Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, March 28, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, March 28, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
In the federal racketeering trial of U.S. Rep. Mario Biaggi of New York, U.S. Attorney Mary Shannon tells the presiding judge that Rep. Robert Garcia, also of New York, accepted bribes from former executives of the Wedtech Corp., a defense contractor. Garcia has not been charged with any crime... The Jesse Jackson campaign for president names New Mexico State Corporation Commissioner Eric Serna as its co-chair for that state.. .Mario Paredes, executive director of the Northwest Center for Hispanics, is among 19 members of a bipartisan presidential commission that observed elections in El Salvador. . . Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode names Socorro Rivera, head of the Borinquen Federal Credit Union there, to the city’s Commission on Human Relations... A San Juan, Puerto Rico,
Superior Court jury finds former police intelligence^ao^rt Rafael Moreno guilty in the 1985 murder of twot&g££?4jj)ci Mf^reWocates at the Cerro Maravilla mountaintop. . . 'jockeys Angel Cordero, Jacinto Vdsquez and Jorge Vel^squroj^'J^^f^^ t0 the Racing Hall of Fame... Nine-year-old BraaKQ*& Latino Agenda Targets Nov. Races and Beyond
With seven months to go before the November presidential elections, some 200 Hispanic elected officials, organization heads, academics, corporate representatives and experts on various topics will gather April 4-6 in Washington, D.C., to shape the National Hispanic Leadership Conference’s fourth quadrennial agenda
The agenda, to be released April, will be formally presented to the eventual Democratic and Republican Party presidential nominees for inclusion in their platforms.
“The intent is not to have them (the candidates) include the Hispanic agenda as an addendum to their platform,’’ said PabloSedillo, conference chairman for this year and director of the Officfe of the Hispanic Secretariat at the U.S. Catholic Conference.
Through the input of the conferees, who are chosen with an eye toward geographic diversity and who represent several Hispanic
Based primarily on nine case studies, a March 10 report by the General Accounting Office found that undocumented workers lower wages and worsen working conditions for legal and native laborers.
The federal watchdog agency qualified its findings, noting that 26 regional studies provided useful data on the subject Still it concluded that low-wage, low-skill laborers-janitors, food processors, agricultural workers - suffered from competition with undocumented workers.
Several studies showed that the wage and benefit battles of increasingly unionized workers were undermined as competition from undocumented workers increased
GAO said the use of undocumenteds willing to work for subminimum wages in restaurants, shoe and garment factories, and auto parts companies lowered the wages of comparable legal and U.S. -born employees. The report also contended that legal workers are unwilling to take some low paying jobs in those areas.
At the same time, it added, their employment indirectly improved opportunities for higher skilled workers by allowing companies
subgroups, the agenda will be shaped by 14 issue committees charged with drafting specific recommendations.
The document will be distributed nationally through the constituencies of the 21 national organizations represented there, as well as to other grass-roots networks.
In answer to the criticism that the agenda will create clutter with other recent ones, Sedillo said, “Ifs important to note that this National Hispanic Leadership Conference has brought in recommendations from the other sumrhits.”
The most recent national Hispanic agenda was released Oct. 21 in Washington, D.C., at a conference chaired by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros. On Oct. 16-18, the Midwest/ Northeast Voter Registration Education Project put out its version in Chicago at its yearly leadership summit.
The effort led by Cisneros, formally called
to keep costs down and expand. Some companies might shut down or move out without access to cheap immigrant labor, the report said.
In a formal reply, the U.S. Labor Department disputed GAO’S conclusions of positive indirect effects, charging the agency with basing its findings on unquantifiable data, including anecdotes. - Darryl Figueroa
Nine Join Override of Veto
Nine of the 11 voting Hispanic congressmen supported the March 22 override of President Reagan’s veto of the Civil Rights Restoration Act. Rep. Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.), the sole voting Republican, supported the veto, while Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) missed the 292 to 133 House vote. Confident that his yes vote was not needed, Martinez kept out-of-town appointments, he said.
The Senate on the same day voted 73 to 24 in favor of the override, which makes anti-discrimination regulations applicable to entire institutions receiving federal funds, rather than just branches.
National Hispanic Agenda ’88, incorporated the bulk of the MNVREP document.
Another initiative seeking to exert influence on the presidential elections is the Southwest-based lmpacto’88. This wide-ranging movement, although not issuing a formal agenda, will attempt to play a brokering role in the elections by mobilizing Latino voters into a
NHLC Agenda Issues
• Civil Rights
• Corporate, Philanthropic Responsibility
• Culture, Language Policy
• Economic Policy
• Education
• Employment
• Foreign Policy/National Security
• Health, Mental Health
• Housing
• Justice 9 Media
• Organized Religion
• Political Empowerment
9 Veterans, Hispanics in the Military
concerted voice, lmpacto’88 is being spearheaded by the Institute for Social Justice in San Bernardino, Calif.
In addition to having NHLCs agenda -themed “Hispanic Issues are America’s Issues? - adopted in principle by the presidential candidates, conferees would like to see the document used as a basis for policy-makers over the next four years.
A group to be selected at the conference will testify before the platform committees of each party at their conventions this summer. Meetings will also be requested with the nominees.
NHLC will issue periodic “report cards” before the election to provide a public measure of the response by the nominees and policymakers to the agenda.
The $100,000 funding for the conference was provided by corporate and foundation contributors. - Felix Perez
Undocumenteds Said to Lower Wages


LA. District Puts Forth Expansive Bilingual Ed. Plan
Offipjals from the Los Angeles Unified SchooH>6ratri8t fele^s^d March 17 the initial steps for an initiative' that would expand and modify the district’s services for limited' English-proficient students.
While increasing the scope of teaching services offered to the students, who number 160,000, the steps also give added flexibility to the teachers and administrators who serve the children.
One proposal offered bilingual programs to pre-kindergarten children. A priority was also placed on the hiring of bilingual teachers for students in kindergarten through third grade. Most of the district’s limited-English-
proficient students are found at this level. Los Angeles? school district serves the nation’s largest population of students who are not fluent in English.
The first four steps of what will be a 10-point plan were presented to the school board. The board will review the proposals over the next five weeks, hold two public hearings and take a final vote May 5.
The proposed expansion of services comes after California Gov. George Deukmejian vetoed an extension of the state’s bilingual education law last July. The blueprint released by Los Angeles school officials goes beyond what the vetoed law mandated.
The districf s proposals also call for a shift from English-as-a-Second-Language courses to relying more heavily on the students native language. Also included was a recommendation to give an extra year to limited-proficient high school students to complete graduation requirements. The plan calls for a change in the number of limited-English-proficient students who must be present before a bilingual program can be offered. Not only would bilingual programs have to be offered if there are more than 10 such students at one grade level but would be required if 15 or more students were in two consecutive levels.
Calif. Law Firms’ Hiring, Promotion Hit
California’s 30 largest law firms were taken to task March 17 by a group led by former state Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso for their failure to hire and promote Latinos.
I n a letter sent to the firms, the San Francisco-based Latino Issues Forum pointed out that
Paddling Suit Remanded
The U.S. Supreme Court let stand March 21 an appeals court ruling that will allow the parents of Teresa Garcia, a New Mexico third-grader, to sue school principal Theresa Miera and other school officials for violating her constitutional rights with severe corporal punishment.
The Miera vs. Garcia case will now go to trial in Santa Fe.
According to the suit, filed in 1982, teacher J.D. S&nchez held then 9-year-old Garcia upside down by the ankles while Miera of the Penasco, N.M., elementary school struck her with a paddle, drawing blood and leaving a permanent scar on her leg.
Puerto Rich’s Primary Held
In Puerto Rico’s March 20 Republican primary, Vice President George Bush captured all 14 delegates as well as the majority of the party’s 3,000 “beauty contest” votes.
In the Democratic non-binding primary, Jesse Jackson won 28% of the vote. Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis came in second, with 22%.
The pro-commonwealth Popular Democratic Party picked up all 33 Democratic delegates. They will remain uncommitted until the island’s Democratic Party convention April 24.
At that time, the 33 elected delegates will select an additional 18. Added to the governor and four senior party officials, they will give Puerto Rico 56 delegates at the Democratic Party’s July 18-21 Atlanta convention.
The local Democratic leader is now PDFs Miguel Hernandez Agosto, who won 56%, or 373,950 votes, against former Governor Carlos Romero Barceld of the pro-statehood New Progressive Party. A total of 671,358 Puerto Ricans voted for delegates while less than 50% cast ballots in the popular contest
Hispanics represented only 0.56% of their 4,305 associates and 2.1% of their 2,999 partners. As of last year, the letter noted, Hispanics accounted for 11 % of the students in the state’s “elite” law schools, including Stanford, UCLA and UC Berkeley's Boalt.
“There is absolutely no relationship between the pool of Hispanics and the numbers being hired,” said John Gamboa, executive director of the Forum.
A common theory given for the scarcity of Latinos and other minorities is their low passing rate on the state bar exam. According to an article in the Stanford Law Review last year, 20% of blacks and 34% of Hispanics passed the bar exam in July 1985.
Gamboadismissed the argument by saying that Hispanics do just as well as whites, 62%, the second time they take the exam.
The Forum circulated the letter to government agencies contemplating doing business with the firms as well as law schools to advise students of where opportunities are available. Included in the letter was a request that the firm with the best hiring and promotion record, Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro, convene a meeting of senior partners at the 30 firms, state bar officials and law school deans. _ p^jX perez
Language Bill Introduced
A bill that would add a referendum to the November ballot in Arizona promoting but not mandating English proficiency isscheduled for a March 24 vote by the state House of Representatives. The bill is in response to a statewide petition drive seeking a constitutional amendment making English the state’s official language.
State Rep. Armando Ruiz (D-Phoenix), who introduced the bill in January, told Weekly Report he has the support of 42 of the 60 House members.
The bill has come to be known as “Arizona English” after a group by that name that organized to counter the “Arizonans for Official English” movement.
The latter group has collected some 50,000 of the 130,048 signatures required by July 7 to get their measure on the November ballot
Legalization Revision’s Usefulness Questioned
To the consternation of several immigration groups and congressmen who seek an extension of the May 4 legalization program deadline, Attorney General Edwin Meese and Alan Nelson, commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, announced March 18 that the deadline would not be moved forward.
INS will, however, accept applications with no documentation beginning April4, allowing an additional 60 days for the supporting forms.
Charles Kamasaki, a legislative analyst with the National Council of La Raza, questioned the usefulness of the revision. He said applicants already receive an additional 30 to 60 days, between filing and interviewing, to furnish required documentation. The only paperwork required with the application, he said, are medical reports.
INS spokesman Duke Austin responded that complete documentation has been required at application time in the past. He added that the bulkof interviews occur on the same day. On March 18 alone, Austin asserted 7,281 of the 9,665 undocumented immigrants who applied Were also granted interviews.
Kamasaki’s contention might be applicable to cases referred by Qualified Designated Entities, but not to INS offices, Austin said I NS surveys i ndicate that 70% of those applying file directly with INS. - Darryl Figueroa
English Classes Funded
California schools will be reimbursed for providing English and citizenship classes to undocumented immigrants in the legalization program, announced State Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig March 15.
Previously, the state? s districts were expected to provide the required classes to program applicants with no certainty of expense reimbursement.
The state will now guarantee payment from $2 billion in federal aid granted the state for three years of legalization program services.
An estimated 550,000 adult immigrants need to take the classes statewide.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Antonio Mejias^Rentas, guest columnist
Miracles Do Happen
Can a non-Hispanic director, with only one prior film to his credit, turn out one of the decade’s most sensitive and richest film portrayals of Hispanic life in the United States?
Miracles do happen, and Robert Radford's “The Milagro Beanfield War" is full of them. The long-awaited film adaptation of John Nichols’ underground classic novel is a wonderfully charming, funny fairy tale that feels like reality.
It is the story of Joe Mondragbn, a handyman in Milagro, New Mexico, who rebels against his forefathers abatement of water rights when he is turned down for work by developers who plan to replace the town with a luxury residential village.
With careful command of the cinematic language, Redford easily establishes a gigantic irony when Mondragbn (Chick Vennera) walks along the flowing water on his way to the chalk-dry beanfield he inherited from his father. Angered by signs warning residents against the use of the water for irrigation, the hero kicks down the control gates, unknowingly letting the water flow down to his beanfield.
The images Redford (and cinematographer Robbie Greenberg) create, of water rushing down and filling up the dry land, are miraculous. From then on, the film leads us through a series of magical events and on to a discovery of the people of the Southwest, who are undaunted by miracles.
ESPARZA DESERVES CREDIT
The director's ease with the subject matter- his careful presentation of the lifestyles and patterns of the New Mexico people- has a major source to credit his co-producer, Moctesuma Esparza
It was Esparza, who produced the outstanding “Ballad of Gregorio Cortez” for director Robert Young, who brought John Nichols’ novel to Redford*s attention.
The acceptance “The Milagro Beanfield War" is likely to have -within and outside the Hispanic community - is to be credited to a group of pioneering Hispanic film makers, among whom Esparza is definitely a leader.
“The Milagro Beanfield War" is not without flaws- and they are the type likely to spark controversy. As with other recent Hispanic film hits, Milagro’s lead character, a Latino, is played by a non-Hispanic actor.
Chick Vennera handles his characterization of Joe Mondragbn beautifully. He is full of the energy and bravado (huevos, as one delightful Anglo character puts it) necessary for the part, but his occasional Spanish is atrocious, a defect he shares with various Hispanic actors in the movie.
The gorgeous Brazilian actress Sonia Braga is equally exciting as Ruby, the town’s mechanic - but once she speaks her lines, the character appears to be down in Bahia
LANGUAGE FLAW UNFORGIVABLE
This is not a forgivable flaw in a film that pays such attention to other details - a two-year production with a multimillion budget.
Two singers with diametrically opposed styles, Freddy Fender and Ruben Blades, are quite in tune with their characters. Fender, a popular Tex-Mex singer, is a natural as Milagro’s mayor; Blades, a Panamanian with a native accent that reveals his salsa background, has created a wonderful characterization (New Mexico accent and all) as the bumbling, yet quite heroic, town sheriff.
Among a wonderful cast with several “name” stars, a virtual unknown stands out effortlessly. Mexican Carlos Riquelme, a 74-year-old veteran of 50 films, is worth the price of admission alone.
This movie lends credence to the old Hollywood axiom that a “superstar'’ of Robert RedforcTs caliber can truly “call the shots.”
Hopefully, it will also give birth to a new axiom that Hollywood should apply to future “Hispanic” productions: a lot of sensitivity, coupled with a lot of Hispanic talent, can go a long way.
Sin Pelos en la lengua
MIAMMN-THE-BARREL: Years back, when print journalism was king, Los Angeles had a reputation as the U.S. city most abused by reporters and authors from elsewhere. Its kooks, weird habits and zany institutions were regular grist for their paper mills.
The writers ran out of insults about the same time that the television tube replaced the front page.
Visual violence became the essential ingredient in news, and the crooks and coke of M iami eventually drew the media spotlight.
The latest voyeur to make Miami squirm in a barrel was CBS’ “48 Hours.” It aired its city tour (shot in December) on March 17 that included the mugging of a pensioner and a firef ight between crack dealers.
Dan Rather was the barker. “Miami today: TV violence and violence that is all too real. Cocaine and commerce...”
Naturally, there was an outcry from the homefolk. The Miami Herald led off its reaction story with an active verb worthy of the CBS script itself:
“They re raping our city,” it quoted one irate citizen.
If the network camera crews had been on hand in mid-March, they could have captured the real Latino contribution to the busy South Florida metropolis.
At the city's 23-block-long annual Calle Ocho Festival on Sunday, March 13, some 199,000 revelers danced into Guinness Book of World Records as the universe’s longest-ever conga line.
Rhapsodized the Herald editorially:
“They were but a few of those attending... Permeati ng the babel of accents native and foreign, the enticing aromas from vendors’ charcoal fires, and the pulsating din from banks of speakers that made each intersection a concert stage was the interethnic conviviality of people simply having a good time...
“Its turnout signifies that Calle Ocho Open House has become the event that is quintessential^ Miami. It is a throbbing mass of energy, a polyglot palette of languages, costumes, foods, customs and music. This festival is unlike anything else in America So is Miami.”
Too bad CBS didn’t wait around. On the other hand, with prose writers like that, who needs cameras?
SPELLING LESSON: The reason most Eastern papers don’t write about Hispanics more often, it’s said, is that they have trouble spelling our names right.
Sin Pelos saw three versions of last week’s story about the 41-year-old New Yorker who was beaten to death by three men and a boy in Spanish Harlem after he snatched a $20 bill from Anna Beterdn, who was about to buy a birthday cake with the money.
The Washington Post identified the victim as Raymondo CARABALLO. USA Today called him CARABELLA. The New York Times identified him as Mr. CARABELL012 times and CARABALLO once.
Only the Times(“AII the News That’s Fit to Print”) mentioned that Anna’s $20 disappeared in the melee and the baker refused to let her have the cake.
POOR PANAMA: The Los Angeles Times has stripped that skinny little county of its last vestige of dignity. On March 20, it reported in large, bold type, “Panama Hats: They re Really From Ecuador..
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
JOHN CHANEY, Temple University basketball coach, commenting in USA Today on his 6-10,250-pound center, Ramon Rivas of Puerto Rico:
“He's our leader on defense... Ramon’s not fast But it takes so long for people to go around him that he makes a lot of quick people slow."
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 28,1988
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
UNDOCUMENTED ALIENS AND WAGES: The U.S. General Accounting Office’s report titled “Illegal Aliens: Influence of Illegal Workers on Wages and Working Conditions of Legal Workers” can be obtained free of charge. For a copy (specify GAO/PEMD-8813BR) contact GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
TEEN-AGE MOTHERHOOD: “Beyond Stereotypes: Who Becomes a Single Teen-Age Mother?” is an 88-page report on the attitudes of unwed teen-age mothers according to race, ethnicity, social background and other factors. For a copy send $4 to: Rand Corporation, Publication Department, 1700 Main St., P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, Calif. 90406-2138(213)451-6913.
YUPPIES, BUPPIESANDCHUPPIES: “Exploring New Dimensions for Segmenting Minority Consumers: Yuppies, Buppies and Chuppies and Intensity of Ethnic Identification” is a 15-page marketing report on how strongly young white, black and Chicano urban professionals identify with theircultures. For a copy send $30 to: Jerome Williams, Assistant Professor of Marketing, 707 Business Administration Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa. 16802.
READING ACHIEVEMENT: “Who Reads Best? Factors Related to Reading Achievement in Grades 3,7 and 11 ” is a 60-page report by the Educational Testing Service which examines the factors that separate proficient and below-average readers. Average reading proficiency is given for Hispanics and other groups. For a copy send $12.50 to: Nation’s Report Card, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710.
AIDS EDUCATION: “Caring forthe Latino AIDS Patient Lessons from a Case History” is a 28-minute video on providing.culturally appropriate care and support services to the Latino AIDS patient To order send $50, plus $5 for shipping and handling, to: Novela Health Foundation, 2524 16th Ave. South, Seattle, Wash. 98144 (206) 325-9897.
N.Y. STATE HOMELESSNESS: “No Time To Lose” is a 27-minute video by the state Department of Social Services on the steps that can be taken to help homeless Hispanic and black children and their families. Included are instructions for individualized plans. To order send $15.95 to: N.Y.S. Department of Social Services, Dept. NTTL, 40 N. Pearl St., Albany, N.Y. 12243.
GROUP TARGETS FOUNDATIONS
Hispanics in Philanthropy, in existence since 1980, seeks to have an executive director by this May to expand its services to include a talent bank and offer advice to Latino grant seekers.
Based in San Francisco, HIP is a voluntary organization of philan-thropical trustees and staff with 55 members. The organization is working on establishing a talent bank that grant givers can tap into when looking for personnel. HIP was created to promote a better understanding of issues that affect Latinos as well as increase the number of Hispanic staff members and trustees of foundations.
For further information contact: HIP, c/o Northern California Grantmakers, 334 Kearny St., San Francisco, Calif. 94108-3205 (415) 788-2982.
AIDS GRANTS AVAILABLE
The New Jersey-based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced this month that it has made available grant support fpr non-profit organizations that can devise projects to prevent the spread of AIDS or improve the delivery of services to individuals infected with AIDS.
Although there are no formal applications, applicants are encouraged to limit their proposals to 15 double-spaced pages. Ten copies of the proposal should be provided. Priority will be given to community-based organizations that have a record of working with affected communities. Application deadline is July 1, 1988.
Proposals should be sent to: Proposal Manager, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, College Road and U.S. Route 1, P.O. Box2316, Princeton, N.J. 08543-2316(609)452-8710. Address questions to Paul Jellinek, Senior Program Officer.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration appointed Manuel Peralta as its associate administrator for management in its Washington, D.C., headquarters. . . Trini Melcher, an accounting professor at California State University at Fullerton and a 1986 graduate of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s Leadership Development Program, gets appointed by U.S. Labor Secretary Ann McLaughlin to a two-year term on the National Child Labor Advisory Committee. . . Jaime Ramon, an expert in national origin discrimination and immigration law, leaves his position as legal adviser to U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos after four years to join a Dallas law firm...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FUND-RAISING DINNERS New York March 28 Washington, D.C. March 30 The National Hispanic Democrats, a group formed to increase Hispanic participation in the electoral process, will host its first two of several planned fund-raising dinners. Democratic National Committee Chairman Paul Kirk will be honored by NHD in New York. U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres of California, NHD co-chair, will be the guest of honor in Washington.
Barbara Leighton (212) 772-7870
AWARDS BANQUET San Francisco March 30
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will hold its annual awards banquet. The event also commemorates the 20th anniversary of the civil rights organization. Ramon Cortines, superintendent of schools for the San Francisco Unified District, will be among those receiving honors.
Joe Ortiz (213) 629-2512
‘ENGLISH ONLY DEBATE Stanford, Calif. March 31
Linda Chavez, president of U.S. English, debates Arnold Torres, former executive director of the Leag ue of United Latin American Citizens, at Stanford University. The Stanford Latino Student Alliance and the school's Speakers Bureau are co-sponsoring the event.
Speakers Bureau (415) 723-4331
COMING SOON
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
The National Hispanic Leadership Conference
Washington, D.C. April 4-6
Joe Trevino (202) 659-0330
ILLITERACY
National SER Jobs for Progress
Chicago April 6-8
Amalia Rochell (214) 631-3999
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
The American Association for Affirmative Action
Denver April 6-9
Judi Burnison (312) 329-2512
HISPANIC MEDIA
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists Dallas April 6-9
Frank Newton (202) 783-6228
IMMIGRATION POLICY The Center for Migration Studies Washington, D.C. April 7, 8 Lydio Tomasi (718) 351 -8800
ANTI-fENGLISH ONLY SYMPOSIUM Arizona English Phoenix, Ariz. April 8 Kathy O’Donnell (602) 256-6745
SPOTLIGHT
BILINGUAL/ESL CONFERENCE: The Fort Worth Independent School District is hosting a North Central Texas “Bilingual/English as a Second Language” conference April 15-16. The agenda will include lectures and workshops on related issues such as: language acquisition, migrant education, parental involvement and teaching strategies There will also be an exhibit featuring bilingual/ESL classroom materials Forfurther information contact Anita Castaheda at (817) 625-7271.
4
March 28,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
County of Santa Clara California
COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SUBSYSTEM DIRECTOR
$52,876-$59,702 Annually plus approximately 7% retirement contribution, performance adjustments available up to $67,469.
Comprehensive Executive Management Benefits Package.
Under the direction of the Director of Mental Health Services, the Community Mental Health Subsystem Director is responsible for planning, directing, administering and coordinating the program activities of the Community Mental Health Subsystem.
Qualifications: Possession of a license issued by the State of California as a Psychologist Clinical Social Worker, Psychiatric Nurse or Marriage, Family, Child Counselor AND 5 years experience providing professional mental health care, 2 years of which was in a responsible management or administrative capacity related to Community Mental Health.
Apply: County of Santa Clara, Personnel Department, 70 W. Hedding St., San Jose, California 95110. Telephone: (408) 299-4355.
Closing Date: Open - anticipate closing mid-April 1988.
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
NATIONAL DIRECTOR Of the 1990 Census Program &
STATE COORDINATOR
Of the 1990 Census Program
National civil rights organization needs to fill two Los Angeles* based positions to develop and coordinate a community education pro* gram about the importance of the census.
Requirements for California Coordinator. Undergraduate degree, 3-5 years community organizing or related activity, working know* ledge of California Hispanic organization experience in working with local & state policymakers, bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Requirements for National Director Same as state director but on a national level, graduate degree, preferably a law degree, 5-7 years community organizing, policy making or legal experience.
Send resume, a writing sample and a list of three references to: R. Calderdn, Personnel, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by April 10.
ATTORNEY
WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY
Counselor II. Appointment to begin Fall 1988. Center for Chicano-Boricua Studies (CBS), College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs. Duties include recruitment and counseling of Hispanic students, working with students to develop study skills, and assisting the Director in liaison with the Hispanic community in Southeastern Michigan.
Master's degree preferred in English, Psychology, Education, or Guidance and Counseling. Bilingual, bicultural skills (Spanish and English) highly desired; prior work experience with Hispanic students preferred. Annual salary $19,000 to$25,000, depending on candidate's qualifications and experience.
Send vitae, including three letters of reference, to: Center for Chicano-Boricua Studies (CBS), Wayne State University, 6001 Cass Avenue, Room 311, Detroit, Ml 48202. Info: J. Tapia-Videla, (313) 577-4379.
Preference will be given to candidates applying before April 30,1988.
Wayne State is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
The Father Moriarty Central American Refugee Program seeks an attorney for political asylum hearings and related work Bilingual (Spanish/ English) required. $19,000 full-time equivalent.
Send letter of interest and resume to: Job opening, ,FMCARP, 180 Fair Oaks St, San Frarv cisco, California 94110 (415) 824-1830. Deadline April 8.
FMCARP is an Affirmative Action Employer.
DIRECTOR, OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION
Rio Hondo College, California Exciting opportunity to develop linkages with business and industry, assess training needs, develop and implement innovative programs. For information and application, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington, D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
HIP SEEKS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is a national association of trustees and staff of grant-making foundations and corporate contributions programs Fund-raising and non-profit administrative experience required.
Contact: Mike Cortes, HIP, 334 Kearny St., San Francisco, California 94108-3205,(415) 788-2982, before April 1.
NATIONAL RADIO SALES Hispanic Radio Network Hot new national Spanish radio syndication service seeks independent sales agent for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Texas. Call(505) 984-0080.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Ordered by ______________________________
Organization_____________________â– _______
Street___________________________________
City, State & Zip_________________________
Area Code & Phone_________________________
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
FROM THE ARTS FILE: A new wing at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M., to highlight Hispanic art, is set to open in the spring of 1989.
The Hispanic Heritage Wing will feature some of the world's finest Hispanic colonial folk art from the museum’s own collection, as well as changing exhibitions of traditional Hispanic arts.
Next summer, prior to its official opening, the wing will house the traveling exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors The show’s stay in New Mexico, July 31 to Nov. 27, follows its engagement in South Florida.
Hispanic Art will be seen at the University of Miamfs Lowe Art Museum in Coral Gables, April 7 to June 30.
The long-awaited plans for another national Latino art show were announced earlier this month by the Adolph Coors Company.
The 1988-89 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour is set to open on Cinco de Mayo at the Mexican Cultural Institute in San Antonio. The juried exhibition, subtitled Expresiones Hispanas, is set to visit Los Angeles and Arvada, Colo., this year. Locations for the
1989 tour have yet to be announced.
Fifty works of art- chosen from some 3,000 entries- are included in Expresiones Hispanas The show’s three top winners, announced with the tour’s schedule, are painters born outside the continental United States: Cuba’s Rafael Soriano, Puerto Rico’s Bibiana M. Suarez and Mexico’s Alfredo Arreguln.
Other dates for Hispanic art around the country include:
• New Mexican artist Malaquias Montoya’s solo exhibit, Art in Politics at the Galeria Sin Fronteras in Austin, runs through April 8.
• Francisco Alvarado Juarez: Native Stranger, a show of works done by the Honduran artist in the United States, at The Art Gallery of the University of Maryland at College Park, will be shown through April 22.
• At New York’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Rooted Visions: Mexican Art Today, a showing by 12 artists living and working in Mexico, shows through May 8.
And south of the border, the 88th birthday of one of Mexico’s foremost painters, Rufino Tamayo, is being celebrated this year with major exhibits at the country’s two most prominent museums - the Rufino Tamayo Museum and the Museum of the Palacio de Bellas . Artes - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
BLACK JOURNALISTS PROTEST: The National Association of Black Journalists staged a press conference in New York City March 18, calling on the nation’s newspapers to double their number of black reporters by the year 1991.
Presently, blacks make up 3.5% of reporters and editors working in the daily press and 12% of the U.S. population, NABJ said.
Hispanics, who comprise 8.8% of the country s population, made up 1.7% of the newspersons working for daily papers in 1986, according to an annual survey by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. It will be releasing figures for 1987 at its convention next month.
NABJ spokesman Dwayne Wickham, a Gannett News Service columnist, told New York reporters that the organization hopes to negotiate with the industry to accomplish the increase, but will consider taking legal action
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
against newspapers with particularly poor hiring records.
Francisco Newton, executive director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, told Weekly Report that he was unaware of the press conference. “I wish we had known. Our two vice presidents are in New York. I feel we could have contributed and made known some of the perspectives we share with black journalists,” he said.
LETRAS DE ORO: Awards of $2,500 each were presented to winners of the 1988 Letras de Oro Spanish-language literary competition March 17 in Miami.
This year’s victors included:
Novel: Ana Maria Delgado, Guayama, Puerto Rico; Poetry: Ximena Allen-Fischer, Gainesville, Fla; Drama: Francisco Ruiz-Ramon, Nashville, Tenn.; Essay: Victor Fuentes, Santa Barbara Calif.; Short story. Manuel Serpa, Miami; Translation (Spanish-language novel into English): Sylvia Lipp, U.S. citizen living in Canada.
Cuba-born Serpa, 47, came to the United States in the Mariel boatlift in 1980. Now living in Miami, he supports himself as a parking lot attendant and commercial illustrator while writing several hours daily. Most of the stories in his winning collection were written here.
The competition, in its third year, is sponsored by the University of Miami and American Express to encourage Spanish-language writers in the United States.
There were 371 entries this year. Writers in Florida submitted 79; New York 53, California 35, Puerto Rico 28, and 12 each from Texas and New Jersey. Winners’ works will be published by Salvat America, a U.S. subsidiary of a Spanish publisher.
ELSEWHERE: California’s Santa Barbara-based Hispanic Business magazine has announced that it will be conducting its first National Hispanic Market Trade Show & Media Expo in New York City Nov. 15-18...
- Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week In the federal racketeering trial of U.S . Rep . Mario Biaggi of New York, U . S . Attorney Mary Shannon tells the presiding j udge that Rep. Robert Garcia, also of New York , accepted bribes from former executives of the Wedtech Corp., a defense contractor. Garcia has not been charged with any crime ... The Jesse Jackson campaign for president names New Mexico State Corporation Commissioner Eric Serna as its co-chair for that state ... Mario Paredes, executive d i rector of the Northwest Center for Hispanics , is among 19 members of a bipartisan presidential comm i ssion that observed elections in El Salvador. . . Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode names Socorro Rivera, head of the Borinquen Federal Credit Union there, to the city's Commission on Human Relations ... A San Juan , Puerto Rico , Superior Court jury finds former police Rafael Moreno guilty in the 1 985 murder of two tes at the Cerro Maravilla mountaintop . . . Angel Cordero, Jacinto Vasquez and Jorge to th e Racing Hall of Fame . . . Nine-year-old Bracl'f#frt! orre'a a nd his f a ther, Robert, of El Segundo , Calif . , return from a two-we ek trip to the Soviet Union after an " ambassadorial visif' fund ed by Sov i et offici a l s ... . Carlos Romero-Garcia, a resident of Wat so nvill e, Ca lif., b ecomes the oldest applicant for legalization at 101 years o f age . .. Four N e w York Hispanics, including a 14-yearold , are charged w i t h m ansla ughter in the beating death of Raymondo Carabello, 4 1 . T h e suspects, none of whom had criminal records , and si x to e i g h t other people chased down Carabello after a woman shouted t ha t he h a d ta ke n $20 from her ... •• , .... 13, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Latino Agenda Targets Nov. Races and B eyon d With seven months to go before the Novem ber presidential elections, some 200 Hispanic elected officials , organization heads, aca demics, corporate representatives and experts on various topics will gather April 4 in Washington , D.C., to shape the National His panic Leadership Conference's fourth quad rennial agenda. The agenda , to be released April, will be fo r mafly presented to the eventual Democratic and Republican Party presidential nominees for inclusion in their platforms . " The intent is not to have them (the candi dates) include the Hispanic agenda as an addendum to their platform,'' said Pablo Sedillo , conference chairman for this year and director of the Office of the Hispanic Secretariat at the U.S. Catholic Con f erence. Through the input of the conferees, who are chosen with an eye toward geographic diversity and who represent several Hispanic subgroups, the agenda will be shaped by 14 issue committees charged with drafting spe cific recommendations. The document will be distributed nationally through the constituencies of the 21 nat i onal organizations represented there, as well as to other grass-roots networks . In answer to the criticism that the agenda will create clutter with other recent ones, Sedillo said, "It's important to note that this National Hispanic Leadership Conference has brought in recommendations from the other summits. " The most recent national Hispanic agenda was released Oct. 21 in Washington, D.C. , at a conference chaired by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros . On Oct. 16, the M i dwesV Northeast Voter Registration Education Pro ject put out its version in Chicago at its yearly leadership summit. The effort led by Cisneros, formally called Undocumenteds Said to Lower Wages Based primarily on nine case studies, a March 10 report by the General Accounting Office found that undocumented workers lower wages and worsen working conditions for legal and native laborers . The federal watchdog agency qualified its findings , noting that 26 regional studies pro vided useful data on the subject. Still it concluded that low-wage , low-sk ill laborersjanitors, food processors , agricultural workers -suffered from competition with undocumen ted workers. Several studies showed that the wage and benefit battles of increasingly unionized workers were undermined as competition from undocumented workers increased. GAO said the use of undocumenteds willing to wo r k for subminimum wages in restaurants , shoe and garment factories , and auto parts companies lowered the wages of comparable legal and U . S . born employees. The report also contended that legal workers are unwilling to t a ke some low pay i ng jobs in those areas . At the same time, it added, their employ ment indirectly improved opportunities for higher skilled workers by allowing companies to keep costs down and e x pand . Some companies might shut down or move out without access to cheap i mmigrant labor, the report said. In a formal reply , the U.S. Labor Depart ment disputed GAO's conclusions of positive indirect effects, charging the agency with bas i ng its findings on unquantifiable data, includ i ng anecdotes. -Darryl Figueroa Nine Join Override of Veto Nine of the 11 voting Hispanic congressmen supported the March 22 override of President Reagan ' s veto of the Civil Rights Restoration Act. Rep. Manuel Lujan (RN . M .), the sole voting Republican, supported the veto , while Rep . Matthew Martinez (DCalif.) missed the 292 to 133 House vote . Confident that his yes vote was not needed, Martinez kept outoftown appointments, he said . The Senate on the same day voted 73 to 24 in favor of the override, which makes anti discrimination regulations applicable to entire institutions receiving federal funds, rather than just branches . National Hispani c Agend a ' 88, in corpo ra t e d the bulk of the MNVREP d oc u ment. Another initiative seeking t o e x ert inf lu e nce on the presidential ele ct io ns i s the So u t hwest based lmpacto '88. This w i de-r an ging move ment , although not is s uin g a fo rma l agenda, will attempt to play a brokeri ng role in the elections by mobili z ing Latino voters into a NHLC Agenda Issues • Civil Rights • Corporate, P h ilanthropic Responsibility • Culture, Language Polic y • Economic Policy • Education • Employment • Foreign Policy/Nations! Security • Health, Mental Health • Housing • Justice • Media • Organized Religion • Political Empowerment • Veterans, Hispanics in the Military concerted voice . lmpac t o '8 8 is being spear headed by the Institute fo r Social Justice in San Bernardino , Calif. In addition to havin g NHLC's age nda themed " Hispan i c Issu e s are America ' s I s s u es" adopted in principle b y the presidenti al candidates, conferees wou l d lik e to s e e the document used as a b asis for po l icy makers over the ne x t four years . A group to be sele cted at th e c o nference will testify before the pl atform comm ittees of each party at their conve n t i o n s t hi s s u m mer. Meetings will also b e requested w i t h th e nominees. NHLC will i ssue p e riodic "report c ards " before the election to pr ovid e a pu blic m ea sure of the response by t h e nom inees a nd p ol icy makers to the agend a . The $100,000 fundin g for the c o nfe renc e was provided by corporate a n d fou nd a ti o n contributors. F e li x Per e z

PAGE 2

Puts Forth Expansive Bilingual Ed. Plan from the Los Angeles Unified March 17 the initial steps for an that would expand and modify the districfs services for limited English-proficient students. While increasing the scope of teaching services offered to the students, who number 160,000, the steps also give added flexibility to the teachers and administrators who serve the children. One proposal offered bilingual programs to pre-kindergarten children . A priority was also placed on the hiring of bilingual teachers for students in kindergarten through third grade. Most of the districfs limited-Englishproficient students are found at this level. Los Angeles' school district serves the nation's largest population of students who are not fluent in English. The first four steps of what will be a 1 0 point plan were presented to the school board. The board will review the proposals over the next five weeks, hold two public hearings and take a final vote May 5 . The proposed expansion of services comes after California Gov. George Deukmejian vetoed an extension of the state's bilingual education law last July. The blueprint released by Los Angeles school officials goes beyond what the vetoed law mandated . Calif. Law Firms' Hiring, Promotion Hit California's 3D largest law firms were taken to task March 17 by a group led by former state Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso for their failure to hire and promote Latinos. In a letter sent to the firms, the San Francisco based Latino Issues Forum pointed out that Paddling Suit Remanded The U.S . Supreme Court let stand March 21 an appeals court ruling that will allow the parents of Teresa Garcia, a New Mexico third-grader, to sue school principal Theresa Miera and other school officials for violating her constitutional rights with severe corporal punishment. The Miera vs . Garcia case will now go to trial in Santa Fe. According to the suit, filed in 1982, teacher J .D. Sanchez held then 9-yearold Garcia upside down by the ankles while Miera of the Penasco, N.M. , elementary school struck her with a paddle, drawing blood and leaving a permanent scar on her leg. Puerto Rico's Primary Held In Puerto Rico's March 20 Republican pri mary, Vice President George Bush captured all 14 delegates as well as the majority of the party's 3,000 "beauty contesf' votes. In the Democratic non-binding primary, Jesse Jackson won 28% of the vote. Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis came in second, with 22%. The pro-commonwealth Popular Democratic Party picked up all 33 Democratic delegates. They will remain uncommitted until the islands Democratic Party convention April 24. At that time, the 33 elected delegates will select an additional18. Added to the governor and four senior party officials, they will give Puerto Rico 56 delegates at the Democratic Party's July 18 Atlanta convention. The local Democratic leader is now PDP's Miguel Hernandez Agosto, who won 56%, or 373,950 votes, against former Governor Carlos Romero Barcel6 of the pro-statehood New Progressive Party. A total of 671,358 Puerto Ricans voted for delegates while less than 50% cast ballots in the popular contest. 2 Hispanics represented only 0 . 56% of their 4,305 associates and 2.1% of their 2,999 partners. As of last year, the letter noted , Hispanics accounted for 11% of the students in the state ' s "elite" law schools, including Stanford, UCLA and UC Berkeley's Boalt. "There is absolutely no relationship between the pool of Hispanics and the numbers being hired," said John Gamboa, executive director of the Forum . A common theory given for the scarcity of Latinos and other minorities is their low passing rate on the state bar exam . According to an article in the Stanford Law Review last year, 20% of blacks and 34% of Hispanics passed the bar exam in July 1985. Gamboa dismissed the argument by saying that Hispanics do just as well as whites , 62%, the second time they take the exam. The Forum circulated the letter to govern ment agencies contemplating doing business with the firms as well as law schools to advise students of where opportunities are available . Included in the letter was a request that the firm with the best hiring and promotion record, Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro, convene a meeting of senior partners at the 30 firms, state bar officials and law school deans.Felix Perez Language Bill Introduced A bill that would add a referendum to the November ballot in Arizona promoting but not mandating English proficiency is scheduled for a March 24 vote by the state House of Representatives. The bill is in response to a statewide petition drive seeking a constitutional amendment making English the state's official language. State Rep . Armando Ruiz ( D-Phoenix), who introduced the bill in January, told Weekly Report he has the support of 42 of the 60 House members. The bill has come to be known as" Arizona English" after a group by that name that organized to counter the" Arizonans for Official English" movement. The latter group has collected some 50,000 of the 130,048 signatures required by July 7 to get their measure on the November ballot. The districfs proposals also call for a shift from English-as-a-Second-Language courses to relying more heavily on the studenfs native language. Also included was a re commendation to give an extra year to limited-proficient high school students to complete graduation requirements. The plan calls for a change in the number of limited-English-proficient students who must be present before a bilingual program can be offered. Not only would bilingual programs have to be offered if there are more than 1 0 such students at one grade level but would be required if 15 or more students were in two consecutive levels. Legalization Revision's Usefulness Questioned To the consternation of several immigration groups and congressmen who seek an ex tension of the May 4 legalization program deadline, Attorney General Edwin Meese and Alan Nelson, commissioner of the U.S. lmmi gration and Naturalization Service, announced March 18 that the deadline would not be moved forward . INS will, however, accept applications with no documentation beginning April4, allowing an additional 60 days for the supporting forms . Charles Kamasaki , a legislative analyst with the National Council of La Raza, questioned the usefulness of the revision. He said applicants already receive an additional 30 to 60 days, between filing and interviewing, to furnish required documentation. The only paperwork required with the application, he said, are medical reports . INS spokesman Duke Austin responded that complete documentation has been re quired at application time in the past. He added that the bulk of interviewsoccuronthe same day . On March 18 alone, Austin asserted, 7,281 of the 9,665 undocumented immigrants who applied v.lere also granted interviews. Kamasaki's contention might be applicable to cases referred by Qualified Designated Entities, but not to INS offices, Austin said INS surveys indicate that 70% pf those applying file directly with INS. -Darryl Figueroa English Classes Funded California schools will be reimbursed for providing English and citizenship classes to undocumented immigrants in the legalization program, announced State Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig March 15. Previously, the state's districts were expected to provide the required classes to program applicants with no certainty of expense re imbursement. The state will now guarantee payment from $2 billion in federal aid granted the state for three years of legalization program services. An estimated 550,000 adult immigrants need to take the classes statewide. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Anton io Mejias-Rentas, guest columnist Miracles Do Happen Can a non-Hispanic director, with only one prior film to his credit , turn out one of the decade's must sensitive and richest film portrayals of Hispanic life in the United States? Miracles do happen, and Robert Redforcfs"The Milagro Beanfield War" is full of them. The long-awaited film adaptation of John Nichols' underground classic novel is a wonderfully charming, funny fairy tale that feels like reality. It is the story of Joe Mondragon, a handyman in Milagro, New Mexico, who rebels against his forefathers abatement of water rights when he is turned down for work by developers who plan to re the town with a luxury residential With careful command of the cinematic language, Redford easily establishes a gi gantic irony when Mondragon (Chick Vennera) walks along the flowing water on his way to the chalk-dry beanfield he inherited from his father. Angered by signs warning residents against the use of the water for irrigation, the hero kicks down the control gates, unknowingly letting the water flow down to his beanfield. The images Redford (and cinematographer Robbie Greenberg) create, of water rushing down and filling up the dry land, are miraculous . From then on , the film leads us through a series of magical events and on to a discovery of the people of the Southwest, who are undaunted by miracles . ESPARZA DESERVES CREDIT The director's ease with the subject matter-his careful presentation of the lifestyles and patterns of the New Mexico peoplehas a major source to credit: his co-producer, Moctesuma Esparza . It was Esparza, who produced the outstanding" Ballad of Gregorio Cortez " for director Robert Young, who brought John Nichols' novel to Redforcfs attention. The acceptance "The Milagro Beanfield War'' is likely to havewithin and outside the Hispanic community-is to be credited to a group of pioneering Hispanic film makers , among whom Esparza is definitely a leader. " The Milagro Beanfield War'' is not without flawsand they are the type likely to spark controversy. As with other recent Hispanic film hits , Milagro's lead character, a Latino, is played by a non-Hispanic actor. Chick Vennera handles his characterization of Joe Mondragon beautifully. He is full of the energy and bravado (huevos, as one delightful Anglo character puts it) necessary for the part, but his occasional Spanish is atrocious, a defect he shares with various Hispanic actors in the movie . The gorgeous Brazilian actress Sonia Braga is equally exciting as Ruby , the town's mechanic-but once she speaks her lines, the character appears to be down in Bahia. LANGUAGE FLAW UNFORGIVABLE This is not a forgivable flaw in a film that pays such attention to other detailsa two-year production with a multimillion budget. Sin Pelos en Ia lengua MIAMI-IN-THE-BARREL: Years back, when print journalism was king, Los Angeles had a reputation as the U .S. city most abused by reporters and authors from elsewhere. Its kooks, weird habits and zany institutions were regular grist for their paper mills. The writers ran out of insults about the same time that the television tube replaced the front page. Visual violence became the essential ingredient in news, and the crooks and coke of Miami eventually drew the media spotlight. The latest voyeur to make Miami squirm in a barrel was CBS' "48 Hours." It aired its city tour(shot in December) on March 17 that included the mugging of a pe'nSioner and a firefight between crack dealers. Dan Rather was the barker. "Miami today: TV violence and violence that is all too real. Cocaine and commerce ... " Naturally, there was an outcry from the homefolk The Miami Herald led off its reaction story with an active verb worthy of the CBS script itself: "They're raping our city," it quoted one irate citizen. If the network camera crews had been on hand in mid-March , they could have captured the real Latino contribution to the busy South Florida metropolis. At the city's 23-block-long annual Calle Ocho Festival on Sunday, March 13, some 199,000 revelers danced into Guinness Book of World Records as the universe's longest-ever conga line . Rhapsodized the Herald editorially: "They were but a few of those attending ... Permeating the babel of accents native and foreign, the enticing aromas from vendors' charcoal fires, and the pulsating din from banks of speakers that made each intersection a concert stage was the interethnic conviviality of people simply having a good time ... "Its turnout signifies that Calle Ocho Open House has become the event that is quintessentially Miami . It is a throbbing mass of energy, a polyglot palette of languages, costumes, foods , customs and music . This festival is unlike anything else in America So is Miami." Too bad CBS didn't wait around . On the other hand, with prose writers like that, who needs cameras? SPELLING LESSON: The reason most Eastern papers don't write about Hispanics more often, ifs said, is that they have trouble spelling our names right . Sin Pelos saw three versions of last week's story about the 41year-old NewYorkerwho was beaten to death by three men and a boy in Spanish Harlem after he snatched a $20 bill from Anna Beteran, who was about to buy a birthday cake with the money. The Washington Post identified the victim as Raymondo CARA BALLO. USA Today called him CARABELLA. The New York Times identified him as Mr. CARABELLO 12 times and CARABALLO once. Only the Times( " All the News That ' s FittoPrinf' ) men1ionedthat Anna ' s $20 disappeared in the melee and the baker refused to let her have the cake . POOR PANAMA: The Los Angeles Times has stripped that skinny little county of its last vestige of dignity. On March 20, it reported in large, bold type," Panama Hats: They're Really From Ecuador ... " Two singers with diametrically opposed styles, Freddy Fender and Ruben Blades , are quite in tune with their characters. Fender, a popular Tex-Mex singer, is a natural as Milagro' s mayor, Blades, a Panamanian with a native accent that reveals his sa/sa background, •---------------------K•a•y•B•a•r•b•a•ro...l has c reated a wonderful characterization (New Mexico accent and all) as the bumbling, yet quite heroic , town sheriff. Among a wonderful cast with several "name" stars , a virtual unknown stands out effortlessly. Mexican Carlos Riquelme, a 74yea r-old veteran of 50 films , is worth the price of admission alone. This movie lends credence to the old Hollywood axiom that a "superstar" of Robert Redforcfs caliber can truly "call the shots." Hopefully, it will also give birth to a new axiom that Hollywood s h ou ld apply to future "Hispanic" productions: a lot of sensitivity, coupled with a lot of Hispanic talent, can go a long way. Quoting. • • JOHN CHANEY, Temple University basketball coach, commenting in USA Today on his 6-10, 250-pound center, Ramon Rivas of Puerto Rico : "He's our leader on defense ... Ramon's not fast. But i . t takes so long for people to go around him that he makes a lot of quick people slow." H is pani c Link Weekly Report March 28, 1988 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING UNDOCUMENTED ALIENS AND WAGES: The U.S. General Accounting Office's report titled "Illegal Aliens: Influence of Illegal Workers on Wages and Working Conditions of Legal Workers" can be obtained free of charge. For a copy (specify GAO/PEMD-8813 BR) contact: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg Md. 20877 (202) 2756241 . ' TEEN-AGE MOTHERHOOD: "Beyond Stereotypes: Who Becomes a Single Teen-Age Mother?" is an 88-page report on the attitudes of unwed teen-age mothers according to race, ethnicity, social back ground and other factors. For a copy send $4 to: Rand Corporation, Publication Department, 1700 Main St., P .O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, Calif. 90406-2138 (213) 451-6913. YUPPIES, BUPPIESAND CHUPPIES: "Exploring New Dimensions for Segmenting Minority Consumers: Yuppies, Buppies and Chuppies and Intensity of Ethnic Identification" is a 15-page marketing report on how strongly young white , black and Chicano urban professionals identify with their cultures . For a copy send $30 to: Jerome Williams, Assistant Professor of Marketing, 707 Business Administration Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa. 16802. READING ACHIEVEMENT: "Who Reads Best? Factors Related to Reading Achievement in Grades 3, 7 and 11" is a 60-page report by the Educational Testing Service which examines the factors that separate proficient and below-average readers . Average reading proficiency is given for Hispanics and other groups. For a copy send $12.50 to : Nation's Report Card, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710. AIDS EDUCATION: "Caring for the Latino AIDS Patient: Lessons from a Case History'' is a 28-minute video on providin! h CUiturally appropriate care and support services to the Latino AIDS patient. To order send $50, plus$5 for shipping and handling, to: Nove Ia Health Foundation , 2524 16th Ave. South, Seattle, Wash. 98144 (206) 325-9897. N.Y. STATE HOMELESSNESS: "No Time To Lose" is a 27-minute video by the state Department of Social Services on the steps that can be taken to help homeless Hispanic and black children and their families. Included are instructions for individualized plans. To order send $15.95 to: N.Y.S. Department of Social Services, Dept. NTIL, 40 N . Pearl St., Albany, N.Y. 12243. CONNECTING GROUP TARGETS FOUNDATIONS Hispanics in Philanthropy, in existence since 1980, seeks to have an executive director by this May to expand its services to include a talent bank and offer advice to Latino grant seekers . Based in San Francisco, HIP is a voluntary organization of philan thropical trustees and staff with 55 members. The organization is working on establishing a talent bank that grant givers can tap into when looking for personnel . HIP was created to promote a better understanding of issues that affect Latinos as well as increase the number of Hispanic staff members and trustees of foundations. For further information contact: HIP, c/o Northern California Grant makers, 334 Kearny St., San Francisco, Calif. 941 08-3205 (415) 788-2982. AIDS GRANTS AVAILABLE The New Jersey-based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced this month that it has made available grant support for non-profit organizations that can devise projects to prevent the spread of AI OS or improve the delivery of services to individuals infected with AIDS. Although there are no formal applications, applicants are encouraged to limit their proposals to 15 double-spaced pages. Ten copies of the proposal should be provided . Priority will be given to community based organizations that have a record of working with affected communities. Application deadline is July 1 , 1988. Proposals should be sent to: Proposal Manager, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, College Road and U.S. Route 1, P.O. Box 2316, Princeton, N . J . 08543-2316 (609) 452-8710. Address questions to Paul Jellinek, Senior Program Officer . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The National Aeronautics and Space Administration appointed Manuel Peralta as its associate administrator for management in its Washington , D.C. , headquarters . . . Trini Melcher, an accounting professor at California State University at Fullerton and a 1986 graduate of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund's Leadership Development Program, gets appointed by U.S. Labor Secretary Ann Mclaughlin to a two-year term on the National Child Labor Advisory Committee. . . Jaime Ramon, an expert in national origin discrimination and immigration law, leaves his position as legal adviser to U . S . Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos after four years to join a Dallas law firm ... Calendar Joe Ortiz (213) 629-2512 'ENGLISH ONLY' DEBATE Stanford, Calif. March 31 HISPANIC MEDIA The National Association of Hispanic Journalists Dallas April6 Frank Newton (202) 783-6228 THIS WEEK FUIIID-RAISING DINNERS New York March 28 Washington , D.C. March 30 The National Hispanic Democrats, a group formed to increase Hispanic participation in the electoral process , will host its first two of several planned fund-raising dinners. Democratic National Committee Chairman Paul Kirk will be honored by NHD in New York . U .S. Rep. Esteban Torres of California, NHD co-chair, will be the guest of honor in Wash ington. Barbara Leighton (212) 772-7870 AWARDS BANQUET San Francisco March 30 The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational -Fund will hold its annual awards banquet. The event also commemorates the 20th anniversary of the civil rights organization. Ramon Cortines, super intendent of schools for the San Francisco Unified District, will be among those receiving honors . 4 Linda Chavez, president of U.S. English, debates Arnold Torres, former executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens, at Stanford versity. The Stanford Latino Student Alliance and the school's Speakers Bureau are co-sponsoring the event. Speakers Bureau (415) 723-4331 COMING SOON LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE The National Hispanic Leadership Conference Washington, D.C. April 4 Joe Trevino (202) 659 ILLITERACY National SER Jobs for Progress Chicago April 6-8 Amalia Rochell (214) 631 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION The American Association for Affirmative Action Denver April 6 Judi Burnison (312) 329 March 28, 1988 IMMIGRATION POLICY The Center for Migration Studies Washington, D.C. April 7, 8 Lydio Tomasi (718) 351 ANTI'.ENGLISH ONLY' SYMPOSIUM Arizona English Phoenix, Ariz . AprilS Kathy O'Donnell (602) 256 SPOTLIGHT BILINGUALJESL CONFERENCE: The Fort Worth ll)dependent School District is hosting a North Central Texas"Bilinguai/English as a Second Language" conference April 15. The agenda will include lectures and workshops on related issues such as: language acquisition, migrant edu cation, parental involvement and teaching strategies There will also be an exhibit featuring bilinguai/ESL classroom materials. For further information contact Anita Castaneda at (817) 625. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS County of Santa Clara California COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SUBSYSTEM DIRECTOR $52,876-$59,702 Annually plus approximately?% retirement contribution, performance adjustments available up to $67,469. Comprehensive Executive Management Benefits Package. Under the direction of the Director of Mental Health Services, the Community Mental Health Subsystem Director is responsible for planning , directing, administering and coordinating the program activities of the Community Mental Health Subsystem. Qualifications: Possession of a license issued by the State of California as a Psychologist , Clinical Social Worker , Psychiatric Nurse or Marriage , Family , Child Counselor AND 5 years experience providing professional mental health care , 2 years of which was in a responsible management or administrative capacity related to Community Mental Health. Apply: County of Santa Clara , Personnel Department, 70 W . Hedding St. , San Jose, California 95110. Telephone : (408) 299-4355. Closing Date : Open anticipate closing mid-April 1988. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY Counselor II. Appointment to begin Fall 1988. Center for Chicano-Boricua Studies (CBS), College of Urban , Labor and Metropolitan Affairs . Duties include recruitment and counseling of Hispanic students, working with students to develop study skills, and assisting the Director in l i aison with the Hispanic community in Southeastern Michigan. Maste(s degree preferred in English , Psychology, Education, or Guidance and Counseling. Bilingual , bicultural skills(Spanish and English) highly desired ; prior work experience with Hispanic students preferred . Annual salary$19,000 to$25,000, depending on candidate's qualifications and experience. Send vitae, including three letters of reference, to: Center for Chicano-Boricua Studies (CBS) , Wayne State University, 6001 Cass Avenue , Room 311, Detroit, Ml48202. Info: J . Tapia-Videla, (313) 577-4379. Preference will be given to candidates applying before April 30, 1988. Wayne State is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. NATIONAL DIRECTOR Of the 1990 Census Program & STATE COORDINATOR Of the 1990 Census Program National civil rights organization needs to fill two Los Angeles-based positions to develop and coordinate a community education pro gram about the importance of the census. Requirements for California Coordinator: Undergraduate degree, 3-5 years community organizing or related activity, working know ledge of California. Hispanic organization experience in working with local & state policymakers , bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred . Requirements for National Director. Same as state director but on a national level, graduate degree, preferably a law degree, 5-7 years community organizing , policy making or legal experience . Send resume, a writing sample and a list of three references to: R. Calder6n, Personnel , MALDEF , 634 S . Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles , Calif . 90014 by April10. ATTORNEY The Father Moriarty Central American Refugee Program seeks an attorney for political asylum hearings and related work. Bilingual (Spanish/ English) required . $19,000 full-time equivalent. Send letter of interest and resume to: Job opening, . FMCARP , 180 Fair Oaks St, San Fral) cisco, California 94110 (415) 824-1830. Dead line April 8 . FMCARP is an Affirmative Action Employer . DIRECTOR, OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION Rio Hondo College, California Exciting opportunity to develop linkages with business and industry , assess training needs , develop and implement innovative programs. For information and application , call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309. ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington, D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737. HIP SEEKS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is a national association of trustees and staffofgrant-making foundations and corporate contributions programs. Fund-raising and non-profit administrative experience required . Contact: Mike Cortes, HIP, 334 KearnySt., San Francisco, California 941 08-3205, (415) 788-2982, before April1. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. NATIONAL RADIO SALES Hispanic Radio Networlc Hot, new national Spanish radio syndication service seeks Independent sales agent for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Texas. Call(505) 9840080. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number , 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. Ordered by Organization Street -----------DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) City, State & Zip ----------$45 per column inch . Area Code & Phone _______ _ _ 5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment. 1989 tour have yet to be announced . , Fifty works of art-chosen from some3,000 entries-are included in Expresiones Hispanas. The show's three top winners, announced with the tour's schedule , are painters born outside the continental United States: Cuba's Rafael Soriano, Puerto Rico's Bibiana M. Suarez and Mexico's Alfredo Arreguin. FROM THE ARTS FILE: A new wing at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe , N.M., to highlight Hispanic art, is set to open in the spring of 1989. The Hispanic Heritage Wing will feature some of the worlcfs finest Hispanic colonial folk art from the museum's own collection , as well as changing e x hibitions of traditional Hispanic arts. Other dates for Hispanic art around the country include: e New Mexican art ist Malaquias Montoya's solo exhibit, Art in Politics, at the Galeria Sin Fronteras, in Austin, runs through AprilS . Ne x t summer, prior to its official opening, the wing will house the traveling e x hibit Hispanic Art in the United States : Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors. The show's stay in New Mexico, July 31 to Nov. 27 , f ollo w s i ts engagement in South Florida. • Francisco Alvarado Juarez: Native Stranger, a show of works done by the Honduran artist in the United States , at The Art Gallery of the University of Maryland at College Park, will be shown through April22. Hispanic Art w ill be seen at the University of Miamrs Lowe Art Museum in Co r al Gables, April 7 to June 30. • At New York's Museum of Contemporary Art , Rooted Visions: Mexican Art Today, a showing by 12 artists living and working in Mexico, shows through May 8. The lo ng-aw ai t ed p lans for another national Latino art show were announced ea r lie r thi s month by the Adolph Coors Company. And south of the border, the 88th birthday of one of Mexico's foremost painters , Rufino Tamayo, is being celebrated this year with major exhibits at the country's two most prominent museums-the Rufino Tamayo Museum and the Museum of the Palacio de Bellas The 1988 89 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour is set to open ori Cinco d e M ayo at the Mexican Cultural Institute in San Antonio . The jurie d ex hibition, subt i tled Expresiones Hispanas, is set to visit Los Angeles and Arvada , Colo., this year . Locations for the . Artes . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Re port BLACK JOURNALI STS PROTEST: The Nationa l Association of B lack Journalists staged a pre ss conference i n New York C i ty March 18, calling on th e nat i on ' s newspapers to double t hei r number of black reporters by the yea r 1991 . P r ese ntly, bl acks mak e u p 3.5% of reporters and edi t o r s worki ng i n the daily press and 12% of t he U.S. population , NABJ said. Hispanics, wh o comprise 8 .8% of the count,Y s population, m a de up 1 . 7 % o f the newspersons working f o r da i l y papers in 1986, according , to an annual survey b y t he American Society of Newspaper Editors. It will be releasing figures fo r 1987 a t it s convention next month . NABJ spo k esman Dwayne Wickham, a Gannett News S e rv ice columnist , told New York reporte r s t hat the o r ganiza t ion hopes to negotiate w it h the indus t ry t o accomplish the increase , but w i ll consider taking legal action H ISPANIC LIN K WEEKLY RE P O RT A nat iona l p u bli ca t io n of H i s p anic Link News S e rvice Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202 ) 2340 or 234 0737 Publi s h er. Hector EricksenM e ndoz a Ed i tor. F elix P e r ez R eporti ng: A nton io Mejias R e n tas, D arryl Figuer oa . G ra phics/P roducti o n : Carlos A rr i e n . Zoila Elias. N o p o rt ion of Hispanic Li nk Weekl y R epo rt m ay be r ep r o d uced o r broa dcast in any form wit ho u t adva n ce p e r miss i on. Annua l subscription (50 issues): Insti tutions/agencies $118 Personal $1 08 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPOR A TE C LA SS I F I E D : A d r a t es 90 ce n ts pe r w ord. Displ ay ads a r e $45 per c o lumn inch. A d s p laced b y Tuesd a y wi ll run i n Weekl y Report s m a il ed Friday of sa me week . Multi pl e use r ates o n reques t 6 against newspapers with particularly poor hiring records. Francisco Newton , executive director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, told Weekly Report that he was unaware of the press conference. "I wish we had known . Our two vice presidents are in New York. I feel we could have contributed and made known some of the perspectives we share with black journalists , " he said. LETRAS DE ORO: Awards of $2,500 each were presented to winners of the 1988 Letras de Oro Spanish-language literary competition March 17 in Miami . This year's victors included: Novel: Ana Maria Delgado , Guayama, Puerto Rico ; Poetry: Ximena Allen-Fischer, Gaines ville , Fla; Drama: Francisco Ruiz-Ram6n, Nashville, Tenn.; Essay: Victor Fuentes, Santa Barbara Calif . ; Short story: Manuel Serpa, Miami; Translation (Spanish-language novel into English): Sylvia Lipp, U . S . citizen living in Canada. Cuba-born Serpa, 47, came to the United States in the Mariel boatlift in 1980. Now living in Miami, he supports himself as a parking lot attendant and commercial illustrator while writing several hours daily . Most of the stories in his winning collection were written here . The competition , in its third year, is sponsored by the University of Miami and American Express to encourage Spanish-language writers in the United States. There were 371 entries this year . Writers in Florida submitted 79; New York 53, Cali fornia 35, Puerto Rico 28 , and 12 each from Texas and New Jersey . Winners' works will be published by Salvat America, a U .S. sub sidiary of a Spanish publisher . ELSEWHERE: California's Santa Barbara based Hispanic Business magazine has announced that it will be conducting its first National Hispanic MarketTrade Show& Media Expo in New York City Nov . 15-18 ... Charlie Ericksen "The Milagro Beanfield War'' (see Guest Column) Hispanic Link Weekly Report