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Hispanic link weekly report, May 2, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 2, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The New This Week
Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry sends letters to all 48 Rj members of the Senate and House Judiciary committees, urging that [I the deadline for legalization be extended... The National Institute for | Work and Learning names Joseph Ferndndez, superintendent of I! Dade County, Fla, Public Schools, to its National Panel on Work and 1 America’s Youth. . . EMILYs - Early Money is Like Yeast - List | includes Patricia Madrid, a candidate for New Mexico’s 1 st Congres-I sional District, as one of eight women nationwide to receive financial I; support from its donor network for Democratic women... Angela
Santos, 21, the first Navy female killed in a terrorist attack, is buried in Ocala, Fla Santos was killed in Naples, Italy, by a car bomb outside a USO club... The National Association of Bilingual Education names Raquel Baez, a middle school teacher from Bronx, N.Y., as its Teacher of the Year... Tracie Ru iz-Contorto JracMO^om retirement after winning a gold medal at the 1^§£j®mp\cs, gains a spot on the U.S. Olympic synchronized swimming team by^winning the solo competition in Indianapolis... Albuq^K^je^i.M.)nonors its founder, Francisco Cuervo y Valdes, with theunveiling of a statue. Cuervo was provisional governor of New Mexico in 1706... Michigan’s Dona Oliveira, a 26-year-old registered nurse, wins the Women’s World Professional Body Building championship in Nice, France...

Legalization Centers Inundated
With the May 4 legalization deadline looming, I an estimated 70,000 undocumented aliens
I are scrambling to file applications the final f week while overwhelmed U.S. Immigration [ and Naturalization Service centers and many l| legalization aid groups are being forced to
II turn applicants away.
Daily applications mushroomed from 2,000 I in January to 10,000 in early April and 20,000 I later in the month. As of April 22, there were I 1,248,263 persons who had applied under I; the legalization program and another421,990 under the agricultural worker program which || has a Nov. 30 deadline.
| “If s just a mad dash at this point,” said Jan j Pena, administrator of Catholic Charities’ immigration unit in Houston. Only20 of their55 | original centers are accepting new applicants “We are so overwhelmed. Many parishes I are only handling applications already in house,” [| Pefta said. She expressed concern over the I many applicants who had already been turned | away by other Qualified Designated Entities.
Gil Carrasco, associate director of the U.S. I Catholic Conference’s migration and refugee f division, which operates over 100 QDEs, confirmed this overload. “Some of our QDEs are j no longer doing intake. Others will not be
doing follow-up work.”
Long lines, applicants camping out at filing centers and eligibility confusion are characterizing the end of the one-year amnesty period, officials say. Texas and California in particular are seeing a major closing rush, with people lined up at INS and QDE centers well before dawn.
If the application process has changed, so have the applicants. “The ones we are seeing now are the most exploited, the less educated,” said Muzaffar Christi, with the International Ladies Garment Workers Union in New York.
INS, which has set a policy of regionally adjusting hours to suit local needs, will be operating until midnight on May4, said spokesperson Jerry Ficklin. Everyone in line at that time will be taken care of, he said. Interviews and additional processing have been virtually halted while employees struggle to deal with new applications.
Many groups have called for a deadline extension. They say the onslaught is proof more time is needed, particularly for those recently made eligible under several relaxed INS guidelines. INS opposes an extension and recommends a presidential veto if necessary. continued on page 2
] Higher Minimum Wage Bills Debated
Two national Hispanic groups, one that t represents business interests and another I that concerns itself with job training and l employment, find themselves at odds over the impact two congressional higher-minimum-i wage bills would have on Latinos.
The full House, after it reconvenes May 10 j from spring recess, is expected to take up a ! bill that would raise the minimum wage in f increments over four years to $6.05. The t Senate version, which calls for a floor of j $4.65 after several years, is awaiting mark-up it in its Labor Committee.
Advocates of increasing the minimum wage \ argue that doing so would raise the standard j of living for families and individuals who are | now below or near the poverty level. The ' current $3.35 minimum wage took effect in I 1981.
[ Opponents say an increase would do away < with hundreds of thousands of entry-level
jobs that primarily go to Hispanic and other minority youth.
Although stating that the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has not formulated an official position, Jorge Negr6n, the group’s Washington representative, said, “We’re always in favor of raising the standard of living of Hispanics, but a minimum wage increase, when weighed against the economy, may hurt Hispanic small businessmen.” h Fred Romero, director of the National SER Policy and Research Institute, disagreed, saying “Nothing but good can happen to Hispank?s> especially those in marginal jobs.” Romero, who used to be director of policy and strategic planning for the U.S. Department of Labor under the Reagan administration, agreed that the concerns of Hispanic small businessmen are justified but noted that the loss of jobs predicted when the minimum wage was last raised never materialized. - Felix Perez
New York’s Hispanics Rally Behind Jackson
Despite repeated virulent attacks by Mayor Edward Koch against the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Hispanics in New York City voted overwhelmingly in that state’s April 19 Democratic primary for Jackson.
According to exit poll results by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 53% cast ballots for Jackson compared with 39.5% for Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis. Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore received 7.1% of the Hispanic vote.
Even with Jackson’s strong showing among Hispanics and blacks, he came in a distant second to Dukakis in the statewide vote. The Massachusetts governor won 51%, Jackson 37% and Gore 10%. Gore has since dropped out of the presidential race.
Latinos Enjoy the Arts
The amount of leisure time among Hispanic adults from 1984 to 1987 has declined faster than that of the general population,* according to the results of a Louis Harris survey.
Hispanics reported having 18 hours of leisure time per week in 1984. This figure decreased to 13 hours per week last year. The 1987 leisure figure for the overall population was 16.6 hours. This compares with 18.1 hours per week three years earlier.
The survey, conducted to gauge the level of participation in the arts and released last month, reported these differences in art activities engaged in:
Hispanic Overall
Paint/Draw 32% 27%
Sculpt 13 8
Modern Dance/
Ballet 27 23
Choral Group/ Choir 26 22
The survey also found that Hispanics outpaced non-Hispanics in their growth of VCR ownershipL Ownership among Hispanics increased from 17% to 65%.
The survey results were based on a nationally representative sample of 1,501 men and women aged 18 and older. Hispanics represented 6% of the sample.


Impacto Forges Ahead; Planning Presidential Debate
Plansare underway for a possible May21 bipartisan presidential debate in East Los Angeles, according to the director of Impacto '88, a grass-roots coalition of Hispanics seeking to exert influence on the November elections and beyond.
The debate, not yet finalized, would have four Hispanics serve as panelists and one as moderator. The questions would be based on the agenda that resulted from last month’s National Hispanic Leadership Conference, the agenda drafted by Impacto in March and last October's National Hispanic Agenda ’88.
“We want to demonstrate that there’s a continuity of planning within the Hispanic community, that we’re looking at issues that not only affect us but the entire country,” Armando Navarro told Weekly Report.
California’s primary is June 7.
Impacto continues to make substantial headway toward the second goal of its twopronged effort establish a working relationship between Mexico and U.S. Latinos, particularly those of Mexican descent.
Some 300 Impacto representatives and Hispanic leaders, including U.S. Reps. Albert Bustamante and Esteban Torres, met April
8 in Tijuana, Mexico, with Mexico presidential aspirant Carlos Salinas de Gortari, the candidate of Mexico’s ruling party, PRI - the Partido Revolucionario Institucional.
Impacto met April 23 with the candidate from a PRI splinter group, Corriente Demo-cratico, and also had a meeting with the choice of the Partido Accidn Nacional April 30.
Said Navarro of Impacto’s future: “We’ve done extremely well with what we’ve had. The key question now is: Are we going to be able to raise the funds, the resources and the lubricants to continue?” - Felix P6rez
Tex. Widens Migrant Student Program
The University of Texas at Austin announced April 22 that it will expand its migrant education program next year. The program allows migrant students to take their school work when they follow the harvest and to mail it back for grading.
The $152,000 effort, funded by the Texas Education Agency, targeted 300 seventh through 12th grade students at high dropout risk last year. This year it hopes to reach 700
Unemployment HHs 8.2%
The Hispanic unemployment rate for March decreased slightly, to 8.2%, a one-tenth of a percentage point drop from the February rate, announced the U.S. Department of Labor*s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2-Year Colleges Targeted
The nation’s community colleges should develop plans to recruit disadvantaged students and identify prospective Hispanic, black and Asian American teachers in high school and assist them toward a teaching career, says a study released April 19.
“By providing quality education to all ages and social groups, the community college can help both the neighborhoods and the nation become self-renewing,” states the two-year study by the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges.
The quality of education and outreach effort are particularly important to Hispanics because 55% of Hispanics in higher education are enrolled in two-year colleges.
There are 1,224 regionally accredited community, junior and technical colleges in the nation, the largest branch of U.S. higher education.
Another of the several recommendations included in “Building Communities: A Vision for a New Century" is that high schools and community colleges should work more closely to cut into the dropout rate and ensure a smoother transition from secondary to postsecondary education. The study concludes that community colleges have a special obligation to dismantle racial, ethnic, age and sex barriers.
2
students, said services coordinator Rose Ann Renteria Such students lose about 12 weeks of school each year, she said.
Statewide, 71,165 migrants are enrolled in grades 7-12. The Texas Education Agency placed their dropout rate at 50%, citing failing grades and frustration due to absence as major contributors to it.
California was the first state to offer such flexibility to migrant students through its Portable Assisted Study Sequence program established in 1978. PASS now involves 20 other receiving or sending states.
The $400,000 program served almost 6,000 ninth to 12th grade students who migrated within or out of California last year. Approximately 98% of those students are Hispanic, said Mary Lloyd, its California coordinator.
“The future of migrant student education is in correspondence courses,” said Lloyd. Migrant educational leaders are staging a con-erence May 9-13 in Hollywood, Fla, to discuss among other things, making state programs compatible and more extensive.
- Darryl Figueroa
The House passed a bill April 20 on a 213-201 vote that would extend the deadline to Nov. 30. The Senate was expected to vote on similar legislation by April 29. Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), one of the original sponsors of the immigration bill, opposes an extension. Sen. Edward Kennedy(D-Masa) said he favors one.
“A lot will depend on how adamant Simpson is and how supportive Kennedy is, but I think we have a good chance,” said legislative analyst Charles Kamasaki of the National Council of La Raza
“The huge numbers of people filing demonstrates that there are still lots of them out there and they need time and counseling before they file,” added Kamasaki.
Peha agreed. “I have been amazed at the number of people still so unaware of basic elements of the law. We need more time.” Additionally, many potential applicants are
Naturalization Denials by INS Called Arbitrary
Naturalization applicants from Mexico South and Central America and Africa are more likely to be denied by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service than are those from other parts of the world, found a study by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials released April 26.
According to the study, the three largest supplier countries with the most INS denials were the Dominican Republic (29%), Cuba (22.2%) and Colombia(21.2%). Mexico came in sixth, having a denial rate of 17.1 %.
The study found that these “administrative" denials accounted for 89% of all naturalization denials from 1985-87. The NALEO report said INS’ application consideration process is done “haphazardly” and varies considerably among its regional offices.
While the INS administers the naturalization program, only federal and some state courts can formally award or deny citizenship. The study recommended that I NS inform rejected applicants that they can reapply through the courts.
still having trouble meeting the program’s basic fees. I ndividuals are assessed a charge of $185, while the maximum feeforafamily is $420.
Employers, who will be liable June 1 if they knowingly hire illegal workers, are also confused about recent INS practices, reported QDE officials. Fearing involvement in illegal activity, many are refusing the new non-photc ID work permit issued to those who file skeletal forms.
Before April 4, laminated photo ID cards were issued as work authorizations to applicants.
The results of pending litigation may make thousands more undocumenteds eligible, Kamasaki pointed out. Court decisions are pending on such issues as waiver provisions for those who were out of the country longeij than 45 days since 1982, and those who left the country after May 1987.
- Darryl Figueroa
\
Hispanic Link Weekly Repot
Basic Fees Pose Problem for Many
continued from page 1


Darryl Figueroa, guest columnist
Teacher Takes to ‘ Pulpit*
Jaime Escalante, an immigrant from Bolivia and unofficial U.S. teacher of the year, is sitting in a posh hotel suite in Washington, D.C. Far from the East Los Angeles classroom where he works his miracle, this humble man is no less the earnest instructor his Garfield High School students know.
The motion picture “Stand and Deliver,” which has earned praises for its artistry and the man it portrays, is changing his classroom forever.
In fact, the 57-year-old Escalante allowed a movie based on his teaching success to be made only when he realized the reach it would give him. “I hope it makes others see there is potential everywhere,” says the stout, balding man.
Escalante’s message couldn’t come at a better time. In an era when Latino students desperately need caring role models to identify with, Hispanics make up less than 2% of the nation’s teachers. The high school dropout rate is as high as80% in some inner-city schools. Less than half of U.S. Latinos over 25 have high school diplomas and only 8.5% have college degrees.
This month, 160 of Escalante’s students will take the advanced placement calculus test. Those who pass will earn a semester's worth of college credit. Many will earn tickets to some of the best colleges in the country.
This at the 99.9% -Hispanic school that was about to lose its academic standing when Escalante appeared a dozen years ago.
GENTLY MANIPULATES
He sits still and speaks softly, his glasses slipping down his nose, as he describes his technique: “It is necessary to teach with the patience of a turtle, the tenacity of a spider, the power of a general and the mind of a calculator.”
Again and again these characteristics surface as he relays how he works. First, he has mothers and fathers sign a contract prohibiting their children from watching much television. Simultaneously, he commits parents to the process, establishes his own authority over students and learns much about the student's home life. The calculator.
“Teachers need to establish not just a relationship with the students, but with mama e papa. You have to understand them. You have to get their help. Schools alone can’t do it,” he informs.
Next, he describes the general. He blackmails and manipulates and demands. “You heard your mom. Only As and Bs, not for one semester but for three years. If you don’t do it, you’re out.”
Once he gets a student in his class, he develops the hold of the spider. “I will not sign a dropout form and I won’t let them give up.”
Many teen-agers would respond to such tactics with rebellion. But, Escalante says, “If you do it with love and touch the sensibility of the kids, they will follow your instruction.” The turtle.
HERITAGE, BILINGUALISM HELP
He admits that he possesses another trait which worked in hisfavor at Garfield: he is himself Latino. “One of the kids told me, ‘I feel confident in your class because you look like me,’ ” whispers Escalante. Whenever he wants to make a serious point, he whispers.
He continues, “I don’t think there would be that kind of communication or confidence if the teacher were Anglo or something else. Once you open that communication, it is very easy. The student flies.”
His heritage and bilingualism have made him successful with parents, too. He calls and says, “Vengo a saludarle” Sometimes when he visits he reprimands parents for their lack of involvement.
“Children have to feel that one day they will be somebody so that they can improve this land,” he whispers.
Through the movie and the pulpit it has brought him, Escalante can now say to every disadvantaged, neglected student what he has been telling his classes for years: You are the best. Don’t be afraid. You are the hope of the future.
Sin pelos en la lengua
KAY S NEW LEAF: At last month’s Hispanic media conference in Dallas, there was concern expressed that I was taking life too seriously lately. So I am tapping the lines of a few old friends who never would commit that sin:
BAR SURVEY: I will start with Richard Avena, former lider of the Southwestern regional office of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He tells me, behind a glass of Scotch, that there’s a bar called “Tenampa” in every Texas town worth its salt and tequila.
He also claims to remember when our suit-and-tie voter registration expert Willie Veldsquez ran a watering hole on the outskirts of San Antonio called the DMZ.
And he challenges anyone to come up with a more creative name for a bar than No Esta Aqui, which sits on the outskirts of San Antonio on Highway 90.
PRESIDENTIAL PRONOUNCEMENT: Philosopher George Archuleta, of Alamosa, Colo., is displeased with the way Jesse Jackson pronounces his home state: Cohuh-rad-uh. But he’s fearful that passage of an Official-English state constitutional amendment in November will force even its native Spanish-speakers to switch from Koh-loh-rah-doe to Coboh-raah-do.
It might also end his continuing campaign to change the name of the daily Fort Collins Coloradoan. “That extra ‘o’ is simply unacceptable,” he protests.
NO MORE WILLIE: The Official-English movement doesn’t intimidate Detroit Tiger pitcher Willie Hernandez, the American League’s 1984 Cy Young and Most Valuable Player award winner.
Last week Hernandez, of Puerto Rican descent, instructed the club to change his name in their line-up card from Willie to Guillermo.
Reporters claim the star pitcher, whose performance has fallen off, wants to be left alone. If the writers have to address him by his first name, that ought to do the trick.
BERNARDINO’S BACK: Bernardino Rodriguez was hired onto the Hialeah Police Department in February 1986 after completing its rigorous training. Four months later he resigned following complaints from superiors that his English was deficient. The dispatchers couldn’t understand him, the city claimed, and when he got excited, he reverted to Spanish.
Now Rodriguez is suing to get his job^ack, charging discrimination-in a city that’s 80% Hispanic. Mark Swanson, his attorney, has an argument that just might sway some Florida jurors: “I have relatives in New York I have a harder time understanding than Bernie.”
WHO LOCA? A front-page article in the Washington Post’s business section April 23 details the Chrysler Corporation’s announced move of its K-car production to“Tuloca, Mexico.” Tu-loca? Who/oca? Would you believe “Toluca”?
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
ANGELO FALCON, director of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, quoted in the April 18 New York Times on the appeal of Democratic candidate Michael Dukakis to Hispanic voters:
“Dukakis has the advantage of speaking flawless and fluent Spanish. But he is boring in any language.”
ALJEAN HARMETZ, In a New York Times’ review of “Stand and Deliver”:
"What is remarkable about ‘Stand and Deliver' is that the heart-pounding excitement comes not from car chases, gang warfare or invented crises in the life of the teacher but from the Advanced Placement calculus exam that the 18 students took for college credit."
(Darryl Figueroa reports for Hispanic Link Weekly Report.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report May 2,1988
3


COLLECTING
MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS: “Sex Bias in College Admissions Tests: Why Women Lose Out” concludes that women not only fail to get their fair share of merit scholarships because of gender bias but also because of ethnic bias. To receive a copy send $7.95 to FairTest, P.O. Box 1272, Harvard Square Station, Cambridge, Mass. 02238.
COMMUNITYCOLLEGES: “Building Communities: A Vision fora New Century’ is a two-year study on how community colleges can better serve students and communities. For a copy send $15 to the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Publications Department, 80 S. Early St., Alexandria, Va. 22304 1-800-336-4776.
LEGALIZATION - THE SECOND STAGE: The Tomas Rivera Center has released a paper questioning what it calls the vague outlines of the second stage of legalization. For a copy of “Tell Me the Name of Grant's Horse: Amnesty Requirements Under the 1986 Immigration Act” send $2 to TRC, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711-3921 (714)625-6607.
PARENTS AND READING: “Becoming a Nation of Readers: What Parents Can Do,” a 29-page booklet by the U.S. Department of Education, includes tips that can be used beginning with preschoolers. To receive a copy, send 500 to the Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
LATCHKEY CHILDREN: “What If I’m Home Alone? - Your Family’s Guide to Home and Personal Safety Skills” is a 16-page, easily readable booklet for children by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. It provides tips on how latchkey children can make their time alone safer and more constructive. For a copy send a $1 check to CPB, P.O. Box 33039-LK, Washington, D.C. 20033.
LEISURE TIME: “Americans and Arts V” is a survey by Louis Harris and Assocs. which finds that Hispanics are inclined to participate in the arts. To order a book highlighting the survey results($2) or for complete copies of the survey ($9), contact the American Council for the Arts, Publications Department, 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10019 (212) 245-4510.
NATURALIZATION APPLICANTS: “New Citizens in Limbo?” is a 21 - page report that analyzes the rejection rates of legalized immigrants applying for U.S. citizenship based on national origin. The study is available free from the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 1-800-44-NALEO.
CONNECTING
$1.2 MILLION AWARDED Signaling its biggest year yet, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund announced last month that it awarded $1.2 million in scholarships to 1,532 Hispanic college students nationally and in Puerto Rico for the 1987-88 academic year.
For the second year in a row, the 13-year-old organization has surpassed$1 million in scholarships awarded. Overthe last 12 years, NHSF has awarded $4.8 million to more than 7,600 Hispanic students. The amount in scholarships awarded has grown to its present level from $30,000 in 1976, the first year the program was in operation.
For more information, contact NHSF, P.O. Box 748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101 (415)892-9971.
REGISTRATION DRIVE UNDERWAY The second of four press conferences by the National Association of Hispanic Publishers to gather support for its print media campaign to get Hispanics to vote will be held May 2 in New York.
Titled “For Your Future,” the 1-month-old campaign will attempt to get out the Hispanic vote through the use of a print advertisement in NAHPs more than 100 member publications. The campaign, funded by Philip Morris, will run through the 1988 elections.
After the New York press conference, there will be one May 10 in Chicago and May 12 in Washington, D.C.
READING PROGRAM SPREADS Now in its second year of operation, an innovative reading program in El Paso, Texas, that not only teaches reading skills to children but improves the literacy level of limited-English-proficient parents, seeks replication throughout the state.
The Intergenerational Reading Program, funded this year to the tune of $40,000 by the Texas Education Agency, teaches reading skills through interaction between the children and parents. The program teaches up to five families at a time for a minimum of six months. The groups meet for one session per week. The level for students ranges from pre-school to primary.
The brainchild of Elizabeth Quintero, a childhood development director at El Paso Community College, three or four groups have followed suit in other areas. Quintero gives training seminars to interested groups across the state to help it catch on. For'more information, write Quintero at El Paso Community College, P.O. Box 20500, El Paso, Texas 79998.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
BIRTHDAY BASH Washington, D.C. May 3
Congressman Henry Gonz&lez (D-Texas) will celebrate his 72 nd birthday and his 35th year as an elected official by giving a public party, as he does annually.
Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236
MAQUILADORA SEMINAR Houston May 5
The first of a series of eight seminars to acquaint Texas businesses with Mexico’s maquiladora industry will be hosted by the Houston Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. This program allows foreign ownership and duty free importation of raw materials in exchange for the employment of Mexican citizens.
Joyce Szabo (512) 224-5322
FUENTES LECTURES Fairfax, Va. May 5
The final lecture to be given by noted Mexican author Carlos Fuentes, heritage professor at George Mason University, is titled “Latin America Faces 4
the Future.” Fuentes will discuss current conditions and the conditions under which Latin America will likely enter the 21 st century.
University Activities (703) 323-3852
CINCO DE MAYO
The 1862 “Battle of Puebla,” when Mexico ousted French troops from its territory, will be commemorated around the country in various ways.
San Diego May 5
The Chicano Federation of San Diego County is hosting a Cinco de Mayo luncheon celebration. The employee of the year will be chosen at this fundraising event.
Irma Castro (619) 236-1228
Montebello, Calif. May 5 '
Some local distributors have donated food and drinks, and over 250 local entertainers, including Mariachi Zapopan, clowns, and magicians, will donate their time for this community celebration of Cinco de Mayo. The Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association co-sponsors the festivities. Amalia L6pez (213) 724-0610 Saint Paul, Minn. May 7
The Concord Street Business Association is sponsoring its fourth annual Cinco de Mayo fiesta. Latino food and music, folkloric dances, a parade and a May 2,1988
five-kilometer race will be among the activities taking place.
Samuel Verdeja (612) 222-6347
Chicago Weekends throughout May Dance, performances and Mexican arts and crafts exhibits will be presented on May weekends as part of The Chicago Field Museum of Natural History commemoration of Cinco de Mayo.
Lisa Elkuss (312) 322-8859
COMING SOON
MIGRANT CONFERENCE
National Association of Community Health Centers
Hollywood, Fla. May 9-13 ,
Dan Cdrdenas (202) 659-8008
MEXICAN/CHICANO AUTHOR AWARDS Universidad Autdnoma de Ciudad Ju&rez University of Texas at El Paso Ju&rez, Mexico May 12-14 El Paso, Texas May 12-14 Ricardo Aguilar (915) 747-5462
LATINO MUSIC Smithsonian Institution*
Washington, D.C. May 14 Luz Maria Pietro (202) 786-2307
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


DIRECTOR OF STUDIES
Princeton University invites applications and nominations for the position of Director of Studies in one of the five residential colleges, which serve as the center of residential life for all Princeton freshmen and sophomores.
The Director of Studies is responsible, under the Office of the Dean of the College, for the organization and oversight of academic advisingand the implementation of academic regulations for the approximately450 freshmen and sophomores who live in each college. He or she is also responsible, under the Office of the Dean of Students, for minor infractions of the rules of conduct and for some personal counseling of the undergraduates who live in the college, as well as for other administrative functions as determined by the Master of the college. The Director of Studies works closely in every regard with the residential college Master, who has overall responsibility for the college.
Applicants Should have had some experience as faculty members or academic administrators in a college or university and must be sensitive to the needs and concerns of students from quite different backgrounds. Although this is a full-time position, arrangements may be made, when feasible, for some limited teaching in the appropriate academic department. Normally a Director of Studies is expected to hold the Ph.D. degree in a discipline taught at Princeton.
Position is available July 15, 1988. Applications must be received by May 23,1988.
Please send curriculum vitae and names of at least three references to: DEBORAH RAIKES-COLBERT, OFFICE OF PERSONNEL SERVICES, CLIO HALL, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08544.
CIVIL SERVICE POSITIONS THE NAVY PUBLIC WORKS CENTER, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA, IS CONTINUOUSLY SEEKING CANDIDATES FOR A VARIETY OF CIVIL SERVICE PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER AND ARCHITECT POSITIONS INCLUDING MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, CIVIL, STRUCTURAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND FIRE PREVENTION ENGINEER; ARCHITECT AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. RESPONSIBILITIES MAY BE IN THE FACILITY PLANNING, DESIGN, UTILITIES, CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION OR CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AREAS. REQUIREMENTS: BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN ENGINEERING OR ARCHITECTURE WITH 3 YEARS OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING/ ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIENCE. SOME POSITIONS MAY REQUIRE PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION. SALARYA RANGE: $31,383 - $35,007. SOME POSITIONS MAY HAVE FURTHER PROMOTION POTENTIAL. U.S. CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND APPLICATION FORMS, CONTACT: CIVILIAN PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT AT (619) 235-2761. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
Director of
Hispanic Policy Analysis Center j
Responsible for overseeing a research center and soliciting funding for the center. Duties include planning, forecasting, budgeting, and preparing reports. Will oversee a small staff. $25-30,000. Send resume to Executive Director, AAMA, 204 Clifton, Hous* ton, Texas 77011.
Princeton University
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08544
An Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer
.. ANNOUNCING ..
A WORKSHOP SPONSORED BY ARLINGTON COUNTY COMMUNITY PLANNING, PARKS AND RECREATION AND THE ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
WHEN: Monday, May 9,1988
TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
WHERE: Wilson School
1601 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, Virginia
Receive information concerning:
0 Job opportunities (current and future)
0 How to apply for employment with Arlington County 0 Benefits
Representatives from these departments will conduct the workshop in English and Spanish.
If you have questions contact Eduardo at (703) 558-2475 or Sarah at (703) 284-5175. We’re looking forward to seeing you!
EOE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Executive Director for national organization fighting bias in standardized tests. Develop strategies, run programs, raise funds, supervise staff. Planning and management experience required. $35,000 to $40,000 per year plus benefits. Resumes to FairTest, Post Office Box 1272, Cambridge, Mass. 02238.
HEALTH CARE PROJECT DIRECTOR
National Hispanic health organization based in Washington, D.C., seeks project director to conduct 8-month multi-faceted health needs assessment for Hispanic community. MPH or equivalent with relevant community health research experience. Excellent written and oral communications skills required. Salary, low to mid thirties.
Send resumes to: Robert Cullen, COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis Call (301) 251-2252.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
GIVE ME CINCO: Various arts and entertainment events around the country - particularly in the Southwest - coincide with the Mexican celebration of the Cinco de Mayo battle at Puebla.
In San Antonio the Expresiones Hispanas 1988/89 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour opens its inaugural exhibition May5 at the Mexican Cultural Institute.
Expresiones Hispanas- with 50 pieces selected from among some 3,000 works - will remain in San Antonio through mid-June.
In Los Angeles the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts holds its annual fund-raising banquet, OI6 L.A., on May 5. The event at the city’s Biltmore Bowl, will honor actors Rita Moreno and C6sar Romero.
Another Los Angeles fundraiser is scheduled for May 6. The UCLA College of Fine Arts will stage a Noche Mexicans concert, with scheduled appearances by Linda Ronstadt, Danny Valdez, the Mariachi Los Camperos, Tito Puente and Poncho Sdnchez. Dedicated to the
late Eddie Cano, the concert will also pay tribute to Nati Cano and Laio Guerrero.
The concert will raise funds to underwrite the first Southern California appearance by the National Symphony of Mexico, which performs at UCLA on June 1.
Guest conductor for that evening will be Abraham Chdvez, conductor of the El Paso Symphony.
This week also marks the national release of Salsa- the latest U.S. Latino-themed film distributed by a “major” studio.
The Cannon release was choreographed by Kenny Ortega, andcowritten by Tom£s Benitez. Ex-Menudo member Robby Rosa stars in the Golan-Globus production.
Although Salsa will be screened in some 1,000 theaters, only selected ones in the Los Angeles area will screen a Spanish-language dubbed version of the musical.
In San Antonio’s Guadalupe Theater, the film series Woman: The Central Character concludes this week with screenings May6 and 7 of the Spanish film Half of Heaven. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
QUOTING HISPANIC COLUMNISTS: Here's what some are talking about
MIGUEL PEREZ, New York Daily News: “From the TV news reports, you would think that in the April 19 New York Democratic presidential primary, Latinos were nonexistent You heard newscasters discuss the implications of the Jewish vote, the black turnout, the whites, the Irish Catholics, and you saw them take exit polls on everything from the war in the Middle East to the racial polarization of this city.
“But on election night, nobody was paying attention to the group of voters who may have been most influential in giving Jesse Jackson a victory in New York City and showing the rest of the country that the city does not condone the racist politics of its mayor...
“Other than Ed Koch, from the Latino perspective there were two other losers in the primary:
“(Former Congressman) Herman Badillo,
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who still dreams of being mayor although he supported Dukakis and lost any chance of emerging as the candidate of a minority coalition, and Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hern&ndez Colon, who came to New York to campaign for Dukakis and thus discredited the impartiality of a voter registration campaign he had been conducting here...”
FERNANDO PINON, San Antonio Expresa-News: “Texas Republicans did two things overwhelmingly on Super Tuesday: 1) They gave Vice President George Bush a resounding 64% of their vote; and 2) They supported the Official English referendum by 92%.
"Did they thus tie an albatross around favorite-son Bush’s neck, one that will burden him in November as he sallies forth to battle the Democrats for H ispanic votes throughout the Southwest?...”
ANTONIO STEVENS-ARROYO, Hispanic Link News Service: “Instead of being a dying appendage to an aging U.S. industrial establishment, Puerto Rico is looking to become the dynamic financial and technological center ! of a developing Caribbean and Central American region.
“The talents, skills and technical know-how acquired by long familiarity with U.S. computers and business procedures are more valuable in the developing region of the Caribbean than in the sprawling U.S. economy.
“Instead of being an affirmative action candidate in a big mainland corporation, a typical Puerto Rican college graduate now is the native Spanish-speaking junior executive, actively courted by finance and business corporations seeking stronger participation in Latin American markets.
“It is a pattern of significance to Mexican-American professionals, who now realize the potential of the Latin American market in the global economy...”
JOE OLVERA, El Paso Times: “Some people say that I’m a hate- monger... because I point out that racism and discrimination still exist in the United States... If my columns make you nervous and angry, maybe I’m digging a little deeper than you like.
“Let’s face it. Anglos have the power to correct overnight many of the existing wrongs. The question is, will they do it?...”
- Charlie Ericksen
“Well, I guess we solved that problem.”
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Santos, 21, the first Navy female killed in a terrorist attack, is buried in Ocala, Fla. Santos was killed in Naples , Italy, by a car bomb outside a USO club ... The National Association of Bilingual Educat ion I Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry sends letters to all 48 names Raquel Baez, a middle schoolteacher from Bronx, N . Y . , as its 11 members of the Senate and House Judiciary committees, urging that Teacher of the Year . . . Tracie retirement the deadline for legalization be extended . . . The National Institute for after winning a gold medal at the gains a spot on the Wo r k and Learning names Joseph Fernandez, superintendent of U.S. Olympic synchronized swimming team bf' a 'j(lning the solo 1 Dade County, Fla., Public Schools, to its National Panel on Work and competi tion in Ind i anapolis . . . its founder, America ' s Youth . . . EMILY'sEarly Money i s Like Yeast-List Francisco Cuervo y Valdes, w ith of a statue. Cuervo includes Patricia Madrid, a candidate for New Mexicds 1st Congreswas provisional governor of New Mexico in 1706 . . . Michigan' s Dona • sional District, as one of e ight women nat ionwide to receive financial Oliveira, a 26-yearold registered nurse , w i ns the Women's World j i . iiii : Voi.ONo.171 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ll May>,lOBB , Legalization Centers Inundated II With the May41egalization deadline looming, doing follow-up work. " an estimated 70,000 undocumented aliens Long lines, applicants camping out at f i ling 6 are scrambling to file applications the final centers and eligibility confus i on are character week while overwhelmed U .S. Imm i gration izing the end of the one-year amnesty peri od , s and Naturalization Service centers and many officials say . Texas and Cal i fornia in part i cular legalization aid groups are being forced to are seeing a major closing rush , with people turn applicants away. lined up at INS and ODE centers well before Daily applications mushroomed from 2 ,000 dawn . in January to 10,000 in early April and 20,000 If the appl i cation process has changed , so later in the month . As of April22, there were have the applicants . " The ones we are seeing 1",248,263 persons who had applied under now are the most exploited , the less educated, " the legalization program and another421 ,990 said Muzaffar Christi, w i th the International under the agricultural worker program wh ich Lad ies Garment Workers Union i n New York. has a Nov . 30 deadline. INS , which has set a policy of regionally " It's just a mad dash at this point," said Jan adjusting hours to su i t local needs, w i ll be Pen a , admin istrator of Catholic Charities' im operating until midnight on May4, said spokes migration unit in Houston. Only20 oftheir55 person Jerry Ficklin. Everyone in line at that original centers are accepting new applicants. time will be taken care of, he said . 1 nterviews "We are so overwhelmed . Many parishes and additional processing have been virtually are only handling applicat i ons already in house, " halted while employees struggle to deal with Peiia said . She expressed concern over the new appl ications. many applicants who had already been turned Many groups have called for a deadline away by other Qualified Designated Ent ities. extension . They say the onslaught i s proof . Gil Carrasco , associate director of the U . S . more t ime is needed, part icularly for those I Catholic Conference' s migration and refugee recently made eligible under several relaxed division , which operates over 100 ODEs , con INS guidelines. INS opposes an extension firmed this overload . "Some of our ODEs are and recommends a president i al veto if neces no longer doing intake. Others w i ll not be sary . contin ued o n page 2 i Higher Minimum Wage Bills Debated I Two national Hispanic groups, one that jobs that primarily go to H i spanic and other 1 represents business interests and another minority youth. that conc erns itself w i th job training and Although stating that the U . S . Hispanic employment, find themselves at odds over Chamber of Comm e rce has not formulated the impact two congress i onal higher-minimuman official position , Jorge Negron, the group' s wage bills would have on Latinos. Washington representative , said , " We ' re The full House, after it reconvenes May 10 always in favor ' of rais i ng the standard of I I from spring recess, is expected to take up a living of Hispan i cs, but a minimum wage I bill that would raise the minimum wage in i nc r ease , when weighed against the eco-il increments over four years to $5.05. The nomy , may hurt Hispanic small businessmen. " ! Senate version, which calls for a floor of Fred Romero , d irector of the National SER $4.65 after several years , i s awaiting mark up Policy and Research Institute , disagreed , say-i in its Labor Committee. ing, " Nothing but good can happen to Hispanl(:s, Advocates of increas i ng the minimum wage especially those in marginal jobs . " Romero , argue that doing so would raise the standard who used to be d i rector of policy and strateg i c 1 of living for famil i es and indi viduals who are planning for the U . S . Department of Labor : now below or near the poverty level . The under the Reagan admin i stration, agreed that ' current $3.35 minimum wage took effect in the concerns of Hispanic small businessmen 1981 . are justified but noted that the loss of jobs Opponents say an increase would do away predicted when the minimum wage was last with hundreds of thousands of entry-level raised never materialized . -Feli x Perez New York's Hispanics Rally Behind Jackson Despite repeated v i rulent attacks by Mayor Edward Koch against the Rev . Jesse Jackson , Hispanics in NewYorkCityvoted overwhelm ingly i n that state's April19 Democratic primary . for Jackson . According to exit poll results by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy , 53% cast ballots for Jackson compared with 39.5% for Massachu setts Gov . Michael Dukakis. Tennessee Sen. A lbert Gore received 7 . 1% of the Hispanic vote . Even with Jackson ' s strong showing among Hispanics and blacks, he came in a distant second to Dukakis in the statewide vote. The Massachusetts governor won 51% , Jackson 37% and Gore 1 0% . Gore has since dropped out of the pres identi al race . Latinos Enjoy the Arts The amount of leisure time among His panic adults from 1984 to 1987 has declined faster than that of the general population: according to the results of a Louis Harris survey. Hispanics reported having 18 hours of leisure time per week in 1984. This figure decreased to 13 hours per week last year. The 1987 leisure figure for the overall popu lation was 16. 6 hours. This compares w ith 18. 1 hours per week three years earlier. The survey, conducted to gauge the level of participation in the arts and released last month , reported these d ifferences in art activities engaged in : PainVDraw Sculpt Hispanic 32% 13 Modern Dance/ Ballet Choral Group/ Choir 27 26 Overall 27% 8 23 22 The survey also found that H ispanics outpaced non Hispan ics in their growth of VCR ownership. Ownership among Hispan i cs increased from 1 7% to 65% . The survey results were based on a nation ally representative sample of 1 , 501 men and women aged 18 and older. Hispanics represented 6% of the sample .

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. I lmpacto Forges Ahead; Planning Presidential Debate Plans are underway for a possible May 21 . bipartisan presidential debate in East Los Angeles, according to the director of lmpacto '88 , a grass-roots coalition of Hispanics seeking to exert influence on the November elections and beyond . The debate, not yet finalized, would have four Hispanics serve as panelists and one as moderator. The questions would be based on the agenda that resulted from last month ' s National Hispanic Leadership Con ference , the agenda drafted by lmpacto in March and last October's National Hispanic Agenda '88. "We want to demonstrate that there's a continuity of planning within the Hispanic community, that we're looking at issues that not only affect us but the entire country," Armando Navarro told Weekly Report. California's primary is June 7 . lmpacto continues to make substantial headway toward the second goal of its two pronged effort establish a working relation ship between Mexico and U.S. Latinos, par ticularly those of Mexican descent. Some 300 lmpacto representatives and Hispanic leaders, including U.S. Reps. Albert Bustamante and Esteban Torres, met April Tex. Widens Migrant Student Program The University ofTexas at Austin announced students, said services coordinator Rose Ann April22 that it will expand its migrant education Renteria Such students lose about 12 weeks program next year. The program allows mi-of school each year, she said . grant students to take their school work . Statewide, 71,165 migrants are enrolled in when they follow the harvest and to mail it • grades 7-12. The Texas Education Agency back for grading. placed their dropout rate at 50%, citing failing The $152,000 effort, funded by the Texas grades and frustration due to absence as Education Agency , targeted 300 seventh major contributors to it. through 12th grade students at high dropout California was the first state to offer such risk last year . This year it hopes to reach 700 flexibility to migrant students through its Unemployment Hils 8.2o/o' The Hispanic unemployment rate for March decreased slightly, to 8.2% , a one-tenth of a , percentage point drop from the February rate , announced the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics. 2 Year Colleges Targeted Portable Assisted Study Sequence program established in 1978. PASS now involves 20 other receiving or sending states. The$400,000 program served almost6,000 ninth to 12th grade students who migrated within or out of California last year . Approxi mately 98% of those students are Hispanic, said Mary Lloyd, its California coordinator . "The future of migrant student education is in correspondence courses," sald Lloyd. Mi grant educational leaders are staging a con erence May9-13 in Hollywood, Fla, to discuss, among other things, making state programs compatible and more extensive. Darryl Figueroa 8 in Tijuana, Mexico, with Mexico presidential aspirant Carlos Salinas de Gortari, the can didate of Mexicds ruling party, PRI the Partido Revolucionario lnstitucional lmpacto met April 23 with the candidate from a PRI splinter group, Corriente Demo cratico , and also had a meeting with the choice of the Partido Acci6n Nacional April 30. Said Navarro of lmpacto's future: "We've done extremely well with what we've had. The key question now is: Are we going to be able to raise the funds, the resources and the lubricants to continue?" Felix Perez Naturalization Denials by INS Called Arbitrary Naturalization applicants from Mexico, South and Central America and Africa are more likely to be denied by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service than are those from other partsoftheworld, found a study by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials released April26. According to the study, the three larges1 supplier countries with the most INS denials were the Dominican Republic (29%), Cuba (22.2%) andColombia(21.2%). Mexico came in sixth, having a denial rate of 17.1 %. The study found that these "administrative" denials accounted for 89% of all naturalization denials from 1985-87. The NALEO report said INS ' application consideration process is done " haphazardly" and varies considerably among its regional offices. While the INS administers the naturalization program, only federal and some state courts can formally award or deny citizenship. The study recommended that INS inform rejected applicants that they can reapply through the courts. The nation's community colleges should develop plans to recruit disadvantaged stu dents and identify prospective Hispanic, black and Asian American teachers in high school and assist them toward a teaching career, says a study released April 19. "By providing quality education to all ages and social groups, the community college can help both the neighborhoods and the nation become self-renewing," states the two year study by the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges. Basic Fees Pose Problem for Many The quality of education and outreach effort are particularly important to Hispanics because 55% of Hispanics in higher education are enrolled in two-year colleges . There are 1 ,224 regionally accredited cornmunity, junior and technical colleges in the nation, the largest branch of U.S. higher edu' cation . Another of the several recommendations included in "Building Communities: A Vision for a New Century" is that high schools and community colleges should work more closely to cut into the dropout rate and ensure a smoother transition from secondary to post secondary education . The study concludes that community colleges have a special obli gation to dismantle racial, ethnic, age and sex barriers. 2 continued from page 1 The House passed a bill April20 on a 213 201 vote that would extend the deadline to Nov. 30. The Senate was expected to vote on similar legislation by April29 . Sen . Alan Simp son (R-Wyo.), one of the original sponsors of the immigration bill, opposes an extension . Sen. Edward Kennedy(D-Mass.) said he favors one. "A lot will depend on how adamant Simpson is and how supportive Kennedy is, but I think we have a good chance," said legislative analyst Charles Kamasaki of the National Council of La Raza "The huge numbers of people filing demon strates that there are still lots of them out there and they need time and counseling before they file," added Kamasaki. Pena agreed. "I have been amazed at the number of people still so unaware of basic elements of the law. We need more time." Additionally, many potential applicants are still having trouble meeting the program's basic fees. Individuals are assessed a charge of$185, while the maximum fee fora family is $420. Employers, who will be liable June 1 if they knowingly hire illegal worl
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Darryl Figueroa, guest columnist Teacher Takes to' Pulp if Jaime Escalante, an immigrant from Bolivia and unofficial U.S. teacher of the year, is sitting in a posh hotel suite in Washington, D.C. Far from the East Los Angeles classroom where he works his miracle, this humble man is no less the earnest instructor his Garfield High School students know. The motion picture" Stand and Deliver," which has earned praises for its artistry and the man it portrays, is changing his classroom forever. In fact, the 57-year-old Escalante allowed a movie based on his teaching success to be made only when he realized the reach it would give him . "I hope it makes others see there is potential everywhere," says the stout, balding man. Escalante ' s message couldn't come at a better time. In an era when Latino students desperately need caring role models to iden tify with, Hispanics make up less than 2% of the nation's teachers. The high school drop out rate is as high as80% in some inner-city schools. Less than half of U .S. Latinos over 25 have high school diplomas and only8. 5% have college degrees. This month, 160 of Escalante ' s students will take the advanced placement calculus test. Those who pass will earn a semester's worth of college credit. Many will earn tickets to some of the best colleges in the country. This at the 99.9% -Hispanic school that was about to lose its academic standing when Escalante appeared a dozen years ago. GENTLY MANIPULATES He sits still and speaks softly, his glasses slipping down his nose. as he describes his technique: " It is necessary to teach with the patience of a turtle, the tenacity of a spider, the power of a general and the mind of a calculator." Again and again these characteristics surface as he relays how he works. First, he . has mothers and fathers sign a contract prohibiting their children from watching much television. Simultaneously, he commits parents to the process, establishes his own authority over students and learns much about the student's home life . The calculator. "Teachers need to establish not just a relationship with the students, but with mama e papa You have to understand them. You have to get their help. Schools alone can't do it , " he informs. Next, he describes the general. He blackmails and manipulates and demands. "You heard your mom . Only As and Bs , not for one semester but for three years. If you don't do it , you're out. " Once he gets a student in his class, he develops the hold of the spider. "i will not sign a dropout form and I won't let them give up." Many teen-agers would respond to such tactics with rebellion. But, Escalante says, "If you do it with love and touch the sensibility of the kids, they will follow your instruction. " The turtle. HERITAGE, BILINGUALISM HELP He admits that he possesses another trait which worked in his favor at Garfield: he is himself Latino. "One of the kids told me, 'I feel , confident in your class because you look like me,' " whispers Escalante. Whenever he wants to make a serious point, he whispers. He continues," I don ' t think there would be that kind of communication or confidence if the teacher were Anglo or something else. Once you open that communication, it is very easy. The student flies. " His heritage and bilingualism have made him successful with parents, too. He calls and says, " Vengo a saludarle." Sometimes when he visits he reprimands parents for their lack of involvement. "Children have to feel that one day they will be somebody so that they can improve this land," he whispers. Through the movie and the pulpit it has brought him, Escalante can now say to every disadvantaged, neglected student what he has been telling his classes for years : You are the best. Don't be afraid. You are the hope of the future. (Darryl Figueroa reports for Hispanic Link Weekly Report . ) Sin pelos en Ia lengua KAY'S NEW LEAF: At last month's Hispanic media conference in Dallas, there was concern expressed that I was taking life too seriously lately. So I am tapping the lines of a few old friends who never would commit that sin : BAR SURVEY: I will start with Richard Avena, former lider of the Southwestern regional office of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights . He tells me, behind a glass of Scotch, that there's a bar called "Tenampa" in every Texas town worth its salt and tequila. He also claims to remember when our suit-and-tie voter regis tration expert Willie Velasquez ran a watering hole on the outskirts of San Antonio called the DMZ. And he challenges anyone to come up with a more creative name for a bar than No Est a A qui, which sits on the outskirts of San Antonio on Highway 90. PRESIDENTIAL PRONOUNCEMENT: Philosopher George Archuleta, of Alamosa, Colo., is displeased with the way Jesse Jackson pronounces his home state: Col-uh rad-uh. But he's fearful that passage of an Official-English state constitutional amendment in November will force even its native Spanish speakers to switch from Koh-loh-rah-doe to Col-oh-raah-do . It might also end his continuing campaign to change the name of the daily Fort Collins Coloradoan. "That extra 'o' is simply unacceptable," he protests. NO MORE WILLIE: The Official-English movement doesn't intimidate Detroit Tiger pitcher Willie Hernandez, the American League's 1984 Cy Young and Most Valuable Player award winner. Last week Hernandez, of Puerto Rican descent, instructed the club to change his name in their line-up card from Willie to Guillermo. Reporters claim the star pitcher, whose performance has fallen off, wants to be left alone. If the writers have to address him by his first name , that ought to do the trick. BERNARDINO'S BACK: Bernardino Rodriguez was hired onto the Hialeah Police Department in February 1986 after completing its rigorous training. Four months later he resigned following complaints from superiors that his English was deficient. The dispatchers couldn't understand him , the city claimed, and when he got excited, he reverted to Spanish . Now Rodriguez is suing to get 18t1reft-11 in a citythat's80% Hispanic. Mark Swanson, his attorney, has an argument that just might sway some Florida jurors: " I have relatives in New York I have a harder time understanding than Bernie . " WHO LOCA? A front-page article in the Washington Post's business section April 23 details the Chrysler Corporation's announced move of its K-car production to "Tuloca, Mexico. " Tuloca? Who loca? Would you believe "Toluca"? Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • ANGELO FALCON, director of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, quoted in the April 18 New York Times on the appeal of Democratic candidate Michael Dukakis to Hispanic voters: "Dukakis has the advantage of speaking flawless and fluent Spanish. But he is boring in any language. " ALJEAN HARMETZ, In a New York Times' review of "Stand and Deliver'': "What is remarkable about 'Stand and Deliver' is that the heartpounding excitement comes not from car chases, gang warfare or invented crises in the life of the teacher but from the Advanced Placement calculus exam that the 18 students took for college credit." Hispani c Link Weekly Report May 2 ,1988 3

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COLLECTING MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS: "Sex Bias in College Admissions Tests: Why Women Lose Out" concludes that women not only fail to get their fair share of merit scholarships because of gender bias but also because of ethnic bias. To receive a copysend$7.95 to FairTest , P .O. Box 1 272, Harvard Square Station, Cambridge, Mass. 02238. COMMUNITY COLLEGES: "Building Communities: A Vision fora New Century" is a two-year study on how community colleges can better serve students and communities. For a copy send $15 to the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges , Publications Department, 80 S . Early St., Alexandria, Va. 22304 1-800-336-4776. LEGALIZATION -THE SECOND STAGE: The Tomas Rivera Center has released a paper questioning what it calls the vague outlines of the second stage of legalization. For a copy of " Tell Me the Name of Granfs Horse: Amnesty Requirements Under the 1986 Immigration Act , " send $2 to TRC , 710 N . College Ave . , Claremont, Calif. 91711-3921 (714) 625-6607. PARENTS AND READING: "Becoming a Nation of Readers : What Parents Can Do," a 29page booklet by the U.S. Department of Education, includes tips that can be used beginning with preschoolers. To receive a copy, send 50 to the Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. LATCHKEY CHILDREN: " What If I'm Home Alone?Your Family's Guide to Home and Personal Safety Skills" is a 16-page, easily readable booklet for children by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. It provides tips on how latchkey children can make their time alone safer and more constructive. Fora copy send a$1 check to CPB , P . O . Box 33039-LK, Washington, D . C . 20033: LEISURE TIME: "Americans and Arts V' is a survey by Louis Harris and Assocs. which finds that Hispanics are inclined to partici pate in the arts. To order a book highlighting the survey results($2) or for complete copies of the survey ($9) , contact the American Cou nei l for the Arts, Publications Department, 1285 Avenue of the Americas , New York, N . Y . 10019 (212) 245-4510. NATURALIZATION APPLICANTS: "New Citizens in Limbo?" is a 21-page report that analyzes the rejection rates of legalized immigrants applying for U . S . citizenship based on national origin . The study is available free from the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D . C . 20003 1-800-44-NALEO. CONNECTING $1.2 MILLION AWARDED Signaling its b iggest year yet , the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund announced last month that it awarded $1.2 million in scholarships to 1 ,532 Hispanic college students nationally and in Puerto Rico for the 1987-88 academic year. For the second year in a row, the 13-year-old organization has surpassed$1 million in scholarships awarded. Over the last 12 years , NHSF has awarded $4. 8 million to more than 7,600 Hispanic students. The amount in scholarships awarded has grown to its present level from $30,000 in 1976, the first year the program was in operation. For more information, contact N HSF, P.O. Box 7 48, San Francisco , Calif . 94101 (415) 892-9971. REGISTRATION DRIVE UNDERWAY The second of four press conferences by the National Association of Hispanic Publishers to gather support for its print media campaign to get Hispanics to vote will be held May 2 in New York. Titled " For Your F:.uture," the 1month-old campaign will attempt to get out the Hispanic vote through the use of a print advertisemsnt in NAHPs more than 100 member publications. The campaign, funded by Philip Morris, will run through the 1988 elections. After the New York press conference, there will be one May 10 in Chicago and May 12 in Washington, D . C . READING PROGRAM SPREADS Now in its second year of operation , an innovative reading program in El Paso, Texas, that not only teaches reading skills to children but improves the literacy level of limited-English-proficient parents, seeks replication throughout the state. The I ntergenerational Reading Program, funded this year to th e tune of $40,000 by the Texas Education Agency, teaches reading skills through interaction between the children and parents. The program teaches up to five families at a time for a minimum of s ix months . The groups meet for one session per week. The level for students ranges from pre-school to primary. The brainchild of Elizabeth Quintero, a childhood development director at El Paso Community College, three or four groups have followed suit in other areas . Quintero gives training seminars to interested groups across the state to help i t catch on . For more information , write Quintero at El Paso Community College, P.O. Box 20500, El Paso, Texas 79998. Calendar the Future." Fuentes will discuss current conditions and th e conditions under whicl:l Latin America will likely enter the 21st century. five-kilometer race will be among the ac t i v iti es taking place . Samuel Verdeja (612) 222-634 7 THIS WEEK BIRTHDAY BASH Washington, D . C . May 3 . Congressman Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) will cele brate his 72nd birthday and his 35th year as an elected official by giving a public party, as he does annually. Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236 MAQUILADORA SEMINAR Houston May 5 The first of a series of eight seminars to acquaint • Texas businesses with Mexico's maquiladora industry will be hosted by the Houston Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. This program allows foreign ownership and duty free importation of raw materials in exchange for the employment of Mexican citizens. Joyce Szabo (512) 224-5322 FUENTES LECTURES Fairfax, Va. May 5 The final lecture to be given by noted Mexican author Carlos Fuentes, heritage professor at George Mason University, is titled "Latin America Faces 4 University Activities ( 703) 323-3852 CINCO DE MAYO The 1862 "Battle of Puebla," when Mexico ousted French troops from its territory , will be commemorated around the country in various ways . San Diego May'S The Chicano Federation of San Diego County is hosting a Cinco de Mayo luncheon celebration . The employee of the year will be chosen at this fund raising event. Irma Castro (619) 236-1228 Montebello, Calif . May 5 Some local distributors have donated food . and drinks, and over 250 local entertainers, including Mariachi Zapopan, clowns, and magicians, will donate their time for this community celebration of Cinco de Mayo . The Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association co-sponsors the festivities. Amalia L6pez (213) 724-0610 Saint Paul , Minn. May 7 The Concord Street Business Association is sponsor ing its fourth annual Cinco de Mayo fiesta Latino food and music, folkloric dances, a parade and a May 2 , 1988 Chicago Weekends throughout May Dance _ performances and Mexican arts and craft s exhibits will be presented on May weekends as part of The Chicago Field Museum of Natural History commemoration of Cinco de Mayo . Lisa Elkuss (312) 322-8859 COMING SOON MIGRANT CONFERENCE National Association of Community Health Centers Hollywood, Fla . May 9-13 , Dan Cardenas (202) 659-8008 MEXICAN/CHICANO AUTHOR AWARDS Universidad Aut6noma de Ciudad Juarez University of Texas at El Paso Juarez , Mexico May 12-14 El Paso, Texas May 12-14 Ricardo Aguilar (915) 747-5462 LATINO MUSIC Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. May 14 Luz Maria Pietro (202) 786-2307 Hispanic Link We e kl y R e port

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r / DIRECTOR OF STUDIES Princeton University invites applications and nominations for the position of Director of Studies in one of the five residential colleges, which serve as the center of residential life for all Princeton freshmen and sophomores. The Director of Stud i es is responsible , under the Office of the Dean of the College, for the organization and oversight of academic advising and the implementation of academic regula tions for the approximately450 freshmen and sophomores who live in each college . He or she is also responsible, under the Office of the Dean of Students, for minor infractions of the rules of conduct and for some personal counseling of the under graduates who live in the college , as well as for other adminis trative functions as determined by the Master of the college. The Director of Studies works closely in every regard with the residential college Master , who has overall responsibility for the college. Applicants should have had some experience as faculty members or academic administrators in a college or university and must be sensitive to the needs and concerns of students from quite different backgrounds . Although this is a position , arrangements may be made , when feasible , for some limited teaching in the appropriate academic department. Nor mally a Director of Studies is expected to hold the Ph. D . degree in a discipline taught at Princeton . Position is available July 15, 1988. Applications must be received by May 23, 1988. Please send curriculum vitae and names of at least three references to : DEBORAH RAIKES-COLBERT , OFFICE OF PERSONNEL SERVICES , CLIO HALL , PRINCETON UNIVER SITY , PRINCETON , NEW JERSEY 08544. Princeton University t::l':J '0 & PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08544 An Equal Opportunity I t,JJ Affl
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Arts & Entertainment late Eddie Cano, the concert will also pay tribute to Nati Cano and Lalo Guerrero. GIVE ME CINCO: Various arts and entertainment events around the country particularly in the Southwest coincide with the Mexican celebration of the Cinco de Mayo battle at Puebla. The concert will raise funds to underwrite the first Southern California appearance by the National Symphony of Mexico , which performs at UCLA on June 1 . Guest conductor for that evening will be Abraham Chavez, conductor of the El Paso Symphony. In San Antonio the Expresiones Hispanas 1988/89 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour opens its inaugural exhibition May 5 at the Mexican Cultural Institute. This week also marks the national release of Salsathe latest U.S. Latino-themed film distributed by a "major" studio. Expresiones Hispanas-with 50 pieces selected from among some 3,000 workswill remain in San Antonio through mid-June. The Cannon release was choreographed by Kenny Ortega, and co written by Tomas Benitez. Ex-Menudo member Robby Rosa stars in the Golan-Giobus production. In Los Angeles the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts holds its annual fund-raising banquet, Ole L.A., on May 5. The event at the city's Biltmore Bowl, will honor actors Rita Moreno and Cesar Romero. Although Salsa will be screened in some 1,000 theaters, only selected ones in the Los Angeles area will screen a Spanish language dubbed version of the musical. Another Los Angeles fund raiser is scheduled for May 6. The UCLA College of Fine Arts will stage a Noche Mexicana concert, with scheduled appearances by Linda Ronstadt, Danny Valdez, the Mariachi Los Camperos, Tito Puente and Poncho Sanchez . Dedicated to the In San Antonio's Guadalupe Theater, the film series Woman: The Central Character concludes this week with screenings May 6 and 7 of the Spanish film Half of Heaven . Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report . QUOTING HISPANIC COLUMNISTS: Here's what some are talking about: MIGUEL PEREZ, New York Dally News: "From the TV news reports, you would think that in the April 19 New York Democratic presidential primary, Latinos were nonexistent You heard newscasters discuss the implications of the Jewish vote, the black turnout, the whites, the Irish Catholics, and you saw them take exit polls on everything from the war in the Middle East to the racial polarization of this city. "But on election night, nobody was paying attention to the group of voters who may have been most influential in giving Jesse Jackson a victory in New York City and showing the rest of the country that the city does not condone the racist politics of its mayor ... "Other than Ed Koch, from the Latino per spective there were two other losers in the primary: "(Former Congressman) Herman Badillo, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa . Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien . Zoila Elias . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request 6 who still dreams of being mayor although he supported Dukakis and lost any chance of emerging as the candidate of a minority coa lition, and Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n, who came to New York to campaign for Dukakis and thus discredited the imparti ality of a voter registration campaign he had been conducting here ... " FERNANDO PINON, San Antonio Exprese News: "Texas Republicans did two things overwhelmingly on Super Tuesday: 1) They . gave Vice President George Bush a resounding 64% of their vote; and 2) They supported the Official English referendum by 92%. "Did they thus tie an albatross around favorite-son Bush's neck, one that will burden him in November as he sallies forth to battle the Democrats for Hispanic votes throughout the Southwest? . . . " ANTONIO STEVENs-ARROYO, Hispanic Link News Service: "Instead of being a dying append l age to an aging U.S. industrial estab lishment, Puerto Rico is looking to become the dynamic financial and technological center ' of a developing Caribbean and Central American "The talents, skills and technical know-how . acquired by long familiarity with U.S. computers , and business procedures are more valuable in the developing region of the Caribbean than in the sprawling U.S. economy. "Instead of being an affirmative action call' didate in a big mainland corporation, a typical Puerto Rican college graduate now is the native Spanish-speaking junior executive, actively courted by finance and business corporations seeking stronger participation in Latin American markets . "It is a pattern of significance to Mexical'l' American professionals, who now realize the potential of ttie Latin American market in the global economy . . . " JOE OLVERA, El Paso Times: "Some people say that I'm a hatemonger ... because I point out that racism and discrimination still exist in the United States ... If my columns make you nervous and angry, maybe I'm digging a little deeper than you like . "Lefs face it. Anglos have the power to correct overnight many of the existing wrongs . The question is, will they do it? ... " Charlie Ericksen "Well, I guess we solved that problem." Hispanic Link Weekly Report