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Hispanic link weekly report, April 4, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 4, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Rudy Lozano takes his oath of office to become the first Latino federal judge in Indiana. Lozano, a native of East Chicago, Ind., presides over the U.S. District Court for Northern I ndiana... Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer and the City Council unanimously pass a resolution proclaiming April to be Amnesty Awareness Month. The proclamation’s aim is to urge more undocumented aliens to apply for legalization. . . Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry proclaims April 9 Amnesty Public Awareness Day. . . Frank Fahrenkopf, chairman of the Republican National Committee, appoints Roy Barrera, a San Antonio lawyer, to RNC’s Coalition Outreach Committee, a committee whose goal is to recruit ethnic and minority voters... Dr.
George Santos of Johns Hopkins University wins the Bristol-Myers Award for distinguished achievement in cancer research. The $50,000 award recognizes Santos’ 30-plus years in the field. . . Jaime Escalante, the East Los Angeles calculus teacher of Bolivian descent whose story is chronicled in the movie Stand and Deliver, is honored at the Embassy of Bolivia in Washington, D.C... Two federal parole examiners recommend that anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch be released from prison May 16 after he completes a three-month sentence for parole violation. Bosch has been scheduled for deportation by immigration authorities... Linda Hanten, a Latina lawyer from California, is inducted as the new chairwoman of the Washington, D.C., Commission on Human Rights... Cookie Rojas, a native of Cuba, is named manager of the California Angels, a major league baseball team...
** ° ” (^^tsPANIcTlN^wiEKL7REP0^7 Small Publishers Provide Crucial Key for Writers
While Hispanic authors find it a difficult- if not impossible - task to have their works taken seriously by major publishers, they continue to find outlets for their labors with 20 or so publishers who specialize in works by or about Hispanics.
Primarily found in the Southwest, these publishing operations range from one-person, garage-contained units to more modern, major-university-affiliated counterparts.
“We wouldn’t be anywhere without them.
They really helped us out,” said Ron Arias, author of the trail-blazing Chicano novel “The Road to Tamazunchale,” First published by Albuquerque’s Pajarito Publications, the book has sold about 20,000 copies. Arizona State University’s Bilingual Press has just published its fifth edition.
From translations of Puerto Rican classics in Maplewood, N.J., to bilingual fiction by Chicano authors in Austin, and from adult-oriented paperbacks in Miami to leather-bound Christian readings in El Paso, works produced by Hispanics are varied.
Hispanic writers and publishers point to
Legalization Extension Advocated
The immigrant legalization program deadline should be extended from May 4 to Nov. 30, advocated a Ford Foundation-funded report released March 29 in Washington, D.C.
David North, its principal writer, said the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service should set the deadline to have it coincide with that of the Special Agricultural Worker program.
Some 1.1 million undocumenteds have applied under the primary program, while259,000 have been brought in through SAW, the report showed. According to INS, nearly 724,000 applicants have been approved to date, while some 11,000 have been denied and 490,000 are pending. The report estimates that600,000 to 800,000 people remain outside the primary I program.
The report found that INS procedures are complex and confusing. North said this was | partly due to the liberalization of the program, which he applauded. He cited cases of
what they feel is the myopic view of major publishers when it comes to the acceptance of Latino literature.
Said Nicolas Kanellos, director of the University of Houston-housed Arte Publico Press, “The analysis (by the major publishers) is that the general consumer is not interested They are not aware of the marketing possibilities and they generally do not want to acknowledge the quality of literature produced by Hispanics in the U.S.”
Arte Publico, perhaps the best known and largest of U.S. Hispanic publishers, was founded in 1972 at Indiana University in Bloomington and for years published the award-winning literary journal Revista Chicanorriqueha. About 90% of the books it has published are in English and it has roughly 100 titles in print, 20 of which came out in 1987.
APPs best known author is Rolando Hinojosa - considered to be the “dean of Mexican American literature,”
While several of the small publishers suffered from declining interest in the’70s and early ’80s, many are hopeful that a current interest
undocumented immigrants who are unaware of their new eligibility.
Among recent changes is a March 23 revision allowing children in foster care to apply. An estimated 1,000 children were previously disqualified because they were recipients of public assistance.
The report follows a March 18 announcement by the Justice Department that while the deadline would not be changed, an extra 60 days would be allowed for supplying supporting documents.
The North Study was released the day before House hearings were set to begin on Rep. Charles Schemer’s (D-N.Y.) bill to extend the deadline by one year.
North also found the program expensive, with costs typically ranging around $1,200 for a family of four, The maximum application fee is $420, but this does not include medical, legal and other related expenses.
- Darryl Figueroa
in Hispanic arts and literature will give them a boost.
In a recent interview, writer and essayist Rudolfo Anaya told Melita Garza, a reporter with The Milwaukee Journal,” La Bamba made a splash in many places in this country... So what you would hope is that somewhere in this audience there are people who will see Chicanos as real people, people who also create other music and books.”
Kanellos said that the current interest in Hispanics “will have some influence.”
He continued, “Major publishers will eventually and gradually open the doors but it will only be in the pre-established channels where ethnic and minority writers always get published, the categories of immigrant literature and ethnic biographies.”
Arias, who works as a senior writer for People magazine, had this to say: “Things will improve. U.S. Hispanics will gain greater recognition in the next five years.”
Anaya, author of the popular “Bless Me, Ultima,” commented on what he perceived as a preference by major publishers for Latin American writers and not U.S. H ispanic authors. “Who knows? Maybe it’s safer or easier or more cosmopolitan to go to Peru or Argentina to find good writers,” he said.
Kanellos disagreed as to the degree Latin American writers are published, saying, “ If s a fallacy to believe that major publishers are printing a lot of Latin American literature. In reality only four books a year are translated from big writers and they don’t sell that well.” Like many of the nation’s small publishing houses, the Hispanic publishers’ principal market is academic. Cuts in university ethnic studies programs have created a gap for a market that relies heavily on purchases by libraries and college students.
“Because there are less black or Puerto Rican studies programs, the sales of these books are in a slump,” according to Waterfront Press director Kal Waggenheim. The Maplewood, N.J.-based publisher specializes in Puerto Rican fiction, translated into English, and island-related sociological and anthropological topics.
Another source for Hispanic books in the
continued on page 2


Cook County, IIL, Judicial Election System Challenged
Illinois Sen. Miguel del Valle (D-Chicago) and two other Chicago-area state representatives filed a lawsuit in a U.S. District Court March 22 charging that Cook County’s at-large election system greatly diminishes the chances of Hispanics and blacks being elected as judges.
The suit calls for the postponement of the county’s November judicial elections until the current system is replaced and the dismissal of the municipality’s 170 Circuit Court associate justices. The suit seeks the creation of single- or multiple-member
judicial districts.
Reacting to the justification that there aren’t enough qualified Hispanics, Senator del Valle told Weekly Report, “There are qualified individuals available, and unless they’re slated by the judges, they have no chance."
Despite Hispanics representing roughly 10% of the county’s population and blacks accounting for 26%, just 2% of the Cook County Circuit Court judges are Latino and 12% are black according to the class-action suit joined by Reps. Anthony Young and
Paul Williams. The suit charges that the current election system violates the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
“Unfortunately, there is a growing number of Hispanics in the court system, and we need judges who are sensitive to our problems- judges who are role models for our children,” said del Valle.
There are 181 Cook County Circuit Court judges. The associate judges are elected by this group. Hispanics account for 1.5% of the associate judges.
- Felix Perez
Language Ordinance Repeal Sought
Dade County, Fla., Commissioner Jorge Valdes annoynced he will submit April 5 a proposal to repeal an anti-bilingual ordinance which mandates that government business be conducted only in English.
Florida voters are expected to vote in November on whether to make English the official language for the state. Valdes said that if the state referendum is passed, as expected, there would be no need for the county ordinance.
It would be important symbolically for the repeal to occur, said Valdes spokesperson Mabel Smart. “The community is offended by it,” she explained. No action will be taken on the Valdes proposal until the November election.
The “Official English” movement needs 350,000 valid signatures by August to have the referendum added to the November ballot
‘Licking’ Baskin-Robbins
A Mexican American couple has been conducting protests of Baskin-Robbins in California since filing March 16 a $15 million discrimination suit against the ice cream company.
Angel and Carmen L6pez dumped 12 pounds of German chocolate, vanilla and other flavors in front of the Los Angeles federal courthouse where the case was filed.
A picket was planned for late last week in front of the company's Glendale, Calif., headquarters, where berry berry strawberry and burgundy cherry were to be unloaded.
The couple's Hemet, Calif., neighbors held a March 29 rally in front of the L6pez shop some 50 miles east of Los Angeles.
The 51-year-olds say they have poured their life savings and seven years into the franchise, which is located in a run-down part of town.
The suit claims that after the couple negotiated a move to an upscale new shopping area nearby, Baskin-Robbins maneuvered to open a company-operated store in its place.
“They treat me like a dumb Mexican,” said Carmen L6pez, who will soon begin a flurry of promotional activity on radio and television. Attorney Stephen Nill said, “We’re trying to show the company there are 31 flavors of people, not just vanilla”
- Darryl Figueroa
Terry Robbins, chairman of Dade Americans United to Protect the English Language, said that some 360,000 signatures had been collected as of March 21.
The county ordinance adopting ‘English only’for government business passed in 1980.
None of the other eight commissioners or Hispanic organizations have publicly pledged their support of Valdesl
Computers Aid Publishing
continued from page 1
United States are the university presses -the University of New Mexico Press, the University of Texas Press and the University of Puerto Rico Press in particular - with books that are required reading in Spanish literature classes around the country.
And first-time writers are finding it easier to publish- even if they have to do it themselves. “The technology is there now. We have more access to computers and desk-top publishing,” said Ricardo Sdnchez, who runs Paperbacks y Mas in San Antonio.
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas, with research assistance by Mary Rivas
In an action that may have implications for hundreds of marriages of undocumented aliens across the country, a Hyattsville, Md, couple filed a lawsuit March 17 in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., charging that the federal marriage fraud law denies them their right to due process and should be struck down as unconstitutional.
Moises and Laura Escobar, devout Mormons, were married in June 1987, while Mois§s, a native of El Salvador, was undergoing deportation proceedings. Immigration authorities apprehended Moises, 29, Sept. 23,1984, in El Paso Texas, for entering the country illegally.
The marriage fraud law, enacted in November 1986, states that aliens who marry U.S. citizens while engaged in deportation proceedings must leave the country for a minimum of two years.
In addition to the alleged violation of the couple's due process right, Elizabeth Gustafson, an attorney working pro bono on the case, said the law is also unconstitutional because it “differentiates between couples undergoing
State Legislator^ Body Rejects‘English Only
The law and justice committee of the National Conference of State Legislators unanimously struck down a proposal March 25 to adopt ‘official English’ as its policy and to endorse this view in Congress.
“With five bills pending (in Congress) to make English the official language, this is a significant victory,” said Martha Jimenez, a policy analyst for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. “The unanimity was unexpected,” she added. Jjmgnez testified before the committee.
Indiana Sen. Joseph Corcoran introduced the proposal last month. Corcoran introduced similar legislation in his home state, which passed in 1984.
Nearly 7,500 state legislators are members of NCSL.
The issue was hotly contested before and during the meeting, with mail and phone calls opposing the resolution streaming in to Iowa Senator Don Doyle, the committee chairman, from state senators, elected officials and Democratic Party leaders.
deportation and those not And that difference can literally be a day.”
The charge of due process violation, said Gustafson, arises from the Escobar's inability to prove their marriage is valid.
Gustafson said she had received word from immigration authorities that they would not carry out Moises’ scheduled March30 deportation until a court decision was handed
down- - Felix Perez
Chicago Settles Bias Suit
The city of Chicago agreed to establish a $9.2 million fund for back wages it must pay in a lawsuit that charged that the city police department discriminated against Hispanics, blacks and women in its hiring and promotions, the U.S. Department of Justice announced March 28.
The fund, which was set up as a result of a 15-year-old suit, will also be used to adjust seniority dates for729 Hispanics, blacks and women.
Couple Takes on Marriage Fraud Law
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Paul Espinosa, guest columnist
Tuned Out by Public TV
Frankly, Pm stumped. The Public Broadcasting Service recently distributed my latest documentary, In the Shadow of the Law. A one-hour program funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, it is a portrait of four families who have lived illegally in the United States for many years.
Unfortunately, many viewers - even in the Southwest - didn’t see the program at all.
To get on the national schedule, In the Shadow of the Law survived two CPB program fund evaluation rounds to become one of 17 projects funded from 274 proposals.
Despite making it onto the national PBS schedule, the program couldn’t make i' >t the more than 200 PBS program managers.
The final gatekeepers in a Byzantine system, some managers moved it to a daytime or ’-inge slot Others didn't air it at all.
Audiences didn’t find In the Shadow of the Law in San Francisco, Dallas, San Jose, Chicago or Miami, despite large illegal populations there. In Los Angeles, where almost half of the nation’s million-plus applicants for legalization live, viewers had to catch it at 11 p.m., three weeks after the national broadcast. Those in Albuquerque and Denver saw it on Sunday at3 p.m. In San Antonio, which is 55% Hispanic, the program aired at 11 p.m.
NO TALKING HEADS’
While the nation’s major media all were carrying midyear assessments of the legalization program, many public TV program managers rejected The Shadow of the Law as just a “ minority” program, in their view likely to be of substandard quality and interesting only to Hispanics.
They're wrong on both counts.
First, TV Guide thought it was good enough to warrant a national MClose Up.” Reviewers on major newspapers in cities where the program aired called it “a powerful documentary” and a refreshing change from talking heads.
Secondly, the new immigration law affects all Americans, and In the Shadow of the Law was designed for anyone interested in what the lives of those living In a shadow society are like.
This is not the first time programs on Hispanic issues have had trouble making it past PBS program managers. I have produced several documentaries which secured national funding and were placed on PBS’ national schedule, only to have them pre-empted by local stations. Other producers of Hispanic programs convince me that my experience is part of a larger pattern.
During the eight years I’ve worked in public broadcasting, I’ve tried to convince stations that promoting and broadcasting such programs can be an excellent way to entice the Hispanic community to watch PBS for other program fare.
WHO DEFINES “COMMUNITY”?
I have raised promotional monies for several of my programs and offered them to stations to help publicize my programs. Rather than welcome these efforts, some rejected promoting the program at all.
At a time when PBS audiences around the country had the opportunity to learn about the British experience in India, shouldn’t they have the same opportunity to learn about aspects bf their own American experience of which they may be ignorant? And isn’t it the responsibility of a public, tax-supported system like public TV to distribute programs which won’t be seen on commercial broadcasting?
Some public broadcasting leaders argue that local stations must be free to act with their community’s interest in mind. But do they include Hispanics in their definition of * local community?
Perhaps PBS stations will wake up to the enormous potential of Hispanic audiences. Perhaps public TV stations will make good on their unique capacity to fill that vast television wasteland with relevant, important programs on American topics.
And then again, perhaps they won’t.
(Paul Espinosa is a senior producer at KPBS-TV in San Diego.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin Pelos en la lengua
THE MILAGRO WAR SPREADS: The recent Santa Fe premiere of “The Milagro Beanf ield War” had the whole state of New Mexico tingling, if not quite trembling.
Cruz Aguilar, who predated and then worked with Reies Tixerina on his Spanish land-grant claims, was among the 150 rural folk who converged March 21 on the state capitol to protest the denial of human, water and land rights.
“The Milagro Beanfield War Continues” and “Tierra o Muerte,” some of their signs proclaimed. Anyone who has seen the Robert Redford/Moctesuma Esparza movie will find Aguilar’s placard especially appealing “The Survival of a People is being threatened by Land Developer
The rural protestors, spanning several generations, crowded into Gov. Garrey Carruthers’ office to plead for a commission to review and act on their complaints. The Santa Fe New Mexican reported that following the 1 1 /2-hour meeting, Carruthers promised to “examine the possibility” of creating a commission. Examine the possibility? Nothing too hasty.
TIXERINA OR TIJERINA? Mexico or Mejico? Since his release from prison a decade ago, Reies T. (famous for the June 5,1967, raid he and six carloads of armed followers staged on the courthouse at Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico, in which two deputies were wounded and a third abducted) has continued his international search for documents to support his land-grant claims. In one he found a ff ' years ago, his family name was spelled “Tixerina” -so he ad< 3d it. A man’s entitled to be called what he wants (although some New Mexico press hasn’t accepted the change yet), so Tixerina it is. I wonder if they still refer to Muhammad All as Cassius Clay there?
DISPATCH FROM CHIMAYO: Robert Redforcfs first choice as a site for the filming of "Milagro" was Chimayo, a picturesque town 20 miles north of Santa Fe. But two years ago, high school principal Harold Martinez led a small but determined group of townfolk in a successful campaign to keep the Hollywood crowd from polluting its ambience.
How does the educator feel about his stand now?
He outlined his personal plans for the film’s premiere:
“We acquired some beans from those plastic bean plants they were using (in the movie). We planted some here in Chimayo, and they're just about ready for harvest. We’re going to cook them Saturday and have a virgin vinyl bean dinner to benefit the Save Plaza del Cerro Committee.”
WHITE EYES SEE WHITE: Beyond New Mexico’s borders, did you notice how few reviews even mentioned Moctesuma Esparza, who owned rights to*the story and co-produced it with Robert Redford?
Time magazine was one that omitted mention of Esparza, although the mag and its critic, Richard Corliss, devoted a full page on March 28 to the film. Included were photos of Redford and actor Chick Vennera - but none of Rub6n Blades, Sonia Braga or Carlos Riquelme.
The New York Times’ Vincent Canby, who panned the film roundly, listed eight key cast members (including Blades and Braga) toward the end of his review, and concluded:
“None of them have a great deal to do except look the part. The most riveting creature in the movie is a great white pig that does tricks on cue..
To each his own. - Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
PAUL RODRIGUEZ, star of the TV series “Trial and Error,” quoted in the Sacramento Bee March 13 on the current television and motion picture successes of Hispanics.
“It's really hard when you have to depend on white liberals for a career. Today we're hot, but tomorrow Koreans could be the rage.”
April 4, 1988


Juan Gonzdlez
GOING HOME...
Jaime Guerra
... to New York
Near the old Jefferson Pool in East Harlem, where my mother and father settled after World War II, when fights erupted between Italians and Puerto Ricans over a girl or a look or whether we Puerto Ricans could swim in the pool, the issues seemed simple- usorthem; do we have a right to walk the streets or not?
No Gallup or CBS told us within a few percentage points how much Italians, Puerto Ricans and blacks disliked each other. Telephones weren’t common enough for pollsters to gauge a community’s pulse yet not touch its people. Television, a gawking infant then, couldn’t package and transmit a riot to our living rooms on an hours notice.
Newspapers weren’t obsessively covering racial ulcers on the city’s surface, as they do today.
But at least there were jobs, mostly the kind that constantly threatened to puncture or amputate your limbs.
Those jobs in postwar America, the chance to provide something better for your kids with enough 10- and 12-hour sweat-filled days, made it possible to endure everything else.
PROGRESS HAD ITS PRICE
After years on the public housing waiting list, ourfamily finally got a chance to leave those 112th Street tenements with bathtubs in the kitchens, toilets in the halls and gas-burning apartment heaters. In 1956 we moved to the outskirts of eternity - the last stop on the A train then, Euclid Avenue - to the sparkling new Cypress Hills projects that had been miraculously erected on a swamp.
But progress had its price.
In the Cypress Hills of the ’50s, you could count the number of Puerto Rican and black families in each building on one hand.
To be Puerto Rican and walk along Liberty Avenue toward Ozone Park or along Jamaica Avenue at night was to rjsk a beating.
Unlike East Harlem, there weren’t enough of us to extract respect. Nor was there a white leader like East Harlem’s legendary Italian congressman Vito Marcantonio, still admired by Puerto Rican elders, to unite the ethnic and racial groups.
On the stoops or in the schools of East New York in the late’50s and early’60s, the pressures were to forget, deny, jettison our language and culture. By doing so we could prove we weren’t really different.
HERITAGE vs. CONFORMITY
Along the line I chose pride in my heritage as more precious than conformity, truth over acceptance. By the late 1960s, that propelled me toward protest, with my baptism in the Columbia student strike of 1968 and my confirmation in the Young Lords Party of the 1970s.
In 1973, I jumped a Greyhound bus for Philadelphia and left the brutal magnificence that is New York. Along the way journalism got to me. A few months ago, it led me back home- as a new columnist with the New York Daily News.
In this short time, my welcome has included: the Howard Beach court decision; two Days of Outrage; the beating of two black men in Bath Beach by a white mob on Christmas night; the riddling of a black man in Queens by two white policemen during an altercation; the deaths in separate incidents in the Bronx of a black hospital worker and an elderly Puerto Rican while in police cutody; and the beating and robbery of a Polish emigre cab driver by a group of young blacks shouting, “Howard Beach, lets do it.”
Some things haven’t changed. They just seem more complicated. And the flood of unskilled jobs that once provided New York’s hope has dried up, leaving our young adrift in an economic wasteland where each racial attack makes you wonder how much more of this we can all endure.
(Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
April 4,
... To San Elizario
Once upon a time, an Anglo-Saxon boy enrolled in my beloved San Elizario Elementary School, 21 miles east of El Paso, Texas. At that time, San Elizario had fewer than 200 families, all “Mexican.” Ours was one of those families.
Within months of his arrival, the boy had “forgotten” his English and his family decided to leave town. The kid departed kicking and screaming. He didn’t want to leave his "Mexican” friends behind.
Little did ke know that he was missing a chance at immortality.
Had that boy remained in San Eli, any visiting politician might have seen him swimming in the polluted irrigation canals with dead animals floating by. Or fishing for carp and catfish with a pitchfork in the slimy drainage ditches.
Had that happened, the boy might have changed the course of San Eli’s history.
The politician would scream holy murder in the hallowed legislative halls of Austin and Washington.
50 YEARS TOO LATE
“As long as I live,” he would say, “I do not want to see even one American child living in such primitive conditions. The town school doesn’t even have a genuine library where they can use their time constructively.”
That one Anglo-Saxon American boy could have been responsible for a playground, swimming pool, library, recreation center and other goodies from across the tracks coming into my town.
Oh well, it doesn’t cost to dream...
Seventeen months ago, there was a 50th anniversary reunion in San Eli. I traveled from Houston to attend. A fund-raising drive was in progress to buy books for a school library that at last was on the drawing boards.
As expected, the people were generous. Some$1,600 was collected. A month and a half ago, the library was finally built For Frank Durdn, then the schoofs principal, and many others, a dream was realized.
Our country spends millions to send the children of the Nicaraguan cbntras to the best schools in Florida and on rum and Coke for their parents so they can dream about sending our children to fight in the country they want to repossess. Why- 50 years too late- did we have to pass the hat for a library in San Elizario, one of the oldest towns in the United States?
Why are there no playgrounds or swimming pools or any places where a child can develop healthfully in my town? Why can’t they get a break like the Anglo children in communities that surround them?
STILL A ‘MEXICAN TOWN’
Today, my town is still a “Mexican” town but it’s unrecognizable. Voracious landholders have turned the cotton farms into unplanned subdivisions. The schools are overcrowded. The economy is in shambles. The kids have absolutely nothing to do.
There is crime and delinquency. Of course there is. One can’t forever swim and fish in filthy water without building resentments. Yet the kids want to achieve.
Perhaps now that we Hispanics are sometimes being courted as if we are the only sehorita in town, our activists will carry the message back to the politicians that Hispanics will flock to the polls on their own if they are treated with equal concern and respect.
Perhaps somebody can explain to the White House and Congress that the San Eli kids are Americans doing more to fight communism than all of the contras put together. They are trying to become good citizens in a country that insists on making them “neglected Mexicans.” Those kids shouldn’t have to wait - can’t wait - until another white family moves into town.
(Jaime Guerra is a copy editor with the Houston Chronicle.)
1988
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


1
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
v\
wcc
BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ANTICIPATED ADJUNCT POSITIONS
1988-89
Day and Evening ALL ACADEMIC SUBJECTS
Accounting Anthropology Art
Astronomy Banking Biology Black Studies
PiedraVftiecfto1?/8BsWS?S. ____________________ ________
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS PRESS- Office of Graduate Studies, Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713-7819 (512) 471-7233, John Kyle WATERFRONT PRESS-52 Maple Ave., Maplewood, N.J. 07040 (201) 762-1565, Kal Waggenheim
Tenm
PRESIDENT
Texas State Technical Institute System
The Texas State Technical System invites applications and nominations for the position of President TSTI is headquartered in Waco,
Texas (population 102,000), and is the only state-supported postsecondary vocational Library Science and technical system in Texas. It offers
Marketing programs designed to assist students in
Mathematics developing career skills in more than seventy
Media Productions programs of study leading to Associate Degrees
Medical Records and Certificates of Completion. Campuses
Music are located in Waco, Harlingen, Amarillo and
Nursing Sweetwater, with extension centers in Abilene
Philosophy and McAllen.
The pledge from Pepsi, to be presented in five annualTnstalimeni of $200,000, will be used to fund fellowships to the MBA program. In addition to the $3,000 fellowships, 10 of which will be available by the fall of 1989, a tuition waiver will also be offered.
Said John Kraft, dean of the College of Business, “We have a
LEGALIZATION PROGRAM EXTENSION: “Through the Maze,” a 74-page Ford Foundation-funded report which reviews the immigration reform law program, is available free of charge. To receive a copy, send a self-addressed 10“ by 13” envelope with $2.40 postage to: Transcentury Development Associates, Attn: Report, 1724 Kalorama Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009-2624.
DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS: “Who’s Who: Chicano Officeholders -1987-88” is a 147-page directory by Western New Mexico University political science professor Arthur Martinez with listings from the federal to the municipal level. For a copy send $19.95 to: Arthur Martinez, P.O. Box 2271, Silver City, N.M. 88062 (505) 538-6229.
significant Hispanic student population” and “this allows us to be competitive to attract those students.”
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
The National Endowment for the Humanities announced March 22 that it will provide $1.5 million to create the Center on the Teaching and Learning of History in Elementary and Secondary Schools at the University of California at Los Angeles. One goal of the center will be to examine the introduction in history courses of ethnic and female authors... Pepsi-Cola Co. announces the appointment of Hernand Gonz&lez as its national Hispanic marketing manager...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. April 4-6 The fourth quadrennial agenda of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference will be developed at this meeting by some 200 Hispanic leadera The agenda will be presented to the Democratic and Republican presidential nominees and to policy makers.
Joe Treviho (202) 659-0330
HISPANICS IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS New York April 4-7
Recognizing a major increase of Hispanic students in Catholic schoola the National Catholic Educational Association’s 85th annual Convention will make Latino issues an integral part of its program. Sessions on Hispanic leadership training programs and other areas will be held Patricia Feistritzer (202) 337-6232
ILLITERACY Chicago April 6-8
The 22nd annual National SER Jobs for Progress conference will present a two-phased plan to combat the problem of illiteracy among Hispanics. The plan
will be reviewed by technology and literacy experts. Amalia Rochell (214) 631-3999
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Denver April 6-9
Experts in program development, counseling, interviewing and employment law will be participating in the 14th annual conference of the American Association for Affirmative Action. Fred Alvarez, an assistant secretary of labor, will discuss recent Labor Department initiatives.
Judi Burnison (312) 329-2512
HISPANIC MEDIA Dallas April 6-9
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and others will hold the sixth annual conference of Hispanic media professionals. Activities include workshops and a job fair involving some three dozen news organization recruiters.
Frank Newton (202) 783-6228
IMMIGRATION POLICY Washington, D.C. April 7, 8 A national legal conference on immigration and refugee policy will be held under the auspices of the Center for Migration Studies, a New York-based non-profit institute. International and national experts will take part in a series of panels covering legislative and employment issues.
Lydio Tomasi (718) 351-8800
April 4,1988
ANTI- ‘ENGLISH ONLY SYMPOSIUM Phoenix, Ariz. April 8
A gathering of Hispanic and non-Hispanic leaders interested in developing a national strategy to combat the English Only movement will include former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt, state Rep. Armando Ruiz, several Arizona mayors and others. The meeting is sponsored by Arizona English.
Kathy O’Donnell (602) 256-6745
COMING SOON
MINORITY CAREERS
New York State Minority Career Convention and
Association
New York April 14
Jacqueline Moreira(212) 923-2020
CHICANO STUDIES
The National Association for Chicano Studies Boulder, Colo. April 14-16 Cordelia Candelaria (303) 492-8852
BILINGUAI7ESL CONFERENCE Fort Worth Independent School District Fort Worth, Texas April 15,16 Anita Castafteda (817) 625-7271
‘ENGLISH ONLY Californians United Palo Alto, Calif. April 16,17 Susannah MacKaye(415) 282-8419
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


GOING HOME.
Juan Gonzdlez
Jaime Guerrs
... to New York
Near the old Jefferson Pool in East Harlem, where my mother and father settled after World War II, when fights erupted between Italians and Puerto Ricans over a girl or a look or whether we Puerto Ricans could swim in the pool, the issues seemed simple- us orthem; do we have a right to walk the streets or not?
No Gallup or CBS told us within a few percentage points how much Italians, Puerto Ricans and blacks disliked each other. Telephones weren’t common enough for pollsters to gauge a community’s pulse yet not touch its people. Television, a gawking infant then, couldn’t package and transmit a riot to our living rooms on an hour's notice.
Newspapers weren’t obsessively covering racial ulcers on the city’s surface, as they do today.
mmmm W ■ • *
;
mm . **;'
... To San Elizario
Once upon a time, an Anglo-Saxon boy enrolled in my beloved San Elizario Elementary School, 21 miles east of El Paso, Texas. At that time, San Elizario had fewer than 200 families, all “Mexican.” Ours was one of those families.
Within months of his arrival, the boy had “forgotten” his English and his family decided to leave town. The kid departed kicking and screaming. He didn’t want to leave his “Mexican” friends behind.
Little did ke know that he was missing a chance at immortality.
Had that boy remained in San Eli, any visiting politician might have seen him swimming in the polluted irrigation canals with dead animals floating by. Or fishing for carp and catfish with a pitchfork in the slimy drainage ditches.
Had that happened, the boy might have changed the course of San Eli’s history.
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WASHINGTON, D.C., INTERNSHIPS: Hispanic Link News Service expects to have new paid internship8 for developing Journalists to work in Washington, D C, in 1988. If interested in receiving an application for any such opportunities write now to Htctor Ertcksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link 1420 N St N W, Washington, D.C. 20005.
6
April 4,1988
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
PRESIDENT
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The Texas State Technical System invites applications and nominations for the position of President TSTI is headquartered in Waco, Texas (population 102,000), and is the only state-supported postsecondary vocational and technical system in Texas. It offers programs designed to assist students in developing career skills in more than seventy programs of study leading to Associate Degrees and Certificates of Completion. Campuses are located in Waco, Harlingen, Amarillo and Sweetwater, with extension centers in Abilene and McAllen.
The President of Texas State Technical Institute System will report to the Board of Regents. This position is responsible for the formulation of policies and programs Working with the Board, the President is the Chief Executive Officer and is expected to effectively represent TSTI in interfacing with the state of Texas Legislative and Executive branches; leaders of business industry, labor, and higher education; and with the leadership of the state of Texas Coordinating Board. The four campus Presidents and System Vice Presidents of Instruction, Development, Fiscal Affairs Human Services and Student Affairs report directly to this office.
Candidates should hold a college degree, but industrial experience and professional achievement are equally important considerations They should possess the communication skills necessry to articulate the mission of the System and enhance its stature throughout the state. Unquestioned integrity, a high energy level, excellent administrative skills political astuteness and genuine enthusiasm for the purpose and role of the System are all important attributes
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Rio Hondo Collage, California
Exciting opportunity to develop linkages with business and industry, assess training needs, develop and implement innovative programs. For information and application, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext 309.
2 < DC M Ui HQ. -KO UJ


Arts & Entertainment
POTPOURRI: A “pro-Hispanic film” currently shooting in Hawaii has the distinction of being the first motion picture ever endorsed by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
“We were enormously impressed by the ultra pro-Hispanic focus of Jerry Schafer's action-drama screenplay,” says Patrick J. Shannon, executive producer of Fists of SteeL The film, starring Carlos Palomino and Henry Silva, is scheduled for an October release.
A couple of New York Puerto Rican graffiti artists have completed work on murals to be used for a TV sitcom pilot currently in production. The murals by Ernie Vales and Gil Aviles depict various New York City street scenes and the racial tensions in South Africa They are being used as background and settings for Livin' Largo
Quincy Jones is one of three executive directors of the pilot about urban kids on their own for the first time. The murals were completed last month in Los Angeles.
Dozens of U.S. Hispanics will be using their art this week for a
different purpose. Miami’s OK South Gallery will hold an auction April 8 to benefit the Casa Nueva Vida residential treatment center for Hispanic drug addicts.
A wide variety of H ispanic musical acts are gearing up for upcoming tours and performances.
For the third year in a row, San Antonio’s Tejano rock group La Mafia has signed a sponsorship deal with the Pepsi-Cola bottling group/Southern Division. The sponsorship will fund La Mafia’s various “Stay in School” performances in Texas high schools.
Mexican singer Emmanuel has a sponsorship deal with another beverage. Michelob will take him on his 15-city Entre Lunas tour that begins April 8 in Los Angeles.
Emmanuel is also featured in a 20-second Spanish-language TV spot for Michelob, produced by New Yorks Castor Spanish International.
This week, the legendary Antologia de la Zarzuela re turns to the United States for a 13-city tour. The company, made up of 80 singers, dancers and musicians, performs in Tampa, Fla, April 8-10.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HEADLINE OF THE DAY: The Border Patrol raided a Compton, Calif., warehouse and picked up a truckload of undocumented workers who reportedly had been smuggled into the country from Mexico to sell frozen fruit bars and ice cream from pushcarts in the Southern California area.
The Los Angeles Times headed the story: “INS Scoops Up51 Alien IceCream Vendors.” ANAYA, ARIAS ON PUBLISHING: Premier U.S. Chicano novelist Rudolfo Anaya, whose works have been published in Polish, German and Spanish as well as English, offered this recent commentary to The Milwaukee Journal's Melita Garza:
“There is a historic prejudice against Mexican people in this country. The reasons are complex and tied up with the people in power and who they share their power with. They haven’t shared power with Chicano people and they haven’t shared in our literary works.”
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Commenting on the potential impact of successful Latino motion pictures on broader acceptance of Latino literary themes and authors, he said:
“It might take the movie industry to create the image of the Chicano in this country and awaken interest in our culture.”
Those few U.S. Latino authors who have been publishedand promoted by establishment publishing houses are generally writers who have little sensitivity to Hispanic culture, some Latino critics note. Richard Rodriguez, author of “Hunger of Memory,” an autobiography that was embraced by Anglo book reviewers but criticized bitterly by Hispanic writers, gained notoriety with his attacks on affirmative action and his perceived contempt for the Hispanic culture.
“He wrote what the Anglo editors wanted to hear and believe, so they published him," one critic commented.
Ron Arias, a respected novelist, labeled Rodriguez “a marginal writer.” He described his prose as “very precious. The content of his writing certainly doesn’t reflect Hispanic
attitudes,” he agreed.
In an article written for Hispanic Link News Service five years ago, Anaya observed: “Even under the most trying of times and circumstances, Chicanos and other Hispanic writers have brought about a writing renaissance with i n ou r l if eti me. B ut since a writ er writes to publish, a writer must have access to publishers. Clearly, the Man-the big publishers- had not been interested in Chicano literature.
“Publishers, and the media in general, have the power to abridge the civil rights of many writers. In the marketplace there is censorship by omission as well as by commission; therefore, the question persists; if any group in this country is denied access to the media, do we really have an enlightened media which is responsive to the civil rights of everybody in the society?
“Society suffers,” he concluded, “because it is kept from knowing its true character. In other words, the civil rights of the total society are abridged.”
- Charlie Ericksen
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

. Making The News This Week George Santos of Johns Hopkins University wins the Bristol-Myers Award for distinguished achievement in cancer research . The $50,000 award recognizes Santos' 30plus years in the field . . . Jaime Escalante, the East Los Angeles calculus teacher of Bol i v i an descen t whose story is chronicled in the movie Stand and Deliver, is honored at the Embassy of Boliv i a in Washington , D . C . .. Two federal parole examiners recommend that anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch be released from prison May 16 after he completes a three month sentence for parole v i olation . Bosch has been scheduled for deportation by immigration authorities ... Linda Hanten, a Latina lawyer from California , is inducted as the new chairwoman of the Washington, D . C . , Commission on Human Rights ... Cookie Rojas, a native of Cuba , is named manager of the California Angels , a major league baseball team. . . Rudy Lozano takes his oath of office to become the first Latino federal judge in Indiana. Lozano , a native of East Chicago, Ind., presides over the U.S. District Court for Northern Indiana . .. Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer and the C i ty Council unan i mously pass a resolution proclaiming April to be Amnesty Awareness Month. The proclamat i on's a i m is to urge more undocumented aliens to apply for legalization . . . Washington, D . C., Mayor Marion Barry procla i ms April 9 Amnesty Public Awareness Day . . . Frank Fahrenkopf, chairman of the Republican National Committee , appoints Roy Barrera, a San Anton i o lawyer , to RNC ' s Coalition Outreach Committee , a committee whose goal is to recruit ethnic and minority voters . .. Dr . vol.sNo.'•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Ap•ll 4 . 1988 Small Publishers Provide Crucial Key for Writers While Hispanic authors find it a difficultif not impossible task to have their works taken seriously by major publishers , they continue to find outlets for the i r labors with 20 or so publishe r s who spec i alize in works by or about Hispanic s . Primarily found in the Southwest , these publishing operations range from one-person, garage-contained units to more modern , major univers i ty-affiliated counterparts . " We wou l dn ' t be anywhere without them. They really helped us out," said Ron Arias , author of the t r ail-blaz i ng Chicano novel "The Road to Tamazunchale . " First published by Albuquerque's Pajarito Publications , the book has sold about 20,000 copies. Arizona State University's Bilingual Press has just published its fifth edition . From translations of Puerto Rican classics in Maplewood, N . J . , to bilingual fiction by Chicano authors in Austin , and from adult oriented paperbacks in Miami to leather bound Christian readings in El Paso , works produced by Hispanics are varied . Hispanic writers a nd publishers point to what they feel is the myopic view of major publishers when it comes to the acceptance of Latino literature . Sa i d Nicolas Kanellos, director oft he Univer s i ty of Houston-housed Arte Publico Press , " The analysis(by the major publishers) is that the general consumer is not interested. They are not aware of the market i ng possibilities and they generally do not want to acknowledge the quality of literatu r e produced by Hispanics in the U.S. " Arte Publico , perhaps the best known and largest of U .S. Hispani c publishers , was found ed in 1972 at Ind i ana University in Blooming ton and for years published the award-winning literary journal Revista Chicanorriquena About 90% of the books it has published are in English and it has roughly 100 titles in print , 20 of which came out in 1987. APPs best known author is Rolando Hinojosa considered to be the " dean of Mexican American literature , " While severpl of t he small publishers suffered from declining interest in the '70s and early '80s, many are hopeful that a current interest Legalization Extension Advocated The immigrant legali z ation program deadline should be extended from May 4 to Nov . 30, advocated a Ford Foundation-funded report released March 29 i n Washington, D .C. David North, its principal writer, said the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service should set the deadline to have it coincide with that of the Speci al Agricultural Worker program . Some 1.1 millio n undocumenteds have ap plied under the primary program, whi le259,000 have been brought in through SAW, the report showed. According to INS, nearly 724,000 applicants have been approved to date, while some 11 ,000 have been denied and 490,000 are pending . The report estimates that600,000 to 600,000 people r e main outside the primary program . The report foun d t h a t INS procedures are complex and North said th i s was partly due to the liber alization of the program , which he applauded. He cited cases of undoc umf:lnted immigrants who are unaware of thei r new eligibility . Among recent c hanges is a March 23 revision allowing childr en in foster care to apply. An estimated 1 ,000 children were previously disqualified because they were recipients of public The rep o rt follows a March 16 announcement by th e ,Justice Department that while the deadline would not be changed, an extra 60 days would be allowed for supplying sup porting d ocu ments. The N o rth was released the day before H o use h e arings were set to begin on Rep . Charles S c humer's (D-N .Y.) bill to extend the deadline by one year . North also found the program expensive , with costs typically ranging around $1,200 for a family of four. The max i mum application fee is $420, but this does not include medical , legal and other related expenses . Darryl F i gueroa in Hispanic arts and literature will give them a boost. I n a recent interview , writer and e ssayist Rudolfo Anaya told Mel i ta Garza , a reporter with The M i lwaukee Journal," La Bamba made a splash in many places in this country ... So what you would hope is that somewhere in this audience there are people who will s e e Ch i canos as real people , people who also create other music and books." Kanellos said that the current interest i n Hispanics " will have some influence. " He continued, "Major publishers will even tually and gradually open the doors but it will only be in the pre-established channels where ethnic and m i nority writers always get published , the categories of imm i gran t literature and ethnic biographies . " Arias, who works as a senior writer for People magazine , had this to say : " Things will improve . U . S . Hispanics will gain greater recognition i n the next five years." Anaya, author of the popular " Bless Me, Ultima, " commented on what he perceived as a preference by major publishers for Latin American writers and not U.S. Hispanic authors. " Who knows? Maybe ifs safer or easier o r more cosmopolitan to go to Peru or Argentina to find good writers," he said. Kanellos disagreed as to the deg ree La ti n American writers are published , saying," lfs a fallacy to believe that major publis hers are printing a lot of Lat i n American literature . In reality only four books a year are translated from big writers and they don't sell that well . " Like many of the nation ' s small publishing houses , the H i spanic publishers ' principal market is academic. Cuts in university ethnic studies programs have created a gap for a market that relies heavily on purchases by librar i es and college students. " Because there are less black or Puerto Rican studies programs , the sales of these books are in a slump," acco r ding to Waterfront Press director Kal Waggenheim . The Maple wood, N . J . -based publ isher specializes in Puerto Rican fiction , translated into English , and island-related sociological and anthro pological topics. Another source for Hispanic books in the cont inu e d o n 2

PAGE 2

Cook County, IlL, Judicial Election System Challenged Illinois Sen. Miguel del Valle (D-Chicago) and two other state represen tatives filed a lawsuit in a U.S. District Court March 22 charging that Cook County's at large election system greatly diminishes the chances of Hispanics and blacks being elected as judges. The suit calls for the postponement of the county's November judicial elections until the current system is replaced and the dismissal of the municipality's 170 Circuit Court associate justices. The suit seeks the creation of singleor multiple-member judicial districts. Reacting to the justification that there aren't enough qualified Hispanics, Senator del Valle told Weekly Report, "There are qualified individuals available , and unless they're slated by the judges, they have no chance." Despite Hispanics representing roughly 1 0% of the county's population and blacks accounting for 26%, just 2% of the Cook County Circuit Court judges are Latino and 12% are black, according to the class-action suit joined by Reps. Anthony Young and Language Ordinance Repeal Sought Dade County , Fla., Commissioner Jorge Valdes annOIJnced he will submit April 5 a proposal to repeal an anti-bilingual ordinance which mandates that government business be conducted only in English. Florida voters are expected to vote in No vember on whether to make English the official language for the state . Valdes said that if the state referendum is passed, as expected, there would be no need for the county ordinance. It would be important symbolically for the repeal to occur , said Valdes spokesperson Mabel Smart. "The community is offended by it," she explained . No action will be taken on the Valdes proposal until the November election The "Official English" movement needs 350,000 valid signatures by August to have the referendum added to the November ballot 'Licking' BaskinRobbins Terry Robbins, chairman of Dade Americans United to Protect the English Language, said that some 360,000 signatures had been col lected as of March 21. The county ordinance adopting 'English only'for government business passed in 1980. None of the other eight commissioners or Hispanic organizations have publicly pledged their support: of Computers Aid Publishing continued from page 1 United States are the university presses the University of New Mexico Press, the University of Texas Press and the University of Puerto Rico Press in particular with books that are required reading in Spanish literature classes around the country . And first-time writers are finding it easier to publisheven if they have to do it themselves. "The technology is there now. We have more access to computers and desk-top publishing," sai . d Ricardo Sanchez , who runs Paperbacks y Mas in San Antonio. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas, with research as sistance by Mary Rivas Paul Williams. The suit charges that the current election system violates the 1965 Voting Rights Act. "Unfortunately, there is a growing number of Hispanics in the court system, and we need judges who are sensitive to our blemsjudges who are role models for our children," said del Valle. There are 181 Cook County Circuit Court judges. The associate judges are elected by this group . Hispanics account for 1.5% of the associate judges. Felix Perez State Legislators' Body Rejects' English Only' The law and justice committee of the National Conference of State Legislators unanimously struck down a proposal March 25 to adopt 'official English' as its policy and to endorse this view in Congress. "With five bills pending (in Congress) to make English the official language, this is a significant victory," said Martha Jimenez, a policy analyst for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund "The unanimity was unexpected," she added . Jimenez testified before the committee . Indiana Sen. Joseph Corcoran introduced the proposal last month. Corcoran introduced similar legislation in his home state, which passed in 1984. Nearly 7,500 state legislators are members of NCSL. The issue was hotly contested before and during the meeting , with mail and phone calls opposing the resolution streaming in to Iowa Senator Don Doyle, the committee chairman , from state senators, elected of ficials and Democratic Party leaders. A Mexican American couple has been con ducting protests of Baskin-Robbins in Cali fornia s i nce filing March 16 a $15 million discrimination suit against the ice cream company. Angel and Carmen L6pez dumped 12 pounds of German chocolate, vanilla and other flavors in front of the Los Angeles federal courthouse where the case was filed. Couple Takes on Marriage Fraud Law A picket was planned for late last week in front of the company's Glendale, Calif . , head quarters, where berry berry strawberry and burgundy cherry were to be unloaded. The couple's Hemet, Calif . , neighbors held a March 29 rally in front of the L6pez shop some 50 miles east of Los Angeles . The 51-year-olds say they have poured their life savings and seven years into the franchise, which is located in a run-down part of town. The suit claims that after the couple tiated a move to an upscale new shopping area nearby , Baskin-Robbins maneuvered to open a company-operated store in its place. "They treat me like a dumb Mexican , " said Carmen L6pez, who will soon begin a flurry of promotional activity on radio and television. Attorney Stephen Nill said, "We're trying to show the company there are 31 flavors of people, not just vanilla." Darryl Figueroa 2 In an action that may have implications for hundreds of marriages of undocumented aliens across the country , a Hyattsville, Md, couple filed a lawsuit March 17 in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., charging that the federal marriage fraud law denies them their right to due process and should be struck down as unconstitutional. Moises and Laura Escobar, devout Mormons, were married in June 1987, while Moises, a native of El Salvador, was undergoing depor tation proceedings. Immigration authorities apprehended Moise 's, 29, Sept. 23, 1984, in El Paso, Texas, for entering the country illegally. The marriage fraud law, enacted in November 1986, states that aliens who marry U.S. citizens while engaged in deportation proceedings must leave the country for a minimum of two years. In addition to the alleged violation of the couple's due process right, Elizabeth Gustafson, an attorney working pro bono on the case, said the law is also unconstitutional because it "differentiates between couples undergoing deportation and those not And that difference can literally be a day." The charge of due process violation, said Gustafson , arises from the Escobar's inability to prove their marriage is valid . Gustafson said she had received word from immigration authorities that they would not carry out Moises' scheduled March30 depor tation until a court decision was handed down . Felix Perez Chicago Settles Bias Suit The city of Chica go agreed to establish a $9.2 million fund for back wages it must pay in a lawsuit that charged that the city police department discriminated against Hispanics, blacks and women in its hiring and promotions, the U .S. Department of Justice announced March 28 . The fund, which was set up as a result of a 15-year-old suit, will also be used to adjust seniority dates for729 Hispanics, blacks and women. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Paul Espinosa, guest columnist Tuned Out by Public TV Sin Pelos en Ia lengua Frankly, I'm stumped. The Public Broadcasting Service THE MILAGRO WAR SPREADS: The recent San ta Fe premiere recently distributed my latest documentary; In the Shadow of of"The Milagro Beanfield War' ' had the whole s tate of New Mexic o the Law. A one-hour program funded by the Corporation for tingling , if not quite trembling . Public Broadcasting, it is a portrait of four families who have Cruz Aguilar, who predated and then worked with Reies lived illegally in the United States for many years. Tixerina on his Spanish land-grant claims, was among the 150 Unfortunately, many viewers-even in the Southwestdidn't see rural folk who converged March 21 on the state capitol to protest the program at all . the denial of human, water and land rights . To get on the national schedule, in the " The Milaoro Beanfield War Continues" and " Tierra o Muerte," Shadow of the Law survived two CPB program some of the;;. signs proclaimed. Anyone who has seen the Robert fund evaluation rounds to become one of 17 Redford/Moctesuma Esparza movie will find Aguilar's placard projects funded from 27 4 proposals. especially appealing: "The Survival of a People is being threatened Despite making it onto the national PBS by Land Developer $." schedule , the program couldn't make i' ;t The rural protestors, spanning several generat ion s , crowded the more than 200 PBS program managers . into Gov . Garrey Carruthers ' office to plead for a commission t o The final gatekeepers in a Byzantine system, review and act on their complaints . The Santa Fe New Mexican some managers moved it to a daytime or reported that following the 1 1 /2-hour meeting , Carruthers promised inge slot Others didn't air it at all . to "examine the . possibility" of creating a commission . Examine Audiences didn't find In the Shadow of the the possibility? Nothing too hasty. Law in San Francisco, Dallas, San Jose, Chicago or Miami, despite TIXERINA OR TIJERINA? Mexico or Mejico? Since his release large illegal populations there. In Los Angeles, where almost half of from prison a decade ago, Reles T. (famous for the June5, 1967, the million-plus applicants for legalization live, viewers had raid he and six carloads of armed followers staged on the to catch it at 11 p .m., three weeks after the natiol'lal broadcast. Those courthouse at Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico , in which two deputies in Albuquerque and Denver saw it on Sunday at3 p.m. In San Antonio, were wounded and a third abducted) has continued his in ternational which is 55% Hispanic, the program aired at 11 p.m. search for documents to support his land-gran t claims. In one he NO 'TALKING HEADS' found a fr years ago, his family name was spelled "Tixerlna"Whilethenation'smajormediaallwerecarryingmidyearassessments so he ad . Jd it. A man's entitled to be called what he wants of the legalization program , many public TV program managers (although some New Mexico press hasn ' t accep ted the change rejected The Shadow of the Law as just a ' ' minority" program, in their yet), so Tlxerlna it is . I wonder if they still refer to Muhammad All view likely to be of substandard qualitY and interesting only to as Cassius Clay there? Hispanics. DISPATCH FROM CHIMAYO: Robert Redford's first choice They're wrong on both counts. as a site for the filming of " Milagro " was Chimayo , a picturesque First, TV Guide thought it was good enough to warrant a national town 20 miles north of Santa Fe . But two years ag o , high school Up." Reviewers on major newspapers in cities where the principal Harold Martinez led a small but det ermined group of program aired called it "panic community to watch Time magazine was one that omitted mention of Esparza, although PBS for other program fare. the mag and its critic , Richard Corliss, devote d a full page on WHO DaF-INES "CO!IIIMUNITY''? March 28 to the film . Included were photos of Redford and actor 1 have raised promotional monies tor 11everal of my programs and Chick Vennera-but none of Ruben Blades, Sonia Braga or offered them to stations to help pul;)licize my programs . Rather than Carlos Rlquelme. welcome these efforts, some rejected promoting the program at all . The New York Times' Vincent Canby, who panned the film A t a time when PBS auc;liences around the country had the roundly , listed eight key cast members (inclu ding B l ades and opportunity to learn about the Briti:>h el(perience in India, shouldn't Braga) toward the end of his review, and concl uded: they have the same opportunity to learn about aspects their own "None of them have a great deal to do except look the part. The American experience of which they may be ignorant? And isn't it the most riveting creature in the movie is a gre at white pig that does responsibility of a public, tax-supported system like public TV to tricks on cue ... " distribute programs which won't be pn commercial broadcasting? ""-IIIIIIT•o-e•a•c•h•h•is-o•w•n•. -------------•K•a•y-B•a•rb•a•r•o_. Some public broadcasting that local stations must be free to act with their community's interest in mind. But do they Q u 0 tl•n g • include Hispanics in their definition of " lo c al community''? Perhaps PBS stations will wake up to the enormous potential of Hisp an ic audiences. Perhaps public TV stations will make good on their unique capacity to fill that vast television wasteland with relevant, important programs on American topics . And then again , perhaps they won't. (Paul Espinosa is a senior producer at KPBS TV in San Diego.) • • PAUL RODRIGUEZ, star of the TV series "Tria l and E r ror," quoted in the Sacramento Bee March 13 on the current television and motion picture successes of Hispanics . " It's really hard when you have to depend on white liberals for a career. Today we're hot, but tomorrow Koreans could be the rage." Hispanic Link Weekly Report April 4 , 1988 3

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GOING HOME ... Juan Gonzalez ... to New York Near the old Jefferson Pool in East Harlem, where my mother and father settled after World War II, when fights erupted between Italians and Puerto Ricans over a girl or a look or whether we Puerto Ricans could swim in the pool, the issues seemed simple-us or them; do we have a right to walk the streets or not? ' No Gallup or CBS told us within a few percentage points how much Italians , Puerto Ricans and blacks disliked each other. Telephones weren't common enough for pollsters to gauge a community's pulse yet not touch its people . Television , a gawking infant then, couldn't package and transmit a riot to our living rooms on an hour's notice. Newspapers weren't obsessively covering racial ulcers on the city's surface, as they do today . But at least there were jobs, mostly the kind that constantly threatened to puncture or amputate your limbs. Those jobs in postwar America, the chance to provide something better for your kids with enough 10and 12-hour sweat-filled days, made it possible to endure everything else. PROG RESS HAD ITS PRICE After years on the public housing waiting list, our family finally got a chance to leave those 112th Street tenements with bathtubs in the kitch ens, toilets in the halls and gas burning apartment heaters. In 1956 we moved to the outskirts of eternity-the last stop on the A train then, Euclid Avenue to the sparkling new Cypress Hills projects that had been miraculously erected on a swamp. But progress had its price. In the Cypress Hills of the '50s, you could count the number of Puerto Rican and black families in each building on one hand. To be Puerto Rican and walk along liberty Avenue toward Ozone Park or along Jamaica Avenue at night was to risk a beating. Unlike East Harlem, there weren't enough of us to extract respect. Nor was there a white leader like East Harlem's legendary Italian congressman Vito Marca ntonio, still admired by Puerto Rican elders , to unite the ethnic and racial groups . On the stoops or in the schools of East New York in the late'50sand early '60s, th e pressures were to forget, deny, jettison our language and culture. By doing so we could prove we weren't really different. HERITAGE vs. CONFORMITY . . . Jaime Guerra To San Elizario Once upon a time, an Anglo-Saxon boy enrolle(:! in my beloved San Elizario Elementary School, 21 miles east of El Paso, Texas. At that time, San Elizario had fewer than 200 families, all "Mexican." Ours was one of those families. Within months of his arrival, the boy had " forgotten" his English and his family decided to leave town. The kid departed kicking and screaming . He . didn't want to leave his " Mexican" friends behind. little did ke know that he was missing a chance at immortality. Had that boy remained in San Eli, any visiting politician might have seen him swim ming in the polluted irrigation canals with dead animals floating by . Or fishing for carp and catfish with a pitchfork in the slimy drainage ditches. Had that happened, the boy might have changed the course of San Elrs history . The politician would scream holy murder in the hallowed legislative halls of Austin and Washington. 50 YEARS TOO LATE "As long as I live," he would say , "I do not want to see even one American child living in such primitive conditions. The town school doesn't even have a genuine library where they can use their time constructively." ' That one Anglo-Saxon American boy could have been responsible for a playground , swimming pool, library , recreation center and other goodies from across the tracks coming into my town. Oh well , it doesn ' t cost to dream ... Seventeen months ago, there was a 50th anniversary reunion in San Eli. I traveled from Houston to attend . A fund-raising drive was in progress to buy books for a school library that at last was on the drawing boards. As expected, the people were generous. Some$1 ,600 was collected A month and a half ago, the library was finally built. For Frank Duran, then the schoofs principal , and many others, a dream was realized . Our country spends millions to send the children of the Nicaraguan cbntras to the best schools in Florida and on rum and Coke for their parents so they can dream about sending our children to fight in the country they want to repossess . Why50 years too latedid we have to pass the hat for a library in San Elizario, one of the oldest towns in the United States? Why are there no playgrounds or swimming pools or any places where a child can develop healthfully in my town? Why can't they get a break like the Anglo children in communities that surround them? STILL A 'MEXICAN TOWN' Along the line I chose pride in my heritage as more precious than conformity , truth over acceptance . By the late 1960s, that propelled me toward protest, with my baptism in the Columbia student strike of 1968 and my confirmation in the Young Lords Party of the 1970s. In 1973, I jumped a Greyhound bus for Philadelphia and left the Today, my town is still a "Mexican" town but ifs unrecognizable . brutal magnificence that is New York. Along the way journalism got to Voracious landholders have turned the cotton farms i nto unplanned me. A few months ago , it led me back home-as a new columnist witt. subdivisions . The schools are overcrowded. The economy is in the New York Daily News. shambles. The kids have absolutely nothing to do. In this short time, my welcome has included: the Howard Beach There is crime and delinquency. Of course there is . One can't court decision ; two Days of Outrage; the beating of two black men in forever swim and fish in filthy water without building resentments . Yet the kids want to achieve . Bath Beach by a white mob on Christmas night ; the riddling of a black man in Queens by two white policemen during an altercation ; the Perhaps now that we Hispanics are . sometimes being courted as if deaths in separate incidents in the Bronx of a black hospital worker we are the only senorita in town , our activists will carry the message and an elderly Puerto Rican while in police cutody; and the beating back to the politicians that Hispanics will flock to the polls on their and robbery of a Polish emigre cab driver by a group of young blacks own if they are treated with equal concern and respect. shouting, "Howard Beach, lefs do it. " Perhaps somebody can explain to the White House and Congress Some things haven't changed . They just seem more complicated. that the San Eli kids are Americans doing more to fight communism And the flood of unskilled jobs that once provided New York's hope than all of the contras put together. They are trying to become good has dried up, leaving our young adrift in an economic wasteland citizensinacountrythatinsistsonmakingthem" neglectedMexicans." where each rac ia l attack makes you wonder how much more of this Those kids shouldn ' t have to wait-can't waituntil another white we can all endure. moves town. . . (Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) (Jatme Guerra ts a copy edttor wtth the Houston Chronicle.) 4 April4, 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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4 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS 0 ' PRESIDENT 6MCC BOROUGH OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE ANTICIPATED ADJUNCT POSITIONS Texas State Technical Institute System Accounting Anthropology Art Astronomy Banking Biology Black Studies 1988 Day and Evening ALL ACADEMIC SUBJECTS The Texas State Technical System invites applications and nominations for the position of President. TSTI is headquartered in Waco, Texas (population 102,000), and is the only state-supported postsecondary vocational Library Science and technical system in Texas. It offers Marketing programs designed to assist students in Mathematics developing career skills in more than seventy Media Productions programs of study leading toAaaociate Degrees Medical Records and Certificates of Completion. Campuses Music are located in Waco, Harlingen, Amarillo and Nursing Sweetwater, with extension centers in Abilene Philosophy and McAllen . ..... ,.., ........... ...... ..... --.;. . • - • -L..-!--1 1vvv, • vv vv. _ __ _ . __ The pledge from Pepsi , to be presented in five annual i UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS PRESS-Office of Graduate Studies, Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713-7819 (512) 471-7233, John Kyle WATERFRONT PRESS52 Maple Ave., Maplewood, N .J. 07040 (201) 762-1565, Kal Waggenheim of$200,000, will be used to fund fellowships to the MBA program. In addition to the $3,000 fellowships, 10 of which will be available by the fall of 1989, a tuition waiver will also be offered. LEGALIZATION PROGRAM EXTENSION: "Through the Maze," a 74-page Ford Foundation-funded report which the im migration reform law program, is available free of charge. To receive a copy, send a self-addressed 1 0" by 13" envelope with $2.40 postage to : Transcentury Development Associates, Attn : Report, 1724 Kalorama Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009-2624. Said John Kraft, dean of the College of Business, "We have a significant Hispanic student population" and "this allows us to be competitive to attract those students." OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS: "Who's Who: Chicano Officeholders -1987-88" is a 147-page directory by Western New Mexico University political science professor Arthur Martinez with listings from the federal to the municipal level. For a copy send $19.95 to: Arthur Martinez, P .O. Box 2271, Silver City, N . M . 88062 (505) 538-6229. The National Endowment for the Humanities announced March 22 that it will provide $1. 5 million to create the Center on the Teaching and Learning of History in Elementary and Secondary Schools at the University of California at Los Angeles. One goal of the center will be to examine the introduction in history courses of ethnic and female authors ... Pepsi-Cola Co . announces the appointment of Hernand Gonzalez as its national Hispanic marketing manager ... Calendar THIS WEEK LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Washington , D . C . April 4-6 The fourth quadrennial agenda of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference will be developed at this meeting by some 200 Hispanic leaders. The agenda will be presented to the Democratic and Republican presidential nominees and to policy makers. Joe Trevino (202) 659-0330 HISPANICS IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS New York April 4-7 Recognizing a major increase of Hi'spanic students in Catholic schools, the National Catholic Educational Association ' s 85th annual Convention will make Latino issues an integral part of its program . Sessions on Hispanic leadership training programs and other areas will be held. Patricia Feistritzer (202) 337-6232 ILLITERACY Chicago April 6-8 The 22nd annual National SER Jobs for Progress conference will present a two-phased pian to combat the problem of illiteracy among Hispanics . The plan Hispanic Link Weekly Report will be reviewed by technology and literacy experts. Amalia Roc hell (214) 631-3999 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Denver April 6-9 Experts in program development , counseling , inter viewing and employment law will be participating i n the 14th annual conference of the American As ation for Affirmative Action . Fred Alvarez, an assistant secretary of labor, will discuss recent Labor Depart ment initiatives. Judi Burnison (312) 329-2512 HISPANIC MEDIA Dallas April 6-9 The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and others will hold the sixth annual conference of Hispanic media professionals . Activities include workshops and a job fair involving sorne three dozen news organization recruiters. Frank Newton (202) 783-6228 IMMIGRATION POLICY Washington, D .C. April7, 8 A national legal conference on immigration and refugee policy will be held undertheauspicesofthe Center for Migration Studies, a New York-based non-profit institute. International and national ex perts will take part in a series of panels covering legislative and employment issues. Lydic Tomasi (718) 351-8800 April 4 , 1988 ANTI-'ENGLISH ONLY' SYMPOSIUM Phoenix, Ariz . April 8 A gathering of Hispanic and non-Hispanic leaders interested in developing a national strategy to combat the English Only movement will include former A r izona Gov. Bruce Babbitt, state Rep. Armando Ruiz , several Arizona mayors and others . The meeting is sponsored by Arizona English . Kathy O ' Donnell (602) 256-6745 COMING SOON MINORITY CAREERS New York State Minority Career Convention and Association New York April 14 Jacqueline Moreira (212) 923-2020 CHICANO STUDIES The National Association for Chicano Studies Boulder , Colo. April14-16 Cordelia Candelaria (303) 492-8852 BILINGUAL/ESL CONFERENCE Fort Worth Independent School District Fort Worth, Texas April 15 , 16 Anita Castaneda (817) 625-7271 'ENGLISH ONLY' Californians United Palo Alto. Calif. April 16, 17 Susannah Mac Kaye (415) 282-841 9 5

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GOING HOME. • • Juan Gonza lez Jaime Guerrs ... to New York ... To San Elizario Near the o ld Jefferson Pool in East Harlem, where my mother a nd f ather settled after World War II, when fights eru pted between Italians and Puerto Ricans over a girl or a look o r w he t her we Puerto Ricans could swim in the pool, the i ssues seemed s i mpleus or them ; do we have a right to walk t he streets o r not? Once upon a time, an Anglo-Saxon boy enrolled in my beloved San Elizario Elementary School , 21 miles east of El Paso, Texas. At that time, San Elizario had fewer than 200 families, all "Mexican . " Ours was one of those families. Within months of his arrival, the boy had "for gotten " his English and his family decided to leave town. The kid departed kicking and screaming. He . didn't want to leave his "Mexican" friends behind. 6 N o Ga llup or CBS told u s within a few percentage points how much Italians , Puerto Ricans and blacks disliked each other . Telephones weren't common enough for pollsters to gauge a community's pulse yet not touch its people . Television , a gawking infant then , couldn't package and transmit a riot to our living rooms on an hour's notice. Little did ke know that he was missing a chance at immortality . Had that boy remained in San Eli , any visiting politician might have seen him swim ming in the polluted irrigation canals with dead animals floating by . Or fishing for carp and catfish with a pitchfork in the slimy Newspapers weren ' t obsessively covering racial ulcers on the city's surface, as they do drainage ditches. Had that happened , the boy might have changed the course of San Elrs history . today. NEWS YOU CAN USE! HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE currently serving 200 magazines and newspapers across the has something new JUST FOR YOU! HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR NATIONAL 10 NEWS-WEEKLY SPECIAL COVERING FEATURES HISPANIC -t:r Calendar U S A -t:r Media Report • • • -t:r The Good News -t:r Editorial Cartoons -t:r Arts & Entertainment -t:r Names Making News -t:r Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua PLEASE START MY SUBSCRIPTION: 0 Start 13-week trial Subscriptions$30 0 Start 50-week Subscription$108 OBillme OBillmy Organization 0 Check encl . MAIL TO: Hispanic link .. .,s Service 1420 ' N' Sl N .VI washington. D .C. 410005 (202) 234-0280 PRODUCER/DIRECTOR KVEwTV is currently accepting applicat i ons for an experienced Producer/Director. This full-time opening calls for someone with one year experience producing commercials and (or) directing live newscasts preferably. Duties will include directing/switching the 5 :30' pm and 11 :00 pm news , as well as producing/ editing commercials, promo ' s etc . . . All interested applicants should contact: Dave Williams Production Manager KVEW Television 601 N. Edison9 Kennewick, WA 99336 (509) 453-0351 Applicat i ons will be accepted thru Friday , April 1 5, 1988. Equal Opportunity Employer REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITeRS: Hispanic Link News Service buys three word feature /opinion pieces weekly, peylng on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national Interest or application. For details and writer's guidelines, write Charlie Erlckeen. Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW , Washington, D.C. 20005. April 4 , 1988 HISPANIC HERITAGE FOR COMMEMORATIVE MATERIALS TO CELEBRATE 1988 NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK, CONTACT ROD ENTER PRISES, INC. MATERIALS INCLUDE VIDEOS, POSTERS, COMMEMORATIVE PINS, BANNERS AND BUTTONS. WRITE OR CALL ROD ENTERPRISES, PO BOX 50472, PASADENA. CA 91105, 818-799-1795. SECRETARY/ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Secretary/ Administrative Assistant. Full time, word processing skills a must , bilingual preferred. $18,000-$20, 000 . Send resumes to Hispanic Designers, 1201 16th St., NW , Suite #230, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 822-7895 . Victor Romero Producer/Director 2130 " N " Street, N. W #101 Washington , D.C., 20037 2 02/223-13[}5 WASHit4GTON, P.C., INTERNSHIPS: t-tlsp•olc Link New• Service expects to have n9w P!lld lntem,hlps for developing journalists In D.C., In 1988 . If Interested In receiving an application for any such oppol' tunltlea. write now to EricksenMendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, WashlngtOI\ D.C. 20005. Hispanic link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS 6MGI.iiiiiiiiiloiic ______ ____ BOROUGH OF MA:\:HATTA;'-; COMMUNITY COLLEGE ANTICIPATED ADJUNCT POSITIONS 1988-89 Day and Evening ALL ACADEMIC SUBJECTS Accounting Anthropology Art Astronomy Banking Biology Black Studies Business Administration Chemistry Community Mental Health Cooperative Education Corporate/Cable Communications Dance Data Processing: Operations Data Processing: Programming Early Childhood Education Economics English ESL French Geography Health Education History Italian Library Science Marketing Mathematics Media Productions Medical Records Music Nursing Philosophy Physical Education Physics Political Science Psychology Puerto Rican/Dominican Studies Reading Real Estate Respiratory Therapy Secretarial Science Spanish Social Service Sociology Speech Student Personnel Services Swimming Theater Travel and Tourism RANK AND SALARY DEPENDENT UPON QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE. MUST SEND RESUME AND COVER LETIER SPECIFYING AREA OF INTEREST BY 4/30/88 TO: Ms. Alyne Holmes Coy Director of Personnel Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007 /RCA VERIFICATION REQUIRED (NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) SOCIAL WORK SUPERVISOR Ann.# 6600-BA-DHS Salary: $34,240 Professional casework supervisor position in the Bureau of Intake Services. Duties inClude program planning and development; clinical management and casework direction; preparation of budget and statistical reports . Independent action is exercised within limits set by Federal, State and local policy directives and program guides. Requires MSW or related plus 3 years experience in casework, counseling or psychiatric social work. Preference may be given to candidates with A) LCSWor ACSWcertification; B) Supervisor experience; C) experience providing a wide variety of services; D) experience providing services to limited-English-Speaking clients . All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on April14, 1988. To request application material please call(703) 558 orTDD (703) 284 (hearing impaired only). Hispanic Link Weekly Report ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th St. North Arlington , Virginia 22201 EOE/MFH . PRESIDENT Texas State Technical Institute System The Texas State Technical System invites applications and nominations for the position of President. TSTI is headquartered in Waco, Texas (population 102,000), and is the only stat&supported postsecondary vocational and technical sY&tem In Texas. It offers programs designed to assist students in developing career skills in more than seventy programs of studyleadlngtoAssoclate Degrees and Certificates of Completion. Campuses are located in Waco, Harlingen, Amarillo and Sweetwater, with extension centers in Abilene and McAllen. The President of Texas State Technical Institute System will report to the Board of Regents. This position Is responsible for the formulation of policies and programs. Working with the Board, the President Is the Chief Executive Officer and is expected to effectively represent TSTIIn Interfacing with the state of Texas Legislative and Executive branches; leaders of buslness,lndustry,labor, and higher education; and with the leadership of the state of Texas Coordinating Board. The four campus PresldentsandSystem Vice Presidents of Instruction, Development, Fiscal Affairs. Human Services. and Student Affairs report directly to this office. Candidates should hold a college degree, but industrial experience and professional achievement are equally important consider atlons. They should possess ttie cominuni . cation skills necessrytoarticulatethe mission of the System and enhance Its stature through out the state. Unquestioned Integrity, a high energy level, excellent administrative skills, political astuteness and genuine enthusiasm fort he purpose and role of the System are all Important attributes. Nominations and applications, along with resumes and references. should be sent to: MR. R. WILLIAM FUNK HEIDRICK AND STRUGGLES, INC. ATIENTION: TSTI PRESIDENT'S SEARCH 1999 BRYAN STREET, SUITE 1919' DALLAS, TEXAS 75201 (214) 22Q-2130 The Texas State Technical Institute is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer. DIRECTOR, OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION Rio Hondo College, California Exciting opportunity to develop linkages with business and industry, assess training needs, develop and Implement innovative programs. For Information and application, call Jean at (213) 692-Q921 ext. 309. 7

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Arts & Entertainment different purpose. Miami's OK South Gallery will hold an auction April 8 to benefit the Casa Nueva Vida residential treatment center for Hispanic drug addicts . POTPOURRI: A "pro-Hispanic film" currently shooting in Hawaii has the distinction of being the first motion picture ever endorsed by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. A wide variety of Hispanic musical acts are gearing up for upcoming tours and performances. For the third year in a row, San Antonio ' s Tejano rock group La Mafia has signed a sponsorship deal with the Pepsi-Cola bottling group/Southern Division . The sponsorship will fund La Mafia's various "Stay in Schoor• performances in Texas high schools. " We were enormously impressed by the ultra proHispanic focus of Jerry Schafer's action-drama screenplay, " says Patrick J. Shannon, executive producer of Fists of Steel The film, starring Carlos Palomino and Henry Silva, is scheduled for an October release . Mexican singer Emmanuel has a sponsorship deal with another beverage. Michelob will take him on his 15-city Entre Lunas tour that begins April 8 in Los Angeles . A couple of New York Puerto Rican graffiti artists have completed work on murals to be used for a TV sitcom pilot currently in production. The murals by Ernie Vales and Gil Aviles depict various New York City street scenes and the racial tensions in South Africa They are being used as background and settings for Livin' Large. Emmanuel is also featured in a 20-second Spanish-language TV spot for Michelob, produced by New York's Castor Spanish International. Quincy Jones is one of three executive directors of the pilot about urba n kids on their own for the f i rst time . The murals were completed last month in Los Angeles . This week, the legendary Antologia de Ia Zarzuela.returns to the United States for a 13-city tour. The company, made up of 80 singers, dancers and musicians, performs in Tampa, Fla, April8-10. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Dozens of U . S . Hispanics will be using their art this week for a Media Report HEADUNEOFTHEDAY: TheBorderPatrol r aided a Compton, Calif. , warehouse and picked up a truckload of undocumented workers who reportedly had been smuggled into the country from Mex ico to sell frozen fruit bars a nd ice cream from pushcarts in the Southern California area. The Los Angeles Times headed the story: "INS Scoops Up 51 Alien Ice Cream Vendors. " ANAYA., ARIAS ON PUBLISHING: Premier U.S. Chicano novelist Rudolfo Anaya , whose works have been published in Polish , German and Spanish as well as English , offered this recent commentary to The Milwaukee Jour nars Melita Garza: " There is a historic prejudice against Mexican people in this country. The reasons are com pl ex and tied up with the people in power and who they share their power with . They haven ' t shared power with Chicano people and they haven ' t s h ared in our literary works." HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat i o n a l publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington. D.C . 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor F elix Perez Report i n!l : Antonio MejiasRentas. Darryl Figueroa . Graphics/Production : Ca r los Arrien, Zoila E lias. No portion of H ispanic Link Weekly Report may be(eproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE C LASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Displa y ads ar e $45 per column inch . Ads placed by Tue sday w ill run in Weekl y Reports mailed Friday of same week . Multiple use rate s on request. 8 Commenting on the potential impact of successful Latino motion pictures on broader acceptance of Latino literary themes and authors, he said: "It might take the movie industry to create the image of the Chicano in this country and awaken interest in our culture." Those few U . S . Latino authors who have been published and promoted by establishment publishing houses are generally writers who have little sensitivity to Hispanic culture , some Latino critics note . Richard Rodriguez , author of "Hunger of Memory, " an autobiography that was embraced by Anglo book reviewers but criticized bitterly by Hispanic writers , gained notoriety with his attacks on affirmative action and his perceived contempt for the Hispanic culture. "He wrote what the Anglo editors wanted to hear and believe, so they published him," one critic commented. Ron Arias, a respected novelist , labeled Rodriguez "a marginal writer. " He described his prose as "very precious. The content of his writing certainly doesn't reflect H i spanic attitudes, " he agreed . In an article written for Hispanic Link News Service five years ago, Anaya observed: "Even under the most trying of times and circumstances, Chicanos and other Hispanic writers have brought about a writing renaissance within our lifetime . But since a writer writes to publish, a writer must have access to publishers. Clearly, the Man.,the big publishershad not been interested in Chicano literature . "Publishers, and the media in general , have the power to abridge the civil rights of many writers. In the marketplace there is censorship by omission as well as by commission; there fore, the question persists ; if any group in this country is denied access to the media, do we really have an enlightened media which is responsive to the civil rights of everybody in the society'? "Society suffers," he concluded, "because it is kept from knowing its true character, In other words, the civil rights of the total society are abridged." Charlie Ericksen HISPANICS IN THE NEWSROOM1988 \ _ _/ C7 Hispanic Link Weekly Report