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Hispanic link weekly report, March 14, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 14, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Making The News Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian and 50 state legislators pay tribute to Arthur Montoya, postmaster of the Sacramento field division of the U.S. Postal Service. Montoya is marking his 25th year with the Postal Service. . . Arizona state Sen. Jestis Higuera lambastes Gov. Evan Mecham for sending a letter to every member of the Senate proclaiming his innocence on charges of concealing a campaign loan and improperly using state funds... The U.S. Senate Republican Conference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs names U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos as a member of its advisory committee. . . Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, along with a group of former and current officials, urges that the New York Board of Estimate be changed, not abolished.
The group feels that the powerful body&y^oitiiSn would reduce minority participation in the city’s governance. . . Los Angeles Councilman Richard Alatorre joins Michael Dukakis’ presidential campaign as a California co-chair... Myrna Milan becomes the first female Hispanic municipal court judge in Newark, N.J... U.S. District Court Judge Kenneth Ryskamp orders the release of anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch, 61. Bosch was imprisoned for a parole violation upon his return to Miami after 14 years in Venezuela, 11 of which were spent in jaiL.. Master Sgt. Gilbert Zamora, who at 13 was the youngest soldier in the Army since the Civil War, retires in special ceremonies at Ft. Ord. Calif. The 6-foot-4, 275-pound Los Angeles native, who was given his final salute by 550 marching troops, fought in Korea and Vietnam. Zamora was found out after 14 months of service but re-enlisted at the age of 17...

Latino Family Safety Net Erodes
If the federal and state programs in place to help families from sinking below the poverty line in 1979 had the same impact in 1986, there would have been some 53,000 fewer Hispanic families living in poverty, concludes a study by the San Antonio*based Southwest Voter Research Institute released March 1.
By factoring in government cash benefits, such as Social Security, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, unemployment insurance and Supplemental Security Income, the study finds that 13% of Latino families with children were lifted out of poverty in 1979. This percentage dropped to 8% in 1986, says the study.
When incorporating cash and non-cash benefits, which include food, housing and medical care, to determine the poverty level, the study concludes that 35% of Hispanic families were raised above the poverty line in 1979 as compared with just 20% in 1986.
By merging cash and non-cash benefits, the study concludes that there would have been some 158,000 fewer impoverished Hispanic families in 1986 if anti-poverty programs were at their.1979 level of effectiveness.
The 1986 federal definition of poverty fora family of four was having a cash income less than $11,203.
Not counting government benefits, the incomes of 627,000 Hispanic families in 1979 were below the poverty line. Despite the fact that this number decreased slightly from 1985
to 1986, there were still more than 1 million such families two years ago.
The study says that federal budget cuts in the early 1980s and the failure of state aid programs to keep pace with inflation are the primary reasons the Hispanic poverty rate increased to 27.3% in 1986 from 21.8% in 1979. Twenty-nine percent of Hispanics- a record 5.2 million - were living below the poverty line in 1985.
Although the study notes that the poverty rate for Hispanic children dipped slightly to 37% in 1986 from its record level of 40% in 1985, it warns, “The failure of government programs to abate the growing poverty level among young Latinos does not portend well for the future health, education and welfare of the nation’s second largest and fastest growing minority group.”
Following are the percentages of children who lived in poverty in 1986 according to the type of family they lived in:
Latino Black White
Female-Headed 67.1% 66.7% 46.3%
Male Present 25.8 17.0 9.8
All Families 37.1 42.7 15.3
Female-headed families, says the institute’s report, fared the worst when looking at the ability of anti-poverty programs to lift families from poverty. In 1979,40% of such families were lifted out of poverty, compared with 23.4% in 1986.
- Felix Perez
INS Blamed in Death of 17-Year-Old in Calif.
Several groups, including the East Los Angeles Immigration Project and the Benito Ju&rez Civic Association, attended a March 6 protest march in Los Angeles of some 250 people to demand a federal investigation into the death of a 17-year-oldChicano who died while in U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service custody.
Ismael Ramirez died Feb. 26 after his arrest during a Border Patrol raid in the Fresno area.
“This is telling us what we can expect when the amnesty period is over in May,” community activist Isabel V&zquez told Weekly Report “It is time people became aware of the abuses the INS is committing.”
Assistant Fresno Border Patrol Agent in Charge John Crockford said Ramirez died in a Fresno hospital 11 days after his arrest. He added that a routine investigation is underway by the INS Office of Professional Responsibility.
According to V&zquez, witness Tomas Pefta said that an INS agent caught the fleeing Ramirez and slammed him to the ground, causing his head to bleed. Six other witnesses, she said, have come forward since a March 2 press conference called attention to the case.
“We want the district attorney’s office to investigate,” Vazquez said.“Once we have every shred of evidence, we also will ask the Hispanic Congressional Caucus to intervene on our behalf.” - Darryl Figueroa
House Passes Rights Bill
On a315-98 vote, the U.S. House of Representatives passed March 2 a civil rights bill that would cut off federal aid to an entire institution if any of its departments were found to discriminate.
The bill is an attempt to expand a 1984 Supreme Court decision in Grove City College vs. Bell, which held that only those departments or activities that were discriminatory could be denied aid.
The Civil Rights Restoration Act was passed Jan. 28 by an equally wide margin in the Senate, 75-14. President Reagan has promised to veto the bill.
Latino Families Lifted From Poverty By Govt Aid
(numbers in thousands)
1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986
Before Transfers After Cash and 627 744 790 892 899 946 1037 1030
Non-Cash Transfers 222 217 202 181 164 186 218 207
% Lifted From Poverty 35.4 29.2 25.6 20.3 18.2 19.7 21.0 20.1
Female-Headed
Before Transfers After Cash and 333 391 427 434 437 486 534 535
Non-Cash Transfers 132 126 116 92 86 105 121 125
% Lifted From Poverty 39.6 32.2 27.2 21.2 19.7 21.6 22.7 23.4
Source: Southwest Voter Research Institute and U.S. Census Bureau


Spanish Speakers Inadequately Served by N.Y. Prisons
New York State Senator Israel Ruiz (D-Bronx) released a report Feb. 29 documenting the inaccessibility of rehabilitative services to the states non-English-speaking Hispanic prison inmates, who comprise roughly 55% of the 12,285 Hispanics incarcerated there.
Ruiz blasted the Department of Correctional Services’ lack of bilingual, bicultural personnel as effectively barring them from rehabilitative and other services. Hispanics are the fastest-growing group in New York’s prison system, and only 37.7% of them were born on the U.S. mainland, the study found.
The largest groups were:
Place of Birth Total %
Puerto Rico 4,660 40.0
U.S. Mainland 4,393 37.7
Dominican Republic 953 8.2
Cuba 571 4.9
Colombia 492 4.2
In New York’s 53 facilities, 30% of the inmate population is Hispanic, compared with 2.7% of the security force, the report found. This creates a language barrier that often leads to violence, the senator contended.
The report showed no Spanish-speaking psychologists, librarians or placement coordinators are made available to Hispanic inmates. Ruiz noted that the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Treatment program offered in 29 facilities employs no Hispanic counselors.
“Many attend meetings but are unable to participate,” the report stated. “The lack of participation... hinders their parole chances when they appear before the Parole Board.”
DOC Commissioner Thomas Coughlin’s response to the report was that he started the Hispanic Inmates Needs Program in 1985/86, said Ruiz spokesman Mike Diamond.
“But he neglected to address the report’s contention that the program itself is not working,” Diamond added.
HINP provides personnel to represent Hispanic inmates at formal hearings. In 1985/86, HINP positions were created at six facilities. Another seven have been funded for 1987/88, Ruiz said, but they have yet to be implemented. - Darryl Figueroa
PRISON INMATES, EMPLOYEES
Total Hisp. % Hisp.
Inmates 40,849 12,285 30.1
C.O. s* 16,517 428 2.7
Civilians* 2,842 119 4.2
Guards 1,607 65 4.0
Supindts*. 53 1 1.9
q* Correction Officers, Non-security civilians, Superintendents
Education Funding Tied to Elections Texas Repubs. Say Yes
to English Referendum
Increases in the Reagan administration’s proposed education budget for fiscal year 1989 are slight and timed to election year politics, say congressional and Hispanic education experts.
The $21.2 billion package, released Feb. 16, is about 4% higher than the 1988 congressional appropriation of $20.3 billion.
Senate Budget Committee Chairman Lawton Chiles(D-Fla.) said of the proposal,“One year deep cuts; the next year modest increases.”
Jim Lyons, legal and political counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education, called the proposed increases inadequate in meeting the needs of Hispanic students “Services in areas such as bilingual education are down while the pool of children needing the services is the fastest growing,” he said.
For the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs the president requested a 4% increase from the 1988 appropriation of $191.8 million to $200.5 million. In 1988 the administration requested $143.1 million.
An analysis by a White House budget monitoring group, OMB Watch, reports that, with inflation adjustments bilingual education funds would be 37% lower in 1989 than in 1980.
The Education Department estimates that there are some 1.5 million limited-English-proficient children in the country. Federal ‘dollars service 250,000 of them. An Education Department spokesperson said they never intended to serve entire districts, but only to provide seed money for bilingual education programs. - Darryl Figueroa
With 99%, or 5,645, precincts reporting, Texas Republicans overwhelmingly supported an English-only referendum on their party’s March 8 Super Tuesday ballot, with 92.1% of the vote.
The non-binding referendum says English should be the “official” language of Texas and the United States. Some 765,178 Republicans voted for the referendum while 65,320 voted against.
Also in Texas, Hispanic Democrats gave Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis a 56% majority of their Super Tuesday vote. Jesse Jackson was second with 21 % and Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore was third with 12%, according to preliminary results from an exit poll conducted by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project.
Two Groups Rate Congress Members
U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres of California was given the highest lifetime rating - 87% -among the 11 voting Latino congressmen when measured on issues of concern to the Consumer Federation of America, revealed a report the group released Feb. 29.
Reps. Manuel Lujan of New Mexico and Solomon Ortiz of Texas were the only two Hispanic congressmen given a 100% rating by a lobbying group measuring how many Congress members voted for-contra aid since 1985, according to another tally released Feb. 26 by the American Conservative Union. Lujan is the lone Hispanic Republican.
In addition to its lifetime ratings, CFA rated the congressmen on how they voted on 14 bills in 1987, such as one that would have limited credit card interest rates and another that would have reduced the funding for the Legal Services Corporation. Overall ratings for 1986 were also provided.
ACU arrived at its rankings by selecting five votes on contra aid. Three votes were from the 99th Congress, one from the first session of the 100th Congress and another from the 2
second session. Eight of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus members rated 20% or below.
Rating Latino U.S. Reps.
ACU ’85 - ’88 ’86 CFA ’87 Life
Calif.
T. Coelho 0% 50% 79% 63%
M. Martinez 0 75 79 79
E. Roybal 0 75 86 83
E. Torres 0 75 86 87
N.M.
M. Lujan* 100 17 21 21
B. Richardson 20 75 64 80
N.Y.
R. Garcia 0 75 86 76
Texas
A. Bustamante 40 50 50 53
E. De la Garza 20 42 57 36
H. Gonzalez 0 75 86 65
S. Ortiz 100 42 43 69
* Lujan is the sole Republican in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.
Sources: The American Conservative Union and the Consumer Federation of America.
Andy Hernandez, SVREP director, said that in the Republican primary, Vice President George Bush was the winner with 48% of the Hispanic vote. Former television evangelist Pat Robertson was second with 34% and Kansas Sen. Robert Dole trailed with 10%.
“We think a lot of Hispanics have switched to the Republican side in order to vote for Robertson,” Hernandez noted. A breakdown of voters was not available at press time.
Bias Settlement Reached
The U.S. Department of Justice announced March 4 that it had reached a settlement with Pan American Airways in a case where the airline was charged with discriminating against a permanent resident alien who was refused employment as a flight attendant
The settlement requires Pan Am to give the woman back pay, reimburse her for related expenses and distribute a statement to employees on the anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The victim’s name and the settlement amount were not disclosed.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
Notice
The New York State Department ofTrans-portation is accepting proposals for the management of Stewart International Airport (located near Newburgh, N.Y.) and Republic Airport (located on Long Island). It is anticipated that separate management contracts, commencing Nov. 1st, 1988 will be entered into for each facility, covering a basic period of 5 years with options for extensions. Responsibilities at Republic Airport will include management of Airport operations and lease negotiations. At Stewart
International Airport, responsibilities would include management of airport operations, marketing activities, control tower operations, and capital project (expansion) management.
Proposers may offer to manage any or all of the responsibilities at either or both of the facilities. Proposals must be submitted no later than April 29th, 1988.
Interested qualified firms may request copies of the solicitations (please specify either or both facilities) in writing from:
Rex Grathwol /s
Director of Contracts NYSDOT Albany, N.Y. 12232 "m
NYSDOT is an equal opportunity affirmative action employer-M/F/H/V
TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available funding, beginning September 1,1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with summer employment generally available, depending on need Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred. Teach four classes per semester, recruit and advise students; university committees and other professional duties as needed; interest in professional research and publications encouraged.
Send letter of interest, vita, official transcripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April 15,1988, to:
Tarleton State University Dr. W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. AA/EEO/MF
ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE Administrative aide: Computer word processing, strong editing skills, type 70 wpm, organizational ability, good phone skills, bilingual (English/Spanish). Salary $18,000 - $20,000 plus benefits. Call (202) 783-4328.
RENTAL
North Arlington, Virginia, unfurnished room for rent. Located near subway and close to Washington, D.C. Rent is $317 per month plus 1/2 of the utilities. Washerand dryer. Available 3/15. Female nonsmoker please. Contact: Concha Orozco. Work (202) 371-2100 or Home: (703) 276-9546.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
The Central American Refugee Network (CARNET), a national coalition of Salvadoran and. other refugee organizations, has opened its office in the nation’s capital and needs volunteer assistance to help it accomplish its many projects and activities.
If you can spare a few hours a week or more, please contact: Roberto Alfaro, president, 421 Seward Sq. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. Telephone (202) 546-7907.
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 1988 MEDIA EDITION
On April4,1988, Hispanic Link will publish its 1988 “media edition.”
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,100 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 6-9 National Hispanic Media Conference in Dallas.
In addition to our regular “Marketplace” section, Weekly Report will carry a full page of “Opportunities in the Media” insert forthat edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
For additional information contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza at (202) 234-0737. Deadline for ad copy is Friday, March 25, 1988.
NURSING DEPARTMENT College Laboratory Technicians Two anticipated CLTpositions available for September 1, 1988:
Techniques Lab: Demonstrates nursing procedures to nursing students; assists classroom instructors in clinical lab. Plans & conducts seminars, workshops, practice/skills sessions for nursing students. Knowledge of basic nursing skills. Vac. #364.
Tutorial Lab: Responsible for management and operation of lab. Monitors lab budget. Hires/supervises lab tutors. Plans & conducts seminars & workshops. Knowledge of basic med-surg., pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric nursing theory. Vac. #365.
Qualifications: Registered Professional Nurse, licensed in N.Y. Min. of 2 yrs. bedside clinical exp. Knowledge of basic computer skills is desirable. 35 hour work week Salary: $24,185/A
Refer to BMCC Vacancy # above and send resume with cover letter by April 1,1988,to: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College City University of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls
FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION General Attorneys
The FTC is recruiting entry level as well as experienced attorneys to work in its regional offices: Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco. Exceptional opportunity to gain and use federal district court experience and to work in areas involving consumer fraud, advertising law and antitrust law. Knowledge of economics and experience in antitrust and/or consumer protection law is desirable.
Salary range is $27,700 - $58,000. Send cover letter, resume and legal writing sample for each regional office for which you are applying by March 18,1988, to: FTC, Division of Personnel, Room 151, Washington, D.C. 20580. Ms. Frye (202) 326-2357.
The FTC is an equal opportunity employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
TROUBLE AT THE ALAMO: The premiere screening of Alamo... The Price of Freedom, at San Antonio’s new 85-foot-wide IMAX Theater, was picketed by members of various national Latino organizations.
The film, intended as a tourist attraction, is “only slightly altered from previous productions (and) just as damaging in its blatant exclusion of Tejanos and their contribution and role in the history of Texas,” according to San Antonio City Councilman Walter Martinez.
The March 6 premiere was picketed by, among others, members of1 the Nosotros actors organization, the League of United Latin American Citizens and the American Gl Forum. The latter two are urging a boycott of the Lubys cafeteria chain and of Pace Mexican food products - the film’s two major investors.
THIS WEEK ON TV: Several Latino characters are introduced on network TV this week - on two hew CBS sitcoms.
Premiering March 14 is NTTNI'sEisenhower & Lutz, which features Rose Portillo in a regular, supporting role. The Los Angeles native
plays Millie Zamora, a secretary to lawyer Barnett “Bud” Lutz (Scott Baku la).
Two episodes of Eisenhower & Lutz will air on the 14th - the premiere at 8:30 (ET) and the second episode at 9:30, its regularly scheduled slot.
Also premiering this week is Columbia Pictures Television’s Trial and Error, which stars Paul Rodriguez and Eddie Velez as East L.A roommates Tony Rivera and John Hernandez (see March 7 HLWR). The sitcom premieres March 15 at 8 p.m.
GRAMMY NOTES: Linda Ronstadt was the only Hispanic to win a Grammy Award outside the “Latin” categories at the ceremony held in New York March 2.
Ronstadt won, along with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, for the album Trio (Warner Bros.) - in the “best country performance by a duo or a group with vocals” category.
All winning performances in the Latin field were albums: Julio Iglesias’ Un hombre solo (Discos CBS Int’l.) for “best Latin pop,” Eddie Palmieri's La Verdad/The Truth (Fania/Musica Latina Int’l.) for “best tropical Latin,” and Los Tigres del Norte? s / Gracias America sin fronteras!(Profono Inf l.)for“best Mexican American performance.”
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
PULITZER RESPONSE: Pulitzer Prize Board administrator Robert Christopher has responded to a series of complaints from Latino media leaders about the board’s failure to include Hispanics among the 66 prize jurors this year.
The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., initiated the protests last month. Several groups joined incriticizing the body, including the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
Its president, Manuel Galv&n, an editorial board member of the Chicago Tribune, challenged an earlier contention by Christopher that the selection process was “colorblind.”
“To NAHJ, it appears that this selection process is not colorblind but color-ignorant, perpetuated by the board members? blindness to their own biases,” Galvan wrote. “.. .NAHJ believes that the ethical and professional
standards of journalism in this country are diminished when the diverse segments of American society are demeaned and ignored."
Christopher’s response to HNMA, received March 8, said that the present jury completed its’88 deliberations the preceding week.
“Both Pulitzer Prize Board Chairman Roger Wilkins and President Michael Sovern of Columbia have informed me that when the Prize Board holds its next meeting on March 28th they plan to urge their fellow members to make an intensive and sustained effort to insure that Hispanic journalists are represented on our juries beginning with those chosen to serve next year.”
HNMA had asked all 66 jurors to decline t their appointments While several expressed some dismay over the omission of Hispanics, none agreed not to serve.
HNMA will meet March 24 to decide whether to pursue its grievance further.
GROUNDBREAKER: Unless she is challenged at the National Hispanic Media Conference April 6-9 in Dallas New York Newsday
reporter Evelyn Hernandez will become the first Puerto Rican and the first woman to lead the National Association of Hispanic Journalists
Past NAHJ presidents included two Chicanos Gerald Garcia and Manuel Galvan, and one Cuban American, Guillermo Martinez. Garcia currently serves as publisher of Texas’ Bryan-College Station Eagle. Martinez is news director of Miami television station WLTV.
Others who earned '88 nominations are: Rosalind Soliz, reporter, KERA-TV, Dallas first v.p.; Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor, Dallas Times Herald, 2nd v.p.; Elisa Alfonso, writer/producer, WSNS-TV, Chicago, secretary; Norma Sosa, managing editor, Corpus Christi Caller-Times in Texas treasurer; and, for at-large delegates (three to be chosen), Patrisia Gonzales, reporter, The Philadelphia Inquirer; Jose Lozano, publisher, La Opinidn, Los Angeles; Edna Negron, reporter, New York Newsday; Ivan Roman, reporter, The Miami Herald; and Maria Elena Salinas, national news anchor, Univision, Los Angeles.
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen*Mendoza Editor F6lix P£rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
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6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Latino Media Associations Must Be More Confrontational
by Francisco Newton
In January 1981, when I became involved in the struggle for Hispanics to attain employment parity and fairer treatment in the media, there existed two or perhaps three local associations of Hispanic media professionals Of these, none were national or even statewide in scope, and only one had adquate financial support and an active membership.
Then, in the span of a few years, there was an explosion of such organizations. By the end of 1984, there were more than two dozen associations, including three that were national.
Now there are five national associations plus local groups in almost every U.S. city with a sizable Hispanic population. But the proliferation of these groups has subsided, and some critics have argued their impact has diminished as well.
What has been accomplished? What does the future portend for these associations?
What is the current situation of Hispanics in the media?
One significant accomplishment has been the development of a national consciousness; another is greater communication among Hispanic media professionals throughout the country. Traveling around the United States in the early 1980s to meet with Hispanic journalists, I learned that the few who were out there knew little about each other. This hurt Hispanic journalists, for in their disunity, 'they had virtually no voice or visibility with the media decisionmakers in this country. They were alone in their struggles to build careers.
HISPANICS WERE ‘NONEXISTENT
This growth in networking is evident in the positive response to the annual Hispanic media conference. Since the first conference in 1982, which drew 250 participants, to the one in 1987, attended by more than 1,500,1 have had countless Hispanic media professionals and students tell me how thrilled they were to meet so many of their peers That excitement spawned many of the Hispanic media organizations around the country.
A second accomplishment resulted from our growing unity and communication. We gained the attention, and to a limited extent the cooperation, of most of the principal media companies and associations In the early 1980s, Hispanics were nonexistent in the minds of media executives, especially in the East, which remains the intellectual and financial heartland of media power in this country.
But now Hispanics are regularly included in scholarship programs job fairs internships and editing and management training programs
Although we have made these gains in the past half dozen years we remain far from our goal of proper representation in all areas and levels of print and broadcast media. In fact, there is reason to fear that we are losing ground.
FINANCIAL SUPPORT NEGLIGIBLE
One obstacle is the negligible financial support Hispanic media groups receive from most media companies What support has been received by our media associations has come from the same small number of media companies and foundations Gannett outstanding among them. The vast majority of these supporters have been newspapers hardly any have been TV or radio stations (a disturbing fact, given that radio is the most relied upon medium among Hispanics).
Because of the recent stock market crash, the problem of financial support will likely get much worse. Those companies that have provided support will now give less. Those that never gave will now attribute their callous stinginess to the stock market.
Two-thirds of the nation’s daily newspapers employ no mlnorities-an indictment of that industry. But there are signs of hope.
Two of the principal newspaper associations - the American Society of Newspaper Editors and the American Newspaper Publishers Association - have created strong minority committees, hired fulltime staff (no Hispanics until this month) to address minority issues and conducted numerous minority job fairs throughout the country.
There has been no effort remotely comparable to this in broadcasting, Hispanic Link Weekly Report
and past gains there are being eroded.
Admittedly, minority employment has long been much higher in government-regulated broadcasting than in print media (Currently, the newsroom employment figures for minorities are 13% In TV, 9% in radio and 7% in newspapers.) Studies for the Radio & TV News Directors Association, however, document the consistent decline of minority employment in broadcasting since 1980.
NEW STRATEGIES NEEDED As the Reagan administration has taken the teeth out of the Federal Communications Commission’s initiatives to offer opportunities to minorities in the industry - as well as stripped other affirmative action efforts of their effectiveness - broadcasters have had less outside pressure to hire minorities. Now, the situation for minorities looks particularly grim because of the major “restructuring'' all TV networks have undergone the past couple of years. Broadcast executives today are increasingly bottom-line oriented; the networks are cutting back on staff in areas where minorities have always been most highly represented - reporting and community affairs.
Faced with the prospect of diminishing financial support and growing employment problems in broadcasting, Hispanic media associations need to consider new strategies if they are to remain viable and productive.
One option they must consider is to become more confrontational with the “powers that be" in the media. For example, they can publicly list those media companies that are most recalcitrant about hiring or promoting minorities They can develop ties with other minority media associations, strengthening cooperation between Hispanic, black, Asian American and Native American media organizations. They can also link with Latino professional and community-based associations that are concerned about the damage the present level and quality of coverage cause Hispanics
COMMUNITY HELP NECESSARY Community-based activists may be in a better position to be aggressive with obdurate media officials and their efforts would be more successful with the advice and support of minority media professionals who understand the workings of the business These strategies recognize the fact that media companies often must be forced to do what’s right No Hispanic media association relishes the prospect of confrontation, but to achieve the parity and fair treatment we seek, we will need to become more assertive or face diminishing strength and effectiveness The media industry has certainly demonstrated that its commitment to social equality is no greater - if as great - than that of other businesses By its failure to act with real commitment in the'70s and ’80s it has proven that it does not even understand its own professional need to include 20 million U.S. Hispanics in its family.
(Francisco Newton serves as executive director of the Washington, D.C -based National Association of Hispanic Journalists.)
National Media Organizations
Following is a list of national Hispanic media organizations their addresses, phone numbers and contact persons
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. Contact: Francisco Newton, executive director.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC PUBLICATIONS: c/o Teleguia de Chicago, P.O. Box 23133, Chicago, III. 60623 (312) 788-8828. Contact: Zeke Montes president.
HISPANIC PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSOCIATION: 5400 E Olympic Blvd., Suite 250, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 726-7690. Contact Esther Renteria, president.
HISPANIC ACADEMY OF MEDIA ARTS AND SCIENCES: P.O. Box 291774, Los Angeles, Calif. 90029-8774(818)954-2720. Contact Ivy Orta national chairperson.
NATIONAL HISPANIC MEDIA COALITION: 5400 E. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles Calif. 90022 (213) 726-7690. Contact: Alicia Vega executive director.
Jan. 25,1988
5


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ARLINGTON COUNTYdOBOPPORTUNITIES
The following positions are open until filled:
POLICE OFFICER (MULTIPLE VACANCIES)
Police Department Ann.#: 5005-8A-POL.; Salary: $26,000 Arlington County is actively recruiting entry-level Police Officers to join one of the few nationally accredited departments in the country. This is professional law enforcement work in which the employee is responsible for protection of life and property.
Duties include patrolling by car/motorcycle to detect or prevent crime, assisting in investigations'of major crimes such as homocide, rape, etc, and testifying in court proceedings, etc;
' Requires two years of college (60 semester or 90 quarter hours) at an accredited college Or university, Virginia driver’s license at time of appointment and U.S. Citizenship. New officers are required to attend 13 weeks of training at Northern Virginia Criminal Justice Academy.
EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN Public Safety Dispatcher Ann. # 1155-8A-POL.; Salary. $17,971 Entrylevel technical/communications work in the Police/Fire Emergency Communications Center. Responds to telephone requests for emergency services; determines emergency/ routine calls and refers appropriately; operates telephone console, telephone call directors, typewriter terminals for on-line computer hook-up and other related equipment. Requires H.S. diploma or equivalent and one year of clerical, communications, or public contact experience, and the ability to type 20 wpm.
The following positions close on February 11, 1988.
SOCIAL WORKER Department of Human Services 3 full-time positions Ann. # 6614-8A-DHS.; Salary $25,195
SOCIAL WORKER Department of Human Services 2 part-time positions, 1 temporary and 1 permanent Ana #6614-8B-DHS.; Salary $12.11 per hour
These are professional positions in the Division of Social Services, Department of Human Services, assigned to a specialized unit. Duties include casework management, individual and family counseling, client assessment crisis intervention, investigations, representation in court hearings, participation on multi-disciplinary teams, delivery of services and other duties assigned to specialized unit. Independent judgment is exercised under the supervision of a Casework Supervisor. Please refer to official announcement for areas in which there are current vacancies
Requires a Master’s degree in closely related area and one year of experience in the delivery of human service programs. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in one or more of the specialized units listed on the announcement and or bilingual ability.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on the closing date. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only.
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department
2100 14th Street, North, Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE/MFH
NATIONAL RADIO SALES
Hispanic Radio Network: Hot, new national Spanish radio syndication service seeks independent sales agent for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Texas, Call (505) 984-0080.
TELEVISION HOST/FIELD PRODUCER
Emmy-award winning bilingual magazine program airing in the number 1 and number 4 markets needs a seasoned journalist to host the series and produce top-q uality, field pieces. Two-to-three years experience researching, writing, editing, producing and appearing in field pieces required. Two years anchoring or hosting experience, undergraduate degree and strong commitment to Hispanic related issues also required. Rush resume and tape to Personnel Office, NEW JERSEY NETWORK, 1573 Parkside Ave., CN 777, Trenton, N.J. 08625.
(eoe-m/f)
FACULTY POSITION Scoring/Arranging/Composition University of Colorado at Denver Full-time, tenure-track position for Fall 1988. Seeking candidates with professional experience in commercial music writing. Terminal degree or significant professional accomplishment required. APPLICATION DEADLINE March 1,1988. Include a tetter of application, complete professional vita, and a minimum of three lettersofrecommendation. Forfurther information contact Search Committee, College of Music, Box 162A, CU-Denver, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, Colo. 80202 or phone (303) 556-2727.
University of Colorado is an AA/EEO employer.
REVISED POSITION LISTING
(Final Filing Date Extended to 3/15/88)
UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required. Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complexorganizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program. Ph.D. required by September, 1988. Salary range for nine-month appointment: $31,500 - $33,900.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is extended to March 15, 1988.
The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
6
Jan. 25,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
FACULTY POSITIONS* < miu. * * University of Colorado at Denver College of Business and Administration
The College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver is actively seeking candidates for faculty positions. Rank is open and commensurate with qualifications and experience Candidates for senior rank must have an earned doctorate a strong research record, proven teaching proficiency, and an ability to assume leadership responsibilities within the College. Success in sponsored research and an ability to deal successfully with external constituents also are desired Applications from women and minorities are strongly encouraged.
The openings are for Fall 1988 in the areas of:
Accounting - Advanced assistant, associate, or full rank.
Finance - Rank open, preferred fields of specialization include financial management, banking and capital markets, international financial management and investments. Strong quantitatlve/econo-metric skills are preferred.
Information Systems- Candidates atassociate/full rank preferred in the areas of production management, information systems, and quantitative methods and statistics.
Management - Candidates at associate/full rank preferred in the areas of organizational behavior/theory, human resource management
or strategic management.
Marketing - Rank open, preferred fields include marketing research, marketing management and strategy, consumer behavior, and inter* national marketing.
Located in downtown Denver, the College of Business and Administration is ideally situated to participate in the growth of the Denver business community. Currently, 900 undergraduate and 1,300 graduate students are enrolled in the College’s AACSB-accredited programs, which include 11 undergraduate majors, six Master of Science programs, a Master of Business Administration program, and executive programs in business administration and health administration.
Please submit resumes to:
Donald L. Stevens, Dean College of Business and Administration University of Colorado at Denver 1475 Lawrence Street Denver, Cola 80202-2219 The University of Colorado is an AA/EEO employer.
POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
POSITION TITLE:
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs and Affirmative Action Officer.
POSITION SUMMARY:
The University of Arizona is seeking to fill the position of Assistant Vice President for Academic | Affairs and Affirmative Action Officer. The person in this position will be responsible for the administration of affirmative action processes and procedures for faculty, professionals, and administrators, and monitors classified staff work force activity through the Personnel Department. The appointee will report to the Provost and will j assist the Provost and Vice Provost in the administration of processes and procedures for hiring, tenure/continuing status, and promotion i of faculty, professionals, and administrators. An
important part of the responsibilities of the appointee will be the articulation and promotion j of the affirmative program of the University of Arizona. The duties of affirmative action officer
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for professional Los Angeles Hispanic-American theatre to manage all administrative aspects of the theater, e.g. fund-raising, marketing, personnel, and public I relations. Salary mid-30s. Send resume to: Chairman, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, 421 N. Avenue 19, Los Angeles, Calif. 90031.
ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION REPAIRERS
The California Air Resources Board is now l accepting applications for the InstrumentTech-
nician II civil service exam. Must have 3 yrs. experience in operation, maintenance & repair of electronic instrumentation (2 yrs. of college, | university, trade or technical school experience
may be substituted.) For more info call (916) 323-1158 before February 1.
include the acquisition and dissemination of information relative to equal employment opportunity/affirmative action to the administration, faculty, staff and students of the University; the maintenance of adequate compliance records; preparation of appropriate reports; the develop* ment of reporting systems; the investigation’of formal and informal complaints; the development and monitoring of policies; and the identification of potential problem areas and the search for appropriate resolutions.
POSITION QUALIFICATIONS:
An understanding of the basic purposes of a university such as the University of Arizona Ability to plan and organize. Interest in problem solving. Familiarity with the administrative structure of large universities. A knowledge of basic academic personnel procedures and equal opportunity and affirmative action issues. Ability to interact with individuals at different levels of the organization (from students to the Board of
Regents) and from diverse backgrounds. Some experience as a faculty member desirable. Preferably at least two years of administrative and supervisory experience. Experience in preparing and presenting reports.
SALARY: Dependent upon qualifications. STARTING DATE: July 1,1988.
DEADLINE:
Nominations and applications must be received no later than March 1,1988. The candidate’s resume, together with names of three references, must be received no later than March “fs, 1988. MAIL TO:
Chair, Search Committee for Assistant . Vice President/Affirmative Action Officer 512 Administration Building University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 85721 EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Lirik, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (E7) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by _ Organization Street_______
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Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
7


Arts & Entertainment
MORE NOMINATION NEWS: Nine Latino recordings are nominated in the "best Latin pop performance” category. (See story, page 2)
Nominated albums are Danny Rivera’s Amaro morir(DNA), Yolandita Monge’s Laberinto be amor (Discos CBS Inf I), Luis Miguel's Luis Miguel '87. Soy como quiero ser (WEA Latina), Lunna’s Lunna (A&M), Jose Josh’s Siempre contigo (Ariola), Emmanuel’s Solo (BMG Music/RCA) and Julio Iglesias? Un hombre solo (Discos CBS Inf I).
Also nominated in the category are En bancarrota, a track from Braulio’s album Lo belloylo prohibido(DiscosCBS Inf I), and Maria Conchita Alonso’s single Otra mentira mis (A&M).
Six albums are listed in the “best tropical Latin performance” category: Rub6n Blades’ Agua de Luna (Moon Water) (Elektra), Caribbean Express! Caribbean Express (A&M), Celia Cruz & Willie Coldn’s The Winners (Vaya/M usica Latina Inf Q, Ray Barreto’s Aqul se puede, Eddie Palmieri’s La verdad-The Truth and Hector Lavoe’s Strikes Back(all on Fania/Musica Latina Inf I).
The nominees in the “best Mexican/American performance!’ category
are all albums: Los Diabios’ Celebracidn, Little Joe’s Timeless (Discos CBS Inf I), Chavela y su Grupo Express’ El rey del barrio, Los Tigres del Norte’s /Gracias! America sin fronteras (Profono Inf I) and Antonio Aguilar’s 15 exitos con tambora Vol 2 (Musart).
Various other Latinos are nominated in other“non Latin” categories. Among those are the Asimbonanga track from Joan Baez’s Recently (MCA) for “best contemporary folk recording,” and South Pacific (FM), performed by Kiri Te Kanawa, Jose Carreras and others, for «$6est mfUsical cast show album.”
The music video Cyndi Lauper in Paris (CBS Music Video Enterprises) is up for “best performance music video” - producer John Diaz is among the nominees Frank Hernandez and Tony Salerno are the album producers of Bullfrogs and Butterflies (Part III) , (Candle), nominated for “best recording for children.”
Nominees for the 30 th annual Grammy A wards were announced in Los Angeles Jan. 14. The statuettes will be handed out March 2 at a ceremony at New York’s Radio City Music Hall - which will be broadcast live by CBS.
ON TV: The film Stones For Ibarra, a Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation, airs on CBS Jan. 29 at 7:30 p.m. Hispanics in the cast include Lupe Ontiveros, Trinidad Silva and Carlos Palomino...
- Antonio Mejlas-Rentas
Media Report
The year 1988 will bring a variety of activities by Hispanic media groups around the country:
CALIFORNIA: The California Chicano News Media Association, headquartered in Los Angeles, is sponsoring its ninth annual Journalism Opportunities Conference Feb. 5 and6 atthe University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
It will bring together college students and media professionals with about 45 recruiters for media organizations across the country.
To obtain a registration packet, contact Leticia Cdrdova, CCNM A, School of Journalism, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695 (213) 743-7158. Registration ts $20.
WASH INGTO N :The Nations I Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington,
D.C., will stage their annual Journalism Career Day at George Mason University in Arlington, Va, Feb. 27.
The event will feature panel sessions with media professionals College recruiters will also be on hand.
For further information contact Jocelyn Cordova, NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
ALSO IN CALIFORNIA: The Southern California-based National Hispanic Media Coalition is staging an invitation-only reception at the American Film Institute in Hollywood Feb. 4 to increase participation in its advocacy efforts by area businesses and professional leaders About 100 guests are expected, N H MC executive director Alicia Vega says.
NHMC, composed of more than 40 organizations nationwide, addresses the issue of Hispanic inclusion in the media
Jose Luis Sedaho and Eduardo Arroyo are producing a video for use by NHMC on tele-
vision’s negative portrayal of Hispanics.
TEXAS: the Network of Hispanic Communicators in Dallas expects to attract more than 100 guests to its Superbowl Fiesta Jan. 31 to help raise funds for the group and its annual writing contest for area high school students.
For further information contact Ernie Soto-mayor, P.O. Box 22213, Dallas, Texas75222 (214) 744-6240.
MICHIGAN: The Michigan Hispanic Media Association has submitted a proposal to stage a workshop at the April 22-23 Michigan Hispanic Educators Conference in Lansing.
The workshop would provide educators and parents with ideas on how to work with the media Instructions will also be given on how to disseminate organization publications and information.
For details contact Jose L6pez, Michigan Hispanic Media Association, P.O. Box 17112, Lansing, Mich. 48901 (517) 485-4389.
. • - - Julio Laboy
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
(202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 ’ »
Publisher HActor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Ffelix PArez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas,' Julio Laboy.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrian, Zoila Ellas
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents perword. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week California Gov . George Deukmejian and 50 state legislators pay tribute to Arthur Montoya, postmaster of the Sacramento field division of the U . S . Postal Service. Montoya is marking his 25th year with the Postal Service. . . Arizona state Sen . Jesus Higuera lambastes Gov . Evan Mecham for sending a letter to every member of the Senate proclaiming his innocence on charges of concealing a campaign loan and improperly using state funds ... The U.S. Senate Republican Conference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs names U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos as a member of its advisory committee. . . Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, along with a group of former and current officials, urges that the New York Board of Estimate be changed , not abolished. The group feels that the powerful o iti q n reduce minority participation in the city's governance. . . Los Angeles Councilman Richard Alatorre joins Michael Dukakis' presidential campa i gn as a California co-chair ... Myrna Milan becomes the first female Hispanic municipal court judge in Newark, N.J . .. U.S. District Court Judge Kenneth Ryskamp orders the release of anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch, 61. Bosch was imprisoned for a parole violation upon his return to Miami after 14 years in Venezuela, 11 of which were spent in jail. . . Master Sgt. Gilbert Zamora, who at 13 was the youngest soldier in the Army since the Civil War , retires in spec i al ceremonies at Ft. Ord. Calif. The 6-foot-4 , 275-pound Los Angeles native, who was given his final salute by 550 marching troops, fought in Korea and Vietnam. Zamora was found out after 14 months of service but re-enlisted at the age of 17 . . . Voi.BNo.111 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT .Latino Family Safety Net Erodes If the federal and state programs in place to help families from sinking below the poverty l i ne in 1979 had the same impact in 1986, the r e would have been some 53,000 fewer Hispanic families living i n poverty , concludes a study by the San Antonio-based Southwest Voter Research Institute released March 1 . By factoring in government cash benefits, such as Social Security , Aid to Families with Dependent Children, unemployment insurance and Supplemental Security Income , the study finds that 13% of Latino families with children "were lifted out of poverty in 1979. This per centage dropped to 8% in 1986, says the study . When incorporating cash and non-cash benefits , which include food , housing and medical care , to determine the poverty level, the study concludes that 35% of Hispanic families were raised above the poverty line in 1979 as compared with just 20% in 1986. By merging cash and non-cash benefits, t he stud y concludes that there would have b een some 158,000 fewer impoverished His panic families in 1986 if anti-poverty programs were at their.1979 level of effectiveness . The 1986 federal definition of poverty for a family of four was having a cash income less than $11 , 203. Not counting government benefits , the i ncomes of627,000 Hispanic families in 1979 we r e below the poverty line . Desp i te the fact tha t this number decreased slightly from 1985 to 1986, there were still more than 1 million such families two years ago. The study says that federal budget cuts in the early 1980s and the failure of state aid programs to keep pace with inflation are the primary reasons the Hispanic poverty rate increased to 27 . 3% in 1986 from 21. 8% in 1979. Twenty-nine percent of Hispanics-a record 5 . 2 million were living below the poverty line in 1985. Although the study notes that the poverty rate for Hispanic children dipped slightly to 37% in 1986 from its record level of 40% in 1985, it warns, " The failure of government programs to abate the growing poverty level among young Latinos does not portend well for the future health , education and welfare of the nation ' s second largest and fastest growing minority group. " Following are the percentages of children who lived in poverty in 1986 according to the type of family they lived in: FemaleHeaded Male Present All Families Latino 67.1% 25.8 37. 1 Black 66.7% 17.0 42.7 White 46.3% 9 . 8 15. 3 Female-headed families, says the institute ' s report , fared the worst when looking at the ability of anti-poverty p r ograms to lift families from poverty . In 1979,40% of such families were lifted out of poverty, compared with 23. 4% in 1986. Felix Perez L atino Families Lifted From P ov ert y By Govt. Aid (numbers in thousands) Befor e Transfers After Cash and Non Cash T r ansfers % Lifted From Poverty Female-Headed Before Transfers After Cash and Non Cash Transfers % Lifted From Poverty 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 627 7 44 790 892 899 946 1 037 1030 222 35.4 333 132' 39. 6 217 29. 2 391 126 32.2 202 25.6 427 116 27. 2 181 20. 3 434 92 21. 2 164 18.2 437 86 19. 7 186 19.7 486 105 21.6 218 21. 0 534 121 22 . 7 207 20. 1 535 125 23. 4 Source : Southwest Voter Research Institute and U . S . Census Bureau INS Blamed in Death in Calif. Several groups, including the East Los Angeles Imm i gration Project and the Benito Juarez Civic Association, attended a March 6 protest march in Los Angeles of some 250 people to demand a federal investigation into the death of a 17-year-old , Chicano who died while in U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service custody. lsmael Ramirez died Feb. 26 after his arrest during a Border Patrol raid in the Fresno area . "This is telling us what we can expect when the amnesty period is over in May," community . activist Isabel Vazquez told Weekly Report "It is time people became aware of the abuses the INS is committing. " Assistant Fresno Border Patrol Agent in Charge John Crockford said Ramirez died in a Fresno hospital 11 days after his arrest. He added that a routine investigation is under way by the INS Office of Professional Responsibility. According to Vazquez, witness Tomas Pena said that an INS agent caught the fleeing Ramirez and slammed him to the ground, causing his head to bleed Six other witnesses, she said, have come forward since a March 2 press conference called attent i on to the case . "We want the district attorney's office to investigate," Vazquez said."Once we have every shred of evidence, we also will ask the Hispanic Congressional Caucus to intervene on our behalf." -Darryl Figueroa House Passes Rights Bill On a 315-98 vote, the U.S . House of Repre sentatives passed March 2 a civil rights bill that would cut off federal aid to an entire institution if any of its departments were fo1.1nd to discriminate . The bill is an attempt to expand a 1984 Supreme Court decision in Grove City College vs. which held that only those depart ments or activities that were discriminatory could be denied aid . The yivil Rights Restoration Act was passed Jan. 28 by an equally wide margin in the Senate, 75-14. President Reagan has pro mised to veto the bill . .

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Spanish Speakers Inadequately Served by N.Y. Prisons New York State Senator Israel Rulz (D Bronx) released a report Feb. 29 documenting the inaccessibility of rehabilitative services to the state's non-English-speaking Hispanic prison inmates, who comprise roughly 55% of the 1 2,285 Hispanics incarcerated there. Ruiz blasted the Department of Correctional Services' lack of bilingual, bicultural person nel as effectively barring them from rehabili tative and other services. Hispanics are the fastest-growing group in New York's prison system , and only 37. 7% of them were born on the U.S. mainland, the study found . The largest groups were: Place of Birth Total. Puerto Rico 4,660 U.S. Mainland 4,393 Dominican Republic 953 Cuba 571 Colombia 492 % 40.0 37. 7 8 . 2 4.9 4 . 2 In New York's 53 facilities, 30% of the inmate population is H i spanic, compared with 2.7% of the security force, the report found . This creates a language barrier that often leads to violence, the senator contended. The report showed no Spanish-speaking psychologists, librarians or placement co ordinators are made available to Hispanic inmates. Ruiz noted that the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Treatment program offered in 29 facilities employs no Hispanic coun selors. "Many attend meetings but are unable to participate ," the report stated . "The lack of participation ... hinders their parole chances when they appear before the Parole Board." DOC Commissioner Thomas Coughlin's response to the report was that he started the Hispanic Inmates Needs Program in 1985/86, said Ruiz spokesman Mike Diamond Education Funding Tied to Elections Increases in the Reagan administration ' s For the Office of Bilingual Education and proposed education budget for fiscal year Minority Languages Affairs , the president 1989 are slight and timed to election year requested a 4% increase from the 1988 appro politics , say congressional and Hispanic edupriation of$191. 8 mill i on to $200.5 million . In cation experts. 1988 the administration requested $143.1 The $21 . 2 billion package, released Feb. million . 16, is about 4% higher than the 1988 congres-An analysis by a White House budget monitorsional appropriation of $20. 3 billion . ing group, OMB Watch, reports that , with Senate Budget Committee Chairman Lawton inflation adjustments, bilingual education funds Chiles(D-Fia. ) said of the proposal , "One year would be 37% lower in 1989 than in 1980. deep cuts ; the next year modest increases." The Education Department estimates that Jim Lyons , legal and political counsel for there are some 1 . 5 million limited-English the National Association for Bilingual Eduproficient children in the country. Federal cation, called the proposed increases ina de' dollars service 250,000 of them . An Education quate in meeting the needs of Hispanic students. Department spokesperson said they never " Services in areas such as bilingual education intended to serve entire districts, but only to are down while the pool of children needing provide seed money for bilingual education the services is the fastest growing, " he said. programs . Darryl Figueroa Two Groups Rate Congress Members U.S. Rep . Esteban Torres of California was given the highest lifetime rating 87% -among the 11 voting Latino congressmen when measured on issues of concern to the Consumer Federation of America, revealed a report the group released Feb. 29. Reps . Manuel Lujan of New Mexico and Solomon Ortiz of Texas were the only two Hispanic congressmen given a 100% rating by a lobbying group measuring how many Congress members voted for-contra aid since 1985, according to another tally released Feb . 2 6 by the American Conservative Union. Lujan is the lone Hispanic Republican. In addition to its lifetime ratings , CFA rated the congressmen on how they voted on 14 bills in 1987, such as one that would have limited credit card interest rates and another that would have reduced the funding for the Legal Services Corporation. Overall ratings for 1986 were also provided . ACU arrived at its ran kings by selecting five votes on contra aid. Three votes were from the 99th Congress. one from the first session of the 1 OOth Congress and another from the 2 second session. Eight of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus members rated 20% or below . Rating Latino U.S. Reps. ACU CFA '85-'88 '86 '87 Life Calif. T . Coelho 0% 50% 79% 63% M. Martinez 0 75 79 79 E. Roybal 0 75 86 83 E. Torres 0 75 86 87 N.M. M . Lujan* 100 17 21 21 B . Richardson 20 75 64 80 N.Y. R. Garcia 0 75 86 76 Texas A. Bustamante 40 50 50 53 E. De Ia Garza 20 42 57 36 H . Gonzalez 0 75 86 65 S. Ortiz 100 42 43 69 * Lujan is the sole Republican in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. Sources : The America n C on s ervative Uni o n and the Con sumer Federation o f Am e ri c a . "But he neglected to address the reporfs contention that the program itself is not working," Diamond added. HINP provides personnel to represent Hispanic inmates at formal hearings. In 1985/86, HINP positions were created at six facilities. Another seven have been funded for 1987/88, Ruiz said, but they have yet to be implemented. Darryl Figueroa PRISON INMATES, EMPLOYEES Total Hisp. % Hisp. Inmates 40,849 12,285 30. 1 C.O. s* 16,517 428 2 . 7 Civilians* 2,842 119 4 . 2 Guards 1,607 65 4.0 Supindts. * 53 1 1.9 Q* Correction Officers , Non-security civilians , Superintendents Texas Repubs. Say Yes to English Referendum With 99% , or 5,645, precincts reporting, Texas Republicans overwhelmingly supported an English-only referendum on their party's March 8 Super Tuesday ballot, with 92. 1% of the vote . The non-binding referendum says English should be the "official" language of Texas and the United States . Some 765,178 Republicans voted for the referendum while 65,320 voted against. Also in Texas, Hispanic Democrats gave Massachusetts Gov . Michael Dukakis a 56% majority of their Super Tuesday vote. Jesse Jackson was second with 21% and Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore was third with 12%, according to preliminary results from an exit poll con ducted by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project. Andy Hernandez, SVREP director, said that in the Republican primary , Vice President George Bush was the winner with 48% of the Hispanic vote . Former television evangelist Pat Robertson was second with 34% and Kansas Sen. Robert Dole trailed with 10% . " We think a lot of Hispanics have switched to the Republican side in order to vote for Robertson," Hernandez noted. A breakdown of voters was not available at press time . Bias Settlement Reached The U.S. Department of Justice announced March 4 that it had reached a settlement with Pan American Airways in a case where the airline was charged with discriminating against a permanent resident alien who was refused employment as a flight attendant. The settlement requires Pan Am to give the woman back pay, reimburse her for related expenses and distribute a statement to em ployees on the anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The victim ' s name and the settlement amount were not disclosed. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS Notice NURSING DEPARTMENT College Laboratory Technicians Two anticipated CL T positions available for September 1, 1988: The New York State Department of'frans portation is accepting proposals for the management of Stewart International Airport (located near Newburgh, N.Y.) and Republic Airport (located on Long Island). It is anticipated that separate management contracts, commencing Nov. 1st, 1988 will be entered into for each facility, covering a basic period of 5 years with options for extensions. Responsibilities at Republic Airport will include management of Airport opera tions and lease negotiations. At Stewart International Airport, responsibilities would include management of airport operations, marketing activities, control tower operations, and capital project (expansion) management. Proposers may offer to manage any or all of the responsibilities at either or both of the facilities . Proposals must be submit ted no later than April 29th, 1988. Interested qualified firms may request copies of the solicitations (please specify either or both facilities) in writ ing from: Techniques Lab: Demonstrates nursing procedures to nursing students; assists class room instructors in clinical lab. Plans & conducts seminars, workshops, practice/skills sessions for nursing students. Knowledge of basic nursing skills. Vac . #364. Tutorial Lab: Responsible for management and operation of lab. Monitors lab budget. HireS/ supervises lab tutors. Plans & conducts seminars & workshops. Knowledge of basic med-surg., pediatric , obstetric, psychiatric nursing theory. Vac. #365. Rex Grathwol Qualifications: Registered Professional Nurse, licensed in N .Y. Min. of 2 yrs. bedside clinical exp. Knowledge of basic computer skills is desirable . 35 hour work week. Salary: $24,185/ A Director of Contracts NYSDOT Albany, N.Y . 12232 NYSDOT is an equal opportunity affirmative action employer-M/F/HN Refer to BMCC Vacancy# above and send resume with cover letter by April1, 1988, to: TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available fund ing, beginning September 1, 1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with sum mer employment generally available , depend ing on need . Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred . Teach four classes per semester; recruit and advise students; university committees and other professional duties as needed; interest in wofessional research and publications encouraged . Send letter of interest, vita , official tran scripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April15, 1988, to: Tarleton State University Dr . W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville , TX. 76402. AA!EEO/MF RENTAL North Arlington , Virginia , unfurnished room for rent. Located near subway and close to Washington, D.C. Rent is $317 per month plus 1/2 oft he utilities. Washer and dryer . Available 3/15. Female nonsmoker please. Contact: Concha Orozco. Work (202) 371 00 or Home: (703) 276-9546. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED The Central Amer i can Refugee Network (GARNET) , a national coalition of Salvadoran and other refugee organizations, has opened its office in the nation's capital and needs volunteer assistance to help it accomplish its many projects and activities. If you can spare a few hours a week or more , please contact: Roberto Alfaro, president, 421 Seward Sq . SE , Washington , D .C. 20003. Tele phone (202) 546-7907. Hispanic Link Weekly Report ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE Administrative aide: Computer word proces sing , strong editing skills , type 70 wpm , or qanizational ability, good phone skills, bilinqual (English/Spanish). Salary $18,000-$20,000 plus benefits. Call (202) 783 4328. PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 1988 MEDIA EDITION On April4, 1988, Hispanic Link will publish its 1988 "media edition." This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1, 1 00 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April6 National Hispanic Media Conference in Dallas. In addition to our regular " Marketplace" section , Weekly Report will carry a full page of " Opportunities in the Media" insert for that edition . If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience , we welcome your ad in either section. For additional information contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza at (202) 234-0737 . Dead line for ad copy is Friday, March 25, 1988. Ms . Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College City University of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER /RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION General Attorneys The FTC is recruiting entry level as well as experienced attorneys to work in its regional offices: Chicago, Dallas , Denver, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco . Exceptional opportunity to gain and use federal district court experience and to work in areas involving consumer fraud, advertising law and antitrust law . Knowledge of economics and experience in antitrust and/or consumer protection law is desirable . Salary range is $27,700$58,000. Send cover letter, resume and legal writing sample for each regional office for which you are applying by March 18, 1988, to: FTC, Division of Personnel, Room 151, Washington, D:C. 20580. Ms. Frye (202) 326. The FTC is an equal opportunity employer. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) -----------$45 per column inch . Area Code & Phone _______ _ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment I plays Millie Zamora, a secretary to lawyer Barnett "Bud" Lutz (Scott Bakula). Two episodes of Eisenhower & Lutz will air on the 14th -the premiere at 8:30 (ET) and the second episode at 9:30, its regularly scheduled slot. TROUBLE AT THE ALAMO: The premiere screening of Alamo ... The Price of Freedom, at San Antonio's new 85-foot-wide IMAX Theater, was picketed by members of various national Latino organi zations. The film, intended as a tourist attraction, is "only slightly altered from previous productions (and) just as damaging in its blatant exclusion of Tejanos and their contribution and role in the history of Texas," according to San Antonio City Councilman Walter Martinez. Also premiering this week is Columbia Pictures Television;s Trial and Error, which stars Paul Rodriguez and Eddie Velez as East LA roommates Tony Rivera and John Hernandez (see March 7 HLWR) . The sitcom premieres March 15 at 8 p.m. The March 6 premiere was picketed by, among others, members of' the Nosotros actors organization, the League of United Latin American Citizens and the American Gl Forum. The latter two are urging a boycott of the Luby's cafeteria chain and of Pace Mexican food products-the film's two major investors. GRAM MY NOTES: Linda Ronstadt was the only Hispanic to win a Grammy Award outside the "Latin" categories at the ceremony held in New York March 2. Ronstadt won, along with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, for the album Trio (Warner Bros.)in the" best country performance by a duo or a group with vocals" category. All winning performances in the Latin field were albums: Julio Iglesias' Un hombre solo (Discos CBS lnt'l.) for "best Latin pop," Eddie Palmieri's La Verdad/The Truth (Fania/Musica Latina lnt'l.) for"best tropical Latin , " and Los Tigres del Norte's iGracias America sin front eras! ( Profono I nt' l.)for" best Mexican American performance . " THIS WEEK ON TV: Several Latino characters are introduced on network TV this week-on twc) . new CBS sitcoms. Premiering March 14 is MTM'sEisenhower & Lutz, which features Rose Portillo in a regular, supporting role. The Los Angeles native Media Report PULITZER RESPONSE: Pulitzer Prize Board administrator Robert Christopher has responded to a series of complaints from Latino media leaders about the board's failure to include Hispanics among the 66 prize jurors this year . The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., initiated the protests last month. Several groups joined in criticizing the body, including the Nationai.Association of Hispanic Journalists. Its president, Manuel Galvan, an editorial board member of the Chicago Tribune, chal lenged an earlier contention by Christopher that the selection process was "colorblind. " "To NAHJ, it appears that this selection process is not colorblind but color-ignorant, perpetuated by the board members' blindness to their own biases," Galvan wrote. " . . . NAHJ believes that the ethical and professional HISPANIC LIN ' K WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Erickser>Mendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias Rentas, Darryl Figueroa. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias . No portion of Hispani c Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 standards of journalism in this country are diminished when the diverse segments of American society are demeaned and ignored. " Christopher's response to HNMA, received March 8, said that the present jury completed its '88 deliberations the preceding week "Both Pulitzer Prize Board Chairman Roger Wilkins and President Michael Sovern of Columbia have informed me that when the Prize Board holds its next meeting on March 28th they plan to urge their fellow members to make an intensive and sustained effort to insure that Hispanic journalists are repre sented on our juries beginning with those chosen to serve next year." HNMA had asked all 66 jurors to decline 1 their appointments. While several expressed some dismay over the omission of Hispanics , none agreed not to serve . H N MA will meet March 24 to decide whether to pursue its grievance further. GROUNDBREAKER: Unless she is chal lenged at the National Hispanic Media Con ference April6-9 in Dallas, New York Newsday -Antonio Mejias-Rentas reporter Evelyn Hernandez will become the first Puerto Rican and the first woman to lead the National Association of His panic Journalists. Past NAHJ presidents included two Chicanos, Gerald Garcia and Manuel Galvan, and one Cuban American , Guillermo Martinez . Garcia currently serves as publisher of Texas' BryanCollege Station Eagle. Martinez is news director of Miami television station WL TV. Others who earned '88 nominations are: Rosalind Soliz, reporter, KERA-TV, Dallas, first v.p.; Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor, Dallas Times Herald, 2nd v.p.; Elisa Alfonso, writer/producer, WSNS TV, Chicago , secre tary; Norma Sosa , managing editor, Corpus Christi Caller-Times in Texas, treasurer, and , for at-large delegates (three to be chosen), Patrisia Gonzales, reporter, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Jose Lozano, publisher, La Opinion, Los Angeles ; Edna Negron, reporter, New York Newsday; Ivan Roman , reporter, The Miami Herald; and Maria Elena Salinas, national news anchor, Univision, Los Angeles . Charlie Ericksen CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. "Rosita, bring me two burros for the gringo." 6 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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l I I I I ! I Latino Media Associations Must Be More Confrontational by Francisco Newton In January 1981, when I became involved i n the struggle for Hispanics to attain employment par ity and fairer treatment in the media, there existed two or perhaps three local associations of Hispanic media professionals. Of these, none were national or even statewide in scope, and only one had adquate financial support and an active membership. Then, in the span of a few years , there was an explosion of such organ i zations. By the end of 1984, there were more than two dozen associations, including three that were national . Now there are five national associations plus local groups i n almost every U.S. c i ty with a sizable Hispanic population. But the proliferation of t hese groups has subsided, and some critics have argued their impact has dim i nished as well . What has been accomplished? What does the future portend for these associations? What i s the current situation of Hispanics in the media? One sign i ficant accomplishment has been the development of a national consciousness; another i s greater communication among Hispanic media professionals throughout the country . Traveling around the United States in the early 1980s to meet with His _ panic journalists, I learned that the few who were out there knew little about each other . This hurt Hispan i c journalists. for in their disunity , they had virtually no voice or visibility with the media decision makers in this country . They were alone in their struggles to build careers . ' HISPANICS WERE 'NONEXISTENT' Thi s growth in networking is evident in the positive response to the annual Hispan i c media conference . Since the first conference in 1982, which drew 250 participants, to the one in 1987 , attended by more than 1,500 , I have had countless Hispanic media professionals and students tell me how thrilled they were to meet so many of their peers. That exc i tement spawned many of the Hispanic media organi zations around the country. A second accomplishment resulted from our growing unity and communication . We gained the attention, and to a limited extent the cooperation, of most of the principal media companies and associations. In the early 1980s, Hispanics were nonexistent in the minds of media executives, especially in the East, which remains the intellectual and financial heartland of media power in this country . But now Hispan i cs are regularly included in scholarship programs, job fairs, internships, and editing and management training programs. Although we have made these gains in the past half dozen years, we remain far from our goal of proper representation in all areas and levels of print and broadcast media. In fact, there is reason to fear that we are los i ng ground. FINANCIAL SUPPORT NEGLIGIBLE One obstacle i s the negligible financial support Hispanic media groups receive from most media companies. What support has been received by our media associations has come from the same small number of media companies and foundations , Gannett outstanding among them. The vast majority of these supporters have been newspapers ; hardly any have been TV or radio stations (a disturbing fact given that radio is the most relied upon medium among Hispanics). Because of the recent stock market crash , the problem of financial support will likely get much worse . Those companies that have provided support will now give less . Those that never gave will now attribute their callous stinginess to the stock market. Two-thirds of the nation's daily newspapers employ no minoritiesan indictment of that industry . But there are signs of hooe. Two of the principal newspaper associations the American Soc i ety of Newspaper Editors and the American Newspaper Publishers Association have created strong minority committees , hired full time staff (no Hispanics until this month) to address minority issues and conducted numerous minority job fairs throughout the country . There has been no effort remotely comparable to this in broadcasting, and past gains there are being eroded. Admittedly, minority employment has long been much higher in government-regulated broadcasting than in print media (Currently , the newsroom employment figures for minorities are 13% in TV, 9% in ra
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6 CORPORATE CLASSI . FlEDS . . . ' . . .. . ARLINGTON COUNTYI.+!'"J . OB t OPPQRTUNITIES 'r,,-., The following positions are open until filled: POLICE OFFICER (MULTIPLE VACANCIES) Police Department Ann.#: 5005-BA-POL.; Salary: $26,000 Arlington County is actively recruiting entry-level Police Officers to join one of 'the few nation ally accredited departMents in the country. This is professional law enforcement work in which the employee is responsible for protection of life and property. Duties include patrolling by car/motorcycle to detect or prevent crime, assisting in investigation s of major crimes such as homocide, rape, etc, and testifying in court proceedings, etc. -' Requires two years of college (60 semester or90 quarter hours) at an accredited college or university, Virginia driver's license at time of appointment and U.S. Citizenship. New officers are required to attend 13 weeks of training at Northern Virginia Criminal Justice Academy. EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN Public Safety Dispatcher Ann.# 1155-SA-POL.; Salary: $17,971 ' Entry-level tech _ nicaVcommunicationswork in the Police/Fire Emergency Communications Center. " Responds to-telephone requests for emergency services; determines emergency/ routine cails and refers appropriately; operates telephone console, telephone call directors, tYpewriter terminals for on-line computer hook•upand other related equipment. Requires H.s. diploma or equivalent and one year of clerical, communications, or public contact experiE!nce, and. the to type 20 _ wpm. The following positions close on February 11, 1988. SOCIAL WORKER Department of Human Services . 3 full-time positions Ann. # 6614-BA-DHS.; Salary: $25,195 SOCIAL WORKER Department of Human Services ' 2 part-time positions, 1 temporary and 1 permanent Ann. #6614-88-DHS.; Salary: $12.11 per hour These are professional positions in the Division of Social Services, Department of Human Ser\lices, assigned to a specialized unit. Duties include casework management, individual . and family counseling, client assessment, crisis intervention, investigations, representation in court participation on multi-disciplinary teams, delivery of services and other duties assigned to specialized unit. Independent judgment is exercised under the supervision of a Casework Supervisor. Please refer to . off(cial announcement for areas rn which there !)re current vacancies. Requires a Master's degree in closely related area and one year of experience in the delivery of huma ri s ervice programs. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in one or more of the specialized units listed on the announcement lind or bilingual ability . . All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be -accepted _ Applic _ ations must be _ . received into the Perso!lnel Department no later. than 5:00 PM on .the closing qate , To . request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). . ARLINGTON COUNTY' Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North, Arlington, VA. EOE/MFH Jan: : 25, 1988 NATIONAL RADIO SALES Hispanic Radio Network: Hot, new national Spanish radio syndication service seeks in dependent salesagentfor New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Texas . Call (505) 984-0080. TELEVISION H()ST/FIELD PRODUCER EIT)my-award winning bilingual magazine pro gram airing in the number 1 and number 4 markets needs a seasoned journalist to host the series and produce top-quality, field pieces. Two-to-three years experience researching, writing, editing, producing and appearing in field pieces required Two years anchoring or hosting experience, undergraduate degree and strong commitment to Hispanic related issues also required. Rush resume and tape to Personnel _ Office, NEW JERSEY NETWORK, 1 Parkside Ave., CN 777_, Trenton, N.J. 08625. (eo e-m/f) FACULTY POSITION Scoring/Arranging/Composition University of Colorado at Denver FuiHime, tenure-track position for Fall1988 . Seeking candidates with professional ex perience in commercial music writing. Terminal degree or significant professional accc)mplish ment required . APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 1, 1988. Include a letter of application, complete professional vita, and a minimum of three letters of recommendation. For further information contact Search Committee, Col lege of. Music, Box 162A, CU-Denver , 1200 _ Larimer St., Denver, Colo. 80202 or phone (303) 556:2727. UniversitY of Colorado is an AA/EEO employer . REVISED POSITION LISTING (Final Filing Date Extended to 3/15/88) UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor , tenure track position in sociology of organizations beginning Sep tember 1988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required. Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program. Ph.D. required by September, 1988. Salary range for nine-month appointment: $31,500-$33,900 . Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Com mittee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is extended to March 15, 1988. . The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Hispanic link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS FACUL ? 1PH*" University of Colorado at Denver College of Business and Administration The College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver is actively seeking candidates for faculty positions. Rank is open and commensurate with qualifications and experience. Candidates for senior rank must have an earned doctoPate , a strong research record, proven teaching proficiency, and an ability to assume leadership responsibilities within the College . Success in sponsored research and an ability to deal successfully with external constituents also are desired Applications from women and minorities are strongly encouraged. or strategic management. MarketingRank open , preferred fields include marketing research, marketing management and strategy, consumer behavior, and intef" national marketing . Located in downtown Denver, the College of Business and Administration is ideally situated to participate in the growth of the Denver business community. Currently, 900 undergraduate and 1,300 graduate students are enrolled in the College's AACS& accredited programs, which include 11 undergraduate majors, six Master of Science programs , a Master of Business Administration program, and executive programs in business administration and health administration . The openings are for Fall1988 in the areas ot Accounting-Advanced assistant, associate, or full rank. Finance-Rank open, preferred fields of specialization include financial management, banking and capital markets, international financial management, and investments. Strong quantitative/econo metric skills are preferred. Please submit resumes to: Donald L. Stevens, Dean College of Business and Administration University of Colorado at Denver 1475 Lawrence Street Information Systems-Candidates at associate/full rank preferred in the areas of production management, information systems. and quantitative methods and statistics. Denver, Colo. 80202,2219 Management-Candidates at associate/full rank preferred in the areas of organizational behavior/theory, human resource management, The University of Colorado Is an AA/EEO employer . POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA POSITION TITLE: Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs and Affirmative Action Officer. POSITION SUMMARY: The University of Arizona is seeking to fill the position of Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs and Affirmative Action Officer . The person in this position will be responsible for the admini& !ration of affirmative action processes and pro cedures for faculty, professionals, and adminis trators. and monitors classified staff work force act i vity through the Personnel Department. The appointee will report to the Provost and will assist the Provost and Vice Provost in the administration of processes and procedures for hiring, tenure/continuing status, and promotion of faculty, professionals, and administrators. An important part of the responsibilities of the appointee will be the articulation and promotion of the affirmative program of the University of Arizona . The duties of affirmative action officer EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for professional Los Angeles Hispanic-American theatre to manage all administrative aspects of the theater , e . g . fund-raising, marketing, personnel, and public relations. Salary mid-30s. Send resume to: Chairman, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts,421 N . Avenue 19, Los Angeles, Calif . 90031. ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION REPAIRERS The California Air Resources Board is now accepting applications for the Instrument Tech nician II civil service exam. Must have 3 yrs. experience in operation, maintenance & repair of electronic instrumentation (2 yrs. of college , university, trade or technical school experience may be substituted.) For more info call (916) 323 before February 1 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report include the acquisition and dissemination of information relative to equal employment opo portunity/affirmative action to the administration, faculty , staff and students of the University; the maintenance of adequate compliance records ; preparation of appropriate reports; the develop ment of reporting systems; the investigation of formal and informal complaints; the development and monitoring of policies; and the identification of potential problem areas and the search for appropriate resolutions. POSITION QUALIFICATIONS: An understanding of the basic purposes of a university such as the University of Arizona. Ability to plan and organize. Interest in problem solving . Familiarity with the administrative struc ture of large universities. A knowledge of basic academic personnel procedures and equal opo portunity and affirmative action issues. Ability to interact with individuals at different levels of the organization (from students to the Board of Regents) and from diverse backgrounds . Some experience as a faculty member desirable. Preferably at least two years of administrative and supervisory experience. Experience in preparing and presenting reports . SALARY: Dependent upon qualifications. STARTING DATE: July 1,1988. DEADLINE: Nominations and applications must be nsceived no later than March 1, 1988. The candidate's resume, together with names ofthree references, must be received no later than March 1988. MAIL TO: Chair, Search Committee for Assistant Vice PresidenVAffirmative Action Officer 512 Administration Building University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 85721 EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPoRTUNITY/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER Women and minorities are encouraged to apply . DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on req\,lest. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street ______________ _ City, State & Zip----------Area Code & Phone ________ _ 7

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Arts & Entertainment are all albums: Los Diablos' Celebraci6n , Little Joe's T i meless (Discos CBS lnfl), Chavela y su Grupo Express' El rey del barrio, Los Tigres del Norte's /Gracias! America sin tronteras (Profono lnfQ and Antonio Aguilar's 15 exitos con ta m bora Vol. 2 fMusart). MORE NOMINATION NEWS: Nine Latino recordings are nominated Various other Latinos are h b minated in o t her " non Latin" categories. In the "best Latin pop performance" category . (See story, page 2) Among those are the Asimbonanga track from Joan Baez's Recently NominatedalbumsareDannyRivera 'sAmaromorir(DNA), Yolandita (MCA) for "best contemporary folk recordiog," . : and South Pacific Monge's Laberinto de amor (Discos CBS lnfl), Luis Miguel's Luis (FM), performed by Kiri Te Kanawa, Jose Carreras and others, for Miguel '87. Soy como quiero ser (WEA liatlna); '-llmna' s,.Lunn.v . " : best m "tl sical cast show album." (A&M), Jose Jose's Siempre contigo (Ariola), Emmanuel's Solo The music video Cyndi Lauper in Paris (CBS Music Video (BMG MusiC/RCA) and Julio Iglesias' Un hombre solo (Discos CBS Enterprises) is up for "best performance music video" producer ll"!t'Q. John Diaz is among the nominees. Frank Hernandez and Tony Also nominated in the category are En bancarrota, a track from . . . Salerno are the album producers of Bullfrogs and Butterflies (Part Ill) Braulio's album Lobello y lo prohibido (Discos CBS lnt'l), and Maria , (Candle), nominated for" best rec;ording for children . " Conchita Alonso's single Otra mentira mas (A&M). Nominees for the 30th annual GrammyAwards were announced in Six albums are listed in the "best tropical Latin performance" Los Angeles Jan. 14 . The statuettes will be handed out March . 2 . at a category: Ruben Blades' Agua de Luna (Moon Water) (Eiektra), ceremony at New York's Radio City Music Hall which will be Caribbean Express' Caribbean Express (A&M), Celia Cruz & Willie broadcast live by CBS. Col6n's The Winners(Vaya/Muslca Latina lnfl), Ray Barreto'sAqui ON TV: The film Stones For Ibarra, a Hallmark Hall of Fame se puede , Eddie Palmieri's La verdad-The Truth and Hector Lavoe's presentation , airs on CBS Jan . 29 at 7 ;30 p.m. H i spanics in the cast Strikes Back(all on Fani8/Muslca l.atlna lnfl). . include Lupe Ontiveros, Trinidad Silva and Carlos Palpmino . . . The nominees in the"best Mexican/American performance" category -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report D.C., will stage their annual Journalism Career Day at George Mason University in Arlington, Va, Feb . 27 . The event will feature panel sessions with The year 1988 will bring a variety of activities media professionals. College recruiters will by Hispanic media groups around the country: also be on hand . CALIFORNIA: The California Chicano For further information contact Jocelyn News Media Association, headquartered in Cordova, NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite Los Angeles, is sponsoring its ninth annual 634, Washington, D . C . 20045 (202) 783 Journalism Opportunities Conference Feb. 5 6228. and6 atthe University of Southern California, . ALSO IN CALIFORNIA: The Southern Los Angeles. California-based National Hispanic Media It will bring together cqllege students and Coalltl . on is staging an invitatioll'only reception media professionals with about 45 recruiters at the American Film Institute in Hollywood for media organizations across.'the country. Feb . 4 to increase participation in its advocacy To obtain a registration packet , contact efforts by area businesses and professional Leticia Cordova, CCNMA, School of Journalism , leaders. About 100 guests are expected, NH MC University of Southern California, Los Angeles, executive director Alicia Vega says. Calif . 90089-1695 (213) 743-7158. RegisNHMC , composed ofmore than 40 organitration +s $20. zations nationwide , the i ssue of WASHINGTON:The National Association Hispanic inclusion in the media. of Hispanic and the Hispanic Jose Luis Sedano and Eduardo Arroyo are . News Media Association. of Washington, . producing a video for use by . NHMC on tele-HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a nationa l publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez .. Reporting : Antonio Mej i as-Rentas, ' Julio Laboy . Graphics/Production: Carlos Arr i en, Zoila EHas No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance perm ission . . Annual subscription (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $1 08 Trial (13 issues) $ 30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Disp lay ads are $45 per column inch. Ads pla c ed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 vis i on ' s negative portraya Lof Hispanics. TEXAS: The Network of Hispanic Com municators in Dallas e , xpects to attract more t han 1 00 guests to its Superbowl Fiesta Jan. 31 to help raise funds for the .group and its annual writing contest for area high school students . For further information contact Ernie Soto mayor , P.O. Box 22213, Dallas, Texas 75222 (214) 7 44-6240. MICHIGAN: The Michigan Hispanic Media Association has submitted a proposal to stage a workshop atthe April22 23 Michigan Hispanic Educators Conference in . Lansing . The workshop would provide educators and parents w i th ideas . on how to work with the media Instructions will also be given on how to disseminate organization publications and information ; For details contact Jose L6pez, Michigan Hispanic Media Assocration ; P.O. B'ox 17112, Lansing, Mich . 48901 (517) 485-4389. Julio Laboy ' H is pan ic Link Weekly Report