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Hispanic link weekly report, June 6, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 6, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News Week
U.S. Reps. Albert Bustamante of Texas, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Robert Garcia of New York, Manuel Luj6n of New Mexico, Solomdn Ortiz of Texas and Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster of Puerto Rico visit Spain, May 27-June 7, to discuss with Spanish officials cultural and commercial exchanges between Spain and the U.S. Hispanic community... Denver Mayor Federico Peha announces his support for Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis as Democratic presidential nominee. . . Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer appoints George MuAoz, former superintendent of the Chicago public schools, as a member of the International Port
Authority... Salvador Collazo, president of the Puerto Rican Bar Association, announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Bronx district attorney... Elizabeth Rodriguez, a second-year-law student at the University of Miami, becomes the first female chief for the prestigious and formerly all-male Iron Arrow honor society. The group voted to allow females as members in 1985 after being barred from the campus... J ulissa G6mez, a 15-year-old gymnast completely paralyzed after suffering a neck injury at a meet in early May in Tokyo, slips into a.coma before being transferred to a hospital in Houston... Marla G6mez Carbonell, who in 1936 became one of the first six women elected to Cuba’s House of Representatives, dies of heart and kidney failure. The Miami resident was 80...

Willie Vel&squez Fights Cancer
When you speak to William Velasquez by telephone, you receive no clue that he is in a hospital bed, waging a battle against kidney cancer, an uncommon disease that spread to several parts of his body before he even knew he was sick.
Willie, who turned 44 on May 9, shares his plans for the future and talks of the ongoing work of his creation, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, with the same enthusiasm he has always shown.
His vibrance seems incongruous with his presence at the M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston where an IV unit pumps four bottles of vitamins and medicine into his arm.
Vel&squez was originally admitted to the Santa Rosa Hospital in San Antonio on May 15 after his wife, Jane, had insisted his increasing fatigue demanded a checkup. Now, he says, doctors give him less than a year to live.
For those unfamiliar with his work, Velasquez is the dynamo responsible for increasing voter registration of Hispanics by 25% around the country and for the resulting growth of
Latino elected officials.
SVREP board member Vilma Martinez echoes the sentiments of many Hispanics around the country: “I am devastated. He has been so important to the Latino community. .. as an advocate, an issue-spotter, a creative thinker, a motivator, an inspiring leader.”
After a few interruptions from nurses, Velasquez relates why Hispanics have remained for so long outside the political process. “Not voting was not apathy. It was a political statement,” he says. “When the system is fixed to work as designed, when Mexicans know they truly have a chance to elect their own representatives, they register to vote in greater numbers than Anglos.”
As president of SVREP since its inception in 1974, Vel&squez has led more than 1,000 voter registration campaigns in 200 cities throughout its six-state regioa His inspiration and formula led to the establishment of the increasingly active Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project.
continued on page 2
Immigrant Smuggling Hearing Begins
A pretrial hearing has been set for June7 in the case of the first reporter, a Latina, to be Charged with smuggling undocumented immigrants across the border while covering the sanctuary movement. The case will be heard in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque, N.M.
Demetria Martinez, 27, a free-lance writer and a poet, was gathering information for a Christmas story planned for the Albuquerque Journal. At the suggestion of the Rev. Glen Remer-Thamert, a Lutheran minister, she went to Ju&rez, Mexico, to interview two pregnant women from El Salvador seeking sanctuary for their unborn children. Martinez said she met with the women again after they had crossed the border into E| Paso, Texas, but did not ride in the same car with them.
Tova Indritz, Martinez’s public defender, is seeking to have the charges dismissed because the district attorney did not obtain permission from the U.S. Attorney General
before filing, as required, she alleges, by Justice Department guidelines.
The government maintains Martinez was not working on a story. Although the story was never written, Ken Wald, an assistant editor at the Albuquerque Journal, said he knew of her plans and considered the story idea legitimate. Martinez’s notes became the basis for a poem which government attorneys plan to present as evidence against her.
If convicted of conspiring to violate U.S. immigration laws, Martinez could face up to 25 years in prison and $1.25 million in fines.
The indictments mark the first time the government has moved against the sanctuary movement since eight workers were convicted in 1986. According to Michael McConnell, author of a book on the movement, interest in sanctuary among churches has not waned. Currently, 410 congregations offer shelter and other assistance.
- Sophia Nieves
Justice Official Taken to Task Over Remarks
Two capital-based Hispanic leaders have found U.S. Justice Department civil rights chief William Bradford Reynolds an unlikely source of criticism for the U.S. Congress’ exemption from some civil rights laws.
Reynolds, speaking before the Senate Judiciary Committee May 26, said Congress denigrated the Reagan administration’s civil rights record while being exempt from the laws.
U.S Rep Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) admitted that there is some discrimination found in the offices of Congress. But, he told Weekly Report by and large it is not practiced “Congress has to contend with public scrutiny. It is better than any law,” he said.
Mario Moreno, assistant counsel with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Washington, D.C., said that though he knows of no discriminatory practices by congressional offices, he could agree in principle that civil rights laws should be applicable to it
“It is surprising and ironic to hear Reynolds say this*” Moreno remarked “He usually lobbies against civil rights enforcement and interprets statutes narrowly.” _ Darryl Figueroa
U.S. Reps. Reveal Worth
Voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus have submitted annual financial disclosure statements required of those serving in Congress. The purpose of the statements, released May 25, is not to show income, but to uncover conflicts of interest
The assets indicated below may not reflect the value of U.S. House members’ residences. Their annual salaries of $85,500 are not included. ASSETS
Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) $500,002 Manuel Lujdn (R-N.M.) $420,005
Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) $401,005 Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) $271,000
Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) $110,003 Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) $55,002
Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) $53,004 Solomdn Ortiz (D-Texas) $46,006 E“Kika” delaGarza (D-Texas) $15,001 Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) $9,005 Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) sought extension


Justice Department Weighs LA. County Redistricting Suit
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors may be the target of a voting rights lawsuit that alleges supervisory districts were redrawn to prevent minorities, especially Hispanics, from gaining a seat on the board.
Los Angeles Assistant County Counsel Mary Wawro confirmed the county received a letter from the U.S. Department of Justice pointing out the lack of minority representation and alleging redistricting had split minority voting power. In the county’s 138-year history, there have been no Latino supen visors.
Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton
was expected to meet with staff members of the Justice Department’s voting rights section June 4 to review information that led to the federal action, according to a department spokesperson.
The Board of Supervisors is required to redraw district boundaries every 10 years and to divide the population evenly. The five supervisors - ail Anglo males - who realigned the district in 1981 are the same members who serve on the board today.
The 1965 Voting Rights Act makes illegal any action which causes minority group members to have “less opportunity than
other members to participate in the political process and to elect representatives of their choice.”
Latinos were estimated to make up 31 % of Los Angeles County’s population of about 7.5 million in 1985. Blacks make up 13%, according to 1985 state figures.
One solution to the problems cited in the Justice Department's letter is to increase the number of county supervisors to seven, according to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. Previous attempts to add two seats were defeated by the voters in 1962 and 1976.
- Sophia Nieves
Univ. of Calif. Said to Exclude Latinos
The University of California’s nine-campus system and its president have overwhelmingly failed at having Latinos represented in top administrative posts, faculty positions and awarding purchasing contracts to Hispanic-owned businesses, charged an activist think tank in a “report card” released May 26 at the state Capitol in Sacramento.
In its report card, the Latino Issues Forum said the university “has failed to meet. . . its general educational obligation as required by the state legislature.”
Basing its figures on university records, the report card gave an “F’ to the state’s largest
institution of higher learning in every area except undergraduate and graduate student enrollment, where the university was given a
G-” and“D,” respectively.
Position Grade % Hispanic
Regents F- 0%
Top 100
Administrators F- 0
Office of
the President F 2.6
Faculty F 2.3
Also criticized was the fact that only 0.67% of the $747 million the university awards in contracts went to Hispanic businesses.
Latino Business People Obey Immigration Law
Hispanic business people may not like federal immigration law sanctions against employers who hire undocumented workers, but they will comply with the law, according to Jorge Negron, director of governmental affairs of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Employer sanctions went into effect June 1.
“Employers should not be watchdogs for the federal government,” said Negrdn, based in Washington, D.C.
Another of the chamber members’ concerns is that the law may create more discrimination against Hispanics in the work place, he added.
“If a guy looks like a non-Anglo, he stands out,” said Negr6n. “It may be an easy way for discriminatory practices to be safeguarded.” The sanctions, part of the immigration law passed in November 1986, are designed to curtail illegal immigration. Employers are also required to keep detailed records on employees.
Fines range from $250 to $2,000 per employee hired in violation of the law.
Employers who have not received a visit from the INS will probably receive a warning the first time they are found to have hired an undocumented immigrant, according to INS officials.
Students Protest Election
UCLA students, angered over the disqualification of a Latino candidate for student body president, upended ballot boxes and took control for a short time May 26 of the building housing the chancellor’s office.
Minority and gay groups had been protesting the removal of Lloyd Monserratt from the race for what they described as racist reasons. The U ndergraduate Student Association Council, which took the action after Monserratfs primary win, maintained he was dropped because of his low grade point average and his lack of academic credits.
Monserratt denied this. He said the school had lost some of his class records.
The actions culminated a period of mounting racial tension on the campus said by student leaders to have begun with the visit of Muslim leader Louis Farrakhan.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Vel&squez Changed Political Map
continued from page 1
He and his organization have prodded more than a million Hispanics into exercising a voice frozen silent from disuse. And he did it on his feet, in the neighborhoods, using his endless reserve of humor.
Richard Avena, former Southwestern regional director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, says of his longtime friend,
“ Even in the smallest Southwest towns that I have visited, the most isolated Latinos would know Willie. I would ask how and they would say, ‘He came here and asked us to register to vote.’ ”
SVREP has constantly fueled the efforts of other civil rights groups to ensure that Hispanics receive fair political representation. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, for one, has filed numerous lawsuits in response to voter denial and fraud discovered by SVREP.
SVREP was first organized by Velasquez in 1970 as a two-year project of the National Council of La Raza. Over the years, SVREP has filed 88 lawsuits. One is being appealed. All the others have been successful. SVREP director Andy Hernandez is currently acting in Velasquez’s place.
Upon hearing of Velasquez’s illness, San Antonio residents began searching for some way to show their love and support. A drive was organized by the League of United
Latin American Citizens to donate blood. The City Council led off its May 19 meeting with prayers for him.
Jane, who is staying with her husband at the hospital, says that calls offering prayers, good wishes and monetary support have been overwhelming. When it was learned that Willie would need transportation to M.D. Anderson May 25, five planes were made available.
Velasquez calls the support his “therapy." “It’s just terrific; it makes me feel good,”
Velasquez has requested a sabbatical from SVREP. He plans to share his time with his wife and children, Carmen, 15, Caterina, 12, and Guillermo, 11. Along with reading and resting, he hopes to write a book on the future contributions of Hispanics to the United States and on the standards they should set for themselves. “A period of introspection is needed now,” hecounsels. “We have been transitioning to power in recent years, and we have to realize the responsibility that power brings. It’s incumbent upon us to say how we will use that power.”
Around the country, Latinos wait and pray that Willie will win his new battle, as he has so many others. “Willie has made a decision to fight as he has with everything else,” says his wife. “He is determined to lick this.” - Darryl Figueroa
2


Rafael C. Castillo, guest columnist
The Candy Jar
My niece had rented the videocassette “Giant,” starring Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor. We sat around the living room and watched it A poignant scene where Juana, the wife of the ostracized son, was refused service at a beauty shop because she was Mexican drew my niece’s curiosity. She was surprised that Hispanics had been so blatantly discriminated against during the’50s.
Now entering a period of introspection, she is asking more questions While over the years racism has become more sophisticated, layered with the thick cosmetic facade of the ethnic joke, my father still remembers a time when people told you flatly, “Sorry, bud. No Mexicans allowed.”
I told my niece about the summer I was 10 years old and my father took me with him to West Texas. He was a truck driver.
It was my first trip away from home, away from the labyrinthine barrios and dirt streets with the neon signs blinking "Tacos de Res.”
We stopped at a Conoco filling station that had a hardware store and cafe. An old man was sitting outside, smoking a pipe.
‘PEPPERBELLIES’ NOT WELCOME When my father disappeared inside the hardware store, I hopped from the Ford pickup, opened the squeaky door of the cafe and peeked inside. A chubby lady wearing a white uniform smiled at me. “Come in, honey, lest you let them flies in,” she said.
I shut the screen door and, spotting the candy jar sitting on the counter, buried my hand inside my pocket. I extended my pudgy hand and asked, in my best English, for 9 cents worth of candies.
The others inside the cafe were ignoring me, which is what normal people do to 10-year-olds. All except a towering, stubble-faced man wearing an apron and a paper cap. He scowled and said loudly, “Sorry, kid. All sold out.”
“Give’m a break!” the waitress said.
“Just shut up! Pretty soon you’ll have all them pepperbellies cornin’ in here buying candies.”
I stood there trembling, my jaws apart and my stomach churning. In my most polite manner, I thanked them and left.
As I was walking from the cafe, my father stepped out of the hardware store. “Didn’t I tell you to stay in the truck?” he said.
“I was just going to buy some candies.”
‘DO YOU HATE HIM?’
I’d stare at my father's countenance: his dark hair, his sad, humble features, that large forehead of his. We drove for miles without a word. Then he abruptly asked, “Well, did you buy any candies?
“No, sir.”
“Why not?”
“Because the man said he didn’t have any more.”
“And did he?”
“Yes, he did.”
“Why do you suppose he refused to sell you any?”
“I guess because of my color.”
“Do you think that’s right?”
“No.”
“And do you hate him and think all people are the same as he is?” “No, sir.”
“Why?”
“Because the man was ignorant,” I said.
“There are some things in human nature that cannot be understood,” he said. “One of those things is judging a man by his color.”
He paused a long while before adding, “Welcome to the real world.” That was my introduction to American racism. As I talked to my niece, I wondered how her generation will be able to handle it In its modern form.
(Rafael C. Castillo, a fiction writer, is San Antonio correspondent for the Paris literary journal Frank).
Sin pelos en la lengua
SHOWDOWN ON COCKRELL HILL: Saturday the voters of Cockrell Hill, Texas, were to choose between incumbent C. W. Martin and challenger Tony Hinojosa Jr. to fill the swing-vote seat on its City Council.
The pair tied at 235 votes apiece in a May 7 election that saw two Latinos elected to the city’s five-member governing body for the first time in its history. Latinos, who make up about 50% of the town’s residents, decided to ru n a slate for three seats after the all-Anglo council refused six months earlier to appoint a Hispanic to fill a vacancy on the body.
C.W. isn’t at all happy about the turn of events. He’s quoted in the May 9 Dallas Morning News:
“They don’t like it in Mexico and they don’t like it here, either. They just got their candy taken away from them, so they got their people to vote for them.”
Talks good, don’t he?
TWO STRIKES, YOU’RE OUT: Closer to the border, the public address announcer for the El Paso Diablos in the Texas baseball league got tossed out of a game May 26 for playing a Linda Ronstadt record.
I’ll explain. There was a close call at home plate that went in favor of the visiting Jackson Mets, and announcer Paul Strelzin just happened to broadcast the stanza from Linda’s “When Will I Be Loved?” that goes, “I’ve been cheated, been mistreated...”
The umpire ordered him to turn Linda off, which he did.
But between innings, the Diablo Diamond Girls began their ritual Dugout Dance - and Paul put the needle on Linda’s record and the ump again.
Then came the historic moment: Paul and Linda got the thumb.
THEM’S FIGHTIN’ WORDS, GRINGO: A correction in the April“Texas Monthly” magazine reads:
“An item in ‘Bum Steers” (TM, January 1988) stated that Joe Madrigal, the state’s director of Hispanic and Latin American affairs, does not speak Spanish. In fact, Mr. Madrigal does speak Spanish. Texas Monthly regrets the error.”
Metelo, Joe!
GOD’S LANGUAGE: There’s the old joke about the Texas politician, arguing against bilingual education, who protested,“If English was good enough for Jesus Christ, it’s good enough for me.”
In Miami last month, when six men- including the Archdiocese’s first Nicaraguan and Haitian priests - were ordained there, the 1,500 in attendance at St Mary’s Cathedral enjoyed a ceremony that included five languages: English, Spanish, Creole, Greek and Latin.
Archbishop Edward McCarthy, who spoke in Spanish to Cuba-born priest Pedro Corces and Managua-born Oscar Brantome, said the rite in Creole for Haitian Jean Pierre. - Kay Barbaro
Quoting. . .
LEO ESTRADA, demographer and UCLA professor, quoted by Los Angeles Times’ business reporter Jesus S&nchez in a May 24 article on market research studies of Latino buying habits:
“There are some real charlatans out there... I see exaggerations all the time because many think it makes us look better. But you don’t have to exaggerate. You would have to be blind not to see the potential of the Latino market.”
SANDRA PETTIT, Los Angeles Legal Aid Foundation attorney, quoted in The New York Times May 8 following a federal court order telling the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to provide Salvadoran refugees with access to telephones, lawyers, bilingual documents and information on their right to seek asylum:
“We have come a long way from the days when a Salvadoran carved his attorney’s name in a bar of soap because he had nothing else to write on or with.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
June 6,1988
3


COLLECTING
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA FAILS: A nine-page report critical of the University of California’s integration of Hispanics into its academic and professional ranks is available at no cost. “Latino Report Card on the University of California” can be obtained by writing to John Gamboa, Latino Issues Forum, 1535 Mission St, San Francisco, Calif. 94103 (415)431-7430.
STATISTICAL ABSTRACT: “Statistical Abstract of the United States" is a rich resource book with statistics on almost every conceivable subject. For a copy of the paperback of the 970-page report, send $25 (specify Stock No. 003-024-06708) to the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT: Scientists and professionals at the postdoctoral level interested in child development and public policy are invited to apply for the 1989 Society for Research in Child Development fellowships. Applicants selected will spend a year, beginning Sept. 1,1989, on a congressional staff. Deadline is Nov. 7, 1988. Contact Babro Miles, SRCD, 100 N. Carolina Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 543-9582.
MIGRANT EDUCATION NEEDS: “Migrant Education: A Consolidated View” presents data on the educational status and needs of migrant students as well as a look at the legislative history and funding of migrant education programs. For a free copy, write the Education Commission of the States, Interstate Migrant Education Council, 1860 Lincoln St., Suite300, Denver, Colo. 80295(303)830-3680.
COMPUTER USAGE: “Computer Competence: The First National Assessment” is an 82-page booklet by the Educational Testing Service which includes data on computer usage according to racial and ethnic group. To receive a copy, send $14 to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, P.O. Box 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710.
AIDS NEWSLETTER: “The COSSMHO AIDS Update” is a monthly newsletter that focuses on the latest AIDS research, grants and activity regarding Hispanics. For a one-year subscription ($40 for non-members and $30 for members) contact COSSMHO AIDS Update, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
CONNECTING
COMBATING AIDS
Shanti Project, a San Francisco-based organization that provides support services for people suffering from AIDS and their loved ones, will conducts bilingual/bicultural training seminar July 16,17 on how to develop AIDS support systems in the city’s Latino community.
The training aims to ensure, through community volunteers, that linguistically and culturally relevant services are available to the Bay City’s Hispanics.
The cost for the seminar is $25 per person. For more information call (415) 777-CARE.
On a national front, the United States Conference of Mayors announced June 1 that it is seeking proposals for funding of co mm unity-based AIDS risk reduction/education programs targeted at racial and ethnic minorities. Approximately 15 grants, ranging from $20,000 to$42,000, will be awarded.
Copies of the Requests for Proposals and additional information can be obtained by contacting Matthew Murguia at (202) 293-7330.
‘OFFICIAL ENGLISH’ CRITIQUED
The National Education Association announced May 23 it will be distributing a handbook that concludes that the Official English movement not only has the potential to harm limited-English-speaking school children but public education as a whole.
The 28-page “Official English/English Only- More than Meets the Eye” handbook examines the movement and its goals through a question-and-answer format The publication also provides a historical background on language restrictionism in the United States as well as a look at bills in Congress seeking a constitutional amendment on Official English.
To order a copy (specify Stock No. 1837-0-00), send $3.95 to NEA Professional Library, P.O. Box 509, West Haven, Conn. 06516.
DESIGNERS TACKLE AIDS
Hispanic Fashion Designers has enlisted the support of the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association by obtaining matching funds to begin taping AIDS public service announcements that will be shown this summer on the Spanish television network Univision and some English-language stations. The group hopes to secure $200,000 in start-up money.
The group, which puts on fashion shows yearly featuring designs of Hispanics such as Adolfo and Carolina Herrera, will learn Aug. 1 if it will be provided with more funds for the project from the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
PUERTO RICAN FESTIVITIES Chicago June 7-13
Fiestas Patronales Puertorriquenas will include food, crafts, entertainment and a parade on June 11. Martha Ramos (312) 292-1414
LATINO OFFICIALS San Antonio June 9-11
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials will meet for its annual conference to discuss topics ranging from AIDS and the H ispanic community to Hispanic voter trends.
Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536
CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS Bronx, N.Y. June 11
Minority rights and the Constitution will be the subject of a panel discussion featuring Fernando Ferrer, Bronx Borough president; Julius Chambers,
director, NAACP Legal Defense Fund; and Tom Wicker of The New York Times. It is sponsored by St. Ann’s Church.
Nancy Cortner (212) 316-7426
SALVADORAN ARTS Washington, D.C. June 11 The Washington Association of Salvadoran Writers will hold a social evening to honor Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton Garda The event will focus on the cultural aspects of U.S. Salvadorans, the basic causes of the civil war in El Salvador and the life and work of Dalton.
Jos6 Martinez (301) 431-1045.
HISPANIC ROLE MODELS Los Angeles June 12
Actor Edward James Olmos will be honored by the American Civil Liberties Union for his efforts to create a dialogue between community leaders, gang youths and juvenile offenders. Jaime Escalante, Garfield High teacher, and the Los Angeles Student Coalition will also be honored.
Lisa Lazar (213) 487-1720
CUBAN CONFERENCE
Washington, D.C. June 12-14 A conference will be held by the Cuban American National Foundation to further its efforts for Cuban American involvement in the political process. Among the speakers scheduled are former Ambassadors Jeane Kirkpatrick and Vernon Walters Topics include the Cuban economy and human rights violations in Cuba Marilyn Kalusin (305) 477-1202.
COMING SOON
MINORITIES IN CORPORATIONS
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Washington, D.C. June 15-17
Deborah Graham (202) 634-6036
IMAGEN AWARD
National Conference of Christians and Jews Beverly Hills, Calif. June 16 NCCJ (213)385-0491
INSTALLATION BANQUET
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Los Angeles June 18
Lourdes Arce (213) 725-3970
4
June 6,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
HOLES IN THE SAFETY NETS: POVERTY PROGRAMS AND POLICIES IN
THE STATES
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has published Holes in the Safety Nets: Poverty Programs and Policies in the States. A separate, 18-to-20 page report for every state and the District of Columbia examines the benefit program options each state has chosen in fashioning its safety net, including discussions of cash and food assistance, medical assistance, unemployment insurance, state taxes, housing assistance, energy assistance, and the WIC program.
The Center also has issued a National Overview report (73 pages in length) that summarizes and compares in text and tables the key characteristics of state poverty policies in each of the areas described above. In addition, the national overview includes an assessment of the anti-poverty impact of government benefit programs, a test of whether a state safety net meets 10 standards of “reasonable adequacy” and the implications of the state safety net findings for national poverty policy.
The state reports are available for$3.50 each and the National Overviewfor$8 by writing or calling the nonprofit, nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 236 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 305, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0591.
PUBLIC INFORMATION DIRECTOR
National Hispanic organization seeks a Public Information Director. Experience in working with national and local media. Excellent writing and editing skills, experience in layout and publication design. Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred. Formal training plus practical experience, Master's degree helpful.
Position available immediately, salary based on experience.' Send resume and writing samples to:
National Council of La Raza 20 F Street NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Att: Lupe Lemus
WHO’S WHO
WHO’S WHO: CHICANO OFFICEHOLDERS: 1987-88 is a comprehensive reference directory compiled by Western New Mexico University Professorof Political Science, Arthur D. Martinez. This latest updated Seventh Edition lists more than 5,000 names, addresses and telephone numbers of Chicano and other Hispanic officeholders from the national to the municipal level. Photographs are incorporated throughoutthe publication. The national level now lists all Hispanics, regardless of ethnic background. Political party functionaries, an expanded listing of nationwide civic organizations, and selected political and demographic tables and charts also are included.
For a copy send $19.95 to: Dr. Arthur D. Martinez, P.O. Box 2271, Silver City, New Mexico 88062, (505) 538-6228. All seven editions are available to those who wish to complete a FULL SET. Please indicate whether you want to be placed on the STANDING ORDER listing to automatically receive each succeeding edition.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PROGRAM DIRECTOR
DIRECTOR, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION
The Latino Institute seeks a director for its research and documentation division to join its management team. Responsible for designing, developing, and providing research on issues affecting the Latino community with priority in the areas of Education, Political Empowerment Health, and Economic Development. Requirements include: Master’s degree in a social research related field, minimum of three years research experience, minimum one year supervisory experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills in Spanish/English. Bicultural preferred.
Salary: $30,000 - $40,000.
Send cover letter and resume by July 1, 1988, to:
Jos£ C. Matos-Real Executive Director Latino Institute 228 South Wabash Room 600 Chicago, III. 60604 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
The Latino Institute is a not-for-profit organization which promotes Hispanic progress through research, training, and advocacy. Service area is limited to Chicago.
National nonprofit, highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management background needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, reliability, loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 110114th St. NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Multi-service community center. Supervision and administration of day-to-day program operations and services. Requirements: master’s degree in S.W. or PA, three years administrative experience, bilingual/bicultural (Spanish). Send resum6 by June 15 to: Latin American Community Center, 1204 West 4th Street Wilmington, Delaware 19085.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
:M:iS
PROJECT DIRECTOR
PROJECT DIRECTOR- National Hispanic health organization seeks project director to manage/conduct national demonstration project to educate out-of-school Hispanic youth in the prevention of AIDS. Duties include: site coordination; materials developments; and training. Requirements: M.P.H. or equivalent with demonstrated relevant experience in AIDS education/prevention; program planning; implementation; and training in the Hispanic community. Salary, low to mid thirties. Send resumes with writing samples to: Robert Cullen, 1030 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1053, Washington, DC 20005.
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Arts & Entertainment
COMING TO A THEATER NEAR YOU: An action/adventure film starring former world welterweight champion Carlos Palomino is among various Latino-themed films coming out this year.
Fists of Steel began shooting in Hawaii last month in locations that will double as Los Angeles and Nicaragua. Henry Silva stars opposite Palomino in this tale of a mild-mannered former boxer whose damaged hands have been medically replaced by a steel webbing of bone and knuckle.
Also in the cast are Ruben Ortiz Paez, the consul of Mexico in Honolulu, and seven other athletes- Alexis Arguello, Ruben Castillo, Armando Muhiz, Mario Celario, Efrem Herrera, Danny L6pez and Daniel Celario, the brother of Mario.
Also due for release in’88 are two major Hollywood Latino releases filmed outside the United States. Principal photography has been completed on Universal Pictures’ Moon Over Parador, filmed in
Brazil, and Columbia Pictures’ The Old Gringo.
RaCil Julid, Sonia Braga and Richard Dreyfuss star in Moon, the story of an actor hired to impersonate the dead president of the fictional South American state Parador. Paul Mazurskys film is scheduled for an Aug. 5 release.
Jimmy Smitsco-stars with Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck in The Old Gringo, which is based on Carlos Fuentes’ novel about a U.S. school teacher in revolutionary Mexico. Argentine director Luis Puenzo, an Oscar winner, directed the film. It is due for a December release.
ONE LINERS: Luis Valdez’s award-winning Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution encores on PBS June 8. (Check local listings) Linda Ronstadt and Evelyn Cisneros are featured... The Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center at Villa Victoria in Boston continues its Traditional Puerto Rican Music Series June 12 with Grupo Mapeye and June 23 with Los Planeros De Abajo. Both groups are from Puerto Rico. . . Miller Genuine Draffs Orchard Beach Free Summer Concert Series in New York City kicked off May 28. The salsa and merengue celebration continues every Saturday and Sunday through Sept. 4... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
THE CORE INFO: The first installment of Noticiero Telemundo-CNN, a Spanish-language national and international news program, aired May 30 at 6:30 p.m. in 15 major Hispanic television markets around the continental United States as well as in Puerto Rico. The 30-minute show began its Monday-through - Friday run with live coverage of the Reagan-Gorbachev summit.
The broadcast represents the first product of Telemundd s operations mergerwith Cable News Network in March. As producer of the shows for Telemundo's network, CNN owns and has complete editorial control over the news program. Telemundo has exclusive broadcast rights.
The show was previously produced by the Hispanic-American Broadcasting Corp., which having lost its $3.6 million client now faces a probable buy-out by Telemundo. According to Nancy Alpert, Telemundds vice president and general counsel, “The outlook
is positive, but there is no final word yet.”
THE PLAYERS: HBC, based in Hialeah, Fla, is the first and only television news service owned by U.S. Hispanics. It has affiliates in 10 U.S. cities and five Latin American countries.
The New York-based Telemundo Group is a non-Hispanic-owned network of five.‘owned-and-operatecf stations in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco-San Jose, Miami and Houston-Galveston, with 10 affiliates in other areas of the United States with a high concentration of Hispanics. It reaches more than 60% of the U.S. mainland Spanish-speaking market. It also owns television stations in Puerto Rico.
Ted Turner’s Cable News Network, with a worldwide staff of 1,600, has affiliates in Central and South America
PROS, CONS AND AFTEREFFECTS: The debate which ensued in Hispanic media circles over the merger continuea
Wrote Ana Veciana-Sudrez, The Miami Herald columnist “When Telemundo purchases Hispanic-American Broadcasting Corporation
in the next few weeks as expected, one of the strongest vestiges of Hispanic media power will fade into oblivion.
“Telemundo executives claim the issue of Latino-controlled Spanish-language television is a red herring. They claim the important matter is that Hispanics are making the programming decisions.
“Translation: Just settle for the crumbs, “in the case of Hispanic media, the messenger has become as important as the message.” Carlos Barba, senior vice president of Telemundo and general manager of New Yorks Spanish-language Channel 47 told New York Daily News columnist Miguel P6rez: “This will be the first network program in Spanish that will be seen live, daily, in all-of Latin America.”
While many observers worry that Noticiero will become nothing more than a Spanish translation of already established CNN programs, Miguel P6rez noted that: “It could result in better coverage of U.S. Latinos by both the Spanish and English-language networks.”
- Darryl Figueroa
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Making The News This Week U .S. Reps. Albert Bustamante of Texas, chairman of the Congres sional Hispanic Caucus , Robert Garcia of New York , Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, Solom6n OrtizofTexasand Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster of Puerto Rico visit Spain, May 27-June 7, to discuss with Spanish officials cultural and commercial e x changes between Spain and the U . S . Hispanic community ... Denver Mayor Federico Pefla announces his support for Massachusetts Gov . Michael Dukakis as Democratic presidential nominee . . . Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer appoints George Muii..o7., former superintendent of the Chicago public schools, as a member of the International Port Authority . . . Salvador Collazo, president of the Puerto Rican Bar Association, announces his candidacy for the nomination of the Bronx district attorney ... Elizabeth Rodrlgu_ez, a second-year-law student at the University of Miami , becomes the first female chief for the prestigious and formerly all-male Iron Arrow honor society. The group voted to allow females as members in 1985 after being barred from the campus. . . Julissa G6mez, a 15-year-old gymnast completely paralyzed after suffering a neck injury at a meet in early May in Tokyo , slips into a . coma before being transferred to a hospital in Houston .. . Marla G6mez Carbonell, who in 1936 became one of the first six women elected to Cuba's House of Representatives , dies of heart and kidney failure . The Miami resident was 80 ... Willie Velasquez Fights Cancer When you speak to William Velasquez by telephone, you receive no clue that he is in a hospital bed , waging a battle against kidney cancer, an uncommon disease that spread to several parts of his body before he even knew he was sick. Willie, who turned 44 on Ma 'y9, shares his plans for the future and talks of the ongoing work of his creation, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project , with t he same enthusiasm he has always shown . His vibrance seems incongruous with his presence at the M .D. Anderson Hospital in Houston where an IV unit pumps four bottles of vitamins and medicine into his arm. Velasquez was originally admitted to the Santa Rosa Hospital in San Antonio on May 15 after his wife, Jane, had insisted his increasing fatigue demanded a checkup. Now, he says, doctors give him less than a year to live. For those unfamiliar with his work, Velas quez is the dynamo responsible for increasing voter registration of Hispanics bY 25% around the country and for the resulting growth of Latino elected officials. SVREP board member Vilma Martinez echoes the sentiments of many Hispanics around the country: "I am devastated. He has been so important to the Latino com munity ... as an advocate, an issue-spotter , a creative thinker, a motivator, an inspiring leader . " After a few interruptions from nurses, Velasquez relates why Hispanics have re mained for so long outside the political process . "Not voting was not apathy. It was a political statement," he says . "When the system is fixed to work as designed , when Mexicans know they truly have a chance to elect their own representatives, they register to vote in greater numbers than Anglos." As president of SVREP since its inception in 197 4 , Velasquez has led more than 1 ,000 voter registration campaigns in 200 cities throughout its six-state region. His inspiration and formula led to the establishment of the increasingly active MidwesVNortheast Voter Registration Education Project. continued on pag e 2 Immigrant Smuggling Hearing Begins A pretrial hearing has been set for June 7 in the case of the first reporter, a Latina , to be charged with smuggling undocumented immigrants across the border while covering the sanctuary movement. The case will be neard in U.S . District Court in Albuquerque , N .M. Demetria Martinez, 27, a free-lance writer a poet, was gathering information for a Christmas story planned fort he Albuquerque Journal. At the suggestion of the Rev . Glen RemerThamert, a Lutheran minister, she went to Juarez, Mexico, to interview two pregnant women from El Salvador seeking sanctuary for their unborn children. Martinez said she rnet with the women after they had crossed the .border into E! Paso , Texas , but did not ride in the same car with them . Tova lndritz, Martinez's public defender, is seeking to have the charges dismissed be cause the district attorney did not obta i n permission from the U.S . Attorney General before filing, as required, she alleges, by Justice Department guidelines . The government maintains Martinez was not working on a story. Although the story was never written, Ken Wald, an assistant editor at the Albuquerque Journal , said he knew of her plans and considered the story idea legitimate . Martinez ' s notes became the basis for a poem which government attor neys plan to present as evidence against her. If convicted of conspiring to violate U.S. immigration laws , Martinez could face up to 25 years in prison and $1.25 million in fines. The indictments mark the first time the government has moved against the sanctuary movement since eight workers were convicted in 1986. According to Michael McConnell, author of a book on the movement , interest in sanctuary among churches has not waned . Currently, 410 congregations offer shelter and other assistance . Sophia Nieves Justice Official Taken to Task Over Remarks Two capital-based Hispanic leaders have found U.S. Justice Department civil rights chief William Bradford Reynolds an unlikely source of criticism for the U.S . Congress' exemption from some civil rights laws . Reynolds, speaking before the Senate Judi ciary Committee May 26, said Congress deni grated the Reagan administration's civil rights record while being exempt from the laws . U.S. ReP. Matthew Martinez(D-Calif.) admitted that there is some discrimination found in the offices of Congress. But, he told Weekly Report, by and large it is not practiced. "Congress has to contend with public scrutiny. It is better than any law," he said. Mario Moreno, assistant counsel with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Edu cational Fund in Washington, D . C . , said that though he knows of no discriminatory practices by congressional offices , he could agree in principle that civil rights laws should be ap plicable to it. "It is surprising and ironic to hear Reynolds say this," Moreno remarked. "He usually lobbies against civil rights enforcement and interprets statutes narrowly . " -Darryl Figueroa U.S. Reps. Reveal Worth Voting members of the Congressional His panic Caucus have submitted annual financial disclosure statements required of those serving in Congress. The purpose of the statements, released May 25, is not to show income, but to uncover conflicts of interest. The assets indicated below may not reflect the value of U.S. House members' residences. Their annual salaries of $85,500 are not included . ASSETS Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) $500,002 Manuel Lujan (R-N . M . ) $420,005 Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) $401,005 Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) $271 ,000 Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) $110,003 Bill Richardson (D-N .M.) $55,002 Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) $53,004 Solom6n Ortiz (D-Texas) $46,006 E. "Kika" de Ia Garza(DTexas) $15,001 Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) $9,005 Robert Garcia (D-N.Y . ) sought extension

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Justice Department Weighs LA. County Redistricting Suit The Los Angeles County Board of Super visors may be the target of a voting rights lawsuit that alleges supervisory districts were redrawn to prevent minorities, especially Hispanics, from gaining a seat on the board. Los Angeles Assistant County Counsel Mary Wawro confirmed the county received a letter from the U.S. Department of Justice pointing out the lack of minority representation and alleging redistricting had split minority voting power. In the county's 138-year history, there have been no Latino super visors. Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton was expected to meet with staff members of the Justice Department's voting rights section June 4 to review information that led to the federal action, according to a department spokesperson. The Board of Supervisors is required to redraw district boundaries every 10 years and to divide the population evenly. The five supervisors all Anglo males -who realigned the district in 1981 are the same members who serve on the board today. The 1965 Voting Rights Act makes illegal any action which causes minority group members to have "less opportunity than Univ. of Calif. Said to Exclude Latinos The University of California's nine-campus system and its president have overwhelmingly failed at having Latinos represented in top administrative posts, faculty positions and awarding purchasing contracts to Hispanic owned businesses, charged an activist think tank in a "report card" released May 26 at the state Capitol in Sacramento. In its report card, the Latino Issues Forum said the university "has failed to meet ... its general educational obligation as required by the state legislature." Basing its figures on university records, the report card gave an "P' to the state's largest institution of higher learning in every area except undergraduate and graduate student enrollment, where the university was given a "0-" and "D," respectively. Position Grade %Hispanic Regents F0% Top 100 Administrators F0 Office of the President F 2.6 Faculty F 2 . 3 Also criticized was the fact that only0.67% of the $747 million the university awards in contracts went to Hispanic businesses. Velasquez Changed Political Map 2 continued from page 1 He and his organization have prodded more than a million Hispanics into exercising a voice frozen silent from disuse. And he did it on his feet, in the neighborhoods, using his endless reserve of humor. Richard Avena, former Southwestern re gional director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, says of his longtime friend, "Even in the smallest Southwest towns that 1 have visited, the most isolated Latinos would know Willie. I would ask how and they would say, 'He came here and asked us to register to vote.' " SVREP has constantly fueled the efforts of other civil rights groups to ensure that Hispanics receive fair political representa tion. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, for one, has filed numerous lawsuits in response to voter denial and fraud discovered by SVREP. SVREP was first organized by Velasquez in 1970 as a two-year project of the National Council of La Raza Over the years, SVREP has filed 88 lawsuits. One is being appealed. All the others have been successful. SVREP director Andy Hernandez is currently acting in Velasqueis place . Upon hearing of Velasquez's illness, San Antonio residents began searching for some way to show their love and support. A drive was organized by the League of United Latin American Citizens to donate blood. The City Council led off its May 19 meeting with prayers for him . Jane, who is staying with her husband at the hospital, says that calls offering prayers, good wishes and monetary support have been overwhelming . When it was learned that Willie would need transportation to M.D. Anderson May 25, five planes were made available . Velasquez calls the support his "therapy.'' "It's just terrific; it makes me feel good." Velasquez has requested a sabbatical from SVREP. He plans to share his time with his wife and children, Carmen, 15, Caterina, 12, and Guillermo, 11. Along with reading and resting, he hopes to write a book on the future contributions of Hispanics to the United States and on the standards they should set for themselves . " A period of introspection is needed now," he counsels. "We have been transitioning to power in recent years, and we have to realize the responsibility that power brings . It's in cumbent upon us to say how we will use that power." Around the country, Latinos wait and pray that Willie will win his new battle, as he has so many others. "Willie has made a decision to fight as he has with everything else," says his wife . "He is determined to lick this." -Darryl Figueroa other members to participate in the political process and to elect representatives of their choice.'' Latinos were estimated to make up 31% of Los Angeles County's population of about 7.5 million in 1985. Blacks make up 13%, according to 1985 state figures. One solution to the problems cited in the Justice Department's letter is to increase the number of county supervisors to seven, according to Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. Previous attempts to add two seats were defeated by the voters in 1962 and 1976. Sophia Nieves Latino Business People Obey Immigration Law Hispanic business people may not like federal immigration law sanctions against employers who hire undocumented workers, but they will comply with the law, according to Jorge Negron, director of governmental affairs of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce . Employer sanctions went into effect June 1. "Employers should not be watchdogs for the federal government," said Negron, based in Washington, D.C. Another of the chamber members' concerns is that the law may create more discrimination against Hispanics in the work place, he added. "If a guy looks like a non-Anglo, he stands out," said Negron. "It may be an easy way for discriminatory practices to be safeguarded.'' The sanctions, part of the immigration law passed in November 1986, are designed to curtail illegal immigration. Employers are also required to keep detailed records on employees. Fines range from $250 to $2,000 per em ployee hired in violation of the law. Employers who have not received a visit from the INS will probably receive a warning the first time they are found to have hired an undocumented immigrant, according to INS officials. Students Protest Election UCLA students, angered over the disqualifi cation of a Latino candidate for student body president, upended ballot boxes and took control for a short time May 26 of the building housing the chancellor's office. Minority and gay groups had been protesting the removal of Lloyd Monserratt from the race for what they described as racist reasons. The Undergraduate Student Association Coun cil, which took the action after Monserratt's primary win, maintained he was dropped because of his low grade point average and his lack of academic credits. Monserratt denied this. He said the school had lost some of his class records. The actions culminated a period of mounting racial tension on the campus said by student leaders to have begun with the visit of Muslim leader Louis Farrakhan. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Rafael C. Castillo, guest columnist The Candy Jar My niece had rented the videocassette "Giant," starring Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor. We sat around the living room and watched it. A poignant scene where Juana, the wife of the ostracized son, was refused service at a beauty shop because she was Mexican drew my niece's curiosity. She was surprised that Hispanics had been so blatantly discriminated against during the '50s. Now entering a period of introspection, she is asking more questions. While over the years racism has become more sophisticated, layered with the thick cosmetic facade of the ethnic joke, my father still remembers a time when people told you flatly, " Sorry , bud. No Mexicans allowed." I told my niece about the summer I was 10 years old and my father took me with him to West Texas. He was a truck driver. It was my first trip away from home, away from the labyrinthine barrios and dirt streets with the neon signs blinking "Tacos de Res." We stopped at a Conoco filling station that had a hardware store and cafe. An old man was sitting outside, smoking a pipe. 'PEPPERBELLIES' NOT WELCOME When my father disappeared inside the hardware store, I hopped from the Ford pickup, opened the squeaky door of the cafe and peeked inside. A chubby lady wearing a white uniform smiled at me. "Come in , honey, lest you let them flies in," she said . I shut the screen door and, spotting the candy jar sitting on the counter, buried my hand inside my pocket. I extended my pudgy hand and asked, in my best English , for 9 cents worth of candies. The others inside the cafe were ignoring me, which is what normal people do to 1 0-year-olds. All except a towering, stubble-faced man wearing an apron and a paper cap. He scow led and said loudly, " Sorry, kid. All sold out." "Give'm a break!" the waitress said. "Just shut up! Pretty soon you'll have all them pepperbelliescomin' in here buying candies." I stood there trembling, my j aws apart and my stomach churning. In my most pol ite manner , I thanked them and left. As I was walking fro m the cafe, my father stepped out of the hardware store. "Didn't I tell you to stay in the truck?" he said. "I was just going to buy some candies. " 'DO YOU HATE HIM?' I'd stare at my father's countenance: his dar k hair, his sad, humble features, that large forehead of his . We drove for miles without a word. Then he abruptly asked, " Well, did you buy any candies? "No, sir." "Why not?" "Because the man said he didn't have any more." "And did he?" "Yes, he did." "Why do you suppose he refused to sell you any?" " I guess because of my color." "Do you think thafs right?" "No." "And do you hate him and think all people are the same as he is? " "No, sir . " "Why?" "Because the man was ignorant," I said . "There are some things in human nature that cannot be understood," he said. "One of those things is judging a man by his color. " He paused a long while before adding, "Welcome to the real world. " That was my introduction to American racism. As I talked to my niece, 1 wondered how her generation will be able to handle it in its modern form. (Rafael C. Castillo, a fiction writer, is San Antonio correspondent for the Paris literary journal Frank). Sin pelo s en Ia lengua SHOWDOWN ON COCKRELL HILL: Saturday the voters of Cockrell Hill , Texas, were to choose between incumbent C. W. Martin and challenger Tony Hinojosa Jr. to fill the swing-vote seat on its City Council. The pa ir tied at 235 votes apiece in a May 7 election that saw two Latinos elected to the city's five-member governinq bodv for the first time in its history. Latinos, who make up about 50% of the town's residents, decided to run a slate for three seats after the a If. Anglo council refused six months earlier to appoint a Hispanic to fill a vacancy on the body. C .W. isn't at all happy about the turn of events. He's quoted in the May 9 Dallas Morning News: "They don't like it in Mexico and they don't like it here, either. They just got their candy taken away from them, so they got their people to vote for them." Talks good, don't he? TWO STRIKES, YOU'RE OUT: Closer to the border, the public address announcer for the El Paso Diablos in the Texas baseball league got tossed out of a game May 26 for playing a linda Ronstadt record. I'll explain. There was a close call at home plate that went in favor of the visiting Jackson Mets, and announcer Paul Strelzin ju st happened to broadcast the stanza from Linda's "When Willi Be Loved?" that goes, "I've been cheated, been mist reated ... " The umpire ordered him to turn Linda off, which he did. But between innings, the Diablo Diamond Girls began their ritual Dugout Dance-and Paul put the needle on Linda's record and the ump again. Then came the historic moment: Paul and Linda got the thumb. THEM' S FIGHTIN' WORDS, GRINGO: A c orrection in the April " T exas Monthly'' magazine reads : "An item in ' Bum Steers" (TM, January 1988) stated that Joe Madrigal, th e state ' s director of Hispanic and Latin American affa irs , does not speak Spanish. In fact, Mr. Madrigal does speak Spanish . Te x as Monthly regrets the error." Metelo , Joe! GOD'S LANGUAGE: There's the old joke about t h e Texas politician , a rguing against bilingual education, who p rot este d , " If English was g o o d enough for Jesus Christ, ifs good enough for me . " In Miami last month, when six men-including the Archdiocese's first Nica ra g uan and Haitian priests-were ordained there, the 1 ,500 in attendance at StMary's Cathedral enjoyed a ceremony that included five languages: English, Spanish, Creole, Greek and Latin. Archbishop Edward McCarthy, who spoke in Spanish to Cuba born priest Pedro Corces and Managua-born Oscar Brantome, said the r ite in Creole for Haitian Jean Pierre. Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • LEO ESTRADA, demographer and UCLA professor, quoted by Los Angeles Times' business reporter Jesus Sanchez in a May 24 article on market research studies of Latino buying habits: "There are some real charlatans out there ... I see exaggerations all the time because many think it makes us look better. But you don't have to exaggerate. You would have to be blind not to see the potential of the Latino market. SANDRA PETTIT, Los Angeles Legal Aid Foundation attorney, quoted in The New York Times May 8 following a federal court order telling the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to provide Salvadoran refugees with access to telephones, lawyers, bilingual documents and information on their right to seek asylum: "We have come a long way from the days when a Salvadoran carved his attorney's name in a bar of soap because he had nothing else to write on or with." Hi s panic Link Weekly Report June 6 , 1988 3

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COLLECTING CONNECTING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA FAILS: A nine-page report critical of the University of California's integration of Hispanics into its academic and professional ranks is available at no cost. "Latino Report Card on the University of California" can be obtained by writing to John Gamboa, Latino Issues Forum, 1535 Mission St, San Francisco, Calif. 94103 (415) 431-7430. I , COMBATING AIDS ! STATISTICAL ABSTRACT: "Statistical Abstract of the United States" is a rich resource book with statistics on almost every conceivable subject. For a copy of the paperback of the 970-page report, send $25 (specify Stock No. 003-024-06708) to the Super intendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. CHILD DEVELOPMENT: Scientists and professionals at the postdoctoral level interested in child development and public policy are invited to apply for the 1989 Society for Research in Child Development fellowships. Applicants selected will spend a year, beginning Sept. 1, 1989, on a congressi onal staff. Deadline is Nov . 7, 1988. Contact Babro Miles, SRCD, 100 N. Carolina Ave . NE , Washington, D .C. 20003 (202) 543-9582. MIGRANT EDUCATION NEEDS: "Migrant Education: A Consoli dated View'' presents data on the educational status and needs of migrant students as well as a look at the legislative history and funding of migrant education programs. For a free copy, write the Education Commission of the States, Interstate Migrant Education Council, 1860 Lincoln St., Suite 300, Denver, Colo . 80295 (303) 830-3680. COMPUTER USAGE: "Computer Competence: The First National Assessment" is an 82-page booklet by the Educational Testing Service which includes data on computer usage according to racial and ethnic group. To receive a copy, send $14 to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, P . O . Box 671 0, Princeton, N .J. 08541-6710. AIDS NEWSLETTER: "The. COSSMHOAIDS Update'' is a monthly newsletter that focuses on the latest AIDS research, grants and activity regarding Hispanics . For a one-year subscription ($40 for non-members and $30 for members) contact COSSMHO AIDS Update, 1030 15th St. NW , Suite 1053, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 371-2100. Shanti Project, a San Francisco-based organization that provides support services for people suffering from AIDS and their loved ones, l will conduct a bilingual/bicultural training seminar July 16, 17 on how to develop AIDS support systems in the city's Latino community. The training aims to ensure, through community volunteers, that linguistically and culturally relevant services are available to the Bay City's Hispanics . The cost for the seminar is $25 per person . For more information call (415) 777-CARE. On a national front, the United States Conference of Mayors announced June 1 that it is seeking proposals for funding of community-based AIDS risk reduction/education programs targeted at racial and ethnic minorities. Approximately 15 grants, ranging from $20,000 to $42,000, will be awarded . Copies of the Requests for Proposals and additional information can be obtained by contacting Matthew Murguia at (202) 293-7330. 'OFFICIAL ENGLISH' CRITIQUED The National Education Association announced May 23 it will be distributing a handbook that concludes that the Official English movement not only has the potential to harm limited-English-speaking school children but public education as a whole . The 28-page "Official English/English OnlyMore than Meets the Eye" handbook examines the movement and its goals through a question-and-answer format The publication also provides a historical background on language restriction ism in the United States as well as a look at bills in Congress seeking a constitutional amendment on Official English. To order a copy(specify Stock No . 1837-Q-00), send $3.95 to NEA Professional Library, P . O . Box 509, West Haven, Conn . 06516. DESIGNERS TACKLE AIDS Hispanic Fashion Designers has enlisted the support of the Pharma ceutical Manufacturers Association by obtaining matching funds to begin taping AIDS public service announcements that will be shown this summer on the Spanish television network Univision and some English-language stations . The group hopes to secure $200,000 in startup money . The group, which puts on fashion shows yearly featu ri ng designs of Hispanics such as Adolfo and Carolina Herrera , will lea r n Aug. 1 if it will be provided with more funds for the project from the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Calendar director, NAACP Legal Defense Fund ; and Tom Wicker ofT he New York Times . It is sponsored by St. Ann's Church. Washington, D.C. June 12-14 A conference will be held by the Cuban American National Foundation to further its efforts for Cuban American involvement in the political process. Among the speakers scheduled are former Ambas sadors Jeane Kirkpatrick and Vernon Walters. Topics include the Cuban economy and human rights violations in Cuba . THIS WEEK PUERTO RICAN FESTIVITIES Chicago June 7 Fiestas Patronales Puertorriquenas will include food , crafts, entertainment and a parade on June 11. Martha Ramos (312) 292-1414 LATINO OFFICIALS San Antonio June 9-11 The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials will meet for its annual conference to discuss topics ranging from AIDS and the Hispanic community to Hispanic voter trends. Kelly Parks (202) 546-2536 CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS Bronx, N.Y. June 11 Minority rights and the Constitution will be the subject of a panel discussion featuring Fernando Ferrer, Bronx Borough president; Julius Chambers, 4 Nancy Cortner (21 2) 316-7 426 SALVADORAN ARTS Washington, D.C. June 11 The Washington Association of Salvadoran Writers will hold a social evening to honor Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton Garcia . The event will focus on the cultural aspects of U.S. Salvadorans, the basic causes of the civil war in El Salvador and the life and work of Dalton . Jose Martinez (301) 431-1 045. HISPANIC ROLE MODELS Los Angeles June 12 Actor Edward James Olmos will be honored by the American Civil Liberties Union for his efforts to create a dialogue between community leaders, gang youths and juvenile offenders. Jaime Escalante, Garfield High teacher, and the Los Angeles Student Coalition will also be honored. Lisa Lazar (213) 487-1720 CUBAN CONFERENCE June 6,1988 Marilyn Kalusin (305) 477-1202. COMING SOON MINORITIES IN CORPORATIONS U . S . Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Washington, D . C . June 15-17 Deborah Graham (202) 634-6036 IMAGEN AWARD National Conference of Christians and Jews Beverly Hills, Calif. June 16 NCCJ (213) 385 . INSTALLATION BANQUET Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles June 18 Lourdes Arce (213) 725-3970 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS HOLES IN THE SAFETY NETS: PUBLIC INFORMATION DIRECTOR POVERTY PROGRAMS AND POLICIES IN THE STATES National His panic organization seeks a Public Information Director. Experience in working with national and local media. Excellent writing and editing skills, experience in layout and publication design. Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred . Formal training plus practical experience, Maste(s The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has published Holes In the Safety Nets: Poverty Programs and Policies In the States. A separate, 18-to-20 page report for every state and the District of Columbia examines the benefit program options each state has chosen in fashioning its safety net, including discussions of cash and food assistance, medical assistance, unemployment insurance, state taxes, housing assistance, energy assistance, and the WIC program . degree helpful. . The Center also has issued a National Overview report (73 pages in length) that summarizes and compares in text and tables the key characteristics of state poverty policie s in each of the areas described above . In addition, the national overview includes an assessment of the poverty impact of government benefit programs, a test of whether a state safety net meets 10 standards of "reasonable adequacy" and the implications of the state safety net findings for national poverty policy. Position available immediately , salary based on experience. Send resume and writinq samples to: National Council of La Raza 20 F Street NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Att: Lupe Lemus The state reports are available for$3.50 each and the National Overview for$8 by writing or calling the nonprofit nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 236 Massachusetts Ave . NE , Suite 305, Washington, D .C. 20002 (202) 544-0591. DIRECTOR, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute seeks a director for its research and documentation division to join its management team. Responsible for de signing, developing, and providing research on issues affecting the Latino community with priority in the areas of Education, Political Empowerment and Economic Develop ment. Requirements include: Maste(sdegree in a social research related field , minimum of three years research experience, minimum one year supervisory experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills in Span1sh / Engllsh . Bicultural preferred. Salary : $30,000 $40,000. Send cover letter and resume by July 1 , 1988, to: Jose C . MatosReal Executive Director Latino Institute 228 South Wabash Room 600 Chicago, Ill. 60604 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. The Latino Institute is a not-for-profit organization which promotes Hispanic pro gress through research , training, and advocacy. Service area is limited to Chicago. PROJECT DIRECTOR PROJECT DIRECTOR-National Hispa ni c health org aniz ation seeks project director to manage/conduc t national demonstration project to educate out-of-school Hispanic youth in the prevention of AIDS. Duties in clude: site coordination; materials develop ments; and training . Requirements: M.P.H . or equivalent with demonstrated relevant e xperience in AIDS education/prevention; program plannin g ; i mpl e m e nt a tion; and trainin g in the Hispanic community. Salary, low to mid thirties. Send resumes with writing samples to: Robert Cullen, 103 0 15th Street, N.W . , Suite 1053, Wa shington, DC 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report WHO'S WHO WHO'S WHO: CHICANO OFFICEHOLDERS: 1987 is a comprehensive reference directory compiled by Western New Mexico University Professor of Political Science, Arthur D . Martinez. This latest updated Seventh Edition lists more than 5,000 names, addresses and telephone numbers of Chicano and other Hispanic officeholders from the national to the municipal level. Photographs are incorporated throughoutthe publication. The national level now lists all H ispanics, regardless of ethnic background. Political party functionaries, an expanded listing of nationwide civic organizations, and selected political and demographic tables and charts also are included. For a copy send$19.95 to: Dr. Arthur D . Martinez, P .O. Box 2271, Silver City, New Mexico 88062, (505) 538-6228. All seven editions are available to those who wish to complete a FULL SET. Please indicate whether you want to be placed on the STANDING ORDER listing to automatically receive each succeeding edition. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National highly visible , public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involve ment experience, and good management back ground needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative , relia bility, loyalty, orderliness are essential . Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 1101 14th St. NW , Suite610, Washington, D . C . 20005. PROGRAM DIRECTOR Supervision and administration of day-to-day program oper ations and services. Requirements: maste(s degree in S.W. or P.A, three years administrative experience, bilinguaVbicultural (Spanish). Send resume by June 15 to: Latin American Community Center, 1204 West 4th Street, Wilmington, Dela ware 19085. GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D . C . , provides : e Design • Typesetting e Lay out e Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20010 (202) 483-7755. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES : (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street ____________________ ______ ___ City, State & Zip ______ __ __ _ Area Code & Phone ____ __ __ _______ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment Brazil, and Columbia Pictures' The Old Gringo. Raul JuliA, Sonia Braga and Richard Dreyfuss star in Moon, the story of an actor hired to impersonate the dead president of the fictional South American state Parador. Paul Mazursky's film is scheduled for an Aug. 5 release. COMING TO A THEATER NEAR YOU: An action/adventure film starring former world welterweight champion Carlos Palomino is among various Latino-themed films coming out this year. Jimmy Smits co-stars with Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck in The Old Gringo, which is based on Carlos Fuentes' novel about a U.S. school teacher in . revolutionary Mexico . Argentine director Luis Puenzo, an Oscar winner, directed the film. It is due for a December release. Fists of Steel began shooting in Hawaii last month in locations that will double as Los Angeles and Nicaragua. Henry Silva stars opposite Palomino in this tale of a mild-mannered former boxer whose damaged hands have been medically replaced by a steel webbing of bone and knuckle. Also in the cast are Ruben Ortiz Paez, the consul of Mexico in Honolulu, and seven other athletes-Alexis Arguello, Ruben Castillo, Armando Muniz, Mario Celario, Efrem Herrera, Danny L6pez and Daniel Celario, the brother of Mario. ONE LINERS: Luis Valdez's award-winning Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution encores on PBS June 8. (Check local listings.) Linda Ronstadt and Evelyn Cisneros are featured ... The Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center at Villa Victoria in Boston continues its Traditional Puerto Rican Music Series June 12 with Grupo Also due for release in'88 are two major Hollywood Latino releases filmed outside the United States . Principal photography has been completed on Universal Pictures' Moon Over Parador, filmed in . Mapeye and June 23 with Los Planeros De Abajo. Both groups are from Puerto Rico ... Miller Genuine Draffs Orchard Beach Free Summer Concert Series in New York City kicked off May 28. The sa/sa and merengue celebration continues every Saturday and Sunday through Sept. 4. . . ,... Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report THE CORE INFO: The first installment of Noticiero Te/emundo-CNN, a Spanish-lan guage national and international news pro gram, aired May 30 at 6:30 p .m. in 15 major Hispanic television markets around the conti nental United States as well as in Puerto Rico . The 30-minute show began its Mondaythrough-Friday run with live coverage of the Reagan-Gorbachev summit. The broadcast represents the first product of Telemundds operations merger with Cable News Network in March. As producer of the shows for Telemundo's network, CNN owns and has complete editorial control over the news program . Telemundo has exclusive broadcast rights . The show was previously produced by the Hispanic-American Broadcasting Corp., which having lost its $3. 6 million client, now faces a probable buy-out by Telemundo. Ac cording to Nancy Alpert, Telemundo's vice president and general counsel, "The outlook HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Fel ix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias Rentas , Darryl Figueroa , Sophia Nieves. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduceo or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASS FlED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per co lumn inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week . Multiple use rates on request. . 6 is positive, but there is no final word yet." THE PLAYERS: HBC, based in Hialeah, Fla, is the first and only television news service owned by U.S. Hispanics. It has affiliates in 10 U.S. cities and five Latin American countries. The New York-based Telemundo Group is a non-Hispanic-owned network of five 'ownedand-operated stations in New York, Los Angeles , San Francisco-San Jose, Miami and Houston-Galveston, with 1 0 affiliates in other areas of the United States with a high con centration of Hispanics. It reaches more than 60% of the U.S. mainland market. It also owns television stations in Puerto Rico . Ted Turner's Cable News Network, with a worldwide staff of 1 ,600, has affiliates in Central and South America. PROS, CONS AND AFTEREFFECTS: The debate which ensued in Hispanic media circles over the merger continues. Wrote Ana Veciana-Suarez, The Miami Herald columnist "When Telemundo purchases Hispanic-American Broadcasting Corporation in the next few weeks as expected, one of the strongest vestiges of Hispanic media power will fade into oblivion . "Telemundo executives claim the issue of Latino-controlled television is a red herring. They claim the important matter is that Hispanics are making the pro gramming decisions. "Translation: Just settle for the crumbs. "In the case of Hispanic media, the messenger has become as important as the message." Carlos Barba, senior vice president of Tele mundo and general manager of New York's Channel47 told New York Dally News columnist Miguel Perez: "This will be the first network program in Spanish that will be seen live, daily, in all of Latin America." While many observers worry that Noticlero will become nothing more than a Spanish translation of already established CNN pro grams , Miguel Perez noted that: "It could result in better coverage of U.S. Latinos by both the Spanish and English-language net works." Darryl Figueroa "Hi, Guillermo. My name is Jesus Jackson." Hispanic Link Weekly Report