spanish, GS 11/12, salary $27 , 172 $32,567 . Contact Maury Cagle, Assistant Chief, Public Information Office, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233 (301) 763. REVISED POSITION LISTING (Final Filing Date Extended to 3/15/88) UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology Invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure track position in sociology of organizations beginning Sepo tember 1988. Some expertise In International organizations or international aevelopment is required . Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector. organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program. Ph.D. required by September, 1988. Salary range for nine-month appointment $31 ,500 $33,900. Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to : Chair, Organizational Studies Search Com mittee, Department of Sociology, University of California. Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is extended to March 15, 1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer . Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. 5

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Arts & Entertainment air Vistas during the third week of the month (check local listings). The second season of Vistas began in January with the national airing of The Well, a drama about a Vietnam veteran played by Tony Ortega. Other titles for'88 are Enough Crying of Tears(fed in March) , Felicidad(April), Nicaraguan Women (May) and Ghosts, Goblins and Other Stories (June). LATINO SERIES AIRS: The second season of the nationally syndicated public television series Vistas continued this month with the airing of the award-winning film The New Maid Vistas, hosted by Rita Moreno, is composed of Latino programs contributed by public television stations and independent producers. The anthology series is syndicated by the Los Angeles-based Latino Consortium/KCET. Rosemary Alderete is the producer and Mark Carreno the executive producer. Vistas is made possible by grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and participating public television stations. The New Maid features Christine Avila as Maria-the title character in a drama about a Guatemalan housekeeper in a U.S. home . The film, which picked up the grand prize at the Aspen Film Festiva( was written and directed by Christine Burrill and produced by Randi Johnson. In other television news, the Galavision cable network concludes its February Cine Cubano series this week with the airing of Pie/ cane/a The cult classic, starring Sarita Montiel and Manolo Fabregas, airs Feb. 26 at 3:30 p.m. EST. IT'S OFFICIAL: The new board of directors of the Hollywood based Nosotros actors organization is installed this week at a dinner dance sponsored by the National Hispanic Media Coalition. Board members are Richard Yniguez, president; Marc Allen Trujillo, first vice president; Alma Beltran, second vice president; Anthony C6rdova, treasurer; and Ralph Camarillo, secretary . The drama was satellite-fed to some 60 Public Broadca!ilting Service stations around the country earlier this month . It airs in Los Angeles Feb. 24 at 10:30 p.m. PBS stations in most Hispanic markets Installation will be Feb. 26 in Los Angeles. Media Report JOURNALISM PROFESSORS: A study to be published next spring has found Hispanic representation among full-time journalism and mass communications professors to te an astoundingly low 0 .2%. Only two of 893 respondents in the national survey, conducted last spring, identified them selves as Hispanic, author David Weaver, professor of journalism at Indiana University , Bloomington, told Media Report . Weaver is president of the Association for Educators in Journalism and Mass Com munication. His telephone survey of faculty at 303 colleges and universities showed that 5.2% of the journalism and mass communica tions professors were minorities. Broken down, they were : blacks, 3 .6%; Asians and Asian Indians, 1.3%; Hispanics,0.2% and others, 0 . 1% . Altogether there are about 3,600. His report, to be published as a journalism HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Darryl Figueroa . Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues): • Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 monograph by the association in May or June, will, in about 100 pages , "provide a portraif' of those in the profession. UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES: Another survey, by Paul Peterson, a journalism pro fessor at Ohio State University, Columbus, has found that Latinos were also badly under represented among 1986 journalism and com munications graduates. He reported undergraduate degrees earned by Hispanics that year: News/editing: 39 out of 2,092 (1.9%). Public relations: 17 out of 1,708 (1.0%). Advertising: 27 out of 2,311 (1.2%). RACIAL HARASSMENT: The February Chicago Reporter detailed an increase in racial harassment in that city for the fourth consecutive year. It counted 364 reported cases in which black, white, Hispanic, Jewish and other groups were victims . A partial breakdown of victims in those cases investigated by the Chicago Commission on Human Relations: B. W. H. J. 0. Physical attack 48 19 6 4 Major property damage Total -Antonio Mejias-Rentas 15 4 1 13 2 147 57 15 36 9 Only 5.9% of the CCHR cases were directed against Hispanics, but the civil rights monthly quoted CCHR investigator Kelly Sander as saying, "The great majority of Hispanic cases go unreported." Sander added, "There is not much harassment of Hispanics in neighborhoods where they predominate. However, when they move into new areas ... then the harrassment comes . " ELSEWHERE: Teresa Rodriguez produced and hosted the onehour documentary Cal/ej6n Sin Salida (Dead End Street) on Hispanic dropouts on Univislon Feb. 20 ... The second annual journalism career day for minority high school students in the Washington, D.C., area will be staged on Saturday , Feb. 27, at the Metro campus of George Mason University in Arlington , Va. lfs put on by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and Hispanic News Media Association of Wash ington, D.C. Charlie Ericksen PIZZA ALL YOU CAN E.AT -$3.89 "J.Iere comes Trouble.'' Hispanic Link Weekly Report