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Hispanic link weekly report, May 30, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 30, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael HernAndez Col6n leads a rally of some 2,000 mostly Puerto Rican residents in Trenton, N.J„ to draw attention to the substance abuse problem among Hispanics. . . After a memorial Mass marking the anniversary of a tornado that killed 30 people and injured 170 others in the predominantly Hispanic town of Saragosa, Texas, Bishop Raymundo Peha walks through the almost-rebuilt community to bless houses... Jos* Torres, 52, resigns after four years as chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission... The U S. Department of Education announces that Cav&n Gonzales, a high school student from Santa Fe, N.M., is among the 139 Presidential Scholars for 1988... A federal judge agrees to the
release of Puerto Rican separatist Filiberto Ojeda Rios on $1 million bail. Ojeda is accused of masterminding a 1983 $7 million robbery of a Wells Fargo depot in Connecticut.. Immigration authorities release Jos* Rodriguez-Gallegos, 44, the Cuban who crashed a ; bus into the Peruvian Embassy compound in Havana. That event precipitated the 1980 Mariel boatlift.. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service announces it has begun deportation and exclusion proceedings against Orlando Bosch, a pediatrician turned militant anti-Castroist. Bosch was convicted in 1968 for a rifle attack on a Polish freighter engaged in trade with Cuba, skipped parole and fled the United States in 1972... Pedro Espada, director of the Soundview Health Clinic in the Bronx, announces his candidacy for the seat of U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia..
ACT Exams Skewed by Status
Regardless of their aptitude, Hispanic students preparing for the most widely used college admissions test in the nation will on average be outscored by non-Hispanic white students when they take the next exam June 11.
If educational opportunity and socioeconomic factors were the same for both groups, this would not be so, according to a national study.
“It is not race or ethnicity that determines test outcomes, but how one Is situated,” said University of Iowa professor George Chambers, an educational testing expert who authored the report. “This study should dispel the myth that school achievement scores are brought down by certain groups."
Chambers matched 964 pairs of Hispanic and Anglo students with 13 identical variables ranging from family income and school attended to gender and number of siblings.
He observed that the matched Hispanics and Anglos scored about equally on the standardized tests. The analyzed exams were those conducted by the American College
Cubana Switches Parties
Florida state Rep. Arnhilda Gonz&lez-Quevedo stunned the Legislature’s Cuban American caucus and her other Republican colleagues May 19 when she took the House floor in Tallahassee and announced she was switching to the Democratic Party.
Gonzdlez-Quevedo, a two-term legislator whose term expires in November, said her decision was based on the Reagan administration’s increasing negotiations with the Castro regime and that individuals fleeing communist governments are no longertreated as refugees but as deportable aliens.
“As this administration continues to negotiate with the tyrant Castro and attempts to normalize relations with the communist government of Cuba, I feel our people have been betrayed,” read Gonz6lez-Quevedo from a four-page statement.
GonzAlez-Quevedds renouncement makes her the sole Democrat in the seven-member Cuban American caucus.
Testing Corporation, which gives the test to approximately80,000 students annually. About 10,000 of them are Hispanic. ACT measures educational achievement rather than aptitude, as does the Scholastic Aptitude Test used in 22 states.
Currently, with a perfect score being 35, the average national ACT score for non-His-panic whites is 19.6 compared with 16.6 for Puerto Ricans and Cubans and 15.2 for Chica-nos. When variables were controlled, Anglos scored 18.7 compared to 16.7 for Chicanos. Anglos got 19.8 compared with 18.9 for Puerto Rican and Cuban students.
Of the factors considered, family income and course work were found to contribute more to test scores. As family income rose so did scores, with the highest income Hispanics outperforming all but one level of Anglos.
Students who took such advanced courses as trigonometry, calculus and chemistry were better prepared for admissions tests. The study noted that Anglos take such classes more often than do Hispanics, while a greater percentage of Puerto Ricans and Cubans take them than do Chicanos.
The report has been distributed to about 500 educational agencies, including the U.S. Department of Education and both educational testing services. There has been no formal response. But David Crockett, vice president of public affairs for ACT, told Weekly Report,
continued on page 2
The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York turned down May 19a request to extend the legalization filing deadline 60 days for undocumented parents with children receiving public assistance.
Individuals who fell into this category had been allowed to file legalization applications until the May 19 hearing.
The suit was filed because of the confusion surrounding the INS’ initial policy to exclude such parents and its subsequent decision to make them eligible. NewYorkCity, NewYork state, and immigrants representing the group affected by the INS policy filed the suit Judge Kenneth Conboy denied the extension
Cockrell Hill, Texas, Latinos‘Come of Age*
In a victory attributed to a strong push to register Hispanic voters, two Latinos were elected to city council for the first time in a small Texas town which until last month had never seen more than 16 Latinos vote in a municipal election.
Rachel Rodriguez and Leo Garda claimed two of five positions on the governing body of Cockrell Hill, south of Dallaa A run-off May 28 was expected to yield yet another seat to a Hispanic candidate; Tony Hinojosa, who tied incumbent C.W. Martin. Each received 235 votes. Delores Singleton, who had supported Latino leaders in their efforts toward representation, was elected mayor.
More than half of Cockrell Hilfs 3,500 residents are Hispanics. Organizers estimated that about 60% of the 123 Latinos who voted in this election had never entered a polling place before.
Resident Sam Rodriguez, whose bid for appointment to a vacant council seat in November was rejected by the all-Anglo council, started the voting registration effort by contacting Domingo Garcia, president of Chicanos Actively United for Social Advancement Garcia's group worked with the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project in signing up more than 400 Hispanic voters.
pending presentation of further evidence. If Conboy decides it is necessary, he can extend the deadline at the triafs completion, according to one of the plaintiff’s attorneys,Janet Calvo. No trial date has been set.
“The case is not lost. We couldn't get what we wanted on a preliminary injunction basis,” she said. “As things stand now, people can’t appyffor legalization). They can be deported.” To prevent this, immigrants who might be affected by a future ruling, but who now are in danger of being deported, are having their cases handled on an individual basis, said a co-counsel.
- Sophia Nieves
Court Rejects Legalization Extension


Work, Social Life of Professional Latinas Examined
Professional Latina Survey
Sixty-eight percent of Hispanic wornen working at the managerial level or higher serve as board members for civic and professional organizations, according to recently released survey of 303 Latinas.
The results were presented in the spring magazine of the National Network of Hispanic Women, Intercambios Femeniles.
The breakdown of those surveyed by NNHW came close to approximating the makeup of the general female Hispanic population: 69.6% Mexican American, 11.4% Puerto Rican, 10% Cuban American and 9% South and Central American. The survey’s response rate was 48%.
In a follow-up study, co-author Hortensia Amaro, a Boston University researcher, analyzed the NNHW statistics. “Family and Work: Predictors of Psychological Well-
Avg. Age 38 Avg. Ed. 18 Yrs. U.S. Born 75% Income* $45,000 Married 50% Priorities
Have Children 58% Career 40%
No. Children 1-2 Family 40%
* Median annual income
Being Among Hispanic Women Professionals? focused on mental health, work and family role balance, and satisfaction in personal and professional life.
Amaro and her colleagues found psychological distress is tied to racial discrimination and the social status of a marriage partner. Generally, professional Latinas, unlike most women, form a relationship with someone at the same level or lower.
About one-third of the married Latinas surveyed married Anglo men. They tended
to marry up in statue
“In oursociety if s unusual forwomen and men to have similar status. It may bring conflicts, difficulties and stress,” Amaro said.
Sixty-two percent of the NNHWs subjects considered their jobs stressful Amaro1 s study went on to tie higher earning power to less stress. She said this disproved the belief held by some employers regarding women’s inability to handle high-level positions.
“When you have a lot of control, you don’t have the same symptoms of stress,” she said.
In every circumstance the study found Puerto Rican women suffered most from psychological distress, or depression. Amaro hypothesized it was tied to lower socioeconomic background and pay.
- Sophia Nieves
LA. Considers‘Newcomer' Programs
A program designed to acclimate new immigrant children in the Los Angeles Unified School District to U.S. customs and language will go into effect in June 1989 if school district officials give the go-ahead to staff school-site proposals.
On June 13 the school board is expected to take a final vote on the voluntary" newcomer" schools.
This month recommendations were presented for two school sites- one encompassing grades 4-8, the other a high school.
These schools, projected as the first of 10, would provide a nurturing environment for
continued from page 1
“It is interesting to have people begin to look at the complex reasons for the differentials we find, ratherthan charge us with bias because of it.”
The report, “All of America’s Children,” also
900 new arrivals, especially those who have fled countries at war. According to district officials, a growing number of their student population is coming from Central America Each of the schools would have its own part-time psychologist and full-time nurse.
Gloria Sierra who is in charge of the newcomer pilot program, described the current means of dealing with these students “These kids are receiving the same service as any youngster born in this country of mainstream parents” she said. “Thai’s equitable, but these kids have more needs”
-Sophia Nieves
found that despite the prevailing view that smaller, more intimate schools provide better learning environments larger schools produce students who score higher. “Big was better for both,” said Chambers. He speculated that more specialized teachers greater availability of advanced courses and assistance programs enriched larger schools
Chambers also observed that when Latinos become better situated, their scores increase more than Anglos. He noted that one-third of the Hispanics examined did not list English as their first language.
His study, released March 7, reviewed the current status of U.S. public education, which is charged with teaching most poor, minority children. It noted that 25% of the 3.6 million children who began public school last year are living in poverty; public school enrollment is 40% minority; and Latino student enrollment between 1972-83 increased by one million while for Anglos, it decreased by six million.
Chambers recommended a fivefold increase in federal education spending, from $8 million to $40 billion. Annual increases for defense spending exceed the entire education budget, the report said, while federal support for public schools is at its lowest level in 20 years. - Darryl Figueroa
INS Proposes Special Spouse, Children Visas
In a move signaling an about-face for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, the agency proposed this month that special visas be issued for the immediate family members of undocumented immigrants who qualified for legalization under the 1986 immigration act
The move caught by surprise many critics of the INS who had been charging throughout the yearlong legalization program that the splitting up of families was inhumane and led to many immigrants not filing for legal status.
Duke Austin, a spokesperson for the INS, said the proposal was made because of a backlog of 10 years for the spouses and children, particularly those from Mexico, of permanent residents Austin said the proposal would provide an additional 200,000visas to be allotted on a competitive basis, for a one-year period only.
The White House has yet to give the proposal its stamp of approval.
U.S. Rep. Charles Schumer(D-N.Y.) said he plans to include the special visa idea into an immigration bill he has introduced.
Font to Quit Foundation
Jose Antonio Font, executive director of the Washington, D.C. -based Cuban American National Foundation, steps down from the influential lobbying group’s helm May 30.
“My job is done. I came at a time of transition and we have since laid out a longterm agenda” said the former director of the capital’s Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce.
Font, who became the organization’s director last May after Frank Calzon quit, said he will now devote all his efforts to his construction business. Mignon Medrano, Fonfs special assistant will serve as acting director of the 9-year-old group until a permanent replacement is named.
Ex-Officer Sues L.A. P. D.
A former officer of the Los Angeles Police Department filed a $1 million lawsuit against the ’department charging that the department engages in systematic denials of raises and promotions to Latinos.
Ernest Valdez, a patrolman from 1980 to 1985, charged that promotions are controlled by a group of white Christian fundamentalists who alter test scores and promote only officers who share their religious beliefs. Valdez, who filed his suit May 4, said he resigned as a result of policies that caused repeated denials of pay raises.
Latinos comprise 30% of the city’s population; 17% of the police force is Hispanic.
A spokesman forthe department admitted to the low representation of Hispanics on the force but denied any pattern of discrimination.
Smaller Schools Not Inherently Better
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Raoul Lowery Contreras, guest columnist
Color-Coded Round-Up
On a recent evening, several dozen San Diego County deputy sheriffs - including SWAT teams in camouflage combat fatigues, armed with high-powered, semiautomatic rifles -surrounded, detained and questioned 85 brown-skinned, Spanish-speaking men aged 16 through 50 regarding a rape.
The 15-year-old victim reported that two young men repeatedly raped her in front of five witnesses. Her description of the assailants was: young, Mexican, Spanish-speaking, approximately 5 feet 7 inches tall. The witnesses: the same, except two were women.
Mobilizing an army of deputies, the Sheriff s Department rounded up the men in the rape’s general locale and, according to reliable witnesses slammed many of them against walls handcuffed and laid them out on the parking lot for hours while each was questioned.
Almost all of the 85 were U.S. citizens or legal immigrants; those not were turned over to the U.S. Border Patrol. Sheriffs spokesmen offered no explanation why men up to 50 years old, or 6 feet tall, were held.
When this story hit the newspapers, the American Civil Liberties Union and Mexican American groups protested that the raid was racially implemented. The Sheriffs Department responded that the detention was voluntary, force was not used and the deputies were well-mannered.
WHAT DO WE GAIN?
A number of questions arise from this episode. First, the rights of the victim. Anyone convicted of this crime should spend the rest of his life in prison, without possibility of parole.
If, however, the constitutional rights of 85 Latinos are trampled in the process, what have we gained?
None of the 85 detainees were arrested for the crime. I nformation leading to the suspects’ arrest was voluntarily offered days later by other Mexican Americans.
One wonders what motivated the raid. Allow me to propose a different scenario.
In downtown San Diego, there’s a bus stop for affluent suburban commuters. Most are upwardly mobile Anglo college graduates, male, in three-piece suits, with brief cases, initialed, of course.
A rape occurs within a block of the bus stop, at approximately 5 p.m., commuter time. The victim; a 15-year-old Mexican girl.
The deputy chief of the San Diego Police Department a Mexican American, orders SWAT teams and dozens of his Latino officers to arm themselves with high-powered, semiautomatic rifles and to dress in urban warfare camouflage uniforms. He briefs them:
‘WE HAVE ALL NIGHT
“Gentlemen, a heinous crime has been committed by two blond, blue-eyed men dressed in three-piece suits and carrying brief cases. The victim reports that several other men and two women, also wearing suits and carrying brief cases, witnessed the rape.
“Deploy around the commuter bus stop and interview every blond, blue-eyed man and woman in a suit and carrying a brief case. I want everyone’s papers and documents checked. If anyone can’t produce papers, the Border Patrol will arrest them,
“You may use any methods necessary to find these vicious criminals and their friends. Handcuff everyone and place them on the ground to await their questioning. Takeyourtime. We have all night.”
I magine how many lawsuits? How many FBI agents would descend on San Diego? How many grand juries would be empaneled? How long would the Mexican American deputy police chief keep his job?
Or, have we with brown skins been relegated to a constitutional Black Hole epitomized by the imperishable words spoken by Claude Rains in the waning moments of the classic movie Casablanca after he kills one of the bad guys, a Nazi,
His orders to police officers: “Round up the usual suspects.”
(Raoul Lowery Contreras is a businessman in La Jolla, Calif.)
Sin polos en la
OBIT: I suppose that his death was noted elsewhere. I saw it in The New York Times obituary section May 21. The head read: Daniel Lewis James Is Dead at 77;
Wrote About Los Angeles Barrio
That he did. Hewroteanoveltitled“FamousAIIOverTown.” But instead of using his own name, he used the pseudonym Danny Santiago.
The novel was about a Chicano kid who was infatuated by Los Angeles' billboards lit up with names of famous people; so he scrawled his own name on walls and fences, like the title says, “all over town.”
There was more substance to the book than that - enough to make Simon & Schuster publish it and for it to receive some very nice reviews. When it came out in 1983 as a “first novel by Chicano author Danny Santiago,” the book won a $5,000 literary award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters - but the author failed to surface to pick up the check.
The following spring we all learned why. “Danny Santiago” was really a 73-year-old 6-foot-6 Yale graduate, a once-successful Hollywood writer who worked with Charlie Chaplin on “The Great Dictator," who later was blacklisted for alleged communist ties and fell to writing grade-B monster movies. Subsequently, he spent three decades with his wife Lilith doing volunteer social work in East Los Angeles.
His literary deception drew generally strong criticism from U.S. Latino writers. He was accused of jumping on the bandwagon at a time when Latino authors finally seemed to be gaining acceptance.
Hispanic Link News Service carried a couple of columns attacking him, and column editor Charlie Ericksen called him at his home in. Carmel, Calif., inviting him to defend what he had done.
James was being harassed by press from all over the country then, but when Ericksen explained that the Link reached primarily a Hispanic audience, he agreed immediately - without even questioning if or what we paid.
In a column carried in Weekly Report and bylined Daniel James/Danny Santiago, he challenged,“What bandwagon?” No Mexican American novel ever had wide sale, he said; his book had been rejected by more than a dozen publishers before S&S took it
“I wanted to write about the Mexican community as WE, not THEY. .. For 35 years my wife and I have been members, by compadrazgo, of several large Mexican families in Los Angeles. We have known and loved four generations, have baptized babies, f stood up at weddings and at confirmations, served as pallbearers.” I
Reminiscing on the phone, James seemed to climb into the skin of Danny Santiago several times.
A few months later, he told a San Francisco Bav Guardian reporter in a question-and-answer session:
“I think when I take on the Santiago persona, I annihilate all the bad years, the years of frustration. I say, ’Here I am, a young Mexican, and I’m writing.’ Santiago just goes... My subconscious opens up and I am able to write faster and cleaner than anything else I’ve ever written.”
One Latino writer who chose to defend Daniel James was the late Enrique Hank L6pez. James’ novel, he said,“transported me to my old Denver barrio... I remember that desperate yearning to get out, to join the outside world seemingly forbidden to Mexican Americans - to be famous all over town.”
Concluded Enrique: “Welcome to our barrio, mano."
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
PAUL RODRIGUEZ, describing his friendship with Edward James Olmos at a workshop in which both participated at the Hispanic Media Conference in Dallas:
“We're about as close as two heterosexuals can be.”
May 30,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
HISPANIC HERITAGE POSTER: The 1988 Hispanic Heritage Week- Sept. 12-17 - poster is available. The poster, 16x22-inches with a four-color design, contains the Aztec calendar. The poster costs $3.50 (include $1.50 for postage and handling). To order contact Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105 (818) 799-1795.
PAY EQUITY: A recent survey finds that 24 states and the District of Columbia have taken steps to address race- or sex-based wage discrimination. For a copy write Local Survey, National Committee on Pay Equity, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
SOUTH FLORIDA’S POLITICAL ECONOMY: "The Political Economy of Cubans in South Florida” is a 46-page essay analyzing forces molding the group’s future. For a copy send $5 to Graduate School of International Studies, University of Miami, North-South Center, Publications, P.O. Box 24-8123, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124-SI 23 (305) 284-6866.
AIDS BROCHURE: A free Spanish-language version of “Understanding AIDS,” an 8-page publication prepared by the U.S. Surgeon Generars Office and the Centers for Disease Control, is now available. To receive a copy, call the toll-free hotline 1-800-344-SIDA.
INVOLVING STUDENTS’ PARENTS
Starting this August the National Education Association will begin a three-year, $97,000 media campaign to increase the involvement of Hispanic parents in the education of their children.
To be waged largely through radio and television public service announcements, the campaign will focus on Hispanics in the Southwest because they have the highest percentage of school-age children. The announcements will be in English and Spanish. The NEA will also schedule promotional events surrounding the release of the announcements to gather interest and support.
Every August during the campaign, the N EA will release two public service announcements for television. The first year the spots will use Hispanic politicians. Entertainers will be used for the second year and the parents of prominent Hispanics for the third.
One radio spot will be released per year. These will be solely in Spanish. Spanish-language brochures will be made available.
ACT SCORES: “All of America’s Children” is a 65-page report which compares the college admissions scores of Hispanics and non-Hispanics whites. The report is available free to education and related groups. Write to: Professor George Chambers, University of Iowa, College of Education, Division of Educational Administration, 210 Lindquist Center, Iowa City 52242.
HISPANA PROFESSIONALS: The National Network of Hispanic Women’s survey profiling professional Latinas is available through the organization. To obtain a copy, send a check payable to NNHW to: 12021 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 353, Los Angeles, Calif. 90025. Attn: Y. Herrera Institutions and corporations: $60; non-members: $30; members: $25.
PROGRAM SEEKS STUDENTS Middlesex County College in Edison, N.J., this fall will enroll 40 students- 20 Hispanic, 20 black- in a new program designed to allow the students to attend classes and work part time at a corporation in their chosen field of study.
While enrolled at the college, the students will be provided through Middlesex’s Minority Access to the Professions Scholars program a career development specialist to develop an educational career plan. A mentor, of the same race, ethnicity and sex, will be assigned to each student at the corporations involved in the program, which is funded through a state grant.
For more information contact the program’s director, John Dunning, at (201) 906-2531.
ift
INTERPRETING DATA ON SUCCESSFUL LATINAS: “Family and Work: Predictors of Psychological Well-Being Among Hispanic Women Professionals” analyzes data on professional Hispanas in the areas of mental health, work and family balance, and career and personal satisfaction. To receive a free copy, contact Hortensia Amaro, Boston University School of Public Health, 85 E. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 02118.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Preparations are underway for a Hispanic Resource Directory that will provide information on organizations, academic programs, government agencies, research centers and foundations relating to U.S. Hispanics. To be included in the directory, contact The Denali Press, P.O. Box1535, Juneau, Alaska 99802(907)586-6014... NewYork’s Metropolitan Museum of Art now offers Spanish-language tours, funded in part by the Avon Products Foundation, every Tuesday and Sunday...

Calendar
The Hispanic Public Relations Association will hold a luncheon to honor Latino athletes. Among the award presenters will be Pete Moraga, KNX-Radio reporter, and Andrew Amador, KH J-TV weatherman. Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC ISSUES Washington, D.C. June 2-3 The National Council of Hispanic Women will be holding a conference on getting the Hispanic vote to count Workshop topics include economic trends in the Latino community, cultural ties among Hispanics and Hispanic women in corporate America. Matilda Marie (202) 639-8823
AIDS BENEFIT Los Angeles June 3
U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal of California will be among the people honored at a fundraiser co-sponsored by the AIDS Project of Los Angeles. Money raised will go toward funding AIDS education programs for Hispanics.
Jim Blevins (213) 380-2000 ext. 286
YOUTH FORUM Los Angeles June 3-4
A conference to form a national youth policy will be held featuring presidential candidates Michael Dukakis and George Bush. Edward James Olmos, actor and producer, will also address the forum participants. Youth organization representatives, national policy experts and high school and college students will discuss topics including dropouts, literacy, teen pregnancy and substance abuse. Jim Hickman (213) 206-3388
New York June 4
Labor and community organizations will host a conference to discuss the effects of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Among the areas to be addressed is the laWs requirement that employers check legal status of potential employees. A panel on workers’ rights will include Zoilo Torres, president of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, and Howard Jordan, executive director of the New York State Assembly Task Force on New Americans RubAn Quiroz (212) 505-6890
COMING SOON
ATHLETE AWARDS Los Angeles June 3 4
CAREER FESTIVAL Houston June 4
The Houston Police Organization of Spanish Speaking Officers will hold an outdoor festival designed to promote career opportunities for Hispanics. It will also include carnival rides, food and an arts and crafts display.
Rico G arcia (713) 695-6134
LEGAL IMMIGRATION
Federation for American Immigration Reform
Washington, D.C. June 10
Romy Pettersen (202) 328-7004
GOVERNOR’S VISIT Latin Chamber of Commerce Miami June 11
Manuela Fiallo (305) 642-3870
IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE
PUERTO RICAN FESTIVITIES Puerto Rican Day Parade Chicago June 11 Martha Ramos (312) 292-1414
May 30,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
7
7
DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE ADMISSIONS & ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Manage recruitment and admission process, including preparation of descriptive materials, recruiting trips to Colleges and other institutions, interviewing prospective applicants, organizing the selection process and counselling those offered admission. Assist in administering all aspects of graduate program. Must have excellent communication and personal skills. Should also possess strong organizational ability and committed to a diverse student body. MPA or equivalent degree and knowledge of graduate professional education desirable.
Please send resume with salary requirements to: James Oliver, Personnel, Clio Hall HL, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. 08544.
Princeton University
Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer m/f
Director of Development
PROJECT DIRECTOR
PROJECT DIRECTOR- National Hispanic health organization seeks project director to manage/conduct national demonstration project to educate out-of-school Hispanic youth in the prevention of AIDS. Duties include: site coordination; materials developments; and training. Requirements: M.P.H. or equivalent with demonstrated relevant experience in AIDS education/prevention; program planning; implementation; and training in the Hispanic community. Salary, low to mid thirties. Send resumes with writing samples to: Robert Cullen, 1030 15th Street, N.W„ Suite 1053, Washington, DC 20005.
PARKS MANAGER City of San Jose
$45,744-$55,596/yr. Position is responsible for planning and directing operations for a major parks section such ascity-wide large facilities. Position requiresa bachelor's degree in parks or recreation management or related field and four (4) years experience in parks management or professional public administration in the planning, organization of parks recreation facilities and programs. Submit resume by July 1,1988 to:
Bob Allen
City of San Jose Personnel Dept.
801 N. First St, Room 207 San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4204
MALDEF, a naf I civil rights org., needs a self-motivated person to conduct fund-raising events throughout the country and solicit funds for the organization. Requirements: undergrad, degree in English, communications, marketing, business or nonprofit management 2-5 yrs exp. in fund raising, marketing, or writing. Experience conducting fund-raising events. Prefer someone who has knowledge of Hispanic or legal issues, is bilingual in Spanish/English and someone who has the ability to use an IBM PC.
Send resume, a writing sample and a list of 3 references to: R.Calder6n, Personnel, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th FI., Los Angeles, CA90014 by 6/3/88.
PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION CHIEF
Announcement#: 0711-8A-LIB For the right individual, the Arlington Cou nty (VA) Public Library offers the professional and personal opportunity of a lifetime...
Located adjacent to the nation’s capital, the library serves a highly progressive and ethnically diverse urban/suburban community of approximately 160,000 residents Arlington’s Public Services Division Chief has overall administrative responsibility for the Library s regionally-acclaimed Central Library (which is slated for a $10.8 million expansion and renovation) and six branch libraries (which are about to undergo a comprehensive services study and facility evaluation). The library system has a FY1988 operating budget of $4.7 million and employs a staff of 119 FTE& This position requires an ALA-accredited MLS or Virginia Librarian’s Certificate; a minimum of 5 years of library experience, with at least three (3) years of successful management-level experience-preferably in a multi-site public library system; and strong leadership, team-building, and interpersonal skills.
Salary Range: $41,600-$58,678. Excellent benefits All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on June 2,1988. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY
Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North v Arlington, VA 22201 EOE/MFH
HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIP WASHINGTON, D.C. - Hispanic Link News Service has a 6- month paid internship available immediately. If interested in receiving information contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a I national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed I of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and ! attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by _____________________________
If 90 cents per word (city, state & zip
| code count as 2 words; telephone j Organization ------------------------
number, 1 word). Multiple use rates I
1 on request street----------------------------------
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES H state & zip___________________________________
(Ads with borders, varied type sizes) j
$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone_______________________
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Riijyil HK/CR
Arts & Entertainment1
SERIES TALK: A new prime-time drama with a Hispanic lead, a brief reprise forthe canceled Trial and Error and the return of three hit series with Latino leads were part of fall schedule announcements made by the three major networks in May.
The new Hispanic character is Tony Maldonado, to appear on the ABC series Knight Watch debutting in the falL Ben Banta(the lead on the failed series Juarez) plays the leader of the Knights, a Guardian Angels type of group.
Also on ABCs fall schedule - announced May 23 - will be the sitcom Roseanne. Actress Evelina Fernandez is featured in the show’s pilot. For 1988-89, ABC is canceling Ohara, which featues Rachel Ticotin.
NBC, the number one-rated network, announced its fall lineup May 17. Included in the schedule are Family 77es(backfor its last season), with lead Tina Yothers; Miami Vice, featuring Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago; and LA Law, with Jimmy Smits in a starring
rol d> 1988
At press time CBS was expected to make its fall schedule announcement. The network was also expected to announce the planned airing of all completed but unseen episodes of Trial and Error.
The National Hispanic Media Coalition announced that five episodes of the canceled CBSsit-com, which starred Paul Rodriguez and Eddy V6lez, will be broadcast in either June-July or September-October.
The decision to air the remaining episodes of Trial and Error was made in a May meeting between members of the NHMC and Gene Jankowski, president of the CBS Broadcast Group. CBS announced the cancellation of the sit-com after airing three episodes in April.
The return of Trial and Error is due in part to the lack of material created by the Writers Guild of America strike, but according to Esther Renteria, a spokesperson for the NHMC, there is some indication that strong viewership response to the series might warrant its return on a permanent basis
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
PROMOTION GAMES? More than half of daily newspaper staffers believe there is no fairness in newsroom promotions, according to survey released last month by the American Society of Newspaper Editors
While 21% believe promotions are based on convenience, 33% think politics are key. Only 39% see merit as the determining factor in job growth. This compares with 68% of newspaper managers Non-minority journalists cite competition from colleagues as the single greatest obstacle faced in the attainment of promotions while 57% of minority journalists believe race is the chief hurdle. This bleak picture is compounded by the feeling of most journalists that opportunities for promotion are rare for everyone.
.SOME MANAGE ANYWAY: Some recently promoted Latinos reacted to the ASNE findings John Garcis formerly a reporter for the Gannett Westchester Rockland Newspapers became Vista magazine New York Bureau Chief
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this month. Garcia said, “There is no question that race is the major obstacle to promotion.” It is, he said, because non-minorities tend to promote other non-minorities. Alan Acosta, new assistant metro editor for the Orange County Register in California, agreed with the mirror effect “There is a non-conscious, institutional system of promoting people like yourself,” Acosta observed.
However, he felt competition from colleagues was a weightier element in aligning oneself for promotions. “Added to my other package of skills, race has been a positive factor for me.” Acosta was deputy regional editor with the Dallas Times-Herald until April Susan Guerrero, who was promoted this month from assistant to chief Sunday editor of the Danbury News-Times in Connecticut, said she put in 12 years at the paper as a feature writer before moving up the ladder. “ I hate always being a minority. For me the problem was with sex more than race.” ALSO: Roberto Sdnchez, publisher and columnist of El Nuevo Herald, was named associate publisher of The Miami Herald. Sdnchez is also a member of the Heralds
editorial board.
WINNERS: “In the Shadow of the Law,” a documentary on undocumented families produced by Paul Espinosa for KPBS-TV in San Diego, was named “Best Documentary at the April 22 broadcast industry conference in San Francisco The program will be broadcast in the San Francisco Bay Area June 23.
Los Angeles’ KCBS-TV news anchor David L6pez won Emmys in two categories, including best news reporting, for a story on cocaine addicted babies. L6pez and reporters Chris Conangla and Yolanda Nava, assistant news director Jos6 Rios and producer Ernie Arboles were part of a team which garnered Emmys at the May21 award ceremony for their coverage of the Oct. 1 earthquake in Los Angeles
PEREIRA REBOUNDS: Sergio Pereira, who resigned his post as Metro-Dade County (Fla) Manager Feb. 10 following the disclosure that he failed to report profits on his income tax forms, is now a radio talk-show host Pereira had his debut May 14 on WNWS-AM in Miami. He can be found discussing the issues of the day Saturdays, from 9 am. to noon. - Darryl Figueroa
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Making The News This Week release of Puerto Rican separatist Flllberto Ojeda Rlos on $1 million bail. Ojeda is accused of masterminding a 1983 $7 million robbe;y of a Wells Fargo depot in Connecticut . . Immigration authorities release Jose RodrlguezGallegos, 44, the who crashed a Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernindez Coion leads a rally of some 2 ,000 mostly Puerto Rican residents in Trenton, N .J, to draw attention to the substance abuse problem among Hispanics. . . After a memorial Mass marking the anniversa;y of a tornado that killed 30 people and injured 170 others in the predominantly Hispanic town of Saragosa , Texas, Bishop Raymundo Pef'la walks through the almost . rebuilt community to bless houses ... Jose Torres, 52, resigns after four years as chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission ... The U .S. Department of Education announces that Cavin Gonzales, a high school student from Santa Fe, N . M . , is among the 139 Presidential Scholars for 1988. . . A federal jud,ge agrc;!es to the • bus into the Peruvian Embassy compound in Havana. That event . precipitated the 1980 Mariel boatlift . . The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service announces it has begun deportation and exclusion proceedings against Orlando Bosch, a pediatrician turned militant anti-Castroist. Bosch was convicted in 1968 for a rifle attack on a Polish freighter engaged in trade with Cuba, skipped parole and fled the United States in 1972. . . Pedro Espada, director of the Soundview Health Clinic in the Bronx , announces his candidacy for the seat of U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia . . : HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT , .... 30,1968 ACT Exams Skewed by Status Cockrell Hill, Texas, Latinos 'Come of Agfi Regardless of their aptitude , Hispanic stu dents preparing for the most widely used college admissions test in the nation will on average be outscored by non-Hispanic white students when they take the next exam June 11. If educational opportunity and socioeconomic factors were the same for both groups, this would not be so, according toa national study. "It is not race or ethnicity that determines test outcomes, but how one Is situated," said University of Iowa professor George Chambers, an educational testing expert who authored the report. " This study should dispel the myth that school achievement scores are brought down by certain groups." Chambers matched 964 pairs of Hispanic and Anglo students with 13 Identical variables ranging from family income and SQhool attend ed to gender and number of siblings. He observed that the matched Hispanics and Anglos scored about equally on the stand ardized tests. The analyzed exams were those conducted by the American College Cubana Switches Parties Florida state Rep . Arnhllda Gonzalez Quevedo stunned the Legislature's Cuban American caucus and her other Republican colleagues May 19 when she took the House floor in Tallahassee and announced she was switching to the Demo c ratic Party . GonzalezQuevedo , a twQ-term legislator whose term expires in November , said her decision was based on the ReaQIJn admini& tration's increasing negotiations with the Castro regime and that individuals fleeing communist governments are no longer treated as refugees but as deportab le aliens. "As this administration c:;ontinues to nego tiate with the tyrant Castro and attempts to normalize relations with the communist government of Cuba, I feel our people have been betrayed," read from a four-page statement. GonzalezQuevedds renouncement makes her the sole Democrat in the seven-member Cuban American caucus . Testing Corporation, which gives the test to approximately 80,000 students annually . About 10,000 of them are Hispanic. ACT measures educational achievement rather than aptitude, as does the Scholastic Aptitude Test used in 22 states. Currently, with a perfect score being 35, the average national ACT score for non-Hi& panic whites is 19.6 compared with 16 . 6 for Puerto Ricans and Cubans and 15.2 for Chica nos. When variables were controlled, Anglos scored 18. 7 compared to 16.7 for Chicanos . Anglos got 19 . 8 compared with 18 . 9 for Puerto Rican and Cuban students. Of the factors considered, family income and course work were found to contribute more to test scores. As family income rose so did scores, with the highest income Hispanics outperforming all but one level of Anglos. Students who took such advanced courses as trigonomet;y, calculus and chemist;y were better prepared for admissions tests. The study noted that Anglos take such classes more often than do Hispanics, while a greater percentage of Puerto Ricans and Cubans take them than do Chicanos . The report has been distributed to about 500 educational agencies, including the U .S. Department of Education and both educational testing services . There has been no formal response . But David Crockett, vice president of public affairs for ACT, told Weekly Report, continued on page 2 In a victory attributed to a strong push to register Hispanic voters, two Latinos were elected to city council for the first time in a small Texas town which until last month had never seen more than 16 Latinos vote in a municipal election. Rachel Rodriguez and Leo Garcia claimed two of five positions on the governing body of Cockrell Hill, south of Dallas. A run-off May 28 was expected to yield yet another. seat to a Hispanic candidate, Tony Hinojosa, who tied incumbent C . W . Martin . Each received 235 votes. Delores Singleton, who had supported Latino leaders in their efforts toward representation , was elected mayor . More than half of Cockrell Hilrs 3,500 residents are Hispanics. Organizers e& timated that about 60% of the 123 Latinos who voted in this election had never entered a polling place before. Resident Sam Rodriguez, whose bid for appointment to a vacant council seat in November was rejecied by the ali-Anglo council , started the voting registration effort by contacting Domingo Garcia, president of Chicanos Actively United for Social Advance ment Garcia's group worked with the South west Voter Registration Education Project in signing up more than 40_9 J:tispanic voters. Court Rejects Legalization Extensio11 The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York turned down May 19 a request to extend the legalization filing deadline 60 days for undocumented parents with children receiving public assistance. Individuals who fell into this catego;y had been allowed to file legalization applications until the May 19 hearing . The suit was filed because of the confusion surrounding the INS' initial policy to exclude such parents and its subsequent decision to make them eligible. New York City, New York state, and immigrants representing the group affected by the INS policy filed the suit. Judge Kenneth Conboy denied the extension pending presentation of further. evidence. If Conboy decides it is necessary , he can extend the deadline at the triaf s completion , according to one of the plaintiff ' s attorneys,Janet Calvo. No trial date has been set. "The case is not lost. We couldn't get what we wanted on a prelimina;y injunction basis," she said. "As things stand now, people can't appy (for legalization). They can be deported:' To prevent this, immigrants who might be affected by a future ruling , but who now are in danger of being deported, are having their cases handled on an individual basis, said a co-counsel. Sophia Nieves

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Work, Social Life of Professional Latinas Examined Sixty-eight percent of Hispanic women working at the managerial level or :higher serve as board members for civic and profes sional organizations, according to recently released survey of 303 Latinas . The results were presented in the spring magazine of the National Network of Hi& panic Women, lntercambios Femeniles. The breakdown of those surveyed by NNHW came close to approximating the makeup of the general female Hispanic population: 69.6% Mexican American, 11.4% Puerto Rican, 1 0% Cuban American and 9% South and Central American. The survey's response rate was 48%. In a follow-up study, Hortensia Amaro, a Boston University researcher, ana lyzed the NNHW statistics. "Family and Work: Predictors of Psychological Well-Professional Latina Survey Avg . Age U.S. Born Married Have Children No . Children 38 75% 50% 58% 1-2 • Median annual income Avg. Ed. 18 Yrs. Income* $45,000 Priorities Career 40% Family 40% Being Among Hispanic Women Professionals'' focused on mental health, work and family role balance, and satisfaction in personal and professional life. Amaro and her colleagues found logical distress is tied to racial discrimination and the social status of a marriage partner. Generally, professional Latinas, unlike most women, form a relationship with someone at the same level or lower. About one-third of the married Latinas surveyed married Anglo men. They tended to marry up in status. "In our society it's unusual for women and men to have similar status. It may bring conflicts, difficulties and stress," Amaro said. Sixty-two percent of the NNHWs subjects considered their jobs stressful Amards study went on to tie higher earning power to less stress. She said this disproved the belief held by some employers regarding women's inability to handle high-level positions. "When you have a lot of control, you don't have the same symptoms of stress," she said. In every circumstance the study found Puerto Rican women suffered most from psychological distress, or depression. Amaro hypothesized it was tied to lower economic background and pay. Sophia Nieves L.A. Considers 'Newcomer' Programs INS Proposes Special A program designed to acclimate new im migrant children in the Los Angeles Unified School District to U .S. customs and language will go into effect in June 1989 if school district officials give the to staff school-site proposals. On June 13 the school board is expected to . take a final vote on the voluntary" newcomer'' schools. This month recommendations were sen ted for two school sites-one encompassing grades4-8, the other a high school. These schools, projected as the first of 1 0, would provide a nurturing environment for 900 new arrivals, especially those who have fled countries at war. According to district officials, a growing number of their student population is coming from Central America . Each of the schools would have its own part-time psychologist and full-time nurse. Gloria Sierra, who is in charge of the new comer pilot program, described the current means of dealing with these students. "These kids are receiving the same service as any youngster born in this country of ' mainstream parents," she said. "That's equitable, but these kids have more needs." -Sophia Nieves Smaller Schools Not Inherently Better continued from page 1 "It is interesting to have people begin to look at the complex reasons for the differentials we find, rather than charge us with bias because of it." 2 The report, "All of America's Children," also Ex-Officer Sues L.A. P. D. A former officer of the Los Angeles Police Department filed a $1 million lawsuit against the 1department charging that the depart ment engages in systematic denials of raises and promotions to Latinos. Ernest Valdez, a patrolman from 1980 to 1985, charged that promotions are controlled by a group of white Christian fundamentalists who alter test scores and promote only officers who share their religious beliefs. Valdez, who filed his suit May 4, said he resigned as a result of policies that caused repeated denials of pay raises. Latinos comprise 30% of the city's popu lation; 17% of the police force is Hispanic. A spokesman for the department admitted to the low representation of Hispanics on the force but denied any pattern of discrimi nation. found that despite the prevailing view that smaller, more intimate schools provide better learning environments, larger schools produce students who score higher. "Big was better for both/' said Chambers. He speculated that more specialized teachers, greater availability of advanced courses and assistance programs enriched larger schools. Chambers also observed that when Latinos become better situated, their scores increase more than Anglos. He noted that one-third of the Hispanics examined did not list English as their first language . His study, released March 7, reviewed the current status of U.S. public education, which is charged with teaching most poor, minority children . It noted that 25% of the 3.6 million children who began public school last year are living in poverty; public school enrollment is 40% minority; and Latino student enrollment between 1972-83 increased by one million while for Anglos, it decreased by six million. Chambers recommended a fivefold increase in federal education spending, from$8 million to $40 billion. Annual increases for defense spending exceed the entire education budget, the report said, while federal support for public schools is at its lowest level in 20 years. Darryl Figueroa Spouse, Children Visas In a move signaling an about-face for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, the agency proposed this month that special visas be issued for the immediate family members of undocumented immigrants who qualified for legalization under the 1986 im migration act. The move caught by surprise many critics j of the INS who had been charging throughout J the yearlong legalization program that the j splitting up of families was inhumane and led i to many immigrants not filing for legal status. 1 Duke Aus.tin, a spokesperson for the INS, I said the proposal was made because of a backlog of 1 0 years for the spouses and l children, particularly those from Mexico, of 1 permanent residents. Austin said the proposal . * would provide an additional200,000' visas, to f be allotted on a competitive basis, for a one year period only. The White House has yet to give the proposal its stamp of approval. U.S. Rep . Charles Schumer(D-N.Y.) said he plans to include the special visa idea into an immigration bill he has introduced. Font to Quit Foundation Jose Antonio Font, executive director of the Washington, D.C. -based Cuban American National Foundation , steps down from the influential lobbying group's helm May 30. "My job is done. I came at a time of transition and we have since laid out a long term agenda," said the former director of the capital's Chamber of Com merce. Font, who became the organization's director last May after Frank Calz6n quit, said he will now devote all his efforts to his construction business. Mignon Medrano, Font's special assistant, will serve as acting director of the 9-year-old group until a permanent replacement is named. • Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Raou I Lowery Contreras, guest columnist Color-Coded Round-Up On a recent evening, several dozen San Diego County deputy sheriffs-including SWAT teams in camouflage combat fatigues, armed with high-powered, semiautomatic riflessurrounded, detained and questioned 85 brown-skinned, Spanish-speaking men aged 16 through 50 regarding a rape. The 1 5-year old victim reported that two young men repeatedly raped her in front of five witnesses. Her description of the assailants was : young , Mexican, Spanish-speaking, approximately 5 feet 7 inches tall. The witnesses: the same, except two were women. Mobilizing an army of deputies, the Sheriffs Department rounded up the men in the rape's general locale and, according to relia ble witnesses, slammed many of them against walls, handcuffed and laid them out on the parking lot for hours while each was questioned Almost all .of the 85 were U.S. citizens or legal immigrants; those not were turned over to the U.S. Border Patrol. Sheriffs spokesmen offered no explanation why men up to 50 years old, or 6 feet tall, were held. When th i s story hit the newspapers, the American Civil Liberties Union and Mexican American groups protested that the raid was racially implemented. The Sheriffs Department responded that the detention was voluntary, force was not used and the deputies were well-mannered . WHAT PO WE GAl N? A number of questions arise from this episode. First, the rights of the victim. Anyone convicted of this crime should spend the rest of his life in prison, without possibility of parole . If, however, the constitutional rights of 85 Latinos are trampled in the process, what have we gained? None of the 85 detainees were arrested for the crime . Information leading to the suspects' arrest was voluntarily offered days later by other Mexican Americans. One wonders what motivated the raid . Allow me to propose a different scenario . In downtown San Diego, there's a bus stop for affluent suburban commuters. Most are upwardly mobile Anglo college graduates, male, in three-piece suits, with brief cases, initialed, of course. A rape occurs within a block of the bus stop, at approximately5 p.m., commuter time. The victim : a 15-year-old Mexican girl. The deputy chief of the San Diego Police Department, a Mexican American, orders SWAT teams and dozens of his Latino officers to arm themselves with high-powered, semiautomatic rifles and to dress in urban warfare camouflage uniforms. He briefs them: 'WE HAVE ALL NIGHT' "Gentlemen, a heinous crime has been committed by two blond, blue-eyed men dressed in three-piece suits and carrying briefcases. The victim reports that several other men and two women, also wearing suits and carrying brief cases, witnessed the rape. "Deploy around the commuter bus stop and interview every blond, blue-eyed man and woman in a suit and carrying a brief case. I want everyone ' s papers and documents checked. If anyone can't produce papers , the Border Patrol will arrest them . "You may use any methods necessary to find these vicious criminals and their friends. Handcuff everyone and place them on the ground to await their questioning. Take your time. We have all night." Sin pelos en Ia lengua OBIT: I suppose that his death was noted elsewhere . I sa w it in The New York Times obituary section May 21. The head read: Daniel Lewis James Is Dead at 77; Wrote About Los Angeles Barrio That he did. He wrote a noveltitled"FamousAII OverT own. " But instead of using his own name , he used the pseudonym Danny Santiago. The novel was about a Chicano kid who was infatuated by Los Angeles ' billboards lit up with names of famous people; so he scrawled his own name on walls and fences, like the title says, "all over town." There was more substance to the book than that-enough t o make Simon & Schuster publish it and for it to receive some very nice reviews . When it came out in 1983 as a "first nov e l by Chicano author Danny Santiago ," the book won a $5,000 literary award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters-but the author failed to surface to pick up the check. The following spring we all learned why . "Danny Santiago " was really a 73-year-old 6-foot-6 Yale graduate, a once-succ essfu l Hollywood writer who worked with Charlie Chaplin on "The Great Dictator," who later was blacklisted for alleged communis t ties and fell to writing grade-B monster movies . Subsequently, he spent three decades with his wife Lilith doing volunteer social work in East Los Angeles. His literary deception drew generally strong criticism from U .S . Latino writers. He was accused of jumping on the bandwagon at a time when Latino authors finally seemed to be gaining ac ceptance. Hispanic Link News Service carried a couple of columns a ttack ing him , and column editor Charlie Ericksen called him at his home in Carmel , Calif . , inviting him to defend what he had done. James was being harassed by press from all over the country then, but when Ericksen explained that the Link reached primarily a Hispanic audience, he agreed immediately without even questioning if or what we paid. In a column carried in Weekly Report and bylined Daniel James/Danny Santiago, he challenged, "What band w agon? " No Mexican American novel ever had wide sale, he said ; his book had been rejected by more than a dozen publishers before S&S took it. "I wanted to write about the Mexican community as WE, not THEY . . . For 35 years my wife and I have been members, by compadrazgo, of several large Mexican families in Los Angeles. We have known and loved four generations, have baptized babies , stood up at weddings and at confirmations, served as pallbearers. '' Reminiscing on the phone, James seemed to climb into the ski n of Danny Santiago several times. A few months later, he told a San Francisco Bav Gua rdian reporter in a question-and-answer session : "I think when I take on the Santiago persona , I annihilate a ll the bad years, the years of frustration. I say, 'Here I am , a young Mexican, and I'm writing.' Santiago just goes ... My subconscious opens up and I am able to write faster and cleaner than anything else I've ever written." One Latino writer who chose to defend Daniel James was the late Enrique Hank L6pez. James' novel, he said, "transported me to my old Denver barrio ... I remember that desperate yearning to get out, to join the outside world seemingly forbidden t o Mexican Americans-to be famous all over town." Concluded Enrique: "Welcome to our barrio, mana. " Kay Barbaro Imagine how many lawsuits? How many FSI agents would descend on San Diego? How many grand juries would be empaneled? How ••••••••••••••••••••••-•••• long would the Mexican American deputy Police chief keep his job? Or, have we with brown skins been relegated to a constitutional Black Hole epitomized by the imperishable words spoken by Claude Rains in the waning moments of the classic movie Casablanca after he kills one of the bad guys, a Nazi. His orders to police officers: "Round up the usual suspects ; " Quoting. • • PAUL RODRIGUEZ, describing his friendship with Ed ward James Olmos at a workshop in which both participated at the Hispanic . Media Conference in Dallas : (Raoul Lowery Contreras is a businessman in La Jolla, Caiif.) "We're about as close as two heterosexuals can be." Hispanic Link Weekly Report May 30, 1988 3

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COLLECTING HISPANIC HERITAGE POSTER: The 1988 Hispanic Heritage WeekSept. 12 -poster is available. The poster, 16x22inches with a four-color design, contains the Aztec calendar. The poster costs $3.50 (include $1.50 for postage and handling). To order contact Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 504 72, Pasadena, Calif . 911 05 (818) 799. PAY EQUITY: A recent survey finds that 24 states and the District of Columbia have taken steps to address raceor sexbased wage discrimination. For a copy write Local Survey, National Committee on Pay Equity, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20036. SOUTH FLORIDA'S POLITICAL ECONOMY: "The Political Eco nomy of Cubans in South Florida " is a 46page essay analyzing forces molding the group's future. For a copy send $5 to Graduate School of International Studies, University of Miami, NortnSouth Center, Publications, P.O. Box 24, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124 8123 (305) 284. AIDS BROCHURE: A free Spanish-language version of "Under standing AIDS," an 8page publication prepared by the U.S. Surgeon Generars Office and the Centers for Disease control, is now available . To receive a copy, call the toll-free hotline 1-SIDA. ACT SCORES: "All of America's Children" is a 65page report which compares the college admissions scores of Hispanics and nonHispanics whites. The report is available free to education and related groups. Write to: Professor George Chambers, University of Iowa, College of Education, Division of Educational Administration, 21 0 Lindquist Center, Iowa City 52242. HISPANA PROFESSIONALS: The National Network of Hispanic Women's survey profiling professional Latinas is available through the organization . To obtain a copy, send a check payable to NNHW to: 12021 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 353, Los Angeles , Calif. 90025. Attn: Y. Herrera. Institutions and corporations: $60; non-members : $30; members : $25. INTERPRETING DATA ON SUCCESSFUL LATINAS: "Family and Work: Predictors of Psychological Well-Being Among Hispanic Women Professionals" analyzes data on professional Hispanas in the areas of mental health, work and family balance, and career and personal satisfaction. To receive a free copy, contact Hortensia Amaro , Boston University School of Public Health, 85 E. Newton St., Boston , Mass. 02118. CONNECTING INVOLVING STUDENTS' PARENTS Starting this August the National Education Association will begin a three-year, $97,000 media campaign to increase the involvement of Hispanic parents in the education of their children. To be waged large ly through radio and television public service announcements, the campaign will focus on Hispanics in the South west because they have the highest percentage of schoolage children. The announcements will be in English and Spanish. The NEA will .also schedule promotional events surrounding the release of the announcements to gather interest and support . Every August during the campaign, the NEA will release two public service announcements for television. The first year the spots will use Hispanic politicians . Entertainers will be used for the second year and the parents of prominent Hispanics for the third. One radio spot will be released per year . These will be solely in Spanish. Spanish-language brochures will be made available. PROGRAM SEEKS STUDENTS Middlesex County College in Edison, N.J., this fall will enroll 40 students20 Hispanic, 20 black-in a new program designed to allow the students to attend classes and work part time at a corporation in their chosen field of study. While enrolled at the college, the students will be provided through Middlesex's Minority Access to the Profess ions Scholars program a career development specialist to develop an educational career plan. A mentor, of the same race, ethnicity and sex, will be assigned to each student at the corporations involved in the program, which is funded through a state grant. For more information contact the progra m's director, John Dunning, at (201) 906 . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Preparations are underway for a Hispanic Resource Directory that will provide information on organizations, academic programs, govern ment agencies, research centers and foundations relating to U.S. Hispanics. To be included in the directory, contact The Denali Press, P.O. Box 1535, Juneau , Alaska 99802 (907) 586 ... New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art now offers Spanish-language tours, funded in part by the Avon Products Foundation, every Tuesday and Sunday ... Calendar The Hispanic Public Relations Association will hold a luncheon to honor Latino athletes. Among the award presenters will be Pete Moraga, KNXRadio reporter, and Andrew Amador, KHJ-TV weatherman , Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690 New York June 4 Labor and community organizations will host a conference to discuss the effects of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Among the areas to be addressed is the law's requirement that employers check legal status of potential employees. A panel on workers' rights will include Zoilo Torres, president of the Nationa l Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, and Howard Jordan, executive director of the New York State Assembly Task Force on New Americans. Ruben Quiroz (212) 505-6890 THIS WEEK HISPANIC ISSUES Washington, D.C. June 2-3 The National Council of Hispanic Women will be holding a conference on getting the Hispanic vote to count. Workshop topics include economic trends in the Latino community, cultural ties among Hispanics and Hispanic women in corporate America . Matilda Marie (202) 639-8823 AIDS BENEFIT Los Angeles June 3 U . S . Rep . Edward Roybal of California will be among the people honored at a fundraiserco-sponsored by the AIDS Project of Los Angeles . Money raised will go toward funding AIDS education programs for Hispanics. Jim Blevins (213) 380-2000 ext. 286 ATHLETE AWARDS Los Angeles June 3 4 . YOUTH FORUM Los Angeles June 3-4 A conference to form a national youth policy will be held featuring presidential candidates Michael Dukakis and George Bush. Edward James Olmos , actor and producer, will also address the forum participants . Youth organization representatives , national policy experts and high school and college students will discuss topics including dropouts, literacy, teen pregnancy and substance abuse. Jim Hickman (213) 206-3388 CAREER FESTIVAL Houston June 4 The Houston Police Organization of Spanish Speaking Officers will hold an outdoor festival designed to promote career opportunities for Hispanics . It will also include carnival rides , food and an arts and crafts display. Rico Garcia (713) 695-6134 IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE May30, 1988 COMING SOON LEGAL IMMIGRATION Federation for American Immigration Reform Washington, D .C. June 10 Romy Pettersen (202) 328-7004 GOVERNOR'S VISIT Latin Chamber of Commerce Miami June 11 Manuela Fiallo (305) 642-3870 PUERTO RICAN FESTIVITIES Puerto Rican Day Parade Chicago June 11 Martha Ramos(312) 292-1414 H1spamc Lmk Weekly Report

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. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS / DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE ADMISSIONS & ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Manage recruitment and admission process, including preparation of descriptive materials, recruiting trips to Colleges and other insti tutions, interviewing prospective applicants, organizing the selection . process and counselling those offered admission. Assist in admin istering all aspects of graduate program. Must have excellent munication and personal skills. Should also possess strong organi zational ability and committed to a diverse student body. MPA or equivalent degree and knowledge of graduate professional education desirable. Please send resume with salary requirements to: James Oliver, Personnel, Clio Hall HL, Princeton University, Princeton , N . J . 08544. Princeton University Equal Opportunity I Affirmative Action Employer m/f PROJECT DIRECTOR PROJECT DIRECTORNational Hispanic health organization seeks project director to national demonstration project to educate out-of-school Hispanic youth in the prevention of AIDS. Duties include: site coordination; materials develop ments; and training. Requirements: M.P.H. or equivalent with demonstrated relevant experience in AIDS education/prevention; program planning; implementation; and training in the Hispanic community. Salary, low to mid thirties Send resumes with writing samples to: Robert Cullen, 1030 15th Street, N . W., Suite 1 053, Washington, DC 20005. Director of Development MALDEF, a nat' I civil rights org . , needs a seH-motivated person to conduct fund-raising events throughout . the country and solicit I funds for the organization . Requirements: undergrad degree in English, communications, marketing, business or nonprofit management 2-5 yrs exp . in fund raising, marketing , or writing. Experience conducting fund-raising events. Prefer someone who has knowledge of Hispanic or legal issues, is bilingual in Spanish/English and someone who has the ability to use an IBM PC. Send resume, a writing sample and a list of 3 references to: R. Calder6n, Personnel, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Angeles, CA90014 by 6/3/88. PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION CHIEF Announcement#: 0711ALIB For the right individual, the Arlington County (VA) Public Library offers the professional and personal opportunity of a lifetime ... Located adjacent to the nation's capital, the library serves a highly progressive and ethnically diverse urban/subUrban community of approximately 160,000 residents ArNngton's Public Services Division Chief has overall administrative responsibility for the Library's regionally-acclaimed Central Library (which is slated for a $10.8 million expansion and renovation) and six branch libraries (which are about to undergo a comprehensive ser vices study and facility evaluation) . The library system has a FY 1988 operating budget of $4.7 million and employs a staff of 119 FTEs This position requires an ALA-accredited MLS or Virginia Librarian's Certificate; a mint mum of 5 years of library experience, with at least three(3) years of successful management level experience-preferably in a multt-site public library system; and strong leadership, team-building, and interpersonal skills. Salary Range: $41,600-$58,678 . Excellent benefits All applicants mu'st submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arling ton County application form will not be ac cepted . Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no laterthan5:00 PM on June 2, 1988. To request application material please call (703) 558 or TOO (703) 284 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 21 00 14th Street, North Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE/MFH HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIP WASHINGTON, D.C.-Hispanic Link News Service has a 6month paid internship available immediately . If interested in receiving infor mation contact: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q737. PARKS MANAGER City of San Jose $45,7 44-$55,596/yr. Position is responsible for planning and directing operations for a major parks section such as city-wide large facilities Position requires a bachelo(sdegree in parks or recreation management or related field and four (4) years experience in parks management or professional public admini& tration in the planning , organization of parks recreation facilities and programs. Submit resume by July 1, 1988 to: DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR:No other publication or system lets you targbt a nationalpool of Latino execut.ives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) Bob Allen City of San Jose Personnel Dept. 801 N. First St., Room 207 San Jose, Calif. 9511 0 (408) 277-4204 Hispanic Link Weekly Report . by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by 1 90 cents per word (city, state & zip . . • code count as 2 words; telephone 1 . Orgamzat1on / number, 1 word). Multiple use rates S t on request. tree --------------DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES. .. I City State & Zip (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) .1 ' ----------$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & EntertalnmenJJJ(; 1988 ( At press time CBS was expected to make its tall schedule SERIES TALK: A new prime-time drama with a Hispanic lead, a brief reprise for t he canceled Trial and Error and the return of three hit series with Latino leads were part of tall schedule announcements made by t h e three major networks in May. announcement. The network was also expected to announce the planned airing of all completed but unseen episodes of Trial and Error. The ne w H i s pan i c character is Tony Maldonado, to appear on the ABC se r ies Knight Watch de butting in the fall. Ben Banta(the lead on the failed seri e s Juarez) plays the leader of the Knights , a Guardian Angels type of g roup. The National Hispanic Media Coalition announced that five episodes of the canceled CBS sit-com, which starred Paul Rodriguez and Eddy Velez, will be broadcast in either June-July or September October. Also on ABC' s fall schedule-announced May 23-will be the sit com Rosean n e . A c tress Evelina Fernandez is featured in the show's pilot. For 1 9 88-89, ABC is canceling Ohara. which teatues Rachel Ticotin. ' The decision to air the remaining episodes of Trial and Error was made in a May meeting between members of the NHMC and Gene Jankowski, president of the CBS Broadcast Group. CBS announced the cancellation of the sit-com after airing three episodes in April . NBC, t he n umber one-rated network, announced its tall lineup May 17 . Included i n t he sc hedule are Family Ties (back tor its last season), with lea d T in a Y o t hers ; Miami Vice, featuring Edward James Olmos and Saund r a S an tiago; and LA Law, with Jimmy Smits in a starring The return of Trial and Error is due in part to the lack of material created by the Writers' Guild of America strike, but according to Esther Renteria, a spokesperson for the NHMC, there is some indication that strong viewership response to the series might warrant its return on a permanent basis. M d • R this month . Garciasaid,"Thereisnoquestion e 1 a e port that race is the major obstacle to promotion. " It is, he said, because non-minorities tend to PROMOTION GAME S? More than half of daily ne w s pa pe r st affers believe there is no fairness in n ewsroom promot i ons, according to surve y re l e a s e d last month by the American Soc iety o f N ew spaper Ed i tors . While 2 1 % be l i eve promotions are based on conv e ni ence, 33% t h ink politics are key. Only 39% see merit as the determining factor in job g r o wth . T h i s compares with 68% of newspaper m anagers. N o n-minority journalists cite com p e ti t i o n fro m colleagues as the single greates t obsta cl e faced in the attainment of promotions, w h ile 57 % of m i nority journalists believe r ac e is th e c hief hurdle. This bleak picture i s c omp ou nd ed by t he feeling of most journalists t h a t opp ortun i t i es for promotion are rare f o r eve ry o n e . .SOME MANAGE ANYWAY: Some recently promoted L atin os rea cted to the ASNE findings. John Ga r cia, for m erly a reporter for the Gannett Rockland Newspapers, be came V ista mag azi ne New York Bureau Chief promote other non-minorities. Alan Acosta, new assistant metro editor for the Orange County Register in California, agreed with the mirror effect. "There is a non-conscious , institutional system of promoting people like yourself," Acosta observed. However, he felt competition from colleagues was a weightier element in aligning oneself for promotions. "Added to my other package of skills, race has been a positive factor for me . " Acosta was deputy regional editor with the Dallas Time• Herald until April. Susan Guerrero, who was promoted this month from assistant to chief Sunday editor of the Danbury NewsTimes in Connecticut , said she put in 12 years at the paper as a feature writer before moving up the ladder. "I hate always being a minority. For me the problem was with sex more than race." ALSO: Roberto Sanchez, publisher and columnist of El Nuevo Herald, was named associate publisher of The Miami Herald. Sanchez is also a member of the Heralds -Antonio Mejias-Rentas editorial board . WINNERS: "In the Shadow of the Law, " a documentary on undocumented tam flies pro duced by Paul Espinosa for KPBs-TV in San Diego, was named " Best Documentary" at the April22 broadcast industry conference in San Francisco. The program will be broadcast in the San Francisco Bay Area June 23. Los Angeles' KCB5-TV news anchor David L6pez won Emmys in two categories, including best news reporting, for a story on cocaine addicted babies . L6pez and reporters Chris Conangla and Yolanda Nava, assistant news director Jose Rios and producer Ernie Arboles were part of a team which garnered Emmys at the May 21 award ceremony for their coverage of the Oct. 1 earthquake in Los Angeles. PEREIRA REBOUNDS: Sergio Pereira, who resigned his post as MetroDade County (Fia) Manager Feb. 10 following the disclosure that he failed to report profits on his income tax forms, is now a radio talk-shc;>w host Pereira had his debut May 14 on WNWS.AM in Miami. He can be found discussing the issues of the day Saturdays , from 9 am. to noon. -Darryl Figueroa -HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT MEMORIAL DAY -1988 A national publication of His panic Link News Service I nc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hecto r Eri c k senMendoza Editor. F e l ix Perez R eporting: Antonio Mej i as-Rentas, Darry l Figueroa , Sophia Ni eves. Graphics/Pr o du ction: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias. No portion o f Hi spa n ic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any fo r m w i t h out advance permission. 6 Annu a l subscription ( 5 0 I ssues): Instit ution s /agencies $118 Personal $108 Tria l (13 Issues) $30 CORPORA T E CLASS FlED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ad s are $45 per column i nch. Ads placed by Tue sday will run i n Weekl y Reports mailed Friday of same w eek. Multiple use r ates o n reques t Hispanic Link Weekly Report