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Hispanic link weekly report, March 21, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 21, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez of Texas receives the National Housing Conference’s highest award - the Nathaniel Keith Award - for his efforts to provide affordable housing to low-and moderate-income families. .. California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Gloria Herrera-Grotefend to the California Council on Criminal Justice. Herrera is a sergeant in the Los Angeles Sheriffs Department... In an effort to diffuse criticism about being unresponsive to the Hispanic community, New York Mayor Edward Koch mentions Deputy Mayor Robert Esnard, a Latino, as a possible running mate in his re-election bid next year... Acting Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer appoints Octavio Mateo as the city's first Latino director of affirmative
action... United Way of America names Sister M. Isolina Ferr6 of Ponce, Puerto Rico, as this year’s recipient of its Alexis de Tocqueville Society Award for her nearly 50 years of volunteer service to delinquency prevention. . . Dr. Rafael Peftalver of Miami, who created a program to retrain exiled Cuban doctors and help them with medical licensing exams, dies at the age of 65 of cancer. Some 2,500 Cubans and 7,700 physicians from other countries took the University of Miami course since 1961... Javier Geraldo Meza of Santa Rosa, Calif., and Victor Ramirez of Cooleemee, N.C., are among 18 people recognized by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission for their acts of valor. Meza saved a man from assault; Ramirez rescued a man from drowning...
»(I^HSPANI^fNK WEEK
New Set-Aside Formula Blasted
The handling of federal funds on the $210 million Dan Ryan Expressway' a major transportation project in Chicago, has angered Hispanic and black construction organizations there. The two groups received only $4.7 million in contracts out of $21.6 million set aside so far for minority-owned businesses
Under federal guidelines established in April 1987, the 10% quota for minority firms on transportation projects can now be met by ‘ awarding contracts to Anglo women, who in the Ryan project received $16.8 million.
“The whole point of set-aside goals is being gutted with this change,” said Peter Martinez, executive director of the Hispanic-American Construction Industry Association in Chicago. “You can see from the Ryan project the abuse that is occurring, and it will become a national problem.”
Harry Pach6n, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, commented, “It is un-
Correction
U.S. Rep. Manuel Luj&n of New MexIctHs Congress’ sole Hispanic voting Republican.
fortunate that rather than expanding the pie, minorities and women have been set up to fight for crumbs from it As it is, Hispanic contractors receive only 2% of federal transportation contracts” NALEO puts out a yearly audit of Hispanic federal contracts.
The situation is exacerbated by the suspicion that women are posing as presidents for businesses run by Anglo men, some construction experts say. “We used to have a hard time finding enough Women Business Enterprises to meet the 3% goal previously applied. Now there is a proliferation of WBEs,” contend* ed Rowan Woofolkjchief of the Illinois Bureau of Small Business Enterprises.
David Morales, executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based National Hispanic Association of Construction Enterprises, said, “We know fronting is going on. In some instances, the wives of majority contractors were receiving contracts”
State Attorney General Neil Hartigan assigned Feb. 25 six deputies to investigate the bidding and contract allotment process Previously, states worked on good faith in continued on page 2
Marielito Release Plan Criticized by U.S. Rep^
In a letter made public March 9, U.S. Rep. Robert Kastenmeier (D-Wisc.), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on the courts civil liberties and the administration of justice, urged the Justice Department to grant hearings to Mariel detainees before deporting them to Cuba.
Labeling the review process set up as a result of last December’s prison uprisings as one that emphasizes “speed over substance,” Kastenmeier said the Justice Department’s appeal panel should be replaced with hearings before an independent body. The congressman also called on the government to provide legal counsel to those detainees who do not have any, allow to remain in the United States those Marielitos who have not committed a felony and grant the detainees the right to present evidence and cross examine hostile witnesses.
Latinas Head 13 Colleges
The number of Latina pollege presidents increased to 13 in 1987 from 10 in 1984, according to a report released March 14 by the American Council on Education’s Office of Women in Higher Education.
Overall, Latinas represented 4.4% of the 296 women who are presidents of post-secondary institutions. Ten percent of the 2,880 accredited colleges and universities in the nation and Puerto Rico were run by females last year.
Although the number of Hispanic, black and Native American female presidents increased from 26 to 40 over the three-year period, minority females account for 13.5% of the women college and university heads.
While the number of minority presidents increased by 14, the growth among females as a group was only 10. This compares with 55 additional female presidents from 1981 to 1984, and an increase of 54 from 1978 to 1981.
Following are where the Latina female pres-
idents are found: Puerto Rico 6 New Jersey 1
California 1 New York 1
Georgia 1 Tennessee 1
Missouri 1 NTexas 1
Nurses’ Exodus Worries Puerto Rico
There is a concern in Puerto Rico over the recent exodus of professional nurses responding to heavy mainland hospital recruitment on the island. The president of the Professional Nurses College, Carmen Vigas, told Weekly Report March 3 that some 1,700 nurses left the island between August 1987 and January 1988.
Another 250 left Puerto Rico’s Health Department during the same approximate period.
Recently, in Carolina, Puerto Rico, the Treatment and Diagnostic Center suffered an almost simultaneous loss of 15 nurses, causing supervisors to take over patient care.
St Joseph’s Medical Center of Paterson, N.J., is actively recruiting Puerto Rican nurses as is the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.
New York City nurses recently have been
staging “sick-outs” to protest what they claim is a threat to public health because of severe understaffing due to overworked and underpaid nurses. More than 1,000 nurses picketed March 9 outside city hospitals, calling for higher wages. During the work actions, doctors were forced to use administrators, medical residents and supervisors for nursing care. Many emergency cases had to be diverted to other institutions The nursed contract expired Nov. 30, 1987. The city manages 17 hospitals Several hospitals particularly in the Bronx, serve large Hispanic constituencies. The starting nurse’s salary in New York is$24,000. The average salary of Puerto Rican nurses according to the island’s Association of Hospitals was $12,000 in 1987. Puerto Rican health officials point out the high cost of living in New York.
- Edward Ledesma


Capital’s Limited-English Students are Underserved
Pointing out the increasingly dire need to better identify and place limited-English-proficient students, Hispanic advocacy groups in Washington, D.C., are urging the city’s Board of Education to accept a proposal that would allow the hiring of bilingual, special education professionals who are non-D.C. residents.
The city’s Commission on Latino Community Development and the Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs held a press conference March 14 to call attention to the problem created by the citys“residency requiremenf rule. The rule states that city employees must live in the city.
Four bilingual positions - social worker, speech therapist, program developer and psychologist- have gone unfilled since last October. The city has a $190,000 federal grant for this fiscal year to fill positions related to bilingual, special education.
Board of Education member Bob Boyd told Weekly Report, “We are not adequately identifying and serving impaired students who are not native-English speakers.” Boyd, who is the board’s chairman for the committee on special education, introduced the proposal to waive the residency requirement He called the board negligent in failing to recognize a student population whose
numbers are “growing exponentially.”
As of March 15, 1988, the city served 4,932 students in its bilingual education programs, 10% of whom are said to be in need of special education classes.
“Because there isn’t enough staff to evaluate and place the language-minority children, many are being underserved,” said Leah Holmes-Bonilla of the Office on Latino Affairs. Although tapering off since the enactment of the 1986 federal immigration law, the number of district students from Central America, particularly El Salvador, increased dramatically in the late 70s and early’80s.
- Felix Perez
No Set-Aside Change Seen Till 1991
continued from page 1
awarding 2-3% of contracts to WBEs while Disadvantaged Business Enterprises were allowed 10% by law.
Concerned groups met Feb. 26 with Gov. James Thompson, who consequently earmarked $15 million in jobs for minority male firms, said Martinez, who attended the meeting.
Black and Hispanic contractors have formed a coalition called DRIVE, Dan Ryan Is Vital to Everyone. Theirf irst act of consolidation was a labor ratio change of two blacks to one Hispanic; it had been four to one, said Martinez.
“It is important to object now, before this policy is applied to other types of contracts. If we do not get our fair share, we will publicly raise hell,” said Martinez.
According to SBE bureau chief Woofolk, local groups are already making their weight felt, but he thinks it is misdirected. “We are on the firing line, yet we have little control over the program,” he said. He explained that Illinois wanted to continue the two goal system, but federal law supersedes thiS. The state also raised the quota to 15% for DBEs.
“Local groups don’t understand that so long as prime contractors sublet 15% to certified DBE firms there is nothing we can do,” he contends.
Ranger, 93, Laid to Rest
Services were held March 15 near Mount-ainair, N.M., for Federico Sisneros, who at 93 was the National Park Service’s oldest ranger. He died of heart failure three days earlier.
Sisneros’ family owned the land on which the 17th century San Gregorio de Abo Mission stands. The land was donated to the state in the 1930s and became part of the Salinas National Monument in 1981.
Sisneros was caretaker when Abo was a state monument and was named a ranger when it became part of the national park system.
Born in 1894 near the Abo mission, Sisneros and his wife lived a few yards from the monument He was buried on the mission grounds.
Congressional experts disagree, maintaining that states can take the initiative not only by setting higher goals, but by looking more closely at how prime contractors meet minority goals before making awards.
The 1987 amendment to the Surface Transportation and Uniform Relocation Act which includes women as DBEs was introduced by Rep. John Paul Hammerschmidt (R-Ark). Helped by strong lobbying from women’s groups, the bill received overwhelming support. “The bill was meant to give women a license to compete," said House transportation subcommittee staffer Mike Toohey. “It was also a compromise made in order to maintain the 10% quota."
The program is not likely to change before 1991, when the bill is up for reauthorization, Toohey said.
“I don’t see these problems going away with the one-goal system,” said Woofolk. “It is a wave that will be spreading nationally.”
A bill Introduced by Rep. Nicholas Mavroules (D-Mass.) meant to reform the Small Business Administration’s 8(a) program passed the House in December. TheSenate is now working on its version. A congressional panel is currently reviewing the Defense Departments’ implementation of its 5% minority contract goals. A congressional task force is reviewing minority set-asides and is expected to issue a report shortly. - Darryl Figueroa
Univision Names Martinez
Guillermo Martinez became March 7 the news and public affairs director of Univision, the Spanish-language television network recently sold to Hallmark Cards. He will be responsible for three national network newscasts, public affairs programming and 1988 election coverage from the Univision center in Laguna Niguel, Calif.
Martinez, 46, was most recently news director of Univision affiliate WLTV (Channel 23) in Miami. For 12 years, he was on the Miami Herald's staff, ultimately joining its editorial | board.
Martinez was a founding member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and for a year served as its president.
‘Legal’ Immigration Bill Passes Senate, 88-4
The U.S. Senate passed March 15, on a 88-4 vote, a bill that seeks to restructure the laws that shape legal immigration into the United, States.
Sponsored by Sena Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), the bill would allot more slots for skilled immigrants from Western European countries. It also sets a cap for the number of brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens who may apply for visas. H ispanic advocacy groups charge that such a cap would worsen the already-existing backlog of cases when individuals receive their legalization under the 1986 immigration law.
Latino Joblessness Rises
Despite the nation’s overall unemployment rate dropping to its lowest level in eight and a half years - 5.6% - the Hispanic jobless rate increased to 8.3% last month from 7.2% in January, according to figures released by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Following are the unemployment rates for 1986 and 1987 for the Hispanic subgroups: Mex. P.R. Cuban Other
’86 ’87 ’86 ’87 ’86 ’87 ’86 ’87
11.2 9.9 14.0 10.1 6.4 5.2 8.6 6.4
Language Drive Thrives
Florida English, the group seeking to make English the state’s official language through constitutional fiat, collected twice as many signatures as it expected during the March 8 Super Tuesday primary in that state.
The group estimates that it took in roughly
200.000 signatures, bringing its total to 430,000. August9 is the deadline by which Florida English, funded by U.S. English, has to turn in nearly350,000 validated signatures to the state.
U.S. English paid $70,000 to a California firm, American Petition Consultants, to spearhead the March 8 drive. They collected
140.000 of the signatures.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Jorge Martinez, guest columnist
‘Paunchy Lion’ Remembered
There’s no doubt about it. The funniest comedians in the country are in grade school. Having taught elementary school youngsters for more than 30 years, Pm sure of it.
Each year we study a unit about Puerto Rico. In the resulting essays, examination papers and classroom discussions, their comments run from beguiling to hilarious. All are in the delightfully original style of children.
Here’s a sample of what they say and write:
“Puerto Rico has many imports. One of their best of all imports is tourists”
“One of their principal products is people.”
“Puerto Rico actually does not get much rain, not counting May through December.”
“One of the main things to be found in Puerto Rico is utopia.” HISTORY TWISTED
History may repeat itself, but eager 9-year-old scholars can usually add some unexpected twists to it. Here are some historical “facts” that you probably never suspected:
“This island was visited by Columbus in 1493,1493 was really in the 15th century, but they were behind the times in those days.” “Sir Francis Drake once figured greatly in Puerto Rican history. But he faded away and is now only a figure of speech.”
Once I explained that Ponce de Le6’n founded a settlement in Puerto Rico in 1510. So how did it come out in an examination paper?
“Puerto Rico was settled by a paunchy lion.”
One student, a little overwhelmed by it all, wrote: “Puerto Rico was explored by men of several nations. That is to say each man was not from several nations, but each man was just allowed to come from one nation and could not be from... oh, never mind.”
‘YOUNGSTERISMS’ COME THICK When the students turn their attention to geography, “youngsterisms” come as thick as chalk dust.
“Puerto Rico is big sideways with a skinny up and down.”
“This island is 3400 in round numbers and square miles.”
Test question: “Where is San Juan?”
Answer. “On page 26.”
Wrote another student: “San Juan has grown so fast that persons living there are now called populatioa The plural of persons is people. The plural of people is population.”
A girl named Linda confided: “San Juan is well known for its hysterical sights.”
Pablo Casals, the internationally acclaimed cellist, drew these comments:
“Pablo Casals was born in 1876, supposably on his birthday.”
“He expired in 1973 and later died from this.”
“Some of the best products of Puerto Rico are sugar, pineapples and Pablo Casals”
Other products?
“They also have a lot of copper or. Nobody knows or what”
THE MONSTER WITH 4,000 FEET The class was taught about Cerro de Punta, at 4,000 feet, the island’s tallest mountain. In a quiz, I was informed:
“Cerro de Punta is the name of a monster that lives there. It has more than 4,000 feet.”
As for the island’s forests:
“A great much of Puerto Rico’s timber supply is used in the making of forests.”
“Their forests are found mostly in woodsy places.”
“Their rivers are useful for getting electricity from. I know at least one person who claims this is interesting.”
I confess. I’m that person. Whatever the subject I’m always interested in hearing their captivating comments - as charming as childhood itself.
(Jorge Martinez is a teacher at Jefferson Elementary School in St. Louis, Mo.)
Sin Pelos en la lengua
DISCOVERY: The first volume of “Young Authors of America” has just been published, and one of its 12 manuscripts came from the sharp pencil of Eva Corona, a promising writer from the Elizabeth Peabody elementary school in Chicagd.
The children’s stories were submitted to The Trumpet Club, a new organization that encourages such writers, and published in soft-cover by Dell Publishing Co. Inc.
They were nice enough to let us reprint Eva’s story. Here it is:
On a Beautiful Sunday Morning by Eva Corona On a beautiful Sunday morning Mrs. Indz woke up early to get ready for the Sunday mass. Every Sunday, she took with her her* small Bible.
No one had realized that Mrs. Indz did not know howto read, for Mrs. In6z always pretended to be reading her Bible during the mass.
This morning she went to church with her Bible and, as usual, decided to sit by herself. She did not want to let anyone know that she couldn’t read.
Unfortunately, a lady came to sit by Mrs. In6z.
Two minutes later another lady sat on the other side of Mrs. In6z.
Mrs. Inez was afraid that the ladies would find out that she did not know how to read.
During the mass, one of the ladies asked Mrs. In6z if she could borrow the Bible. Mrs. Inez was afraid of that, but she let the lady borrow her Bible.
The lady returned the Bible and Mrs. In^z continued pretending.
A moment later the other lady noticed something. She whispered to Mrs. In6z, “I think you’re reading your Bible upside down.”
Mrs. In6z answered,“Neveragain would I let this lady borrow my Bible!”
“Why not?” asked the lady.
“She didn’t return my Bible the way it was!” answered Mrs. In6z.
-Kay Barbaro
Quoting..
GUILLERMO MARTINEZ, ex- news director of Miami’s WLTV, commenting on the presidential race in a Miami Herald column:
"Between nowand November, Cuban-American voters may realize that their predictability has cost them their leverage. One candidate may ignore them because he knows they will never vote for him. The other may just take them for granted.”
JULIAN LOERA, Huntington Park, Calif., shoe store manager, explaining to a Los Angeles Times reporter the $75 rate his Zapateria Guadalajara charges to help legalization applicants fill out their papers:
uThe price is low because we make it back in shoes.”
March 21,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
LATINA COLLEGE PRESIDENTS: To receive a copy of the report by the American Council on Education on the slackening growth of female college presidents, send a self-addressed envelope with 39$ postage to: Office of Women in Higher Education, ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 939-9390.
EDUCATION AND TRAINING: “Campaign '88: Education and Training Issues of Special Importance to Hispanics” is a 14-page report which gives an overview of Hispanic problems and discusses how education and training are critical in overcoming them. For a copy, send 75$ to: National SER Policy and Research Institute, 1320 10th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 328-0466.
HIGH SCHOOL INTERNSHIPS: Applications are available for the 1988 Hispanic Congressional High School Summer Internship Program. Sixteen graduating seniors will work from June 13 to Aug. 5 to get hands-on experience in Washington, D.C. Deadline is April 8. For an application or information, contact the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. (202) 543-1771.
YOUNG WRITERS: The 102-page book“The Trumpet Club Young Authors of America” contains stories written by 8- to 11-year-old winners of the clubs writing contest If you are interested in obtaining a copy, contact The Trumpet Club at 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10103 1-800-826-0110.
ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIPS: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers is accepting applications for its 1988-89 scholarships. Candidates must be full-time students majoring in science or engineering. For applications contact Kathy Borunda, SHPE Foundation Committee, P.O. Box 87, Main Office, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 (213) 888-2080.
COMMUNITY COLLEGE RECRUITMENT: “Minorities in Urban Community Colleges: Tomorrow’s Students Today’ is a report by the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges which lists several steps community colleges must take to increase minority recruitment and retention. For a copy send $7.50 to: AACJC Publication Sales, 80 S. Early St., Alexandria, Va. 22304 1-800-336-4776.
AIDS: The AIDS International/lnformation Distribution Service has released its directory of AIDS information resources. Titled “The AJ.D.S. Catalog,” the booklet lists books, audio/video tapes, computer data bases, hotlines and organizations For a copy send $1 to: AI.D.S., P.O. Box 2008, Saratoga, Calif. 95070 (408) 866-6303.
FASHION SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED
The National Honorary Board of Hispanic Designers announced March 1 that it is seeking entries for its competition for Hispanic students enrolled in accredited fashion design schools and other related institutions
The categories of the competition are fashion photography, fashion design, and set and stage design. The deadline is April 30.
The winners will receive a $1,000 scholarship and an all-expense-paid trip to the Sept. 15 Hispanic Fashion Designers' Gala in Washington, D.C.
The organization is also offering two six-to-eight-week internships for six to ten students to work on the show’s production. Interns receive a $1,500 stipend for travel and lodging and a $500 - $1,500 scholarship.
For more information and applications, write: Hispanic Designers Inc., 1201 16th St NW, Suite 230, Washington, D.C. 20036.
EPIC TO PUBLISH
The English Plus Information Clearinghouse plans to release the first issue of its bimonthly newsletter, EPIC Events, late this month or early next month.
EPIC was established in October 1987 to promote the “English Plus” concept, which holds that society is best served when all persons have access to opportunities to learn English proficiency plus master a second language. The organization is in part an attempt to counterbalance the English-only movement.
A six-month subscription to EPIC Events is $12. The March/April issue is 12 pages. For more information contact: EPIC, Mary Carol Combs, project director, c/o National Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Forum, 227 Massachusetts Ave. NE Suite 120, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0004.
EDUCATION HOTLINE OPENS
The National Committee for Citizens in Education recently announced that its toll-free hotline has added a bilingual counselor for Spanish speakers.
The hotline, 1-800-NETWORK, or (301) 997-9300 for callers in Maryland and Alaska, is open to parents and others interested in information and assistance on education problems and public school issues. The bilingual counselor is available on weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m. Eastern time.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FARM WORKER HEARING McAllen, Texas March 21
The Texas House Laborand Employment Relations Committee will hold a hearing at the request of United Farm Workers of America into whether the immigration law provision allowing employers to import foreign workers is being abused at the expense of domestic farm workers.
Rebecca Flores Harrington (512) 474-5010
PARAPROFESSIONAL CONFERENCE Bakersfield, Calif. March 21 The sixth annual paraprofessional conference for educators will be held at the University of California at Bakersfield, one of several co-sponsors of the meeting. Educator and sociologist Samuel Betances will address the problems of drug abuse and dropouts. Nancy Comstock (20i)f 398-3641
FUTURE OF NON-PROFITS New York March 23
Mayor Henry Cisneros of San Antonio will deliver a
keynote address on post-Reagan era opportunities for non-profit organizations at this conference sponsored by the New School for Social Research. State Commissioner of Social Services Cesar Perales will be among those being presented awards. Terry Boggis (212) 741-5667
LATINA CONFERENCE Chicago March 25, 26
The workshops and lectures held at this Latino Institute-sponsored women’s conference will cover topics such as effective people management and discuss social issues like single, working mothers. Marta Istomin, artistic director of the Kennedy Center, will be the keynote speaker.
Rosa Machabanski (312) 663-3603
HISPANIC LABOR HISTORY
Washington, D.C. March 26 A historical overview of Hispanic work experiences in the United States will be presented by Latino scholars The panel discussion is part of the Smithsonian Institution’s program in Hispanic American history. A showing of the 1953 film “The Salt of the Earth” will follow the lecture.
Luz Maria Pietro (202) 786-2307
FUND-RAISING DINNER San Diego March 26
The eighth annual dinner of theChicano Federation
of San Diego County will highlight the importance of immigrants to the strength of the nation. This fundraiser will also honor community leaders. Jerry Apodaca, former governor of New Mexico, will be the keynote speaker.
Irma Castro (619) 236-1228
EDUCATORS CONVENTION New Orleans March 26-29 Hispanic education leaders will share their ideas on how best to serve the fast growing Hispanic student population at the annual luncheon sponsored by the National Caucus of Hispanic School Board Members. The forum is part of the National School Boards Association annual convention.
Philip Smith (703) 838-NSBA
SPOTLIGHT
NATIONAL HISPANIC MEDIA CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Publications, among others, will hold the sixth annual conference of Hispanic media professionals in Dallas April 6-9. Workshops covering several aspects of journalism, from print to broadcast, and a job fair with recruiters from some three dozen news organizations will be held. Some 1,500 participants are expected. For further information call Frank Newton at (202) 783-6228.
4
March 21,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report








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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EDUCATION EQUITY SPECIALIST
EDUCATION EQUITY SPECIALIST-WEBER STATE COLLEGE. Individual will provide technical assistance and training to local public schools in the mountain west on problems to reduce or alleviate race, sex, and national origin segregation. Familiarity with the public educational system at the regional, state, district and local levels is necessary. Must beable to travel 50% of the time. Master's degree in education or related area required. 5 years experience with the following: educational equity issues and related federal laws; designing and conducting assessments and/or evaluations, reports, and grant writing, and use of statistical, analysis procedures; designing and conducting training sessions. 3 years of recent classroom experience in ESL, bilingual or cross-cultural education. Bilingual background preferred. Knowledge orfamiliarity with male role socialization, male/minority dropout programs, and teen parenting programs highly desirable. Salary negotiable.
Send letter of application, resume and the names, addresses and daytime telephone numbers of three references to: Ms. Jan Perry Evenstad, c/o Personnel Department, Weber State College, Ogden, Utah 84408-1016. This position will not be filled prior to April 22, 1988.
IYSC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 1988 MEDIA EDITION
On April4,1988, Hispanic Link will publish its 1988 “media edition.”
This special issue will reach our subscribers (more than 1,100 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 6-9 National Hispanic Media Conference in Dallas.
In addition to our regular “Marketplace” section, Weekly Report will carry a full page “Opportunitiesin the Media” insert forthat edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
For additional information contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza at (202) 234-0737. Deadline for ad copy is Friday, March 25, 1988.
NURSING DEPARTMENT College Laboratory Technicians Two anticipated CLTpositions available for September 1, 1988:
Techniques Lab: Demonstrates nursing procedures to nursing students; assists class* room instructors in clinical lab. Plans & conducts seminars, workshops, practice/skills sessions for nursing students. Knowledge of basic nursing skills. Vac. #364.
Tutorial Lab: Responsible for management and operation of lab. Monitors lab budget. Hires/supervises lab tutors. Plans & conducts seminars & workshops. Knowledge of basic med-surg., pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric nursing theory. Vac. #365.
Qualifications: Registered Professional Nurse, licensed in N.Y. Min. of 2 yrs. bedside clinical exp. Knowledge of basic computer skills is desirable. 35 hour work week. Salary: $24,185/A
Refer to BMCC Vacancy # above and send resume with cover letter by April 1,1988,to: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College City University of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER IRCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY
CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment contingent upon available funding, beginning September 1,1988. Assistant Professor level, salary competitive with summer employment generally available, depending on need. Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred. Teach four classes per semester; recruit and advise students; university committees and other professional duties as needed; interest in professional research and publications encouraged.
Send letter of interest, vita, official transcripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April 15,1988,
° Tarleton State University Dr. W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. AA/EEO/MF
RENTAL
North Arlington, Virginia, unfurnished room for rent. Located near subway and close to Washington, D.C. Rent is $317 per month plus 1/2 of the utilities. Washerand dryer. Available 3/15. Female nonsmoker please. Contact Concha Orozco. Work (202) 371-2100 or Home: (703) 276-9546.
NATIONAL DIRECTOR Of the 1990 Census Program &
STATE COORDINATOR
Of the 1990 Census Program
National civil rights organization needs to fill two Los Angeles* based positions to develop and coordinate a community education program about the importance of the census.
Requirements for California Coordinator Undergraduate degree, 3-5 years community organizing or related activity, working know* ledge of California Hispanic organization experience in working with local & state policymakers, bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Requirements for National Director Same as state director but on a national level, graduate degree, preferably a law degree, 5-7 years community organizing, policy making or legal experience.
Send resume, a writing sample and a list of three references to: R. Calderbn, Personnel, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by April 10.
HIP SEEKS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is a national association of trustees and staff of grant-making foundations and corporate contributions programs Fund-raising and non-profit administrative experience required.
Contact Mike Cortes, HIP,334 KernySt, San Francisco, California 94108-3205, (415) 788-2982, before April 1.
ATTORNEY
The Father Moriarty Central American Refugee Program seeks an attorney for political asylum hearings and related work Bilingual (Spanish/ English) required. $19,000 full-time equivalent.
Send letter of interest and resume to: Job opening, iFMCARP, 180 Fair Oaks St, San Francisco, California 94110 (415) 824-1830. Deadline April 8.
FMCARP is an Affirmative Action Employer.
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Arts & Entertainment
U.S. TEATRO TRAVELS: U.S. Hispanic theater artists continue gaining international recognition - as proven by two recent events:
• Miami’s Teatro Avante was one of two theater companies representing the United States at the Second Annual International Festival of Community Theater held last month in Puebla, Mexico. Teatro Avante staged Una caja de zapatos vacia, by Cuban playwright Virgilio Pineira.
® New York actress Ilka Tanya Paydn performed La sehorlta Margarita last month at the Havana International Theatre Festival The one-woman show, written by Brazilian Roberto Athayde, was translated into Spanish by New York playwright Dolores Prida.
Payan performed La sehorita Margarita last September at the Festival de Teatro Iberoamericano in Cddiz, Spain. The show will travel to Los Angeles this summer for a staging by the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts.
Interest in the United States in Spanish and Latin American theater is also on the rise.
This week, a drama by Mexican contemporary writer Victor Hugo Rascon receives its English-language premiere in San Diego. Voices in the Threshold, translated and directed by Raul Moncada, will be presented in a workshop production by the Southwestern College Drama Department in association with the Old Globe Theater's Teatro Meta
The drama will be staged at Southwestern’s Mayan Hall, March 23 to 26.
A comedy by another contemporary Mexican playwright continues on stage through this week at L.A.’s Bilingual Foundation of the Arts. Rosa de dos aromas, by Emilio Carballido, closes March 27.
In Washington, D.C, one of Spain’s most popular comedies ever also completes its run on March 27. GALA Hispanic Theater staged Jacinto Benavente’s The Bonds of Interest, in English only.
Home-grown Hispanic theater is also being produced in the United States.
San Antonio’s Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center recently presented the Los Actores de San Antonio company in Soldierboy, a play by Judith and Severo Perez, directed by Jos6 Manuel Galvdn.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SUPPORT SOUGHT: The National Hispanic Media Coalition is sending out a call for Latino organizations to watch and support, through a letter-writing campaign to CBS-TV and Columbia Pictures, the new half-hour television comedy series “Trial and Error.” The series, starring Paul Rodriguez and Eddie Velez as a T-shirt salesman and a young lawyer who live together, debuted March 15.
According to Chairman Armando Dur6n of the Los Angeles-based coalition, NHMC has reviewed the eight episodes shot so far. “The series portrays the Latino community in a positive light,” he says, and it uses Hispanics in significant roles “in front of, as well as behind, the cameras.”
He adds, “For the first time in television history, a situation comedy series has been produced bilingually” and made available to Spanish-speaking viewers through special
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Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
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second-language broadcasts Radio stations in Chicago, Houston, San Antonio and Los Angeles carried the Spanish versions. More are expected to do so.
Television reviewers weren't as generous in their reactions to the opening episode as was NHMC. A sampling from two syndicated columnists:
Tom Shales: “Instead of upgrading the image of Hispanics on the air,‘Trial and Error1 comes perilously close to being a Latino ‘Amos ’n’ Andy.’ ’’
Richard Marin: “When ABC scrapped plans a couple of months ago for a series called ‘Ju&rez,’ Hispanic-American groups cried prejudice. Wait till they get a load of‘Trial and Error.’ Surely this is not the kind of publicity (or entertainment) America’s fastest growing minority wants, or needs.”
Reacting to Shales and Marin, Hispanic Link entertainment critic Antonio Mejias-Rentas commented, “They’re telling us that we’re offended because it offends them.”
His reaction to the show?
“If s a typical bland, dumb sitcom. It doesn’t
matter what the critics say. Like a bad cake, the show will fall by itself.”
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT: The New York chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts & Sciences will present its New York “Image” award for outstanding achievement by a Hispanic in broadcasting to Marceiino Miyares, president of Manhattan’s Times Square Studios on March 31.
Miyares, a Bay of Pigs veteran, produces “Geraldo,” with Geraldo Rivera, and “ Business This Morning,” a new financial news program, at the studios, which he acquired last year.
RE-ELECTED: Esther Renteria, president of Renteria Public Relations in Los Angeles, will be installed March 21 for a second term as president of the national Hispanic Public Relations Association.
LEADER: WIND/La Tremenda was reported as Chicago Latinos^ favorite radio station by Hispanic Market Research Feb. 22. With a 26.7% market share, it is the first AM station to become No. 1. WO JO- FM ran second with a 23.7% share... _ Char//e Ericksen
(See Guest Column)
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. Making The News This Week U .S. Rep . Henry Gonzalez of Texas receives the National Housing Conference's highest award-the Nathaniel Keith Award-for his efforts to provide affordable housing to low-and moderate-income families. . . California Gov. George Deukmejlan appoints Gloria Herrera-Grotefend to the California Council on Criminal Justice. Herrera is a sergeant in the Los Angeles Sheriffs Department. .. In an effort to diffuse criticism about being unresponsive to the Hispapic community, New York Mayor Edward Koch mentions Deputy Mayor Robert Esnard, a Latino, as a possible running mate in his re election bid next year ... Acting Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer appoints Octavlo Mateo as the city's first Latino director of affirmative action ... United Way of America names Sister M. lsolina Ferre of Ponce, Puerto Rico, as this year's recipient of its Alexis de Tocqueville Society Award for her nearly 50 years of volunteer service to delinquency prevention . . . Dr. Rafael Pel'lalver of Miami , who created a program to retrain exiled Cuban doctors and help them with medical licensing exams, dies at the age of65 of cancer. Some 2,500 Cubans and 7,700 physicians from other countries took the University of Miami course since 1961 ... JavlerGeraldo Meza of Santa Rosa, Calif., and VIctor Ramirez of Cooleemee, N.C., are among 18 people recognized by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission for their acts of valor. Meza saved a man from assault; Ramirez rescued a man from drowning ... v ....... ,.,l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1-21.1988 New Set-Aside Formula Blasted The handling of federal funds on the $210 million Dan Ryan Expressway; a major trans portation project in Chicago, has angered Hispanic and black construction there. The two groups received only $4.7 million in contracts out of $21.6 million set aside so far for minority-owned businesses. Under federal guidelines established in Apri11987, the 10% quota for minority firms on transportation projects can now be met by ' awarding contracts to Anglo women, who in the Ryan project received $16.8 million. "The whole point of set-aside goals is being gutted with this change," said Peter Martinez, executive director of the Hispanic-American Construction Industry Association in Chicago . "You can see from the Ryan project the abuse that is occurring, and it will become a national problem." Harry Pach6n, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, commented, "It is un-Correction fortunate that rather than expanding the pie, minorities and women have been set up to fight for crumbs from it. As it is, Hispanic contractors receive only 2% of federal trans portation contracts." NALEO puts out a yearly audit of Hispanic federal contracts . The situation is exacerbated by the suspicion that women are posing as presidents for businesses run by Anglo men, some construc tion experts say. "We used to have a hard time finding enough Women Business Enter prises to meet the 3% goal previously applied. Now there is a proliferation of WBEs," contend ed , Rowan Woofolkichief of the Illinois Bureau of Small Business Enterprises . David Morales, executive director of the Washington, D.C.based National Hispanic Association of Construction Enterprises, said, "We know fronting is going on . In some in stances, the wives of majority contractors were receiving contracts." State Attorney General Neil Hartigan as signed Feb. 25 six deputies to investigate the bidding and contract allotment process. U.S. Manu.el Lu!an of. New Previously, states worked on good faith in Congress sole H1spamc votmg conlinued on page 2 Nurses' Exodus Puerto Rico ThereisaconcerninPuertoRicooverthe st ing "sick-outs" to protest what they recent exodus of professional nurses re-cl im is a threat to public health because of sponding to heavy mainland hospital recruit severe understaffing due to overworked ment on the island . The president of the and underpaid nurses. More than 1,000 Professional Nurses College , Carmen Vigas, nurses picketed March 9 outside city hos told Weekly Report March 3 that some pita Is, calling for higher wages. During the 1,700 nurses left the island between August work actions, doctors were forced to use 1987 and January 1988. administrators, medical residents and super Another 250 left Puerto Rico's Health visors for nursing care. Many emergency Department during the same approximate cases had to be diverted to other institutions. period. The nurses' contract expired Nov. 30, Recently, in Carolina, Puerto Rico, the 1987. The city manages 17 hospitals. Treatment and Diagnostic Center suffered Several hospitals, particularly in the Bronx, an almost simultaneous loss of 15 nurses, serve large Hispanic constituencies . The causing supervisors to take over patient starting nurse's salary in New York is$24 , 000. care. The average salary of Puerto Rican nurses, St. Joseph's Medical Center of Pater according to the island's Association of son, N.J., is actively recruiting Puerto Rican Hospitals, was $12,000 in 1987. Puerto nurses as is the New York City Health and Rican officials point out the high Hospitals Corporation. cost of living in New York. New York City nurses recently have been Edward Ledesma Marie/ito Release Plan Criticized by U.S. Rep. In a letter made public March 9, U.S. Rep. Robert Kastenmeier (DWisc.) , chairm an of the House Judiciary Committee's subcommittee on the courts, civil liberties and the adminis tration of justice, urged the Justice Department to grant hearings to Marie! detainees before deporting them to Cuba. . Labeling the review process set up as a result of last December's prison uprisings as one that emphasizes "speed over substance," Kastenmeier said the Justice Department's appeal panel should . be replaced with hearings before an independent body . The congres& man also called on the government to provide legal counsel to those detainees who do not have any, allow to remain in the United States those Marielitos who have not committed a felony and grant the detainees the right to present evidence and cross examine hostile witnesses. Latinas Head1 3 Colleges . The number of Latina :college presidents increased to 13 in 1987 from 1 0 in 1984, according to a report released March 14 by the American Council on Education's Office of Women in Higher Education. Overall, Latinas represented 4.4% of the 296 women who are presidents of post : secondary institutions . Ten percent of the ' 2,880 accredited colleges and universities in the nation and Puerto Rico were r un by females last year. Although the number of Hispanic, black and Native American female presidents in creased from 26 to 40 over the three-year period, mii'I.Jrityfemales account for 13. 5% of . the women college and university heads. While the number of minority presidents increased by 14, the growth among females . as a group was only 10. This compares with 55 additional female presidents from 1981 'to 1984, and an increase of 54 from 1 978 to 1981. Following are where the Latina female pres: idents are found : Puerto Rico 6 California 1 Georgia 1 , Missouri 1 New Jersey New York Tennessee , Texas 1 1 1 1 . '

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Capital's Limited-English Students are Underserved Pointing out the increasingly dire need to better identify and place limited-English proficient students, Hispanic advocacy groups in Washington, D.C., are urging the city's Board of Education to accept a proposal that would allow the hiring of bilingual, special education professionals who are non-D.C. residents. The city's Commission on Latino Com munity Development and the Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs held a press conference March 14 to call attention to the problem created by the city's "residency requiremenr rule. The rule states that city employees must live in the city. Four bilingual positions-social worker, speech therapist, program developer and psychologist-have gone unfilled since last October. The city has a $190,000 fedE!ral grant for this fiscal year to fill positions related to special education . . Board of Education member Bob Boyd told Weekly Report, "We are not adequately identifying and serving impaired students who are not native-English speakers." Boyd, who is the board's chairman for the committee on special education, introduced the proposal to waive the residency require ment He called the board negligent in failing to recognize a student population whose No Set-Aside Change Seen Till1991 continued from page 1 awarding 2-3% of contracts to WBEs while Disadvantaged Business Enterprises were allowed 1 0% by law. Concerned groups met Feb. 26 with Gov. James Thompson, who consequently ear marked$15 million in jobs for minority male firmS, said Martinez, who attended the meeting . Black and Hispanic contractors have formed a coalition called DRIVE, Dan Ryan Is Vital to Everyone. Theirfirst act of consolidation was a labor ratio change of two blacks to one Hispanic; it had been four to one, said Martinez. "It is important to object now, before this policy is applied to other types of contracts. If we do not get our fair share, we will publicly raise hell," said Martinez . According to SBE bureau chief Woofolk, local groups are already making their weight felt, but he thinks it is misdirected. "We are on the firing line, yet we have little control over the program," he said. He explained that Illinois wanted to continue the two goal system, but federal law supersedes this. The state also raised the quota to 15% for DBEs. "Local groups don't understand that so long as prime contractors sublet 15% to certified DBE firms there is nothing we can do," he contends. Ranger, 93, Laid to Rest Services were held March 1 5 near Mount ainair, N.M., for Federico Sisneros, who at 93 was the National Park Service's oldest ranger. He died of heart failure three days earlier. Sisneros' family owned the land on which the 17th century San Gregorio de Abo Mission stands. The land was donated to the state in the 1930s and became part of the Salinas National Monument in 1981. Sisneros was caretaker when Abo was a state monument and was named a ranger when it became part of the national park system. Born in 1894 near the Abo mission, Sisneros and his wife lived a few yards from the monument He was buried on the mission grounds. 2 Congressional experts disagree, maintaining that states can take the initiative not only by setting higher goals, but by looking more closely at how prime contractors meet minority goals before making awards. The 1987 amendment to the Surface Trans . portation and Uniform Relocation Act which includes women as DBEs was introduced by Rep. John Paul Hammerschmidt (A-Ark). Helped by strong lobbying from women's groups, the bill received overwhelming sup port. "The bill was meant to give women a license to compete," said House transportation subcommittee staffer Mike Toohey. "It was also a compromise made in order to maintain the 1 0% quota." . The program is not likely to change before 1991, when the bill is up for reauthorization, Toohey said. -"I don't see these problems going away with the one-goal system," said Woofolk. "It is a wave that will be spreading nationally." A bill introduced by Rep. Nicholas Mavroules (D-Mass.) meant to reform the Small Business Administration's B(a) program passed the House in December. TheSenate is now work ing on its version. A congressional panel is currently reviewing the Defense Departmenfs 1 implementation of its 5% minority contract goals. A congressional task force is reviewing minority set-asides and is expected to issue a 1 report shortly . -Darryl Figueroa Univision Names Martinez Guillermo Martinez became March 7 the news and public affairs director of Univision, the Spanish-language television network re cently sold to Hallmark Cards. He will be responsible for three national network news casts, public affairs programming and 1988 election coverage from the Univision center in Laguna Niguel, Calif. Martinez, 46, was most recently news director of Univision affiliate WL TV (Channel 23) in Miami. For 12 years, he w.as on the Miami Herald's staff, ultimately joining its editorial1 board . Martinez was a founding member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and for a year: served as its president. numbers are "growing exponentially." As of March 15, 1988, the city served 4,932 students in its bilingual education programs, 1 0% of whom are said to be in need of special education classes. "Because there isn't enough staff to eva luate and place the language-minority chil dren, many are being underserved," said Leah HolmesBonilla of the Office on Latino Affairs. Although tapering off since the enact ment of the 1986 federal immigration law, the number of district students from Central America, particularly El Salvador, increased dramatically in the late '70s and early '80s. Felix Perez 'Legal' Immigration Bill Passes Senate, 88 The U.S. Senate passed March 15, on a 884 vote, a bill that seeks to restructure the laws that shape legal immigration into the Unit ed ; States. Sponsored by Sens. Edward Kennedy (D Mass.) and Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), the bill would allot more slots for skilled immigrants from Western European countries. It also sets a cap for the number of brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens who may apply for visas . Hispanic advocacy groups charge that such a cap would worsen the already-existing backlog of cases when individuals receive their legalization under the 1986 immigration law . Latino Joblessness Rises Despite the nation's overall unemployment rate dropping to its lowest level in eight and a half years-5.6%-the Hispanic jobless rate increased to 8.3% last month from 7.2% in January , according to figures released by the U . S . Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics . Following are the unemployment rates for 1986 and 1987 for the Hispanic subgroups: Mex. P.R. Cuban Other '86 '87 '86 '87 '86 '87 '86 '87 11.2 9.9 14. 0 10.1 6 . 4 5.2 8 . 6 6.4 Language Drive Thrives Florida English, the group seeking to make English the state's official language through constitutional fiat, collected twice as many signatures as it expected during the March 8 Super Tuesday primary in that state . The group estimates that it took in roughly 200,000 signatures, bringing its total to 430,000. August9 is the deadline by which Florida English, funded by U.S. English, has to turn in nearly350,000 validated signatures to the state. U.S. English paid $70,000 to a California firm, American Petition Consultants, to spear head the March 8 drive. They collected 140,000 of the signatures . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Jorge Martinez, guest columnist 'Paunchy Lion' Remembered T here's no doubt about it. The funniest comedians in the country are in grade school. Having taught elementary school youngsters for more than 30 years, I'm sure of it. Each year we study a unit about Puerto Rico . In the resulting essays , examination papers and classroom discussions, their com ments run from beguiling to hilarious. All are in the delightfully original style of children . Here's a sample of what they say and write : "Puerto Rico has many imports. One of their best of all imports is tourists." "One of their principal products is people." " Puerto Rico actually does n ot get much rain, not counting through December." " One of the main things to be found in Puerto Rico is utopia." HISTORY TWISTED History may repeat itself, but eager9-year-old scholars can usually add some unexpected twists to it. Here are some historical"facts" that you probably never suspected: "This island was visited by Columbus in 1493. 1493 was really in the 15th century , but they were behind the times in those days." "Sir Francis Drake once figured greatly in Puerto Rican history. But he faded away and is now only a figure of speech . " Once I explained that Ponce de Le6'n fo unded a settlement in Puerto Rico in 151 0. So how did it come out in an examination paper? "Puerto Rico was settled by a paunchy lion." One student, a little overwhelmed by it all, wrote: "Puerto Rico was explored by men of several nations . That is to say each man was not from several nations, but each man was just allowed to come from one n ation and could not be from ... oh , never mind . " 'YOUNGSTERISMS' COME THICK When the students turn thek attention to geography , "youngsterisms" come as thick as chalk dust. " Puerto Rico is big sideways with a skinny up and down . " " This island is 3400 in round numbers and square miles." Test question: "Where is San Juan?" Answer. "On page 26. " Wrote another student: "San Juan has grown so fast that persons living there are now called population . The plural of persons is peop le. The plural of people is population." A girl named Linda confided: "San Juan is well known for its hysterical sights." Pablo Casals, the internationally acclaimed cellist, drew these co m ments : " Pablo Casals was born in 1876, supposably on his birthday." " He expired in 1973 and later died from this . " "Some of the best products of Puerto Rico are sugar, pineapples and Pablo Casals." Othe r products? "The y also have a lot of copper or. Nobody knows or what." THE MONSTER WITH 4,000 FEET Sin Pelos en Ia lengua DISCOVERY: The first volume of "Young Authors of America" has just been published, and one of its 12 manuscripts came from the sharp pencil of Eva Corona, a promising writer from the Elizabeth Peabody elementary school in Chicag6 . The children's stories were submitted to The Trumpet Club , a new organization that encourages such writers , and published in soft-cover by Dell Publishing Co . Inc . They were nice enough to let us reprint Eva's story . Here it is: On a Beautiful Sunday Morning by Eva Corona On a beautiful Sunday morning Mrs. Inez woke up early to get. ready for the Sunday mass . E11ery Sunday , she took with her her small Bible. No one had realized that did not know how to read, for Mrs . Inez always pretended to be reading her \ Bible during the mass. This morning she went to church with her Bible and, as usual, decided to sit by herself. She did not want to let anyone know that she couldn't read . Unfortunately , a lady came to sit by Mrs . Inez. Two minutes later another lady sat on the other side of Mrs . Inez. ''' Mrs. Inez was afraid that the ladies would f i nd out that she did not know how to read. During the mass, one of the ladies asked Mrs . Inez if she could borrow the Bible . Mrs . Inez was afraid of that , but she let the lady borrow her Bible . The lady returned the Bible and Mrs . Inez continued pretending. A moment later the other lady noticed someth i ng . She whispered to Mrs . Inez, "I think you're reading your Bible upside down . " Mrs. Inez answered , " Never again would I let this lady borrow my Bible! " "Why not?" asked the lady . " She didn't return my Bible the way it was!" answered Mrs . Inez . Kay Barbaro T h e class was taught about Cerro de Punta, at 4,000 feet, the -------------------------islan d s tallest mountain . In a quiz , I was informed: " Cerro de Punta is the name of a monster that lives there. It has mor e than 4 ,000 feet." As for the islands forests : "A great much of Puerto Rico's timber supply is used in the making of forests." " Their forests are found mostly in woodsy places. " " Their rivers are useful for getting electricity from. I know at least one person who claims this is interesting." I confess . I'm that person . Whatever the subject, I'm always intere sted in hearing their captivating comments-as charming as c hildhood itself. (Jor g e Martinez is a teacher at Jefferson Elementary S.chool in St . Lou is, Mo.) Quoting. • • GUILLERMO MARTINEZ, ex . news director of Miami's WL l:V, commenting on the presidential race in a M i ami Herald column: " Between now and November, Cuban-American voters may realize that their predictab i lity has cost them their leverage . One candidate may ignore them because he knows they will never vote for him. The other may just take them for granted" JULIAN LOERA, Huntington Park , Calif. , shoe store manager , explaining to a Los Angeles Times reporter the $75 rate his Zapateria Guadalajara charges to help legalization applicants fill out their papers: "The price is low because we make it back in shoes." Hi s p a n ic link W ee kly Report March 21, 19S8 3

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COLLECTING LATINA COLLEGE PRESIDENTS: To receive a copy of the report by the American Council on Ectucation en the slackening growth of female college presidents, send a self-addressed envelope with 39 postage to: Office of Women in Higher Education, ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 939-9390. EDUCATION AND TRAINING: "Campaign '88: Education and Training Issues of Special Importance to Hispanics" is a 14-page report which gives an overview of Hispanic problems and discusses how education and training are critical in overcoming them. For a copy, send75 to: NationaiSER Policy and Research Institute, 1320 1Oth St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 328. HIGH SCHOOL INTERNSHIPS: Applications are available for the 1988 Hispanic Congressional High School Summer Internship Program. Sixteen graduating seniors will work from June 13 to Aug. 5 to get hands-on experience in Washington, D.C. Deadline is April a: For an application or information, contact the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. (202) 543-1771. YOUNG WRITERS: The 102-page book "The Trumpet Club Young Authors of America". contains stories written by 8-to 11-year-old winners of the club's writing contest. If you are interested in obtaining a copy, contact The Trumpet Club at 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y . 10103 1-800" 826-0110. ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIPS: The Society of Hispanic Prcr fessional Engineers is accepting applications for its 1988-89 scholar ships . Candidates must be full-time students majoring in science or. engineering. For applications contact Kathy Borunda, SHPE Found ation Committee, P.O. Box 87, Main Office, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 (213) 888-2080. COMMUNITY COLLEGE RECRUITMENT: "Minorities in Urban Community Colleges: Tomorrow's Students Today" is a report by the American Association of and Junior Colleges which lists several steps community colleges must take to increase minority recruitment and retention. For a copy send $7.50 to: AACJC Publication Sales, 80 S. Early St., Alexandria, Va. 22304 1 :800-336-4 776. AIDS: The AIDS International/Information Distribution Service has released its directory of AIDS information resources. Titled"The AI.D.S. Catalog," the booklet lists books, audio/video tapes, computer data bases, hotlines and organizations. For a copy send $1 to: A.I.D.S., P.O. Box 2008, Saratoga, Calif. 95070 (408) 866-6303. CONNECTING FASHION SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED The National Honorary Board of Hispanic Designers announced March 1 that it is seeking entries for its competition for Hispanic students enrolled in accredited fashion design schools and other related institutions. The categories of the competition are fashion photography , fashion design, and set and stage design. The deadline is April 30. The winners will receive a $1,000 scholarship and an all-expense paid trip to the Sept. 15 Hispanic Fashion Designers' Gala in Washington , D.C. The organization is also offering two six-tcreight-week internships for six to ten students to work on the show's production . Interns receive a $1,500 stipend for travel and lodging and a $500-$1,500 scholarship. For more information and applications, write: Hispanic Designers Inc., 1201 16th St NW, Suite 230, Washington, D.C. 20036. EPIC TO PUBLISH The English Plus Information Clearinghouse plans to release the first issue of its bimonthly newsletter, EPIC Events , late this month or early next month . EPIC was established in October 1987 to promote the "English Plus" concept, which holds that society is best served when all persons have access to opportunities to learn English proficiency plus master a second language . The organization is in part an attempt to counterbalance the English-only movement. A six-month subscription to EPIC Events is $12. The March/April issue is 12 pages. For more information contact: EPIC, Mary Carol Combs, project director, c/o National Immigration , Refugee and Citizenship Forum, 227 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 120, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0004. EDUCATION HOTLINE OPENS The National Committee for Citizens in Education recently announced that its toll-free hotline has added a bilingual counselor for Spanish speakers. The hotline, 1-800-NETWORK, or (301) 997-9300 for callers in Maryland and Alaska, is open to parents and others interested in information and assistance on education problems and public school issues. The bilingual counselor is available on weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m. Eastern time . Calendar THIS WEEK keynote address on post Reagan era opportunities for non-profit organizations at this conference sponsored by the New School for Social Research. State Commissioner of Social Services Cesar Perales will be among those being presented awards. Terry Boggis (212) 741-5667 of San Diego County will highlight the importance of immigrants to the strength of the nation . This fund raiser will also honor community leaders. Jerry Apodaca , former governor of New Mexico, will be the keynote speaker. Irma Castro (619) 236-1228 FARM WORKER HEARING McAllen, Texas March 21 The Texas House Labor and Employment Relations Committee will hold a hearing at the request of United Farm Workers of America into whether the immigration law provision allowing employers to import foreign workers is being abused at the expense of domestic farm workers. Rebecca Flores Harrington (512) 47 4-501 0 PARAPROFESSIONAL CONFERENCE Bakersfield, Calif. March 21 The sixth annual paraprofessional conference for educators will be held at the University of California at Bakersfield, one of several co-sponsors of the meeting . Educator and sociologist Samuel Betances will address the problems of drug abuse and dropouts. Nancy Comstock (201) 398-3641 FUTURE OF NON-PROFITS New York March 23 Mayor Henry Cisneros of San Antonio will deliver a 4 LATINA CONFERENCE Chicago March 25 , 26 The workshops and lectures held at this Latino Institute-sponsored women's conference will cover topics such as effective people management and discuss social issues like single, working mothers . Marta lstomin, artistic director of the Kennedy Center , will be the keynote speaker. Rosa Machabanski (312) 663-3603 HISPANIC LABOR HISTORY Washington , D.C. March 26 A historical overview of Hispanic work experiences in the United States will be presented by Latino scholars. The panel discussion is part of the Smithsonian Institution's program in Hispanic American history . A showing of the 1953 film "The Salt of the Earth'' will follow the lecture . Luz Maria Pietro (202) 786-2307 FUND-RAISING DINNER San Diego March 26 The eighth annual dinner of the Chicano Federation March 21, 1988 EDUCATORS CONVENTION New Orleans March 26-29 Hispanic education leaders will share their ideas on how best to serve the fast growing Hispanic student population at the annual luncheon sponsored by the National Caucus of Hispanic School Board Members. The forum is part of the National School Boards Association annual convention. Philip Smith (703) 838-NSBA SPOTLIGHT NATIONAL HISPANIC MEDIA CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Publications, among others, will hold the sixth annual conference of Hispanic media professionals in Dallas April6-9. Workshops covering several aspects of journalism, from print to broadcast, and a job fair with recruiters from some three dozen news organizations will be held. Some 1,500 participants are expected . For further information call Frank Newton at (202) 7836228. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION EQUITY SPECIALIST EDUCATION EQUITY SPECIALISTWEBER STATE COLLEGE. Individual will provide technical assistance and training to local public schools in the mountain west on problems to reduce or alleviate race , sex , and national origin segregation . Familiarity with the public educational system at the regional, state , district and local levels is necessary . Must be able to travel 50% of the time. Master's degree in education or related area required. 5 years experience with the following: educational equity issues and related federal laws; designing and conducting assessments and/or evaluations , reports , and grant writing, and use of statistical , analysis procedures ; designing and conducting training sessions. 3 years of recent classroom experience in ESL, bilingual or cross-cultural education. Bilingual background preferred . Knowledgeorfamiliaritywith male role socialization, male/minority dropout programs, and teen parenting programs highly desirable . Salary negotiable . Send letter of application, resume and the names , addresses and daytime telephone numbers of three references to: Ms. Jan Perry Evenstad, c/o Personnel Department, Weber State College , Ogden, Utah 84408. This position will not be filled prior to April22, 1988. WSC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 1988 MEDIA EDITION OnApril4, 1988, Hispanic Link will publish its 1988 " media edition ." Th1s spec1al1ssue w1ll reach our subscnbers (more than 1,100 advocates and professionals across 39 states) AND a projected 1,500 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April6 National Hispanic Media Conference in Dallas . In addition to our regular " Marketplace " section, Weekly Report will carry a full page " Opportunities in the Media" insert fort hat edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded , special audience, we welcome your ad in either section. For additional information contact Hector Ericksell-Mendoza at(202) 234 0737. Dead line for ad copy is Friday , March 25, 1988. NURSING DEPARTMENT College Laboratory Technicians Two anticipated CL T positions available for September 1, 1988 : Techniques Lab: Demonstrates nursing procedures to nursing students; assists class room instructors in clinical lab. Plans & conducts seminars, workshops , practice/skills sessions for nursing students. Knowledge of basic nursing skills . Vac . #364. TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE and Tenure-track appointment, contingent upon available fund ing , beginning September 1 , 1988. Assistant Professor level , salary competitive with surll" mer employment generally available , depend ing on need. Ph.D. essential; professional experience in civil rights jurisprudence preferred Teach four classes per semester; recruit and advise students; university committees and other professional duties as needed; interest in professional research and publications encouraged . Send letter of interest , vita , official trail" scripts, three letters of recommendation and/ or placement file on or before April15, 1988, to : Tarleton State University Dr. W. Eugene Atkinson Department of Social Sciences Box T-2006 Tarleton Station Stephenville, TX. 76402. ANEEO/MF RENTAL North Arlington , Virginia, unfurnished room forrent. located near subway and close to Washington, D .C. Rent is $317 per month plus 1/2 of the utilities. Washer and dryer. Available 3/1 5 . Female nonsmoker please. Contact Concha Orozco . Work (202) 371 or Home : (703) 2769546. NATIONAL DIRECTOR Of the 1990 Census Program & STATE COORDINATOR Of the 1990 Census Program National civil rights organization needs to fill two Los Angeles-based positions to develop and coordinate a community education pro gram about the importance of the census. Requirements for California Coordinator: Undergraduate degree, 3-5 years community organizing or related activity, working know ledge of California. Hispanic organization experience in working with local & state policymakers, bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Requirements for National Director. Same as state director but on a national level, graduate degree, preferably a law degree , 5 7 years community organizing, policy making or legal experience . Send resume , a writing sample and a list of three references to: R. Calder6n, Personnel, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles , Calif . 90014 by April10. HIP SEEKS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is a national association of trustees and staff of grant making foundations and corporate contributions programs. Fund-raising and noll-profit administrative experience required. Contact: Mike Cortes, HIP,334 KernySt., San Francisco , California 941 08, (415) 788 2982, before April 1 . ATTORNEY The Father Moriarty Central American Refugee ! Program seeks an attorney for political asylum hearings and related work. Bilingual (Spanish/ English) required. $19,000 full-time equivalent. Send letter of interest and resume to: Job opening, 1 FMCARP, 180 Fair Oaks St. , San Frail" cisco, California 94110 (415) 824. Dead line April 8 . FMCARP is an Affirmative Action Employer . ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE Administrative aide: Computer word proces sing, strong editing skills , type 70 wpm, or ganizational ability , good phone skills, bilingual (English/Spanish) . Salary $18,000-$20,000 plus benefits. Call (202) 783. Tutorial Lab: Responsible for management and operation of lab . Monitors lab budget. HireS/ supervises lab tutors. Plans & conducts seminars & workshops . Knowledge of basic med-surg., pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric nursing theory. Vac . #365. Qualifications: Registered Professional Nurse, licensed in N.Y. Min. of 2 yrs . bedside clinical exp. Knowledge of basic computer skills is desirable. 35 hour work week. Salary: $24,185/ A DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Refer to BMCC Vacancy# above and send resume with cover letter by April1 , 1988, to: Ms . Alyne Holmes Coy, Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College City University of New York 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER /RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED No Phone Calls Hi s panic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES Ordered by Organization Street --------------City, State & Zip (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) . -----------$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment This week, a drama by Mexican contemporary writer Victor Hugo Rascon receives its English -la nguage premiere in San Diego . Voices in the Threshold , translated an d directed by Raul Moncada, will be presented in a workshop production by the Southwestern College Drama Department in association with the Old Globe Theater's Teatro Meta U.S. TEATRO TRAVELS: U .S. Hispanic theater artists continue gaining international recognition-as proven by two recent events : • Miamrs Teatro Avante was one of two theater companies representing the United States at the Second Annual International Festival of Community Theater held last month in Puebla, Mexico . Teatro Avante staged Una caja de zapatos vacia, by Cuban playwright Virgilio Pineira. The drama will be staged at Southwestern's Mayan Hall, March 23 to 26. • New York actress llka Tanya Payan performed La senorita Margarita last month at the Havana International Theatre Festival. The one-woman show , written by Brazilian Robert o Athayde, was translated into Spanish by New York playwright Dolores Prida. A comedy by another contemporary Mexica n playwright continues on stage through this week at L.A.'s Bilingual Foundation of the Arts. Rosa de dos aromas, by Emilio Carballido, closes March 27. In Washington, D.C., one of Spain's most popular comedies ever also completes its run on March 27. GALA Hispan i c Theater staged Jacinto Benaven te's The Bonds of Interest, in English only. Payan performed La senorita Margarita last September at the Festival de Teatro lberoamericano in Cadiz , Spain. The show will travel to Los Angeles this summer for a staging by the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts. Home-grown Hispanic theater is also being produced in the United States. San Antonio's Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center recently presented the Los Ac tores de San Antonio company in Soldierboy, a play by Judith and Severo Perez, directed by Jose Manuel Galvan . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Interest in .the United States in Spanish and Latin American theater is also on the rise. Media Report SUPPORT SOUGHT: The National His panic Media Coalition is sending out a call for Latino organizations to watch and support, through a letter-writing campaign to CBs-TV and Columbia Pictures, the new half-hour television comedy series "Trial and Error ." The series, starring Paul Rodriguez and Eddie Velez as a T-shirt salesman and a young lawyer who live together, debuted March 15. According to Chairman Armando Duron of the Los Ang eles-based coalition, NHMC has reviewed the eight episodes shot so far . "The series portrays the Latino community in a positive light," he says, and it uses Hispanics in significant roles "in front of , as well as behind, the cameras." He adds, "For the first time in television history, a situation comedy series has been produced bilingually" and made available to Spanish-speaking viewers through special HISPANIC Ll N K WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-o280 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector Erickser>-Mendoza Editor. F elix Perez R eporting: Antonio Mej iasRentas, Darryl Figueroa . Graphic s/ P rod u ct i o n : Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $1 08 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word . Displa y ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday wi ll run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. second-language broadcasts. Radio s tations in Chicago, Houston, San Antonio a nd Los Angeles carried the Spanish versions. More are expected to do so. Television reviewers weren't as generous in their reactions to the opening episode as was NHMC. A sampling from two syndicat ed columnists: Tom Shales: "Instead of upgrading the image of Hispanics on the air, 'Trial and Error' comes perilously close to being a Latino 'Amos 'n' Andy.'" Richard Marin: "When ABC scrapped plans a couple of months ago for a series called 'Juarez,' Hispanic-American groups crie d prejudice . Wait till they get a load of ' Tr i al and Error.' Surely this is not the kind of publicity (or entertainment) America's fastest growing minority wants, or needs." Reacting to Shales and Marin , Hispanic Link entertainment cri tic Antonio Mejias Rentas commented , " They're telling us that we ' re offended because it offends them." His reaction to the show? "lfs a typical bland, dumb sitcom . It doesn't matter what the crit i cs say . Like a bad cake, the show will f all by itself. " OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT: The New York chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts & Sciences will present its New York "Image" award for outstanding achiev ement by a Hispanic in broadcasting to Marce lino Miyares, president of Manhattan's Times Square Studios on March 31. Miyares, a Bay of Pigs veteran, produces "Geraldo," with Geraldo Rivera, and " Business This Morn ing," a new financial news program, at the studios, which he acQuired last year. RE-ELECTED : Esther Renteria , president of Renteria Public Relations in Los Angeles, will be in sta lled March 21 for a second term as president of the national Hispanic Public Relations Association. LEADER: WIND/ La Tremendawas reported as Chicago Latinos ' favorite radio station by Hispanic Market Research Feb . 22. With a 26.7% market share, it is the first AM station t o become No.1. WOJD-FM ran second with a 23.7% share . . . Charlie Ericksen (See Guest Column) 6 Hispa n ic Link Weekly Report