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Hispanic link weekly report, March 7, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 7, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Mercedes Pena of Sacramento as legislative liaison and information officer for the Department of Fair Employment and Housing... U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Deputy Commissioner Mark Everson says recently returned Cuban exile Orlando Bosch, a militant anti-Castroist, should be imprisoned for a parole violation and deported to Venezuela, where he spent 11 years in jail.. . Florida state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen organizes a delegation of twenty Cuban American politicians from Florida in a letter-writing campaign to the U.S. Parole Commission and the Immigration and Naturalization Service ask-
ing that Bosch not be treated as an excludable alien subject to deportation... Luis Acle, former assistsA^ire$oi$^#Hhe White House Office of Public Liaison and the Federation for American Immigration Reform, announces his campaign for the 44th Congressional District of California against incumbent Jim Bates... Dr. Luis P6rez, the first foreigrvborn president of the Florida Medical Association, dies at the age of 60 in Sanford, Fla, after a long illness. P6rez, a cardiologist, came to the United States from Cuba in 1957. . . University of Miami senior Maria Rivera scores 41 points in a basketball game, surpassing the university record for total career points, 2,298, set by National Basketball Association Hall of Famer Rick Barry. Rivera now has 2,310 points...

Pupil Misplacement Drops in ’86
The representation of Hispanic students in the nation’s “Educable Mentally Retarded” classrooms dropped to 5% in 1986 from 8% in 1984, according to survey results released recently by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.
Latino education experts welcomed the development but cautioned that much remains to be done to halt the misplacement of non-and limited-English-speaking Hispanics in
Treatmentand Placement-’86
Hisp. Black Asian Whit?
Enrollment 10% 16% 3% 70%
Gifted 5 8 5 81
Corp. Pun. 8 31 0 60
Susps. 9 30 1 59
EMR 5 35 1 58
Grads. 6 12 3 78
Corp. Pun.-corporal punishment; Susps.- suspensions; EMR- educable mentally retarded
Source: U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights
EMR classes - classes for mildly retarded students.
“It sounds good on its face, but you have to be very cautious, because the Office of Civil Rights has been so lax in data collection... in the past,” said Arturo Vargas, senior education policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza.
The biennial survey projected that in 1986 Hispanics accounted for 22,600 of the 433,900
students placed in EMR classes. This compares with 41,400 of 529,000 in 1984.
Hispanics increased their overall enrollment in public schools from 9% to 10%, or from 3.6 million to 4.1 million.
In addition to reporting enrollment and EMR data, the Department of Education survey also measured suspensions, corporal punishment and bilingual education enrollment.
Professor Alba Ortiz, the director of bilingual special education at the University of Texas at Austin, told Weekly Report the decrease in Hispanic EMR students was due to several reasons, including that "states, districts and people are becoming more sensitive to the legal issue of misappropriation of students.”
Ortiz said a critical ingredient necessary to ensure that students are properly placed is the involvement of parents through the use of bilingual teachersand aides. She mentioned a recent example where a non-English-speak-ing mother was not aware her child was in an EMR class because of an inaccurate translation given by a school official.
Jose Cardenas, executive director of the San Antonio-based Intercultural Development Research Association, pointed to otherfactors that have played a part in the decrease of Hispanic EMR students: new teaching methodologies, more bilingual education classes and the movement away from using intelligence tests as the sole criterion for determining
continued on page 2
Calif. Official Suggests Legalization Extension
The California official responsible for overseeing the state’s implementation of the federal immigration law’s legalization program recommended Feb. 25 to the state secretary of Health and Welfare that he support an extension of the program.
Mark Helmar, assistant secretary of program and fiscal affairs for the state Department of Health and Welfare, said he made the recommendation to Secretary Cliff Allenby based on state projections that only 950,000 of the state’s 1.7 million immigrants eligible for legalization will apply. The application deadline is May 4.
“Those eligible who do not apply will continue to be victimized and go further underground,” Helmar told Weekly Report.
As of Febi 16, California had received 710,205 legalization applications, or roughly 55% of the nation’s total.
Rejy s Remarks Cause Stir
Members of a San Diego community coalition gathered outside the district office of U.S. Rep. Ron Packard (R-Calif.) Feb. 18 to protest statements the congressman had made blaming the area’s rise in crime on undocumented aliens.
The Rev. Rafael Martinez, a leader of the North County Coalition for Human Resources, said the group held a press conference to request that Packard retract his statement or document his allegations. A spokesman for the congressman said the statements grew out of letters that Packard receives regularly from constituents about alleged crimes committed by aliens.
“We find it in poor taste that a congressman, who represents the affluent and the poor of this community, could make such a statement” said Martinez, pastor of the Solana Beach Presbyterian Church.
Members of the coalition were also upset that Packard called for increased Border Patrol roundups along the major thoroughfares where aliens congregate to look for work. “Those raids are like driving cattle into a corral. They’re hideous,” complained Martinez.
Latino Student Placement and Treatment-1986
Corp.
Enrollment* Gifted Pun. Susps. EMR Grads.
California 1,381 27% 12% 33% 29% 35% 18%
Texas 1,086 33 18 25 37 37 25
New York 385 12 8 0** 10 4 5
Illinois 157 9 4 4 8 6 4
Arizona 155 26 12 37 28 35 19
Florida 150 9 2 3 6 6 8
New Jersey 132 11 4 91** 11 14 6
New Mexico . 128 45 21 39 54 55 42
Colorado 85 14 11 23 23 19 9
* In thousands
** Percentages may be skewed due to unrepresentative samples
Corp. Pun. - Corporal Punishment; Susps. - Suspensions; EMR - Educable Mentally Retarded Source: U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights


Los Angeles Hispanics Protest County Hiring Record
Los Angeles County employee groups complained at a Feb. 24 press conference that the county’s own figures show Latino hiring to be discriminatory and unacceptably below their representation in the population.
Latinos hold 11,989 of the county’s 65,415 full-time jobs and are 18.3% of its work force, according to the county’s Office of Affirmative Action Compliance. They were 27.6% of the county population in 1980 and are projected to be 31 % by 1990. In 1977, Latinos held 8,221 of the jobs and were 13% of the work force.
Blacks comprise 19,947 of the county government’s work force, or 30.5%. They are 12.6% of the population.
The county set a Latino hiring goal of 27.6%, to be met by 1990.
Jose Roberto Juarez, director of employment programs at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, one of the groups staging the news conference, told Weekly Report, “This is part of a continuing effort to bring the problem to the attention of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.” No Hispanics sit on the five-member board.
Some black leaders saw it as an effort to take jobs away from them.
At the press conference, Raul Nunez, president of the Chicano Employees Association,said,“I am not anti-black, but I am
pro-Hlspanic in this matter.”
RobertTkfiasT the county’s affirm at ive^c-tion compliance officer, said 6,000 jobs are needed to meet Latino hiring parity.
“That the Board of Supervisors has not felt obligated to respond is indicative of the contempt in which they hold the Hispanic community,” Juarez contended.
A U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission investigation of the county’s Department of Health Services is underway in response to charges of discrimination by the Chicano Employees Association.
“In some county departments,” said Juarez, “Latino hiring is worse now than in 1977.” - Darryl Figueroa
Top Districts Report Dropout Declines
The first, second and third largest school districts in the nation, New York City, Los Angeles and Dade County, released February reports documenting decreases in their high school dropout rates In New York City, the one-year rate fell from 12.6% to 8.3% between 1980/81 and 1985/86. Ethnic breakdowns were not available, but Hispanics represent 34% of the 936,231 student enrollment There were24,000 dropouts The Los Angeles single-year rate dropped from 18.1% in 1986 to 14.5% last year. Hispanics accounted for 51.3% of the dropouts, blacks 21.1% and Anglos 16.9%. There were 17,543 dropouts
In Dade County, there was a decrease from 29.5% for the class of ’84 to 24% for the class of ’86. Of the 4,100 students who left Dade schools in 1986, 1,537 were Latino.
Education experts attributed some of the improvement to dropout prevention programs, particularly tutorial and counseling services. All agreed that long-range studies paint a more accurate picture than those compiled annually. Luis Reyes, New York’s ASPIRA research and advocacy director, said that if projected over a four-year period, the citywide dropout rate would be 30.7%.
Drop Traced to Mid-’60s
continued from page 1
placement. He said the drop can be traced to an effort begun in the mid-1960s, which included lawsuitsfiled by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and other groups, among Hispanic parents and educators protesting the often arbitrary placement of students. - Felix Perez
Top INS Official Says ‘Air Cubans Deportable
“Any Cuban who commits a crime, whether he is a resident or citizen of the United States, and if the law sees fit, can be deported,” said U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Commissioner Alan Nelson during a Feb. 25 conference in Washington, D.C., examining the status of Mariel detainees.
Cuba and the United States agreed last November to reinstate an immigration pact that provides for the deportation to Cuba of Mariel detainees who have committed crimes It is the first time a top INS official has stated such a position.
The agreement provides for the deportation of about 2,500 detainees to Cuba and in return, the United States agrees to allow 20,000 Cubans and 3,000 political prisoners to immigrate here every year.
Phila. Latinos Charge Police Brutality
2 Policemen Sentenced
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge sentenced Feb. 22 a former Huntington Park, Calif., police officerfo two years in prison and another to six months for their conviction' in the 1986 torture of a then 17-year-old Salvadoran in an effort to extract a confession.
Judge Michael Berg handed down the two-year sentence to William Lustig, 32, and the six-month one to Robert Rodriguez, 27.
Last December a jury found the two guilty of felony assault under the color of authority and misdemeanor inhumane treatment of a prisoner. The jury found that Rodriguez had only aided and abetted in the crime and did not torture the victim, Jaime Ramirez, of Huntington Park, Ramirez had testified that Lustig zapped him - while he was handcuffed in the back of a patrol car- four times on his inner left thigh with a stun gun.
Ramirez was arrested in November 1986 when a third officer spotted him carrying a bag of stolen car parts Lustig and Rodriguez later pulled up in separate cars. Rodriguez said he did not interfere or turn in Lustig because of a policeman’s code of silence.
Following a Feb. 23 meeting with Philadelphia’s Hispanic community, an assistant district attorney has been assigned to join in a police investigation of charges that three city police officers used unnecessary force when arresting three Latinos, including two pregnant women, on Feb. 12.
Ariel Rodriguez, 22, Gloria Hernandez, 19, and her sister Maria Isabel Veldsquez, 20, were arrested for disorderly conduct and charged with various degrees of assault.
At the community’s request, a meeting was held with Police Commissioner Kevin Tucker and Hispanic leaders, including Common Pleas Court Judge Nelson Diaz and state Rep. Ralph Acosta (D-Philadelphia).
Tucker rejected a call to set up an independent investigation panel with Hispanic community members He did however promise to recommend that the district attorney conduct an independent investigation, said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman forthe National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
“ I don’t have confidence in any investigation of police brutality that involves (police) Internal Affairs It is inherently biased,” Sambolin added.
District Attorney Ronald Castille’s office said it is normal procedure for it to investigate such charges jointly with Internal Affairs Police Captain Richard DeLise said the arrests occurred when officers tried to disperse a disorderly crowd and Hernandez, nine months pregnant, allegedly refused to leave. As one officer escorted Hernandez to the police car, Veldsquez grabbed his nightstick and started swinging it, DeLise charged. He added that the officers subdued the women without using force, but when they were handcuffed, Rodriguez threw a bottle at the officers. He ran, was apprehended, and got into a scuffle. Rodriguez required hospital treatment, DeLise said.
Sambolin disagreed, saying that an officer, displeasedwith Hernandez’s slow gait, starting nudging her along. Sambolin said she said, “Can’t you see I’m pregnant?” The officer reportedly respQgd^d, “What do I care? It’s not my kid.” ^
Hernandez, said Sambolin, was kicked in the stomach and has contusions over that area. Velasquez, two months pregnant, was kicked in the kidney. - Darryl Figueroa
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Antonio Stevens-Arroyo, guest columnist
Habichuelas or Frijoles
Many of my Mexican-American friends can’t understand Puerto Rican politics. They like our food (although they always add chile), eat our beans (which they call frijoles instead of habichuelas), admire our rapid-fire Spanish and dance to our Caribbean rhythms.
But when it comes to discussing the political status of the island, they don’t understand either our passion or the issues.
Of course, there’s nothing easy in the question about whether Puerto Rico should be a state, an independent republic, or stay a commonwealth. But I think part of the confusion about Puerto Rico is the premise that statehood would put the island society on a higher political rung, just as happened when New Mexico and Arizona became states in 1912. People often forget that Puerto Rico did not achieve its political organization until 1952.
Protected by international law and its relative isolation as an island, Puerto Rico has a very different political and cultural dynamism than the U.S. Southwest. Statehood represents a step backward - not an advance - for the 3.5 million Puerto Ricans on the island. The majority of the people there, as indeed most of the 2 million immigrants to the U nited States, have consistently refused to vote for statehood.
STATE STATUS A STEP DOWN
Puerto Ricans have been U.S. citizens since 1917, but those of us who do not reside in a state pay no federal income taxes and have no vote in federal elections. Rather than think of ourselves as a territory lacking statehood, we Puerto Ricans think of ourselves as a people who have made a lasting alliance with the United States. After all, the 1952 constitution of Puerto Rico was submitted not only to the U.S. Congress, but also to the United Nations General Assembly.
According to international law, Puerto Rico stands above a state but not as high as an independent republic in its legal and political powers. What state in the union - even if it were to have a majority of Spanish-speaking people- could make Spanish the official language of instruction in all public schools?
International law assures Puerto Rico a claim to 200 miles of maritime coastal waters; states have a limit of only three miles.
The island is covered by the treaty that made Latin America a nuclear-free zone. Puerto Rico has its own legal tradition, based on the Napoleonic Code rather than Anglo-Saxon law.
It even fields its own Olympic teams, which compete against the United States and the world’s nations in international competition.
NO HYPHENATED ‘-AMERICAN’
Up until the present, most of us have preferred our Latino “nationality over assimilation. Of all Latino groups, we have been No. 1 in holding onto our heritage - even if it means testing the character of U.S. cultural pluralism. We may share virtually the same culture as other Latinos, but we have a different history. Our destiny is different.
I would be the first to volunteer a list of criticisms about the defects of the commonwealth status, but like millions of Puerto Ricans, I don’t think statehood is the remedy. Even though Puerto Rico’s needs are often ignored by the United States, the odds seem better when the island goes one on one with Washington, rather than having six out of 441 representatives or two out of 102 senators.
Whatever our problems - and they are many- I’m glad to be called “a Puerto Rican” with no hyphenated “-American” stuck on as a tag. As long as we*Sf use statehood, we will not be a “minority group ” with the baggage of quotas. In Puerto Rico, we have now the social, political and economic advantages that most Mexican-Americans can only dream of. No one will ever convince me that my habichuelas are really frijoles, or that Puerto Ricans should take a step backward to statehood.
(Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo is an associate professor of Puerto Rican Studies at Brooklyn College.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report March
Sin pelos en la lengua
BAD HABIT: Some habits are tough to break. Miguel Garcia went to Florida’s Dade County courthouse late last month to explain that he wouldn’t be able to appear on his assigned date to answer a theft charge because he had to be in another courtroom at the same hour to answer another theft complaint.
As bailiff Elisa Yepe stood up to attend to his case, her $525 gold bracelet fell to the floor. Instinctively, Miguel grabbed it and took off running. It might have been a perfect crime if he hadn’t left his subpoena on the counter.
VICTIMS: Field crew leader Ray Garcia needed 60 field workers to fill his bus in Immokalee, Fla.- but only 30 in the large crowd of willing hands had ID cards.
“They* II starve to death without the work,” a driver explained to a reporter there. “ But if they don’t have a card, we can’t take them.”
If s a familiar sight in Florida’s agricultural valleys since the ’86 immigration law took effect
The irony is that nearly all of the 100 bypassed workers were U.S.-born blacks who didn’t have papers to prove their legal residence here.
“Ifs a racket,” is all that frustrated Lorenzo Bread could say. “You’ve got to have an ID to get an ID.”
BAMBAMANIA: Next month Rhino Records will produce the La Bamba album to end all La Bamba albums. It will include versions of the song, we are advised, by groups including the Rice University Owls marching band, the Plugz and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.
TORTILLA BOOMERANGS: Mexicans eat tortillas, right? So, reasoned the Immigration & Naturalization Service in Dallas, why not stick little messages about registering for legalization in tortilla packages?
It did so in 80,000 of them and learned quickly that tortillas are food for our souls as well as our stomachs. “Insensitive” and “racist’ were a couple of the charges hurled at la migra.
But lawyer Francisco Garcia of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund offered the best assessment. “What approach are they going to take for other ethnic groups?” he challenged. “Are amnesty messages in fortune cookies next?”
HERE’S THE BEEF: Dr. Henry Adams-Esquivel, vice president of San Diego’s Market Development Inc., offers today’s statistic:
“Hispanics are highly predisposed to beef consumption and voice strong positive attitudes toward beef.” During a two-week test period, Hispanics served it22% more often than theircounter-parts in the general population, he found.
If Fritz Mondale wants to jump into the muddled presidential race, at least he’ll have the answer to the question that plagued him for so long in ’84.
_____________________________________________- Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
SEN. ALAN SIMPSON (R-Wyo.), commenting on the Senate Judiciary Committee’s grilling of Supreme Court nominee Anthony Kennedy about his past membership in clubs with restrictive membership policies:
"The U.S. Senate is not bound by any of that stuff (equal opportunity laws). We have congressmen who discriminate against blacky against whites, against Hispanics, against women. They will never tell you that They do not have to.”
MICHAEL LYONS, group product manager of Mazola cooking oil, quoted by reporter Jose de C6rdoba in the Feb. 18 Wall Street Journal:
“One million dollars (spent in advertising) in the Hispanic market will take you further than $10 million in the general market ”
(Hispanics account for more than 20% of Mazola’s sales.)
7,1988 3


COLLECTING
HISPANICS IN THE CLASSROOM: “1986 Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey” is a 39-page report with enrollment and graduation data by race, ethnicity and sex. Also given is the enrollment of Hispanics in bilingual, special education, and gifted and talented classes. For a free copy, write: Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Attn. Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey, 330 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202.
PUERTO RICO’S POLITICAL STATUS: “The United States and Puerto Rico: Decolonization Options and Prospects,” a book by Ronald Perusse, director of the Inter American Institute of Puerto Rico, recommends a plebiscite in 1989 to determine whether the island should seek independence or statehood. For a copy of the book, which advises against free association, send $11.75 to: IAIPR, Penthouse G, Condominium El Monte Norte, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00918(809) 763-2409.
SALVADORAN REFUGEES: The Central American Refugee Center has released an 84-page study titled “After Seven Years in Honduras... Salvadoran Refugees Return Home.” For a copy send $10 to: CARE-CEN, 3112 Mt. Pleasant St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 328-9799.
LEGAL SERVICES: “How to Start a Free Legal Services Plan for Your Group” isa32-page manual on how any group with 150 or more members in an area can start a free legal services plan. To order the manual, send $3 to: National Resource Center for Consumers of Legal Services, 815 15th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 347-2203. (For a more complete manual, with sample brochures, contracts, publicity material and more information, send $15.)
LITERARY COMPETITION: The Caddo National Writing Center is sponsoring its seventh annual poetry, fiction and non-fiction competition. The entry fees are $20 for four poems, two short fiction or two nonfiction pieces. The grand prize for poetry is $1,000, short fiction and non-fiction, $2,000. Deadline is March 31. For more information write: CNWC, Contest Committee, P.O. Box 37679, Shreveport, La. 71133-7679.
EMPLOYER SANCTIONS: “Immigration Reform: Status of Implementing Employer Sanctions After One Year” is a report by the U.S. General Accounting Office which finds that enforcement of employer sanctions has been satisfactory and not an unreasonable burden on employers. For a free copy (specify GAO/GGD-88-14, Nov. 5), write: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
CONNECTING
INFORMATION CENTER OPENED
SER-Jobs for Progress, a national network of Hispanic employment and literacy programs, officially opened the nation’s first national Hispanic information network March 2 in Milwaukee.
Also unveiled was SER’s Literacy Laboratory.
In addition to being made available to SER’s48 affiliates through telephone modems, the Network I nformation Center will also be used by the American G.l. Forum and the League of United Latin American Citizens. Other Hispanic community-based organizations will be plugged into the computer network in the future.
The NIC will allow organizations to improve their efficiency through services such as electronic mail, data analysis and word processing.
The Literacy Laboratory will be used to evaluate and disseminate the effectiveness of automated learning curricula for youth and adults.
GROUPS’ EFFORTS RECOGNIZED
U.S. Secretary of Labor Ann McLaughlin announced Feb. 25 that a California organization serving primarily Hispanic teen-age mothers was one of 10 recipients of the Job Training Partnership Act Presidential Awards.
The Teen-age Parenting Program of Visalia, Calif., which has a completion rate of 92%, provides school completion and job training. It also addresses health, housing and social needs.
On Feb. 18 the Caribbean-American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement of Brooklyn, N.Y., was one of five New York-area groups honored by the Citizens Committee of New York for its efforts to make the city a better place to live.
Located in the Lefferts Garden section of Brooklyn, the Caribbean group offers counseling and recreational programs to children recently arrived from the Caribbean.
HACER NEGOTIATES PACT
The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility negotiated late last month an 11-point plan with San Francisco-based Pacific Bell that commits the telephone company to purchase more products and services from Hispanic-owned businesses.
The three-year plan, says HACER Chairman Raul Yzaguirre, could result in $150 million worth of business. The pact also calls for the communications giant to advertise in Latino publications, contribute to cultural groups and hire and promote more Latinos.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LATINA EMPOWERMENT Somerset, N.J. March 8
The Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey is sponsoring a statewide forum at which Jane Velez-Mitchell of WCBS-TV, New York, and Gloria Rodriguez, publisher of Hispanic Entrepreneur magazine, among others, will be speaking. Workshops on the status of Latinas and on topics that impact upon them will be held.
Ivette Del Rio (609) 292-8840
TEACHERS CONVENTION Chicago March 8-13
The 22nd annual convention of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages will offer workshops on such topics as teaching English to the deaf and teaching refugees.
Juana Hopkins (202) 872-1271
AWARDS DINNER New York March 9 4
At the third annual dinner of this kind, the National Puerto Rican Forum will present an award to Citicorp/ Citibank for their affirmative action efforts.
Marta Garda (212) 685-2311
BUSINESS PROGRAM
Washington, D.C. March 10
The Ibero-American Chamberof Commerce isspon-
soring a business development seminar that will
cover all aspects of company operations from start
up to growth management for smalfbusinesses and
large enterprises.
Linda Rentz Mayo (202) 296-0335
PUERTO RICAN AGENDA
San Jose, Calif. March 12
El Concilio Puertorriqueho is sponsoring a conference
which seeks to establish an agenda to deal with the
political, employment, educational and economic
problems of the Puerto Rican community in the
West and Midwest.
Jorge Pineiro (402) 298-0306
NEW YORK STATE LATINOS Albany, N.Y. March 13-15
The New York State Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force, newly established by Assembly Speaker Mel Miller, is sponsoring a conference titled Somos March 7,1988
Uno. The meeting is designed to identify and later implement legislative remedies for the ills of the Latino community.
Roberto Calderm (518) 455-5253
MARI AC HI FESTIVAL Fresno, Calif. March 13
Radio Bilingue is hosting its sixth annual mariachi festival featuring Mariachi de la Tierra, Mariachi Colonial, and Mariachi Azteca.
Samuel Orozco (209)486-5174
COMING SOON
HISPANICS IN TEXAS
The University of Texas at El Paso
El Paso March 16
Howard Daudistal (915) 747-5555
LETRAS DE ORO
American Express/University of Miami
Miami March 17
Luis Palemea (305) 447-4400
MEDICATION EDUCATION National Hispanic Council on Aging San Diego March 19 Cid Randal (202) 265-1288
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


NURSING DEPARTMENT College Laboratory Technicians Two anticipated CLTpositions available for September 1, 1988:
Techniques Lab: Demonstrates nursing procedures to nursing students; assists classroom instructors in clinical lab. Plans & conducts seminars, workshops, practice/skills sessions for nursing students. Knowledge of basic nursing skills. Vac. #364.
Tutorial Lab: Responsible for management and operation of lab. Monitors lab budget. Hires/supervises lab tutors Plans & conducts seminars & workshops. Knowledge of basic med-surg., pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric nursing theory. Vac. #365.
Qualifications: Registered Professional Nurse, licensed in N.Y. Min. of 2 yrs. bedside clinical exp. Knowledge of basic computer skills is desirable. 35 hour work week Salary: $24,185/A
Refer to BMCC Vacancy # above and send resume with cover letter by April 1,1988,to: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College City University of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls
TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY
CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available funding, beginning September 1,1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with summer employment generally available, depending on need. Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred. Teach fou r classes per semester; recruit and advise students; university committees and other professional duties as needed; interest in professional research and publications encouraged.
Send letter of interest, vita, official transcripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April 15,1988,
Tarleton State University Dr. W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. AA/EEO/MF
FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION General Attorneys
The FTC is recruiting entry level as well as experienced attorneys to work in its regional offices: Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. Exceptional opportunity to gain and use federal district court experience and to work in areas involving consumer fraud, advertising law and antitrust law. Knowledge of economics and experience in antitrust and/or consumer protection law is desirable.
Salary range is $27,700 - $58,000. Send cover letter, resume and legal writing sample for each regional office for which you are applying by March 18,1988, to: FTC, Division of Personnel, Room 151, Washington, D.C. 20580. Ms. Frye (202) 326-2357.
The FTC is an equal opportunity employer.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST. To plan and develop information and promotion programs for Census Bureau activities and reports, especially with regard to the Hispanic media. Must have college degree and three years of relevant experience. Must be fluent in Spanish, GS 11 /12, salary $27,716 - $33,218. Contact Maury Cagle, Assistant Chief, Public Information Office, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, (301) 783-4051.
The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer
NATIONAL HISPANIC DEMOCRATS
The National Hispanic Democrats Inc., a new political organization co-chaired by U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), Marife Hernandez of New York and Luis Lauredo of Florida, will help Hispanics nationwide exercise their political power at the ballot box in November and into the 21 st century.
Become a Founding Associate Member of this independent, national organization. Leo Gallegos, executive director.
A $5 check (payable to NHD) covers your 1988 membership. Send it care of coordinator Leo Gallegos, National Hispanic Democrats, P.O. Box 90460, Washington, D.C. 20090-0460.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Established national Hispanic organization seeks Executive Director to manage and administer operations at the National Image Inc. office in Washington, D.C. Primary responsibilities and skills: Fund raising, administration, management, computer technology, and bilingual (Spanish/English).
Salary negotiable. Applications must be postmarked March 8, 1988. Submit your resume to Mr. Alfred Garcia, 3906 Greystone Dr., Austin, Texas 78701.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
The Central American Refugee Network (CARNET), a national coalition of Salvadoran and other refugee organizations, has opened its office in the nation’s capital and needs volunteer assistance to help it accomplish its many projects and activities.
If you can spare a few hours a week or more, please contact: Roberto Alfaro, president, 421 Seward Sq. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. Telephone (202) 546-7907.
The following two positions are with RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE* Whittier, California.
ASSISTANT DEAN, BUSINESS EDUCATION
ASSISTANT DEAN, PHYSICAL EDUCATION
For application procedure, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
EOE- AA/employer
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 1988 MEDIA EDITION
On April4,1988, Hispanic Linkwill publish its 1988 “media edition.”
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,100 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 6-9 National Hispanic Media Conference in Dallas.
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Arts & Entertainment
WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS: Three much-awaited film and TV projects with Hispanic storylines and Latino stars make their official bows during the month of March.
The three continue the trend initiated last year with La Bamba- to premiere in simultaneous English and Spanish versions.
Opening this week in Los Angeles is Stand and Deliver (previously titled Walking on Watei), the film starring Edward James Olmos as Jaime Escalante, a math teacher at that city’s Garfield High School. The story about Escalante’s success in teaching calculus to the barrio students also features performances by Rosana de Soto and Andy Garcia
Warner Bros, is releasing Stand and Deliver on a slow, city-by-city schedule. It opens March 11 in Los Angeles. Other opening dates are March 18, New York; April 1 in San Francisco, Dallas, Miami and selected cities in Southern Califiornia, Arizona and Texas; April 8 in Chicago and nationally April 15.
Stand and Deliver is directed by Ramon Menendez and produced by Tom Musca; the pair wrote the American Playhouse Theatrical film, a Menendez/Musca & Olmos production.
Next week marks the return to network television of comedian Paul
Rodriguez - in his second weekly comedy series. Trial and Error, which also stars Eddie Velez, makes its debut March 15 at8 p.m.(ET) on CBS.
Rodriguez and V6lez are paired off as East LA roommates; one is a T-shirt vendor, the other a new lawyer. The sitcom, from Columbia Pictures Television, also stars Luis Avalos and Kamala Lopez.
Columbia Is planning an experiment with CBS affiliates in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Houston and San Antonio, to broadcast a Spanish-language soundtrack of the sitcom on local radio stations.
A “very limited” three-city release of The Milagro Beanfield War is scheduled later this month. Universal Pictures will release the film March 18 in Los Angeles, New York and Toronto. The national release, with simultaneous Spanish-dubbed prints, has been moved to April 1.
The film, based on the John Nichols novel, stars Ruben Blades, Sonia Braga, Julie Carmen and Carlos Riquelme. Robert Redford directed Milagro; he produced it with Moctesuma Esparza
The dubbed Spanish versions of all three projects are being produced by the Los Angeles-based Intersound Inc. Whenever possible, Hispanic lead actors have dubbed their own voices for the Spanish soundtrack. Those include Olmos, de Soto and Garcia in Stand and Deliver; Riquelme and Carmen in Milagro Beanfield War; and Rodriguez in Trial and Error. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
PROTEST JOINED: Many Latino media groups and individuals have joined the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C, in its protest to the Pulitzer Prize body at Columbia University over its failure to include a Hispanic on the 66-member jury.
Manuel Galvan, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca, publisher of Hispanic magazine, are among those denouncing the omission.
Apodaca wrote Columbia University President Michael Sovem: “When our Associate Publisher, Dr. Jose Armas, spoke with Mr. Robert Christopher about the matter, he was informed the jurors were selected on the basis of ‘special qualifications, not ethnicity.’
“I would be interested to know if any His-panics were recommended and/or considered and on what basis disqualified.”
The 66 appointed jurors were asked by HNMA President Hector Ericksen-Mendoza and Board Chairman Ricardo Chavira in individual letters not to serve until such time as Hispanics were adequately represented.
They received a few responses expressing surprise and concern, but none, as of press time, agreeing not to serve.
ENFOQUE TO FIGHT ON: The weekly half-hour Enfoque Nacional will continue to broadcast, with emphasis on commercial stations, after National Public Radio cuts off support for the program March 24.
Executive producer Jose Mireles says that the recent addition of commercial stations in several key Latino markets, including Los Angeles, San Antonio, Calexico, Calif., Washington, D.C., and Albuquerque, has increased
its audience significantly. An agreement with the Southwest radio network Spanish Information Service will add at least 22 more stations WINNERS: Latinos won fourof 16 awards given out at the National Conference of Christians and Jews competition in San Diego. The winners, announced Feb 22 at a media awards luncheon, included Paul Espinosa, for his KPBS-TV documentary “In the Shadow of the Law” on undocumented workers (best overall entry); Julie J. Rocha and Adam Gettinger Brizuela, editors of the biweekly El Sol de San Diego, for their editorial “All the Best-Todo Lo Mejor," on U.S. Hispanics who enjoy the best of both worlds; David Valladolid, also writing for El Sol, for an article on The Mythology of Mexican Immigration; and Maria Velasquez, moderator of KFMB-Aiwrs City Beat series, for a program interpreting the legalization policy of the ’86 immigration law.
- Charlie Ericksen
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Actor Edward James Olmos, left, and calculus teacher Jaime Escalante discuss a scene from the film Stand and Deliver. (See Arts and Entertainment).
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Rf..l> ' Making The News This Week California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Mercedes Pena of Sacramento as legislative liaison and information officer for the Department of Fair Employment and Housing ... U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service Deputy Commissioner Mark Everson says recently returned Cuban exile Orlando Bosch, a militant anti Castroist, should be imprisoned for a parole violation and deported to Venezuela, where he spent 11 years in jail. . . Florida state Sen . Ileana Ro&Lehtinen organizes a delegation of twenty Cuban American politicians from Florida in a letter-writing campaign to the U.S. Parole Commission and the Immigration and Naturalization Service asking that Bosch not be treated as an excludable alien subject to deportation . . . Luis Acle, former White House Office of Public Liaison and thE!' 'F'ederation for American lmmiqration Reform, announces his campaign for the 44th Congres sional District of California against incumbent Jim Bates ... Dr. Luis PereZ, the first foreign-born president of the Florida Medical Association, dies at the age of 60 in Sanford , Fla. , after a long illness. Perez , a cardiologist, came to the United States from Cuba in 1957 . . . University of Miami senior Marla Rivera scores 41 points in a basketball game, surpassing the university record for total career points, 2,298, set by National Basketball Association Hall of Famer Rick Barry. Rivera now has 2 ,31 0 points ... vol.oNo.loll HISPANIC UNK WEEKLY REPORT Pupil Misplacement Drops in '86 The representation of Hispanic students in the nation's "Educable Mentally Retarded" classrooms dropped to 5% in 1986 from 8% in 1984, according to survey results released recently by the U . S . Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights . Latino education experts welcomed the development but cautioned that much remains to be done to halt the misplacement of non and limited-English speaking Hispanics in Treatment and Placement'86 Hisp. Black Asian Enrollment 10% 16% 3% 70% Gifted 5 8 5 81 Corp. Pun. 8 31 0 60 Susps. 9 30 1 59 EMR 5 35 1 58 Grads. 6 12 3 78 Corp. Pun.corporal punishment ; Susps.suspen sions; EMReducable mentally retarded Source : US. Department of Education 's Office o f Civil Right s EMR classes classes for mildly retarded students. "It sounds good on its face, but you have to be very cautious, because the Office of Civil Rights has been so lax in data collection .. . in the past , " said Arturo Vargas, senior education policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza The biennial survey projected that in 1986 Hispanics accounted for 22,600 of the 433,900 students placed in EMR classes. This com pares with 41,400 of 529,000 in 1984. Hispanics increased their overall enrollment in public schools from 9% to 1 0%, or from 3.6 million to 4.1 million . In addition to reporting enrollment and EMR data, the Department of Education survey also measured suspensions, corporal punish ment and bilingual education enrollment. Professor Alba Ortiz, the director of bilingual special education at the University of Texas at Austin, told Weekly Report the decrease in Hispanic EMR students was due to several reasons, including that "states, districts and people are becoming more sensitive to the legal issue of misappropriation of students." Ortiz said a critical ingredient necessary to ensure that students are properly placed is the involvement of parents through the use of bilingual teachers and aides. She mentioned a recent example where a non-English-speak ing mother was not aware her child was in an EMR class because of an inaccurate translation given by a school official . Jose Cardenas, executive director of the San Antonio-based Intercultural Development Research Association, pointed to other factors that have played a part in the decrease of Hispanic EMR students: new teaching metho dologies, more bilingual education classes and the movement away from using intelligence tests as the sole criterion for determining continued on page 2 Latino Student Placement and Treatment-1986 Corp. Enrollment* Gifted Pun. Susps. EMR Grads. California 1,381 27% 12% 33% 29% 35% 18% Texas 1,086 33 18 25 37 37 25 New York 385 12 8 0** 10 4 5 Illinois 157 9 4 4 8 6 4 Arizona 155 26 12 37 28 35 19 Florida 150 9 2 3 6 6 8 New Jersey 132 11 4 91 ** 11 14 6 New Mexico 128 45 21 39 54 55 42 Colorado 85 14 11 23 23 19 9 *In thousands •• Percentages may be skewed due to unrepresentative samples Corp. Pun.Corporal Punishment ; Susps . Suspensions; EMREducable Mentally Retarded Sou r ce: U . S . D epartment of Education 's Office of Civil Rights Calif. Official Suggests Legalization Extension The California official responsible for over seeing the state's implementation of the federal immigration law's legalization program re commended Feb . 25 to the state secretary of Health and Welfare that he support an extension of the program. Mark Helmar , assistant secretary of program and fiscal affairs for the state Department of Health and Welfare, said he made the re. commendation to Secretary Cliff Allen by based on state projections that only 950,000 of the state's 1 . 7 million immigrants eligible for legal ization will apply. The application deadline is May4. "Those eligible who do not apply will continue to be victimized and go further underground," Helmar told Weekly Report. As of Feb. 16, California had received71 0,205 legalization applications, or roughly 55% of the nation ' s total. Rep's Remarks Cause Stir Members of a San Diego community coalition gathered outside the district office of U . S . Rep . Ron Packard (A-Calif.) Feb . 18 to protest statements the congressman had made blaming the area's rise in crime on undocumented aliens. The Rev . Rafael Martinez, a leader of the North County Coalition for Human Resources, said the group held a press conference to request that Packard retract his statement or document his allegations. A spokesman for the congressman said the statements grew out of letters that Packard receives regularly from constituents about alleged crimes com mitted by aliens. " We find it in poor taste that a congress man, who represents the affluent and the poor of this community, could make such a statement," said Martinez, pastor of the Solana Beach Presbyterian Church. Members of the coalition were also upset that Packard called for increased Border Patrol roundups along the major thorough fares where aliens congregate to look for work. "Those raids are like driving cattle into a corral. They're hideous," complained Marti nez .

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Los Angeles Hispanics Protest County Hiring Recor d Los Angeles employee groups The county set a Latino hiring goal of complained at a Feb. 24 press conference 27.6%, to be met by 1990. Robert Arias, the county's afftrmattve acthat the county's own figures show Latino Jose Roberto Juarez, director of employtion compliance officer, said 6,000 jobs are hiring to be discriminatory and unacceptably ment programs at the Mexican Americ an needed to meet Latino hiring parity. below their representation in the population . Legal Defense and Educational Fund , one " That the Board of Supervisors has not Latinos hold 11 ,989 of the county's 65,415 of the groups staging the news conference, felt obligated to respond is indicative of the full-time jobs and are 18. 3% of its work told Weekly Report, "This is part of a con-contempt in which they hold the Hispanic force, according to the county's Offic e of tinuing effort to bring the problem to the community," Juarez contended. Affirmative Action Compliance. They were attention of the Los Angeles County Board A U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity 27.6%ofthecountypopulationin1980and of Supervisors . " No Hispanics sit on the Commiss i on investigation of the county's are projected to be 31% by 1990. In 1977, five-member board. Department of Health Services is underway Latinos held 8,221 of the jobs and were Some black leaders saw it as an effort to in to charges of discrimination 13% of the work force. take jobs away from them. by the Chicano Employees Association. Blacks comprise 19,947 of the county At the press conference, Raul Nuiiez, "In some county departments," said Juarez, governmenfs work force, or30.5% . They are president of the Chicano Employees As"Latino hiring is worse now than in 1977." 12 . 6% of the population. sociation,said,"l am not anti-black, but I am -Darryl Figueroa Top Districts Report Dropout Declines The first, second and third largest school districts in the nation, New York City , Los Angeles and Dade County, released February reports documenting decreases in their high school dropout rates. In New York City, the one-year rate fell from 1 2 . 6% to 8 . 3% between 1980/81 and 1985/86. Ethnic breakdowns were not available , but Hispanics represent 34% of the 936,231 student enrollment There were 24,000 dropouts. The Los Angeles single-year rate dropped from 18.1% in 1986 to 14.5% last year. His panics accounted for 51. 3% of the dropouts, blacks 21.1% and Anglos 16.9%. There were 17,543 dropouts. In Dade County, there was a decrease from 29. 5% for the class of '84 to 24% for the class of ; 86. Of the 4,1 00 students who left Dade schools in 1986, 1 ,537 were Latino. Education experts attributed some of the improvement to dropout preve ntion programs, particularly tutorial and counseling services. All agreed that long-range studies paint a more accurate picture than those compiled annually. Luis Reyes, New York's ASPIRA research and advocacy director, said that if projected over a four-year period, the citywide dropout rate would be 30.7%. Drop Traced to Mid'60s continued from pag e 1 placement He said the drop can be traced to an effort begun in the mid-1960s, which included lawsuits filed by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and other groups, among Hispanic parents and educators protesting the often arbitrary placement of students. Felix Perez Top INS Official Says 'All' Cubans Deportable "Any Cuban who commits a crime, whether he is a resident or citizen of the United States, and if the law sees fit, can be deported," said U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Commissioner Alan Nelson during a Feb. 25 conference in Washington, D.C., examin ing the status of Marie! detainees. Cuba and the United States agreed last November to reinstate an immigration pact that provides for the to Cuba of Marie I detainees who have committed crimes. It is the first time a top INS official has stated such a position . The agreement provides for the deportation of about 2,500 detainees to Cuba and in return, the United States agrees to allow 20,000 Cubans and 3,000 political prisoners to immigrate here every year . 2 Policemen Sentenced Phila. Latinos Charge Police Brutality A Los Angeles Superior Court ju dge sen tenced Feb. 22 a former Hul_"lti ngton Park, Calif., police officerto two years in prison and another to six months for their convi et ion ' in the 1986 torture of a then 17-year-old Salvadoran in an effort to extract a confession . Judge Michael Berg handed down the two year sentence to William Lustig,32, and the six-month one to Robert Rodriguez, 27. Last December a jury found the two guilty of felony assault under the color of authority and misdemeanor inhumane treatment of a prisoner. The jury found that Rodriguez had only aided and abetted in the crime and did not torture the victim, Jaime Ramirez, of Huntington Park. Ramirez had testified that Lustig zapped him while he was handcuffed in the back of a patrol car-four times on his inner left thigh with a stun gun. Ramirez was arrested in November 1986 when a third officer spotted him carrying a bag of stolen car parts. Lustig and Rodriguez later pulled up in separate cars. Rodriguez said he did not interfere or turn in Lustig because of a policeman's code of silence . 2 Following a Feb . 23 meeting with Philadel phia's Hispanic community, an assistant dis attorney has been assigned to join in a police investigation of charges that three city police officers used unnecessary force when arresting three Latinos, including two preg nant women, on Feb. 12. Ariel Rodriguez, 22, Gloria Hernandez, 19, and her sister Maria Isabel Velasquez, 20, were arrested for disorderly conduct and charged with various degrees of assault At the community's request, a meeting was held with Police Commissioner Kevin Tucker and Hispanic leaders, including Common Pleas Court Judge Nelson Diaz and state Rep . Ralph Acosta (D-Philadelphia). Tucker rejected a call to set up an independent investigation panel with Hispanic community members. He did however promise to recommend that the district attorney con duct an independent investig ation, said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman fort he National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights. "I don't have confidence in any investigation of police brutality that involves(police) Internal . '\ ffairs. It is inherently biased," Sambolin added District Attorney Ronald Castille's office said it is normal procedure for it to investigate such charges jointly with Internal Affairs. Police Captain Richard Delise said the arrests occurred when office rs tried to dis perse a disorderly crowd and Hernandez , nine months pregnant, allegedly refused to leave. As one officer escorted Hernandez to the police car, Velasquez grabbed his night stick and started swinging it, Delise charged . He added that the officers subdued the women without using force, but when they were handcuffed, Rodriguez threw a bottle at the officers . He ran, was apprehended, and got into a scuffle. Rodriguez required hospital treatment Delise said. Sambolin disagreed, saying that an officer, displeasedwith Hernandez's slow gait, start ing nudging her along. Sambolin said she said , "Can't you pregnant?" The officer reportedly "What do 1 care? lfs not my kid ." :. Hernandez , said Sambolin, was kicked in the stomach and has contusions over that area. Velasquez, two months pregnant, was kick _ e _ d in the --Darryl Figueroa Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Antonio StevensArroyo, guest columnist jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Habichuelas or Frijoles Many of my Mexican-American friends can ' t understand Puerto R i can politics. They l i ke our food (although they always add chile) , eat our beans (which they call frijoles instead of habichuelas) , admire our rapid-fire Spanish and dance to our Caribbean rhythms. But when it comes to discussing the political status of the island , they don't understand either our passion or Of course, there' s nothing easy in the question about whether Puerto Rico should be a state, an independent republic, or stay a commonwealth. But I think part of the con fusion about Puerto Rico is the premise that statehood would put the island society on a higher political rung, just as happened when New Mexico and Arizona became states in 1912. People often forget that Puerto Rico did not achieve its political organization until 1952. -Protected by international law and its relative isolation as an island , Puerto Rico has a very different political and cultural dynamism than the U . S . Southwest. Statehood represents a step backward-not an advance -for the 3 . 5 million Puerto Ric ans o n the island . The majority of the people there, as i nde e d mo s t of the 2 million immigrants to the United States, h ave c on sistently r e fused to vote for statehood. STATE STATUS A STEP DOWN Puerto Ricans have been U . S . c itiz e n s since 1917 , but those of us who do not reside in a state pay no federal in c ome ta xe s and hav e no vote in federal elections. Rathe r than think of ourselves a s a territory lacking statehood, we Puerto Ricans think of ourselves as a people who have made a lasting alliance with the United States . After all , the 1952 constitution of Puerto Rico was submitted not only to the U.S. Congress, but also to the United Nations General Assembly . According to international law , Puerto Rico stands above a stat e but not as high as an independent republic in its legal and pol i tical powers. What state in the union even if i t were to have a majority of Spanish-speaking peoplecould make Spanish the official language of instruction in all public schools? International law assures Pue rto Rico a claim to 200 miles of maritime coastal waters; states have a limit of only three miles . The island is covered by the treaty that made Latin America a nuclear-free zone. Puerto Rico has i t s own legal tradition, based on the Napoleonic Code rather than Anglo-Saxon law . It even fields its own Olympi c teams, which compete against th e United States and the world's nations in international competition. NO HYPHENATED '-AMERICAN' Sin pelos en Ia lengua BAD HABIT: Some habits are tough to break. Miguel Garcia went to Florida's Dade County courthouse late last month to explain that he wouldn' t be able to appear on his assigned date to answer a theft charge because he had to be in another courtroom at the same hour to answer another theft complaint. As bailiff Elisa Yepe stood up to attend to his case, her $525 gold bracelet fell to the floor. Instinctively, Miguel grabbed it and took off running. It might have been a perfect crime if he hadn't left his subpoena on the counter. VICTIMS: Field crew leader Ray Garcia needed 60 field work ers to fill his bus in Immokalee, Fla . but only30 in the large crowd of willing hands had ID cards. " They'll starve to death without the work," a driver explained to a reporter there. "But if they don't have a card , we can't take them." lfs a familiar sight in Florida's agricultural valleys since the '86 immigration law took effect The irony is that nearly all of the 100 bypassed workers were U.S.-born blacks who didn ' t have papers to prove their legal residence here . "lfs a racket," is all that frustrated Lorenzo Bread could say. " You ' ve got to have an ID to get an ID." BAMBAMANIA: Ne x t month Rhino Records will produce the La Bamba album to end all La Bamba albums. It will include versions of the song , we are advised, by groups including the Rice University Owls marching band , the Plugz and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. TORTILLA BOOMERANGS: Mexicans eat tortillas, right? So, reasoned the Immigration & Naturalization Service in Dallas , why not stick little messages about registering for legalization in t ortilla packages? It did so in 80,000 of them and learned quickly that tortillas are food for our souls as well as our stomachs. "Insensitive" and " r acisf' were a couple of the charges hurled at Ia migra But lawyer Francisco Garcia of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund offered the best assessment. " What approach are they going to take for other ethnic groups?" he c hallenged . " Ar e amnesty messages in fortune cookies next? " HERE ' S THE BEEF: Dr . HenryAdams-Esquivel, vice president of San Diego ' s Ma r ke t Development Inc., offers today's statistic: " Hispani c s are hi ghly predisposed to beef consumption and v o ice stron g P-Q_Sitive attitudes toward beef." During a two-week test period , Hispanics served it22% more often than their counter parts in the general population, he found . If Fritz Mondale wants to jump into the muddled presidential race , at least he ' ll have th e answer to the question that plagued him for so long in '84. Up until the present most of us have preferred our Latino " nationality" over assimilation. Of all Latino groups, we have been No. 1 in holding .. onto our heritage-even if it means testing the character of U . S . cultural pluralism . We may share v irtually the same culture as other Latinos, but we have a different history. Our destiny i s different. I would be the first to volunteer a lis t of criticisms about the defects of the commonwealth status, but like millions of Puerto Ricans , I don ' t think statehood is the remedy. Even though Puerto Rico's needs are often ignored by the United States, the odds seem better when the island goes one on one with Washington, rather than having six out of 441 representatives or two out of 1 02 senators. Whatever our problems-and they are many-l'm glad to be called "a Puerto Rican" with no hyphenated "-American" stuck on as a tag. As long as we>l'f!fuse statehood, we will not be a "minority group" with the baggage of quotas. In Puerto Rico , we have now the social , political and economic advantages that most Mexican-Americans can only dream of . No one will ever convince me that my habichuelas are really frijoles, or that Puerto Ricans should take a step backward to statehood. (Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo is an associate professor of Puerto Rican Studies at Brooklyn College.) Quoting. • • SEN. ALAN SIMPSON (R-Wyo.), commenting on the Senate Judiciary Committee' s grilling of Supreme Court nominee Anthony Kennedy about his past membership i n clubs with restrictive member ship policies: "The U.S. Senate is not bound by any of that stuff(equal opportunity laws) . We have congressmen who discriminate against blacks, against whites, against Hispanics, against women. They will never tell you that They do not have to." MICHAEL LYONS, group product manager of Mazola cooking o i l , quoted by reporter Jose de C6rdoba in the Feb. 18 Wall Street Journal: " One million dollars (spent i n advertising) i n the Hispanic market will take you further than $10 million in the general market. " (Hispanics account for more than 20% of Mazoia's sales. ) Hi spanic Link Weekly Report March 7 , 1988 3

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COLLECTING HISPANICS IN THE CLASSROOM: "1986 Elementary and Se condary School Civil Rights Survey' ' is a 39-page report with enroll ment and graduation data by race , ethnicity and sex. Also given is the enrollment of Hispanics in bilingual, special education, and gifted and talented classes. For a free copy, write: Office of Civ i l Rights, U.S . Department of Education, Attn. Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey, 330 C St. SW , Washington, D . C . 20202. PUERTO RICO'S POLITICAL STATUS: "The United States and Puerto Rico : Decolonization Options and Prospects, " a book by Ronald Perusse, director of the Inter American Institute of Puerto Rico, recommends a plebiscite in 1989 to determine whether the island should seek independence or statehood. For a copy of the book, which advises against free association, send $11 . 7 5 to: IAI PR , Penthouse G , Condominium El. Monte Norte, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00918 (809) 763-2409. SALVADORAN REFUGEES: The Central American Refugee Center has released an 84page study titled " After Seven Years in Honduras . . . Salvadoran Refugees Return Home." For a copy send $10 to: CARE CEN, 3112 Mt. Pleasant St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 328-9799. LEGAL SERVICES: "How to Start a Free Legal Services Plan for Your Group" is a32page manual on how any group with 150 or more members in an area can start a free legal services plan . To order the manual , send $3 to: National Resource Center for Consumers of Legal Services, 815 15th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 347-2203 . (For a more complete manual , with sample brochures , contracts, publicity material and more information , send $15.) LITERARY COMPETITION: The Caddo National Writing Center is sponsoring its seventh annual poetry, fiction and non-fiction competition. The entry fees are $20 for four poems, two short fiction or two non fiction pieces. The grand prize for poetry is $1,000, short fiction and non-fiction, $2,000. Deadline is March 31. For more informati on write: CNWC, Contest Committee, P . O . Box 37679, Shreveport, La . 71133-7679. EMPLOYER SANCTIONS: "Immigration Reform : Status of Implementing Employer Sanctions After One Year" is a report by the U . S . General Accounting Office which finds that enforcement of employer sanctions has been satisfactory and not an unreasonable burden on employers. For a free copy (specify GAO/GGD-88-14 , Nov . 5), write: GAO , P .O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg , Md. 20877. CONNECTING INFORMATION CENTER OPENED SER-Jobs for Progress, a national network of Hispanic employment and literacy programs, officially opened the nation's first national Hispanic information network March 2 in Milwaukee. Also unveiled was SEA ' s Literacy Laboratory. In addition to being made available to SEA's 48 affiliates through telephone modems, the Network Information Center will also be used by the American G. I. Forum and the League of United Latin American Citizens. Other Hispanic community-based organizations will be plugged into the computer network in the future. The NIC will allow organizations to improve their efficiency through services such as electronic mail , data analysis and word processing. The Literacy Laboratory will be used to evaluate and disseminate the effectiveness of automated learning curricula for youth and adults . GROUPS' EFFORTS RECOGNIZED U . S . Secretary of Labor Ann Mclaughlin announced Feb. 25 that a California organization serving primarily Hispanic teen-age mothers was one of 10 recipients of the Job Training Partnership Act Presi dential Awards . The Teen-age Parenting Program of Visalia , Calif . , which has a completion rate of 92%, provides school completion and job training. It also addresses health , housing and social needs. On Feb . 18 the Caribbean-American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement of Brooklyn , N . Y., was one of five New York-area groups honored by the Citizens Committee of New York for its efforts to make the city a better place to live. Located in the Lefferts Garden section of Brooklyn, the Caribbean group offers counseling and recreational programs to children recently arrived from the Caribbean . HACER NEGOTIATES PACT The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility negotiated late last month an 11-point plan with San Francisco-based Pacific Bell that commits the telephone company to purchase more products and services from Hispanic-owned businesses. The three-year plan , says HACER Chairman Raul Yzaguirre , could result in $150 million worth of business. The pact also calls for the communications giant to advertise in Latino publications, contribute to cultural groups and hire and promote more Latinos. Calendar At the third annua l dinner of this kind, the National Pue rto Rican Forum will pres e nt an award to Citicorp / Citibank for their affirmative action efforts. Uno . The meeting is designed to identify and later implement legislative remedies for the ills of the Latino community. THIS WEEK LATINA EMPOWERMENT Somerset, N . J . March 8 The Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey is sponsoring a statewide forum at which Jane Velez Mitchel! ofWCB& TV, New York, and Gloria Rodriguez, publisher of Hispanic Entrepreneur magazine , among others, will be speaking . Workshops on the status of Latinas and on topics that impact upon them will be held. lvette Del Rio (609) 292-8840 TEACHERS CONVENTION Chicago March 8-13 The 22nd annual convention of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages will offer workshops on such topics as teaching English to the deaf and teaching refugees . Juana Hopkins (202) 872-1271 AWARDS DINNER New York March 9 4 Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 BUSINESS PROGRAM Washington , D.C. March 1 0 The I bero-American Chamber of Commerce is spon soring a business development seminar that will cover all aspects of c ompany operations from start up to growth management for smalrbusinessesand l arge enterprises . Linda Rentz Mayo (202) 296-0335 PUERTO RICAN AGENDA San Jose, Calif. March 12 El Concilio Puertorriqueno is sponsorin g a conference which seeks to establish an agenda to deal with the political , employment , educational and economic problems of the Puerto Rican community in the West and Midwest. Jorge Pineiro (402) 298-0306 NEW YORK STATE LATINOS Albany , N . Y . March 13-15 The New York State Puerto Rican / Hispanic Task Force , newly established by Assembly Speaker Mel Miller, is sponsoring a conference titled Somos March 7 , 1988 Roberto Calderin (51 8) 455-5253 MARIACHI FESTIVAL Fresno , Calif . March 13 Radio Bilingue is hosting its sixth annual mariachi festival featuring Mariach i de Ia Tierra, Mariachi Colonial, and Mariachi Azteca. Samuel Orozco (209) 486-5174 COMING SOON HISPANICS IN TEXAS The University of Texas at El Paso Ei Paso March 16 Howard Daud i stal (915) 747-5555 LETRAS DE ORO American E x press / University of Miami Miami March 17 Luis Palemea (305) 447-4400 MEDICATION EDUCATION National Hispanic Council on Aging San Diego March 19 Cid Randal (202) 265-1288 H i spani c Link Weekl y Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS NURSING DEPARTMENT College Laboratory Technicians Two anticipated CL T positio n s ava il ab l e for September 1 , 1988 : Techniques Lab: Demonstrates nursing procedures to nursing students; assists c l ass r oo m instructors in clinical lab. P lans & conducts se m i nars, workshops , practice/skills sessions for nursing students. Knowledge of basic n ursing sk ills. Vac . #364. Tutorial Lab: R esponsible for managem ent and operation of lab . Monitors lab budget. HireS/supervises lab tutors. Plans & conducts seminars & workshops. Knowledge of basic m ed-surg., pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric nursi n g theory. Vac. #365. Qua l ifications: Registe red Professional Nurse, licensed in N.Y. Min. of 2 yrs. bedside c l inica l exp. Knowledge of basic computer skills is desirabl e . 35 hour work week. Salary $24,185/A Refer to BMCC Vacancy # above and send r esume with cove r letter by April1, 1988,to: Ms. A l yne Holmes Coy, Di rector of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College C i ty Universi t y of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUA L OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER /RCA VERI FICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECI ALIST. To plan and develop information and promotion programs for Census Bureau activities and reports, es pe cia lly with regard to the Hispanic media . Must have college degree and three years of relevant experience. Must be fluent in Spanish , GS 11/12, salary $27,716-$33,218. Contact Maury Cagle , Assistant Chief , Public Information Office, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, (301) 783-4051. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available fund ing, beginn in g September 1, 1988. Assistant Professor level , salary competitive with sum mer employment generall y avai lable, depend in g on ne ed. Ph.D . essential; professional experience in civil rights j urisprudence preferred. T each lour classes per semester, recruit and advise students; university committees and other profess i onal duties as needed; inte rest in profess ional research and publications encouraged. Send letter of interest, vita, offici a l tran sc ripts, three letters of recomme ndation and/ or placement file on or before April15, 1988, to: Tarleton State Un i versity Dr . W . Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Bo x T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville , TX. 76402. AA!EEO!MF H ispanic Link Weekl y Report FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Genera l Attorneys The FTC is recruiting entry level as well as experienced attorneys to work in it s regional offices: Ch i cago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. Exceptional opportunity to ga in and use federal district court experie n ce and to work in areas involving cons umer fraud, advertis in g law and antitrust law. Know l edge of econ omics and expe rience in antitrust and/or consumer protection law is desirable. Salary range i s $27,700-$58,000. Send cover letter. resume and legal writing sample for each regional office for which you are applying by March 18, 1988, to: FTC , Division of Personnel, Room 151 , Washington, D . C . 20580. Ms. Frye (202) 326-2357. The FTC is an equal opportunity employer. NATIONAL HISPANIC DEMOCRATS The National Hispanic Democrats Inc., a new political organization co-chaired by U . S . Rep. E s teban Torres (D-Calif.) , Marife Hernandez of New York and Luis Lauredo of Florida, will h e lp Hispanics nationwide e xe rcise their political power at the ballot box in November and into the 21st century. Become a Founding Assoc iate Member of th1s Independent, national organization. Leo Ga llegos, executive dire c tor. A $5 check (payabl e to NH D ) cover s your 1988 membe rship. Send it care of coordinator L eo Gallegos, National Hispanic Democr ats, P.O. Box 90460, Washington, D .C. 20090-0460. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Established n at ional Hispanic orga ni zat ion seeks Executive Director to m a n age and administer operations at the Natio n a l Image Inc. office in Wash ington, D.C. Primary re s ponsibil i ties and ski lls: Fund raising, ad minis tration . managemen t , computer techn ology, and b ilingual (Spanish/English). Salary negotiable. Applications must be postmarked March 8 , 1988 . Submit your re sume to Mr. Alfred Garcia, 390 6 Greystone Dr., Aust in , Texas 78701. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED The Central American Refugee Network (GARNET), a national coalition of Salvadoran and other refugee organizations, has opened its office in the nation's capital and needs volunteer assistance to help it accomplish its m a ny and activities. If you can spare a few hours a week or more please contact: Roberto Alfaro , president, 421 Seward Sq. SE , Washington, D . C . 20003. Tele phone (202) 546-7907. Th e following two positions are with RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Whittier, California. ASSISTANT DEAN, BUSINESS EDUCATION ASSISTANT DEAN, PHYSICAL EDUCATION For application procedure, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309. EOEAA/employer PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 1988 MEDIA EDITION On April4, 1988, Hispani c Link will publish its 1988 "media edition." This special issue will reach our subscribers ( more than 1 ,100 advocates and professionals ac ross 39 states) AND a projected 1 ,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April6 National Hispanic Medi a Confe ren c e in Dallas . In addition to our regular "Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page of"Opportunities in the Media" insert for that edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, spec ial audience, we welcome yo'ur ad in either section. For additional information contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza at (202) 234-0737. Dead line for ad copy-is Friday , March 25, 1988. NATIONAL RADIO SALES Hispanic Radio Network: Hot, new national Spanish radio syndication service seeks ind ependent sales agent for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Te xas. Call(505) 9840080. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: .. No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per w ord (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organ iza tio n Street ___________ _ City, State & Zip ________ _ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment Rodriguez-in his second weekly comedy series. Trial and Error, which also stars Eddie Velez, makes its debut Marc' h 15 at 8 p.m. (El) on CBS. WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS: Three much-awaited film and TV projects with Hispanic storylines and Latino stars make their official bows during the month of March. Rodriguez and Velez are paired off as East LA roommates: one is a T-shirt vendor, the other a new lawyer . The sitcom, from Columbia Pictures Television, also stars Luis Avalos and Kamala Lopez. Columbia is planning an experiment with CBS affiliates in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami , Houston and San Antonio, to broadcast a Spanish-language soundtrack of the sitcom on local radio stations. The three continue the trend initiated last year with La Bamba-to premiere in simultaneous English and Spanish versions. Opening this week in Los Angeles is Stand and Deliver (previously titled Walking on Watef), the film starring Edward James Olmos as Jaime Escalante, a math teacher at that city's Garfield High School. The story about Escalante's success in teaching calculus to the barrio students also features performances by Rosana de Soto and Andy Garcia. A "very limited" three-city release of The Milagro Bean field War is scheduled later this month. Universal Pictures will release the film March 18 in Los Angeles, New York and Toronto. The national release, with simultaneous Spanish-dubbed prints, has been moved to April1. Warner Bros. is releasing Stand and Deliver on a slow, city-by-city schedule. It opens March 11 in Los Angeles. Other opening dates are March 18, New York; April1 in San Francisco, Dallas, Miami and selected cities in Southern Califiornia, Arizona and Texas ; April 8 in Chicago and nationally April 15. The film , based on the John Nichols novel , stars Ruben Blades, Sonia Braga , Julie Carmen and Carlos Riquelme . Robert Redford directed Milagro; he produced it with Moctesuma Esparza. The dubbed Spanish versions of all three projects are being produced by the Los Angeles-based lntersound Inc. Whenever possible, Hispanic lead actors have dubbed their own voices for the Spanish soundtrack. Those include Olmos, de Soto and Garcia in Stand and Deliver; Riquelme and Carmen in Milagro Bean field War; and Rodriguez in Trial and Error. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Stand and Deliver is directed by Ramon Menendez and produced by Tom Musca; the pair wrote the American Playhouse Theatrical film, a Menendez/Musca & Olmos production. Next week marks the return to network television of comedian Paul Media Report PROTEST JOINED: Many Latino media groups and individuals have joined the His panic News Media Association of Wash ington, D.C. , in its protest to the Pulitzer Prize body at Columbia University over its failure to include a Hispanic on the 66-member jury . Manuel Galvan, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca, publisher of Hispanic magazine, are among those denouncing the omission. Apodaca wrote Columbia University President Michael Sovern: "When our Associate Publisher, Dr. Jose Armas, spoke with Mr. Robert Chris topher about the matter, he was informed the jurors were selected on the basis of 'special qualifications, not ethnicity.' HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Darryl Figueroa . GraphicS/Production: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 "I would be interested to know if any His panics were recommended and/ or considered and on what basis disqualified." The 66 appointed jurors were asked by HNMA President Hector Ericksen Mendoza and Board Chairman Ricardo Chavira in indivi dual letters not to serve until such time as Hispanics were adequately represented . They received a few responses expressing surprise and concern, but none, as of press time, agreeing not to serve . ENFOQUE TO FIGHT ON: The weekly half-hour Enfoque Nacional will continue to broadcast, with emphasis on commercial sta tions, after National Public Radio cuts off support for the program March 24. Executive producer Jose Mireles says that the recent addition of commercial stations in several key Latino markets, including Los Angeles, San Antonio , Calexico , Calif., Wash ington, D .C., and Albuquerque, has increased its audience significantly. An agreement with the Southwest radio network Spanish Infor mation Service will add at least 22 more stations. WINNERS: Latinos won four of 16 awards given out at the National Conference of Chris tians and Jews competition in San Dieqo. The winners, announced Feb . 22 at a media awards luncheon, included Paul Espinosa, for his KPBS.TV documentary "In the Shadow of the Law " on undocumented workers (best overall Julie J. Rocha and Adam Gettinger Brizuela, editors of the biweekly El Sol de San Diego, for their editorial" All the BestTodo Lo Mejor," on U.S. Hispanics who enjoy the best of both worlds; David Valladolid, also writing for El So( for an article on The Mythology of Mexican Immigration; and Maria Velasquez, moderator of KFMB-AM's City Beat series, for a program interpreting the legalization policy of the '86 immigration law . Charlie Ericksen CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tue s day will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same weP.k. Multiple use rates on request. Actor Edward James Olmos, left, and calculus teacher Jaime Escalante discuss a scene from the film Stand and Deliver. (See Arts and Entertainment). 6 Hispanic Link Weekly Repprt