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Hispanic link weekly report, May 23, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 23, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian names Maryela Martinez, a 16-year-old honors student born in Havana, Cuba, as the student representative of the state Board of Education for 1988-89. Living ini Orange County, Martlnezwill bethefirstHispanicstudenttoserveon i the board... San Antonio police arrest Parker Abeli former congressional candidate, for hiring a hit man to assassinate MayorHenry Cisneros... The colleagues of Los Angeles County Superior Court J udge Ricardo Torres elect him as the court’s assistant presiding judge, a position not held by a Hispanic since 1859. The assistant presiding judge automatically assumes the court’s top spot after a two-year term... The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service gives permission to
MAR 2 4
Moises Escobar, a resident of H yattsvi I re,'Md.r to' remain in the United States while a court decides on the constitutionality of a marriage fraud law under which Escobar would be deported... The Colorado Special Olympics inducts vocational rehabilitation teacher Colleen JuArez, of Grand Junction, into its Hall of Fame... Julissa Gdmez, a 15-year-old gymnast from San Antonio injured at a meet in Tokyo May 5, remains unable to move her arms or legs but is conscious and can blink her eyes... Jockey Angal Cordero gets elected into thoroughbred racing’s Hall of Fame... By winning the $37,500 first prize in the Chrysler-Plymouth Classic in Middletown, N.J., Nancy L6pez now leads the Ladies Professional Golf Association’s earnings list this year with $189,882... Miami Dr. Alberto Castro, who along with three associates developed a way to rapidly diagnose Legionnaire's disease, dies of heart failure at age 54...
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Uncertainty Hampers Legalization’s 2nd Step
The clock has started ticking on the second stage of the legalization process. But educators, social service providers and public administrators do not have a precise idea of what will be expected of them or applicants.
Final U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service regulations governing the step will not be issued until September. The INS is distributing draft copies of the regulations to interested organizations for their review and input Proposed regulations will then be printed in the Federal Register, followed by a 30-day comment period.
Estimates of those who qualified during the first phase but are unaware they must fulfill second step requirements to become permanent residents run as high as 80%, said Michael Zamba of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
“I’m fearful the word won’t get out and that there won’t be enough training and facilities,” Zamba said.
According to the INS, the lag time in putting out the official regulations will not pose a problem. Those program participants seeking a green card must only show“they are enrolled and progressing satisfactorily,” said an INS spokesman. This translates into proof of 30 hours of attendance in a class at least 60
Latinos have a major opportunity to influence 71% of the nation’s 269 electoral college votes irv the November presidential election, says the National Association! of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. In a NALEO analysis released May 18, the concentration of His-panics in nine states was credited with this possible influence.
Ninety percent of adult Hispanics live in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Texas These states account for 193 electoral votes
Louis DeSipio, a NALEO research associate said, “In the past there’s been emphasis on why Latinos don’t vote. Despite all the limiting factors, the Hispanic vote is starting to be a swing vote.”
The Hispanic portion of the national vote
hours long. Or they can choose to take an INS civics and English oral exam.
Once applicants become permanent residents they must wait five years to become citizens or three years if they marry a U.S. citizen. If the applicants attended class to meet requirements for a green card, they must take the oral test to obtain citizenship.
Immigrants who applied for temporary residency at the beginning of the legalization program will start to stream in when the 18-month waiting period elapses in December. They will then have one year to set up an interview for a green card.
Rudimentary English is what is needed to meet the language criterion established by the INS said Gilbert Carrasco, the U.S Catholic Conference’s director of Immigration Services But he questioned whether courses on U.S government can be taught in such basic English. He said he is encouraging his network of service providers to use a curriculum of English language lessons paired with civics instruction in the student’s native tongue. The INS proposes to give the civics test in English.
Eliza May of the American Public Welfare Association agreed with Carrasco. “Can you imagine teaching U.S. civics to people in
grew from 2.4% to 3.6% between 1976 and 1986 - a 50% increase. In Florida 89% of eligible Latinos registered to vote in 1986. The total number of Latinos voting in 1986 was 2,866,000.
Because of recent immigration, the percentage of adult Hispanics eligible to vote has dropped, DeSipio added. I n 1986, for the first time, more than one-third of Hispanic adults were not citizens.
Another roadlock to electoral participation is the relative youth of the Hispanic population. The average age of Latinos is 25. Young adults are least likely to vote, the report pointed out
Other factors it cited as discouraging the Latino vote are poverty and a lower level of
education. „
- Sophia Nieves
English who can’t read or write (in their native language)?”
She said 70% of the applicants are illiterate or low literate in English. A survey commissioned by the APWA determined 50% of those eligible for the second stage had completed only three to six years of schooling.
Preparation classes are being offered through a variety of sources, including community-based organizations and school districts. That presents problems, according to Zamba
He said the cost per class session depends on who is offering the INS-approved course It runs from a few dollars a session to $1,500 for a Berlitz immersion course, he said.
Costs incurred by states because of legalization will be lessened through federal grant money soon to become available Approximately $928 million in State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants will be provided to states; a minimum of 10% each must be allocated for public education, health and social service assistance. The rest of the
continued on page 2
Panel Hears(English-Only’
The first hearing on four bills that would make English the official language of the United States by constitutional amendment was held May 11 by the U.S. House civil and constitutional rights subcommittee.
Sponsors of the legislation who testified were U.S. Reps. Norman Schumway(R-Calif.), William Broomfield (R-Mich.) and Clarence Miller (R-Ohio). Citing a divisive drift toward bilingualism, the congressmen called for unity through an official-language amendment Repi Virginia Smith (R-Neh), who has also proposed an English-only bill, did not testify.
U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, was among those who testified in opposition to the legislation. He noted that Hispanics were never asked to speak English on the battlefields where they served.
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) stated in his testimony, “We should be providing help to the 1.5 million who applied for residency (through the legalization program) rather than wasting time on these amendments.”
Latinos Seen as Influential in Nov. ’88


Furor Grows Over Paintings Sold by Miami Museum
The Cuban American caucus of the Florida Legislature and the Miami City Commission called May 12 for separate investigations of Miamf s Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture The calls came as the museum has come under increasing fire from powerful Cuban American groups for auctioning several paintings by artists who had not broken ties with the Castro regime.
In addition to sending a letter to Florida Secretary of State Jim Smith requesting that his office investigate the museum for allegedly misspending a $125,000 grant from the Secretary’s office, the seven-member legislative caucus has also withdrawn its support for $250,000 in state funding for the museum this year.
The Miami City Commission unanimously approved a resolution calling for federal
and state investigations.
“We felt then and we feel now that what we did (auctioning the paintings) is in accordance with First Amendment principles,” Teresa Saldise, museum president, told Weekly Report
State Rep. Javier Souto downplayed any suggestion that the legislative caucus^ moves were related to the auctioned works. “We as Cuban Americans don’t want hanky-panky,” he said, referring to the possible misspent grant. “This is America, a country of laws.”
Saldise thought it ironic that none of the allegations were brought up prior to the April 22 auction.
The matter took a grim turn May 3 when a pipe bomb was tossed through the front door of the museum. The following day 18
of the museum's board of directors resigned in protest to the decision to sell the paintings On May 10 the board elected new members and tried to put the episode behind it.
The day after the election of the new board members, including that of Saldise from vice president to president, a coalition of groups and individuals, including the Cuban American National Foundation, the Latin American Chamber of Commerce and Armando Valladares, called for the board’s resignation. It refused.
Admitting that the 15-year-old museum would be hard pressed to survive without state funding, Saldise stood by the board’s decision. “We welcome all investigations and hope all concerned Americans step forward and take a stand on this issue”
- Felix P6rez
U.S. English School Plan Questioned
Florida English representatives said May 10 “we are putting our money where our mouth is? by helping to raise at least$100,000 to open a Miami branch of an adult English school in Los Angeles.
It remains unclear exactly how much money the parent organization, U.S. English, will contribute to the Florida English effort U.S. English has 350,000 members who pay an average $20 contribution, said Tom Olson, public affairs director in Washington, D.C. Based on these figures, its gross 1988 budget is about $7 million. Last year its program budget, including salaries, travel and publications, was $3.7 million, he added.
No funds have as yet been budgeted for the Florida school, though some $100,000 will be needed in the first year, said Pat Fulton, spokesperson for Florida English. When funds are raised, they are expected to come not only from U.S. English members, but from government grants and community
Sorzano to Leave Post
Jos6 Sorzano, special assistant to President Reagan and head of the Latin American Affairs division of the National Security Council, announced his resignation May 16.
Though Sorzano has not submitted a formal letter of resignation to the president, he will leave by May 31, said W***® House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater. The Cuba-born Sorzano said he was leaving for‘personal reasona" However, The Washington Times reported that Sorzano’s frustration over what he feels are relaxed contra policies led him to quit
Sorzano, 47, was appointed to the post Jan. 2, 1987, by then National Security Advisor Frank Carlucci. He was a deputy to Jeane Kirkpatrick when she was United Nations Ambassador. He did not mention any future plana '
contributions, she explained.
Mary Carol Combs, project director of the English Plus Information Clearinghouse in Washington, D.C., said, “We would like to see more effort on their part to provide opportunities for people to learn English.”
Along with advocating English-only legislation, one of the goals of U.S. English at its inception over five years ago was to support English instruction programa noted Olson. It began to dip into its resources for this purpose in January 1987 when it opened a Los Angeles office charged with conducting research and development of programs and materials as well as fundraising.
Barbara Kaze, regional director of the Los Angeles office, said the parent group estimated that $650,000 was needed over a two- to three-year period. Kaze said that they have spent less than half that amount, with some coming from foundation grants.
Some $200,000 of the money granted for Project Golden Door has gone to the Cambria English Institute, the school for which a Miami location is being scouted. With about another $100,000, Kaze acquired English-as-a-Second-Language and “survival English” tapes. Additionally, the project sponsors an English-teaching radio program.
Combs said, “ From my experience teaching English, there is not much that can be taught from tapes.
“They are probably doing this because they need some credibility because of the divisiveness caused by their campaigns for English-only legislation.” _ Darryl Figueroa
funds are to be distributed according to the discretion of state officials.
California is alloting about 16% of its grant money for education. Los Angeles Unified School District officials have made it clear they will need more.
According to Domingo Rodriguez, the head
Groups Urge Congress to Fund Literacy Plan
Several Hispanic and civil rights groups issued a call May 11 for full appropriation of $26.5 million for the newly created English Literacy Grants Program.
The program, a modified version of a bill introduced by U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), targets literacy programs for limited-English-speaking adults and others not in school. It is part of the $8.3 billion education package signed by President Reagan April 28.
The bill provides state grants for English programs, incorporating such innovative features as child care and transportation support, and the requirement that half the funds go to programs operated by community-based groups.
As many as 56% of Hispanics are considered functionally illiterate.
The National Council of La Raza, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the American Civil Liberties Union and others at a Capitol Hill press conference expressed concern that funds would not be fully appropriated. Demand for such programs is expected to increase with the additional needs of the bulk of the 2.1 million legalization applicants They must pass English proficiency tests in order to obtain permanent residency.
Repi Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) is lobbying fellow congressmen to request full funding from the appropriations subcommittee that considers the education budget It is expected to mark up the bill May 26.
of Los Angeles Unifiecfs legalization program, the district estimates the 200-hour program they are offering will cost $1,300 per head, more than twice the amount estimated by the INS to provide sufficient education,
“We’re not putting anything out we’re not going to be reimbursed for,” said Rodriguez.
- Sophia Nieves Hispanic Link Weekly Report
$928 Million Allotted for Legalization
continued from page 1
2


Henry Cisneros, guest columnist
Looking Ahead
If the United States makes a decision to leave an entire sector of its population undereducated, underproductive and living in permanent “underclass” status, as is implicitly being made in national policy every day, this country cannot continue to prosper.
The egalitarian ideals of the nation itself are at risk We can ill afford to lose the very lubricant that makes the engine of our democratic society work because the margins of success in global competition are too narrow as it is.
Without individuals believing that by staying on less than desirable jobs in order to send children to school, we lose.
Without individuals feeling that it is possible for them to break out of hopelessness, no government can provide them education.
Unless members of the news business become advocates for change in one of the most fundamental issues confronting us today, matters are going to get a lot worse.
WHITE BASTIONS CHANGING
President Reagan says there is no danger of our nation losing its middle class. Nevertheless, last year the top one-fifth of the country’s residents earned 43% of the national income- the greatest percentage since the end of World War II. By contrast, the bottom one-fifth earned 4.7% - the smallest percentage in 25 years. This suggests a polarization along income lines which, when complicated by race, will create an impossible circumstance, or chasm, that cannot be bridged..
We listen to the palaver from the presidential candidates about their economic programs on trade, but who is making the linkage between trade and this problem - the loss of jobs and a growing economic underclass?
The United States is witnessing the growth of minority populations. One recent study found that California, which was80% white in 1940, will have no definable ethnic majority by the year2006. It projects the ethnic mix will be equal percentages of Anglo, black, Asian and Hispanic.
And we are starting to see changes in places we think of as the bastions of traditional white governance - such as Dallas, where today the majority of the school system’s students under the third grade are Hispanic and black
As traditional white populations grow older and minority populations swell, we must prepare for change in our educational systems, in the newsrooms, in our governments, and in our attitudes toward how we govern ourselves, through cooperation and consensus.
MEDIA LEADERSHIP NEEDED
The newspaper in the community is the keeper of the cultural ethos. It must work to keep egalitarian ideals before the community daily. Those who are in the news business must become advocates not just in print and over the air, but working in the community itself. They must hold not only minority officials and other governmental officials accountable on these issues, but also business and civic organizations.
The solutions to our problems are going to be fashioned at the local level well into the next century- or they just are not going to happen. We cannot wait for federal dollars.
Who better to lead on some of these initiatives, not only in their editorial commentaries, but also by heading the committees and by sharing expertise, than those in the news media?
Education and crime are not minority issues. They are America’s issues in the most fundamental way. Never before have we been willing to surrender to the idea of a permanent underclass. But unfortunately it is increasingly becoming a reality.
U nless we treat these problems, not as part of a sideshow, but as an issue central to our survival as a nation, we will not progress.
(In this column, San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros summarizes a presentation he made to the American Society of Newspaper Editors in Washington, D.C., April 13.)
Sin pelos on la lengua
t COMO SE LLAMA? A few weeks ago we reported that Detroit Tiger relief pitcher Willie Hernandez had instructed the club to change his first name back to Guillermo.
At the time, the Puerto Rican star was struggling badly on the mound and taking a merciless razzing from the same fans and press who worshipped him in 1984 when he was voted the American League’s Most Valuable Player.
The May 16 Sporting News offers this update:
“What’s in a name? For Guillermo (nee Willie) Hern&ndez, there seems to be a lot Hernandez had a 20.77 earned-run average as ‘Willie’ this season, giving up three runs in 1 1/3 inninga
“After saying he wanted to be called Guillermo, his given name, he gave up only one run in his next eight inninga saving one game and winning another.”
Quick Somebody tell Eastern Airlines head Frank Lorenzo to switch to Francisco.
OLD NAME, NEW GAME: Federico Pefta has kept his Spanish first name through thick and thin in his roller-coaster ride as Denver mayor. Not for a minute did he consider switching to “Fred,” even in his darkest hour.
A couple of months ago, the Denver Post stopped needling him long enough to observe: “He is Denver's Velcro mayor, stuck with the blame for everything from the city’s moribund economy and hemorrhaging budget to jarring potholes and an embarrassing Super Bowl loss.”
Since then, the tides of fortune have been kinder to 41-year-old Federico. In April, a years-long logjam was broken and one of his pet projects - a giant downtown convention center- began construction. Then a recall campaign against him ran out of steam, to the embarrassment of his political foes.
Last Tuesday, another of his pet projects, a shiny new airport in neighboring Brighton, won voters? approval there.
Then Pefta, an avid jogger and very eligible bachelor, was overtaken by Ellen Hart, a popular high-country marathon runner. They were married on Saturday.
HOLLYWOOD COLORS’ HISPANICS EVIL: Seven years ago, journalist/activist Juan Gonzftlez offered this commentary:
“ For millions of Americans who have never seen one or touched one, a Puerto Rican is personified by West Side Story’s knife-wielding George Chaklria. If you didn’t carry a knife, if you didn’t have jet-black slicked-down hair, you weren’t a real Puerto Rican.
“Hollywood said so.
“Now, in the ’80s, Hollywood has decided to refurbish the stereotype. The new edition of the “Puerto Rican movie” is Fort Apache: The Bronx...”
When there’s only one ‘Puerto Rican movie’ a decade, Gonz&lez complained, “and in it a police detective says, ‘We have 50,000 potential cop killers in this precincf (of 70,000), middle America , will go home more certain than ever in its racist stereotype of the savage Puerto Rican.”
Now Juan has seen “Colors,” Dennis Hopper’s box-office success about gang warfare in California’s City of the Angels.
“Every Latino and black civilian with a speaking part is portrayed as irrational or part of the violent drug life of Los Angeles,” he critiques. “It’s cowboys and Indians all over again, only the Indians have Uzis and the cowboys .38s.”
Now a columnist with the New York Daily News, Juan encourages
his readers: “Do yourself a favor. Boycott it.” „ _. .
7 Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
HENRY CISNEROS, San Antonio mayor, on hearing that tax protester Parker Abell was arrested after offering an undercover officer $5,000 to kill him:
"/ think I should be worth more than $5,000."
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
May 23,1988
3


COLLECTING
ENGLISH INSTRUCTION: A series of five video tapes, each 15 minutes and providing basic English for new immigrants, is available free to community groups. Request a copy from Barbara Kaze, Regional Director, U.S. English, 11444 W. Olympic Blvd, Suite 1051, Los Angeles, Calif. 90064 (213) 312-9525.
NEWSPAPER READERSHIR “Reading Newspapers: The Practices of America’s Young Adults?’ includes information on Hispanic readers. It is available free as an 11 -page summary orfor$5.00 and postage in its 51 -page entirety. Write or call the Education Writers Association, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036(202)429-9680.
SECOND STAGE DRAFT REGULATIONS: Draft copies of regulations for stage two of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service's legalization program are being made available to interested organizations and individuals. For a free copy write: Information Operations Unit of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Room 5044, 425 I Street NW, Washington D.C. 20536.
IMMIGRATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY: “Immigration Control: A New Role for Social Security” looks into the use of Social Security cards in determining employment eligibility and problems associated with counterfeiting. For a free copy of the report (specify Acc. No. 135304, GAO/HRD-88-4), write U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
UNDOCUMENTED ALIENS AND WAGES: “Illegal Aliens: Influence of Illegal Workers on Wages and Working Conditions of Legal Workers” can be obtained for free by writing (specify Acc. No. 135244, GAO/PEMD-88-13BR) the General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
ROSTER OF ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials “1987 Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials” lists 3,317 officials and an analysis of related trends. For a copy send $34.50 to 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C 20003 (202) 546-2536.
HIGHER EDUCATION STATUS: The American Council on Education has released its“Sixth Annual Status Report on Minorities in Higher Education” which presents data on degrees earned and fields of concentration according to racial and ethnic group. For a copy send $7.50 to Office of Minority Affairs, ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 939-9395.
CONNECTING
GROUP RECEIVES S2.1 MILLION
The San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities has received a $2.1 million, three-year grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts of Philadelphia for a pilot program to improve the participation and success of South Texas Hispanics in higher education.
The Hispanic Student Success Program, announced May 4, consists of five components. It will be implemented through the involvement of South Teyas school districts, college staff, faculty and administrators, parents, volunteers, community-based groups, elected officials and business and church leaders.
One component seeks to change government policies serving as barriers to Hispanics in higher education. Another will be a media campaign about the value of higher education. The other components will attempt to develop relationships between the parents and schools, provide educational support services to teachers and counselors and give support services to the students.
HACU hopes gradually to introduce successful strategies at its member institutions.
ELDERLY TARGETED
The Commonwealth Fund, a philanthropic foundation devoted to health concerns and headquartered in New York, announced recently that it had given a $372,000 grant to a Rockville, Md, group to collect information on the health and economic needs of Hispanic elderly.
Through a national survey, to be undertaken by Westat Inc, the Commonwealth Fund’s Commission on Elderly People Living Alone hopes to provide information that will help in the design of culturally relevant health and social services.
Hispanics over65 nownumberl million and are expected to reach 1.7 million by the year 2000.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
The National Hispanic Scholar Awards Program, sponsored by the College Board through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces that 1,000 Hispanic high school students will receive scholarships for college next fall. Scholarships of $1,500 each went to 500 students The other 500 received $100 awards .. AT&T expands its bilingual service for operated-assisted long-distance calls nationwide. To request it, customers say, “AT&T Espahol."...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
CHILI COOK-OFF Washington, D.C. May 23
Fifty chili aficionados are expected to compete in a cook-off sponsored by the Capital Council of the Leagueof United Latin American Citizens and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Proceeds go to a scholarship fund.
Carl Custer (202) 447-2006
MENTAL HEALTH CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. May 24,25 The International Counseling Center will hold a conference addressing the lack of mental health services for multiethnic and multicultural populations. Among the issues to be covered are cross-cultural adoptions and culturally relevant service delivery for Hispanics.
Diane Koslow(202) 483-0700
TRAINING CONFERENCE Cleveland May 24-28 4
The 1988 National Image Training Conference and Convention will include presentations by experts on affirmative action and Hispanic education issues. A symposium will offer training In areas that include affirmative action placement and career planning. Vince Gonzalez (216) 771-1207
CHAMBER BANQUET Sacramento May 26
The fourth annual Scholarship Awards Banquet, a benefit for the Sacramento Hiapapic Chamber of Commerce’s scholarship fund, will be held to honor the chamber's 1988 scholarship winners. Mistress of ceremonies is Bette V&squez, KCRA television personality.
Chamber Office (916) 454-4403
BIRTHDAY PARTY Los Angeles May 27
An evening with Los Angeles Councilman Richard Alatorre and Friends will be held- The israh Vaughan and Count Basie Orchestra will perfgrm following dinner.
Angie Vdsquez (213) 629-9254
STUDENT LEADERSHIP Los Angeles May 28
United Teachers of Los Angeles’ Chicano-Latino May 23,1988
Education Committee will hold a conference to assist high school students develop leadership skills and help the Latino community. The keynote address will be given by Los Angeles Councilwoman Gloria Molina.
Barbara Rentz (213) 487-5560
COMING SOON
PRE-COLLEGE SEMINAR
National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering
Houston May 31-June 3
Ronni Denes (212) 279-2626
HISPANIC WOMEN CONFERENCE National Association of Hispanic Women Washington, D.C. June 2-3 Luisa Bras (202) 639-8823
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Latin American Bar Association Chicago June 4 Jesse Reyes (312) 744-6958
CUBAN AMERICAN CONGRESS Cuban American National Foundation Washington, D.C. June 12-14 Mario Portuondo (202) 265-2822
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION CHIEF
Announcement#: 0711-8A-LIB
For the right individual, the Arlington County (VA) Public Library offers the professional and personal opportunity of a lifetime...
Located adjacent to the nation’s capital, the library serves a highly progressive and ethnically diverse urban/suburban community of approximately 160,000 residents Arlington’s Public Services Division Chief has overall administrative responsibility for the Library's regionally-acclaimed Central Library (which is slated for a $10.8 million expansion and renovation) and six branch libraries (which are about to undergo a comprehensive services study and facility evaluation). The library system has a FY1988 operating budget of $4.7 million and employs a staff of 119 FTE& This position requires an ALA-accredited MLS or Virginia Librarian’s Certificate; a minimum of 5 years of library experience, with at least three (3) years of successful managament-level experience-preferably in a multi-site public library system; and strong leadership, team-building, and interpersonal skills.
Salary Range; $41,600-$58,678. Excellent benefits All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on June 2,1988. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE/MFH
PROJECT COORDINATOR
National organization seeks self-starter to direct a mental health promotion campaign aimed at low income elderly. Requires M.A. in human service field; Bilingual; public relations or public education experience; and excellent communication skills. Salary DOE Send resume or call: President AN PPM, 2727 West 6th Street, #270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057; (213) 487-1922.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Executive Director for national organization fighting bias in standardized tests. Develop strategies, run programs, raise funds, supervise staff. Planning and management experience required. $35,000 to $40,000 per year plus benefits. Resumes to FairTest, Post Office Box 1272, Cambridge, Mass. 02238.
HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIP WASHINGTON, D.C. - Hispanic Link News Service has a nine-month paid internship available immediately. If interested in receiving information contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
Bowling Green State University
The Department of Special Education at Bowling Green State University is searching for an Assistant Professor of Special Education.
This is a full-time academic year tenure track position for teaching and supervising undergraduate and graduate students in Special Education and pursuing scholarly activities. Primary responsibilities are coursework in one or more of the following areas of special education (learning disabilities, developmentally handicapped, behavior disordered) and in the area of early childhood education of handicapped children. Additional instructional responsibilities may include multiple handicapped or hearing impaired. Other responsibilities include advisement, grant proposal writing, and professional service.
Individuals seeking the position must have a doctoral degree in special education with additional training or experience in the early childhood education of handicapped children. Applicants must have three years of appropriate teaching experience or equivalent Applicants should exhibit evidence of scholarly productivity. The terminal degree is required for probationary appointment which begins on August 15.
The salary range is $22,500 to $23,500 depending upon qualifications.
Applicants should send inquiries, applications, or nominations with supporting papers (official transcripts, vita, three (3) letters of reference) by June 15,1988, to:
Dr. Edward Fiscus, Chairman Department of Special Education 451 Education Building College of Education and Allied Professions Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0255 Telephone: (419)372-7293
PARKS MANAGER City of San Jose
$45,744-$55,596/yr. Position is responsible for planning and directing operations for a major parks section such ascity-wide large facilities. Position requiresabachelor’sdegree in parks or recreation management or related field and four (4) years experience in parks management or professional public administration in the planning, organization of parks recreation facilities and programs. Submit resume by July 1,1988 to:
Bob Allen
City of San Jose Personnel Dept.
801 N. First St, Room 207 San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4204
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a
national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Arts & Entertainment
TV NEWS: The short-lived CBS ait-com Trial and Error, which starred Paul Rodriguez and Eddie VAlez, was named the third worst prime time program of the 1987-88 season by a poll of the nation’s TV critics.
Trial and Error follows The Highway Man and A Different World in a list compiled by Electronic Media, a trade publication, from its semiannual poll of newspaper critics. By contrast, the series LA Law, with Jimmy Smits in a starring role, was named the critics? favorite.
Another canceled series with Hispanic leads will air this week on ABC. The one- hour pilot for Juarez, which was taken off the network schedule before it aired, will be broadcast May 28 - check local listings - reportedly due to a programming void created by the Writers? Guild strike.
Benjamin Bratt and Ada Maris star in the drama set in the El Pasc/JuArez border. The cast is predominantly Hispanic.
Next month, the first-ever program to be syndicated in Spanish-and English-language versions, begins airing on the International Television Network. Bravol, hosted and produced by Nelly GalAn, is a talk show patterned after Donahue and the Oprah Winfrey show
that will focus on issues of concern to U.S. Hispanics. The show is taped in two half hour installments on the same topic, one in each language.
ITN has scheduled to air Bravo! twice weekly, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, on the satellite-fed network’s 56 U.S. affiliates.
The talk show is not to be confused with Premios Bravo 1988(Latin Music Awards), an award special to be aired by Unlvlsion May 29. The program, which will hand out honors in 21 categories, was taped in the Dominican Republic May 14.
. Special awards will be presented to Julio Iglesias, Los Lobos, JosA Luis Rodriguez and Linda Ronstadt
ONE LINERS: After delays caused by the U.S. State Department, the more than 80 singers, dancers and musicians of Cubafs Tropicana nightclub launched their long-awaited North American tour May 18 in New York.'. . A. Martinez and Bob Vila are among performers nominated for daytime Emmy Awards... The Elvis Show, a multimedia extravaganza created by curator Robert LApez, continues on view at the La Luz de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles through May 29... And May 31 is the deadline for applications for the Ritchie Valens music scholarship competition offered by the Los Angeles-based Youth Opportunities Foundation...
- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
LA BAMBA CONTINUES: Advertising Age, a major national trade publication, inaugurated a monthly two-page section called Perspective in its Nov. 2 issue.
It covers trends and issues in Hispanic advertising It also attempts to help advertisers ascertain nuances of the market Each column contains an update on products targeted at Hispanics.
“it should have happened a long time ago,” senior editor Ed Fitch, who writes the section, tpld Weekly Report He sees the expanded coverage of Hispanics as part of a larger trend starting with La Bamba, fueled by the success of Hispanic publications such as Vista and even the cross-over appeal of singers such as RubAn Blades.
“Once people realize there is money to be
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made, they start riding the wave,” said Fitch. Perspective runs in the last issue of every month.
YOUNG ADULT READERS: A study commissioned by the Education Writers Association in Washington, D.C., found that 90% of young adults read newspapers at least once a week. This applies to Hispanics, blacks and whites The report, presented April 14 to the Literacy Committee of the American Society of Newspaper Editprs, qoted that the greater the_. educatn they sar were re Thettjc newspaJ for Hisbi whites [j
smai|v Section missing from higher, original document
43%. In
read national or international news compared with whites 85%, and Hispanics 82%.
The report found a strong relationship between reading proficiency and the reading of hard news Of those who read the news portion, the average reading proficiency level for blacks was eighth grads for whites it was beyond the 11 th grade level and for Hispanics it was close to this level.
ANPA MEETING: Hispanic journalism lead-eoujire scheduled to meet with Jerry Fried-m, president of the American Newspaper iSlishers Association, May 26. Connections Kt might be established between ANPA and rcino media groups to help increase the mbers of minority journalists on newspaper dfs will be explored. The discussion was Hated by FAlix PArez, editor of Weekly V>ort National Association of Hispanic ernalists President Evelyn HernAndez is ong those expected to attend.
â–  - Darryl Figueroa
|g paie- a wsh..
'You don’t have to go to college to be a success... We need the people... who do the physical work of our society. "
—Vice President George Bush to students at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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, ;_ .. v • ••\' Making The News This Week ;;1[\i::i 2/1. Molses Escobar, a resident of Hyattsvil e ; KKd., to remain in the United States while a court decides on the constitutionality of a marriage fraud law under which Escobar would be deported ... The Colorado Special Olympics inducts vocational rehabilitation teacher Colleen Juirez, of Grand Junction, into its Hall of Fame ... Jullssa G6mez, a 15-year-old gymnast from San Antonio injured at a meet in Tokyo May 5, remains unable to move her arms or legs but is conscious and can blink her eyes. . . Jockey Angel Cordero gets elected into thoroughbred racing's Hall of Fame. . . By winning the $37,500 first prize in the Chrysler-Plymouth Classic in Middletown, N.J., Nancy L6pez now leads the Ladies Professional Golf Association's earnings list this year with $189,882 ... Miami Dr. Alberto Castro, who along with three associates developed a way to rapidly diagnose Legionnaire's disease, dies of heart failure at age 54 ... California Gov. George Deukmejlan names Maryela Martinez, a . 16-year-old honors student born in Havana, Cuba, as the student representative of the state Board of Education for 1988-89. Living in , Orange County, Martinez will be the first His panic studentto serve on i the board .. San Antonio police arrest Parker former congressional candidate, for hiring a hit man to assassinate MayorHeniyCisnerOII'. ,, The colleagues of Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Ricardo, Torres elect him as the courfs assistant presiding judge, a position not held by a Hispanic since 1859. The assistant presiding judge automatically assumes the courfs top spot after a term ... The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service gives permission to . Vol 8 No. 20 HISPANI LINK WEE Uncertainty Hampers Legalization's 2nd Step The clock has started ticking on the second stage of the legalization process. But edu cators, social service providers and public administrators do not have a precise idea of what will be expected of them or applicants. Final U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service regulations governing the step will not be issued until September. The INS is distributing draft copies of the regulations to interested organizations for their review and input Proposed regulations will then be printed in the Federal Register, followed by a 30-day comment period . Estimates of those who qualified during the first phase but are unaware they must fulfill second step requirements to become per manent residents run as high as 80%, said Michael Zamba . of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. "I'm fearful the word won't getout and that there won't be enough training and facilities," Zamba said . According to the INS , the lag time in putting out the official regulations will not pose a problem. Those program participants seeking a green card must only show"they are enrolled and progressing satisfactorily," said an INS spokesman. This translates into proof of 30 hours of attendance in a class at least 60 hours long. Or they can choose to take an INS civics and English oral exam. Once applicants become permanent r& sidents, they must wait five years to become citizens, or three years if they marry a U.S. citizen. If the applicants attended class to meet requirements for a green card, they must take the oral test to obtain citizenship. Immigrants who applied for temporary r& sidency at the beginning of the legalization program will start to stream in when the 18month waiting period elapses in December. They will then have one year to set up an interview for a green card. Rudimentary English is what is needed to meet the language criterion established by the INS. said Gilbert Csrrasco, the U.S. catholic Conference's director of Immigration Services. But he questioned whether courses on U.S. government can be taught in such basic English. He said he is encouraging his net work of service providers to use a curriculum of English language lessons paired with civics instruction in the studenfs native tongue. The INS proposes to give the civics test in English. Eliza May of the American Public Welfare Association agreed with Carrasco . "Can you imagine teaching U.S. civics to people in Latinos Seen as Influential In Nov. '88 Latinos have a major opportunity to influence 71% of the nation's 269. electoral college votes in the November presidential election, says the National Association \ of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. In a NALEO analysis released May 18, the concentration of Hi& panics in nine states was credited with this possible influence. Ninety percent of adult Hispanics live in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Texas. These states account for 193 electoral votes. Louis DeSipio, a NALEO research associate, said, "In the past there's been emphasis on why Latinos don't vote. Despite all the limiting factors, the Hispanic vote is starting to be a swing vote." The Hispanic portion of the national vote grew from 2.4% to 3.6% between 1976 and 1986-a 50% increase . In Florida 89% of eligible Latinos registered to vote in 1986. The total number of Latinos voting in 1986 was 2,866,000. Because of recent immigration, the per centage of adult Hispanics eligible to vote has dropped, DeSipio added. In 1986, tor the first time, more than on&-third of Hispanic adults were not citizens. Another roadlock to participation is the relative youth of the Hispanic population. The average age of Latinos is 25. Young adults are least likely to vote, the report pointed out Other factors it cited as discouraging the Latino vote are poverty and a lower level of education. Sophia Nieves English who can' tread or write (in their native language)?" She said 70% of the applicants are illiterate or low literate in English. A survey commi& sioned by the APWA determined 50% of those eligible for the second stage had com pleted only three to six years of schooling. Preparation classes are being offered through a variety of sources, including community based organizations and school districts. That presents problems, according toZamba He said the cost per class session depends on who is offering the IN&approved co. urae. It runs from a few dollars a session to $1 ,500 for a Berlitz immersion course, he said. Costs incurred by states because of legali zation will be lessened through federal grant money soon to become available. Approxi mately $928 million in State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants will be provided to states; a minimum of 10% each must be allocated for public education, health and social service assistance . . The rest of the continued on PllQ& 2 Panel HealS' English-Only' The first hearing on four bills that would make English the official language of the United States by constitutional amendment was held May 11 by the U.S. House civil and constitutional rights subcommittee. Sponsors of the legislation who testified were U.S. Reps. Norman Schumway(RCallf.), William Broomfield (RMich.) and Clarence Miller (R-Ohio). Citing a divisive drift toward bilingualism, the congressmen called for unity through an offici8Hanguage amendment Rep. Virginia Smith (A-Neb), who has also proposed an English-only bill, did not testify. U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, was among those who testified in opposition to the legislation. He noted that Hispanics were never asked to speak English on the battlefields where they served . Sen. John McCain (RAriz . ) stated in his testimony, "We should be providing help to the 1.5 million who applied for residency (through the legalization pr(>gram) rather than wasting time on these amendments."

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FurorGrowsOverPaintingsSold by Miami Museum The Cuban American caucus of the Florida Legislature and the Miami City Commission called May 12 for separate investigations of Miamrs Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture. The calls came as the museum has come under increasing fire from powerful Cuban American groups for auctioning several paint ings by artists who h_ad not broken ties with the Castro regime . In addition to sending a letter to Florida Secretary of State Jim Smith requesting that his office investigate the museum for allegedly misspending a $125,000 grant from the Secreta,Ys office, the sevell"member legislative caucus has also withdrawn its support for $250,000 in state funding for the museum this year. The Miami City Commission unanimously approved a resolution calling for federal and state investigations. "We felt then and we feel now that what we did (auctioning the paintings) is in accord ance with First Amendment principles,'' Teresa Saldise, museum president, told Weekly Report . State Rep. Javier Souto downplayed any suggestion that the legislative caucus' moves were related to the auctioned works. "We as Cuban Americans don't want hanky panky," he said, referring to the possible misspent grant. "This is America, a of laws." Saldise thought it ironic that none of the allegations were brought up prior to the April 22 auction. The matter took a grim turn May 3 when a pipe bomb was tossed through the front door of the museum. The following day 18 U.S. English School Plan Questioned Florida English representatives said May 10 "we are putting our money where our mouth is" by helping to raise at least$1 00,000 to open a Miami branch of an adult English school in Los Angeles. It remains unclear exactly how much money the parent organization, U.S. English, will contribute to the Florida English effort. U.S. English has 350,000 members who pay an average $20 contribution, said Tom Olson, public affairs director in Washington, D.C. Based on these figures, its gross 1988 budget is about $7 million. Last year its program budget, including salaries, travel and public ations, was $3. 7 million, he added No funds have as yet been budgeted for the Florida school, though some $100,000 will be needed in the first year, said Pat Fulton, spokesperson for Florida English. When funds are raised, they are expected to come not only from U.S. English members, but from government grants and community contributions, she explained. Mary Carol Combs, project director of the English Plus Information Clearinghouse in Washington, D.C., said, "We would like to see more effort on their part to provide opportu nities for people to learn English." Along with advocating English-only legislatio" one of the goals of U.S. English at its inception over five years ago was to support English instruction programs, noted Olson. It began to dip into its resources for this purpose in . January 1987 when it opened a Los Angeles office charged with conducting research and development of programs and materials as well as fundraising. Barbara Kaze, regional director of the Los Angeles office, said the parent group estimated that $650,000 was needed over a twoto three-year period. Kaze said that they have spent less than half that amount, with some coming from foundation grants. of the museum's board of directors resigned in protest to the decision to sell the paintings. On May 10 the board elected new members and tried to put the episode behind it. The day after the election of the new board members, including that of Saldise from vice president to president, a coalition of groups and individuals, including the Cuban American National Foundation, the Latin American Chamber of Commerce and Armando Valladares, called for the boards resignation. It refused. Admitting that the 15-year-old museum would be hard pressed to survive without state funding, Saldise stood by the boards decision. "We welcome all investigations and hope all concerned Americans step forward and take a stand on this issue." Felix Perez Groups Congress to Fund Literacy Plan Several Hispanic and civil rights groups issued a call May 11 for full appropriation of t26.5 million for the newly created English Literacy Grants Program. The program, a modified version of a bill introduced by U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), targets literacy programs for limited English-speaking adults and others not in school. It is part of the $8.3 billion education package signed by President April 28. The bill provides state grants for English programs, incorporating such innovative fea tures as child care and transportation support, and the requirement that half the funds go to programs operated by community-based groups. As many as 56% of Hispanics are considered functionally illiterate. Sorzano to Leave Post , Some $200,000 of the money granted for Project Golden Door has gone to the Cambria English Institute, the school for which a Miami location is being scouted. With about another $100,000, Kaze acquired English-a&a-Second Language and "survival English" tapes. Additionally, the project sponsors an English teaching radio program. The National Council of La Raza, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational . Fund, the American Civil Liberties Union and others at a Capitol Hill press conference expressed concern that funds would not be fully appropriated. Demand for such programs is expected to increase with the additional needs of the bulk of the 2.1 million legalization applicants. They must pass English proficiency tests in order to obtain permanent residency. 2 Jose Sorzano, special assistant to President Reagan and head of the Latin American Affairs division of the National Security Council, announced his resignation May 16. Though Sorzano has not submitted a formal letter of resignation to the president, he will leave by May 31, said W .. ; ... House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater. The Cuba born Sorzano said he was leaving for"personal reasons." However, The Washington Times reported that Sorzano's frustration over what he feels are relaxed contra policies led him to quit. Sorzano, 47, was appointed to the post Jan. 2, 1987, by then National Security Advisor Frank Carlucci. He was a deputy to Jeane Kirkpatrick when she was United Nations Ambassador. He did not mention any future plans. Combs said," From my experience teaching English, there is not much that can be taught from tapes. "They are probably doing this because they need some credibility because of the divisive ness caused by their campaigns for English only legislation." Darryl Figueroa Rep. Albert Bustamante([). is lobbying fellow congressmen to request full funding from the appropriations subcommittee that considers the education budget It is expected to mark up the bill May 26. $928 Million Allotted for Legalization continued from page 1 funds are to be distributed according to the discretion of state officials. California is alloting about 16% of its grant money for education. Los Angeles Unified School District officials have made it clear they will need more. According to Domingo Rodriguez, the head of Los Angeles Unifieds legalization the district estimates the 200-hour program they are offering will cost $1,300 per head, more than twice the amount estimated by the INS to provide sufficient education, not putting anything out we're not going to be reimbursed for," said Rodriguez. Sophia Nieves Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Henry Cisneros, guest columnist Looking Ahead If the United States makes a decision to leave an entire sector of its population undereducated, underproductive and living in permanent" underclass" status, as is implicitly being made in national policy every day, this country cannot continue to prosper. The egalitarian Ideals of the nation itself are at risk. We can ill afford to lose the very lubricant that makes the engine of our democratic society work because the margins of success in ' global competition are too narrow as it is. Without individuals believing that by staying on less than desirable jobs in order to send children to school, we lose. Without individuals feeling that it is possible for them to break out of hopelessness, no government can provide them education. Unless members of the news business become advocates for change in one of the most fundamental issues confronting us today, matters are going to get a lot worse. WHITE BASTIONS CHANGING President Reagan says there is no danger of our nation losing its middle class. Nevertheless, last year the top one-fifth of the country's residents earned 43% of the national income-the greatest percentage since the end of World War II. By contrast, the bottom one-fifth earned 4.7%the smallest percentage in 25 years. This suggests a polarization along income lines which, when complicated by race, will create an impossible circumstance, or chasm, that cannot be bridged .. We listen to the palaver from the presidential candidates about their economic programs on trade, but who is making the linkage between trade and this problem the loss of jobs and a growing economic underclass? The United States is witnessing the growth of minority populations. One recent study found that California, which was80% white in 1940, will have no definable ethnic majority by the year2006. It projects the ethnic mix will be equal percentages of Anglo, black, Asian and Hispanic. And we are starting to see changes in places we think of as the bastions of traditional white governance such as Dallas, where today the majority of the school system's students under the third grade are Hispanic and black. As traditional white populations grow older and minority populations swell, we must prepare for change in our educational systems, in the newsrooms, in our governments, and in our attitudes toward how we govern ourselves, through cooperation and consensus. MEDIA LEADERSHIP NEEDED The newspaper in the community is the keeper of the cultural ethos. It must work to keep egalitarian ideals before the community daily. Those who are in the news business must become advocates not just in print and over the air, but working in the community itself. They must hold not only minority officials and other governmental officials accountable on these issues, but also business and civic organizations. The solutions to our problems are going to be fashioned at the local level well into the next century-or they just are not going to happen. We cannot wait for federal dollars. Who better to lead on some of these initiatives, not only in their editorial commentaries, but also by heading the committees and by sharing expertise, than those in the news media? Education and crime are not minority issues. They are America's issues in the most fundamental way. Never before have we been willing to surrender to the idea of a permanent underclass. But unfortunately it is increasingly becoming a reality. Unless we treatthese problems, not as part of a sideshow, but as an issue central to our survival as a nation, we will not progress. (In this column, San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros summarizes a presentation he made to the American Society of Newspaper Editors in Washington, D. C., April 13.) Sin pelos en /a /engua t.COMO SE LLAMA? A few weeks ago we reported that Detroit . Tiger relief pitcher Willie Hern6ndez had instructed the club to change his first name back to Guillermo. At the time, the Puerto Rican star was struggling badly on the mound and taking a merciless razzing from the same fans and press who worshipped him in 1984 when he was voted the American League's Most Valuable Player. The May 16 Sporting News offers this update: "Whaf s in a name? For Guillermo (nee Willie) Hernandez, there seems to be a lot. Hernandez had a 20.77 earned-run average as 'Willie' this season, giving up three runs in 1 1/3 innings. "After saying he wanted to be called Guillermo, his given name, he gave up only one run in his next eight innings, saving one game and winning another." Quick. Somebody tell Eastern Airlines head Frank Lorenzo to switch to Francl•co. OLD NAME, NEW GAME: Federico Pe"a has kept his Spanish first name through thick and thin in his roller-coaster ride as Denver mayor. Not for a minute did he consider switching to "Fred," even in his darkest hour. A couple of months ago, the Denver Post stopped needling him long enough to observe: "He is Denver's Velcro mayor, stuck with the blame for everything from the city's moribund economy and hemorrhaging budget to jarring potholes and an embarrassing Super Bowl loss." Since then, the tides of fortune have been kinder to 41-yearold Federico. In April, a year& long logjam was broken and one of his pet projects-a giant downtown convention center-began con struction. Then a recall campaign against him ran out of steam, to the embarrassment of his political foes. Last Tuesday, another of his pet projects, a shiny new airport in neighboring Brighton, won voters' approval there. Then Pei'la, an avid jogger and very eligible bachelor, was overtaken by Ellen Hart, a popular high-country marathon runner. They were married on Saturday. HOLLYWOOD'COLORS' HISPANICS EVIL: Sevenyearsago, journalisVactivist Juan Gonz61ez offered this commentary: "For millions of Americans who have never seen one or touched one, a Puerto Rican is personified by West Side Story's knife wielding George Chaklrt .. If you didn't carry a knife, if you didn't have jet black slicked-down hair, you weren't a real Puerto Rican. "Hollywood said so . "Now, in the '80s, Hollywood has decided to refurbish the stereotype. The new edition of the "Puerto Rican movie" is Fort Apache: The Bronx. . . " When there's only one 'Puerto Rican movie' a decade, Gonzalez complained, "and in it a police detective says, 'We have 50,000 potential cop killers in this precincf (of 70,000), middle America , will go home more certain than ever in its racist stereotype of the savage Puerto Rican." Now Juan has seen "Colors, " Dennl• Hopper's box-office success about gang warfare in California's City of the Angels. "Every Latino and black civilian with a speaking part is portrayed as irrational or part of the violent drug life of Los Angeles," he critiques. "lfs cowboys and Indians all over again, only the Indians have Uzis and the cowboys .38s." Now a columnist with the New York Daily News, Juan encourages his readers: "Do yourself a favor. Boycott it." Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • HENRY CISNEROS, San Antonio mayor, on hearing that tax . protester Parker Abell was arrested after offering an undercover officer $5,000 to kill him: "I think I should be worth more than $5,000." Hispanic Link Weekly Report May 23,1988 3

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COLLECTING .ENGLISH INSTRUCTION: A series of five video tapes, each 15 . mmutes and providing basic English for new immigrants, is available free to community groups. Request a copy from Barbara Kaze Regional Director, U.S. English, 11444 W . Olympic Blvd., Suite 1051: Los Angeles, Calif. 90064 (213) 312-9525. NEWSPAPER "Reading Newspapers: The Practices of America's Young Adults" includes information on Hispanic readers. available free as an 11page summary orfor $5.00 and postage in 1ts 51page entirety. Write or call the Education Writers Association, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-9680. SECOND STAGE DRAFT REGULATIONS: Draft copies of regulations for stage two of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service's legalization program are being made available to interested organizations and individuals. For a free copy write: Information Operations Unit oft he Immigration and Naturalization Service, Room 5044, 425 I Street NW, Washington D .C. 20536. IMMIGRATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY: "Immigration Control: A New Role for Social Security" looks into the use of Social Security cards in determining employment eligibility and problems associated with counterfeiting. For a free copy of the report (specify Ace . No . 135304, GAO/HRD-88-4), write U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. UNDOCUMENTED ALIENS AND WAGI!S: "Illegal Aliens: Influence of Illegal Workers on Wages and Working Conditions of Legal Workers" can be obtained for free by writing (specify Ace. No . 135244, GAO/PEMD-88-13BR) the General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. ROSTER OF ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials "1987 Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials'' lists 3,31 7 officials and an analysis of related trends. For a copy send $34.50 to 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. eooo3 (202) 546-2536. HIGHER EDUCATION STATUS: The American Council on Education has released its "Sixth Annual Status Report on Minorities in Higher Education" which presents data on degrees earned and fields of concentration according to racial and ethnic group. For a copy send $7.50 to Office of Minority Affairs, ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 939-9395. CONNECTING GROUP RECEIVES $2.1 MILLION The San Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities has received a $2.1 million, three-year grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts of Philadelphia for a pilot program to improve the participation and success of South Texas Hispanics in higher education. The Hispanic Student Success Program, announced May4, consists of five components. It will be implemented through the involvement of South Teas school districts, college staff, faculty and administrators, parents, volunteers, community-based groups, elected officials and business and church leaders. One component seeks to change government policies serving as barriers to Hispanics in higher education. Another will be a media campaign about the value of higher education . The other components will attempt to develop relationships between the parents and schools, provide educational support services to teachers and coun selors and give support services to the students. HACU hopes gradually to introduce successful strategies at its member institutions. ELDERLY TARGETED The Commonwealth Fund, a philanthropic foundation devoted to health concerns and headquartered in New York, announced recently that it had given a $372,000 grant to a Rockville, Md, group to collect information on the health and economic needs of Hispanic elderly. Through a national survey, to be undertaken by Westat Inc., the Commonwealth Funds Commission on Elderly People Living Alone hopes to provide information that will help in the design of culturally relevant health and social services. Hispanics over65 now number 1 million and are expected to reach 1 . 7 million by the year 2000. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The National Hispanic Scholar Awards Program, sponsored by the College Board through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces that 1,000 Hispanic high school students will receive scholarships for college next fall. Scholarships of $1,500 each went to 500 students. The other 500 received $100 awards. . . AT&T expands its bilingual service for operated-assisted long-distance calls nationwide. To request it, customers say, "AT&T Espaiiol." ... Calendar THIS WEEK The 1988 National Image Conference and . Convention will include presentations by experts on affirmative action and Hispanic Qducation issues. A symposium will offer traininQ in ftrtas that include affirmative action placement and c;;areer planning. Vince Gonzalez (216) 771 Education Committee will hold a conference to assist high school students develop leadership skills and help the Latino community . The keynote address will be given by Los Angeles Councilwoman Gloria Molina . Barbara Rentz (213) 487-5560 CHILl COOK-OFF Washington, D . C . May 23 CHAMBER BANQUET Sacramento May 26 COMING SOON Fifty chili aficionados are expected to compete in a cook-offsponsored b y the Capital Counci l of the League of United Latin American : Citizens and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Proceeds go to a scholarship fund . Carl Custer (202) 44 7 MENTAL HEALTH CONFERENCE Washington , D . C . May 24, 25 The International Counseling Center will hold a conference addressing the lack of mental health services for multiethnic and multicultural populations. Among the issues to be covered are cross-cultural adoptions and culturally relevant service delivery for Hispanics. Diane Koslow (202) 483-0700 TRAINING CONFERENCE Cleveland May 24-28 4 The fourth annual Scholarship Awargs Banquet, a benefit for the Sacramento HiPftn! Q Chamber of Commerce's scholarship fund, wilf 1:1@ to honor the 1988 scholarshiQ wirmer!!. Mistress of ceremonies is Bette Vasquez. KCflA television personality. Chamber Office (916) 454-4403 BIRTHDAY PARTY Los Angeles May 27 An evening with Los Angeles CO!.Inci!man Richard Alatorre and Friends will be held. The S!lrah Vaughan and Count Basie Orchestra will P@rfQrm following dinner. Angie Vasquez (213) 629-9254 STUDENT LEADERSHIP Los Angeles May 28 United Teachers of Los Angeles' Chicano-Latina May23,1988 PRE-COLLEGE SEMINAR National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering Houston May 31-June 3 Ronni Denes (212) 279-2626 HISPANIC WOMEN CONFERENCE National Association of Hispanic Women Washington, D .C. June 2-3 Luisa Bras (202) 639 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Latin American Bar Association Chicago June 4 Jesse Reyes(312) 744-6958 CUBAN AMERICAN CONGRESS Cuban American National Foundation Washington, D .C. June 12 Mario Portuondo (202) 265 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION CHIEF Announcement#: 0711-SALIB For the right individual, the Arlington County (VA) Public Library offers the professional and personal opportunity of a lifetime ... Located adjacent to the nation's capital, the library serves a highly progressive and ethnically diverse urbarv'suburban community a approximately 160.000 resident& Arlington's Public Services Division Chief has overall administrative responsibility for the Library's regionally-acclaimed Central Library (which is slated for a $10. 8 million expansion and renovation) and six branch libraries (which are about to undergo a comprehensive ser vices study and facility evaluation) . The library system has a FY 1988 operating budget of $4. 7 million and employs a staff of 119 FTE& This position requires an ALA-accredited MLS or Virginia Librarian's Certificate; a mum of 5 years of library experience, with at least three(3) years of successful managament level experience-preferably in a multi-site public library system; and strong leadership, team-building, and interpersonal skills. Salary Range: $41,600-$58,678 . Excellent benefits. All applicants mu" st submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arling ton County application form will not be ac cepted . Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 :00 PM on June 2, 1988. To request application material please call (703) 558 or TOO (703) 284 (hearing impaired only) . ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 21 00 14th Street , North Arlington , VA. 22201 EOE/MFH PROJECT COORDINATOR National organization seeks self-starter to direct a mental health promotion campaign aimed at low income elderly. Requires M .A. in human service field; Bilingual; public relations or public education experience; and excellent communication skills. Salary DOE. Send resume or call : President, ANPPM, 2727 West 6th Street, #270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057; (213) 4871922. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Executive Director for national organization lighting bias in standardized test& Develop strategies, run programs, raise funds, supervise staff. Planning and management experience required. $35,000 to $40,000 per year plus benefits. Resumes to FairTest, Post Office Box 1272, Cambridge, Mass. 02238: HISPANIC LINK .INTERNSHIP WASHINGTON, D.C. Hispanic Link News Service has a nine-month paid internship available immediately . If interested in receiving infor mation contact: Hector EricksenMendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SPECIAL EDUCATION Bowling Green State University The Department of Special Education at Bowling Green State University is searching for an Assistant Professor of Special Education. This is a full-time academic year tenure track position for teaching and supervising undergraduate and graduate students in Special Education and pursuing scholarly activities. Primary responsibilities are coursework in one or more of the following areas of special education (learning disabilities, developmentally handicapped, behavior disordered) and in the area of earty childhood education of handicapped children. Additional instructional responsibilities may include multiple handicapped or hearing impaired . Other responsibilities include advisement, grant proposal writing, and professional service . Individuals seeking the position must have a doctoral degree in special education with additional training or experience in the eartychildhood education of handicapped children . Applicants must have three years of appropriate teaching experience or equivalent Applicants should exhibit evidence of scholarly productivity . The terminal degree is required for probationary appointment which begins on August 15. The salary range is $22,500 to $23,500 depending upon qualifications. Applicants should send inquiries, applications, or nominations with supporting papers (official transcripts, vita, three (3) letters of reference) by June 15, 1988, to: Dr . Edward Fiscus, Chairman Department of Special Education 451 Education Building College of Education and Allied Professions Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 Telephone: (419) 372 Section missing from origial document PARKS MANAGER City of San Jose $45 , 744 -$55,596/yr. Position is responsible for planning and directing operations for a major parks section such as city-wide large facilities. Position requires a bachelo(sdegree in parks or recreation management or related field and four (4) years experience in parks management or professional public admini& !ration in the planning , organization of parks recreation facilities and programs. Submit resume by July 1, 1988 to: Bob Allen City of San Jose Personnel Dept. 801 N. First St, Room 207 San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277 DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a nationaipool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link. 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street __________________________ ___ City, State & Zip __________ _ Area Code & Phone _________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment TV NEWS: The short-lived CBS s . it-com Trial and Error, which starred Paul Rodriguez and Eddie Velez, was named the third worst prime time program of the 1987-88 season by a poll oft he nation's TV critics. Trial and Error follows The Highway Man and A Different World in a list compiled by Electronic Media, a trade publication, from its semiannual poll of newspaper critics. By contrast, the series LA Law, with Jimmy Smits in a starring role, was named the critics' favorite. Another canceled series with Hispanic leads will air this week on ABC. The one-hour pilot for Juarez, which was taken off the network schedule before it aired, will be broadcast May 28 check local listings reportedly due to a programming void created by the Writers' Guild strike. Benjamin Bratt and Ada Maris star in the drama set in the El PaSO/Juarez border. The cast is predominantly Hispanic. Next month, the first-ever program to be syndicated in Spanish and English-language versions, begins airing on the International Televlalon Network. Bravo!, hosted and produced by Nelly Galan, is a talk show patt,rned after Donahue and the Oprah Winfrey show that will focus on issues of concern to U.S. Hispanics. The show is taped in two half-hour installments on the same topic, one in each language. ITN has scheduled to air Bravo! twice weekly, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, on the satellite-fed network's 56 U.S. affiliates. The talk show is not to be confused with Premios Bravo 1988 (Latin Music Awards), an award special to be aired by Unlvlalon May 29. The program, which will hand out honors in 21 categories, was taped in the Dominican Republic May 14. • Special awards will be presented to Julio Iglesias, Los Lobos, Jose Luis Rodriguez and Linda Ronstadt. ONE LINERS: After delays caused by the U.S. State Department, the more than 80 singers, dancers and musicians of Cuba's Tropicana nightclub launched their long-awaited North American tour May 18 in New York. . A. Martinez and Bob Vila are among performers nominated for daytime Em my Awards. .. The Elvis Show, a multimedia extravaganza created by curator Robert L6pez, continues on view at the La Luz de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles through May 29. . . And May 31 is the deadline for applications for the Ritchie Valens music scholarship competition offered by the Los Angele _ s-based Youth Opportunities Foundation ... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report made, they start riding the wave," said Fitch. read national or international news compared Perspectiva runs in the last issue of every with whites, 85%, and Hispanics, 82%. LA BAMBA CONTINUES: Advertising Age, a major national trade publication, inau gurated a monthly two-page section called Perspectlva in its Nov. 2 issue. It covers trends and issues in Hispanic advertising. It also attempts to help advertisers ascertain nuances ot _ the market Each column contains an update . on i&rlieted at Hispanics. "It should have happened a long time ago," senior editor Ed Fitch, who writes the section, told Weekly Report He sees the expanded coverage of Hispanics as part of a larger trend starting with La Samba, fueled by the success of Hispanic publications such as Vista and even the croa&over appeal of singers such as Ruben Blades. "Once people realize there is money to be HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A natlonal_ publicatiori of Link N•-Service Inc. 1420 • N' Street NW ' Weshlngton, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or Publisher. H6ctor Ericksea,-Mendoza Editor. F61ix P6rez Reporting: Antonio Meji-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa. Sophia Nieves. Graphlciii'Production: Carlos Arrien, Zolla Elias. No portion of Hispanic Link WeeklY Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annuel subscription (50 Issues): lnatltutlone/egencl" 1118 Peraonel 1108 Trlel (13 luu") 130 CORPORATE CLASS FlED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 month. The report found a strong relationship bei. YOUNG ADULT READERS: A study tween reading proficiency ' . and the reading of missioned by the EducatiOn Writers Association hard news. Of those who read the news in Washington, D.C., found that 90% of young portion, the average reading proficiency level adults read newspapers at least once a week. for blacks was eighth grade, for whites it was This applies to Hispanics, blacks and whites. beyond the 11th grade level and for Hispanics The report, presented April14 to the Literacy 1t as close to this level. Committee of the American Society of News-PA MEmNG: Hispanic journalism paper __ that the gre_!!ter tltP-rescheduled to meet with Jerry , president of the American Newspaper they I'Oiishers Association, May 26. Connections Section missing from original document >