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Hispanic link weekly report, June 13, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 13, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
President Reagan signs into law a bill that allows the children of Secret Service Agent Manuel Marrero to continue theireducation at a federal school in Puerto Rico. Marrero died at the 1986 Dupont Plaza Hotel fire while conducting an investigation... U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Chairman Clarence Pendleton, often at odds with civil rights advocates because of his stances against comparable worth, federal set-aside contracts and other issues, dies at age 57 of a heart attack in San Diego while exercising... Willie Velasquez, founder of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, leaves the M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston to return home to San
Antonio after beginning treatment for cancer... Some 700 pages of secret FBI documents on the alleged activities of Orlando Bosch when he jumped parole and left the United States lead to the decision of a district judge to reject his plea for release while he undergoes exclusion proceedings. Bosch, an anti-Castro militant, came illegally to the United States in February... The Milwaukee Brewers'choose Alex Fernandez as their first-round draft pick in the amateur draft of professional baseball. Fernandez, an 18-year-old pitcher from Miamfs Pace High School, was the 24 th pick overall... A Denver jury clears United Blood Services, a blood bank, of liability in the case of Susie Quintana. Quintana charged that the company was liable for hercontracting AIDS from a tainted blood transfusion...

Firms Tally $8 Billion in Sales
The top 500 Hispanic-owned businesses generated more than $8.1 billion in sales in 1987, according to Hispanic Business magazine’s June issue.
The sixth annual directory indicated these businesses employ more than 64,000 people.
“We’re seeing growth in gross sales and personnel,” said Julia Kilgore, a Hispanic Business magazine associate editor. “They’re maturing and making the transition to larger companiea”
This is the first year the directory excluded
A U.S. Postal Service job applicant was denied employment in spite of being authorized to work under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, charged a complaint filed in San Francisco June 1.
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed the complaint with the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Special Counsel on behalf of Leticia Sosa, claiming it was the first such suit against a federal government agency.
The Justice Department told Weekly Report that it had received four or five similar complaints against the Postal Service, the Department of Agriculture and INS in recent weeks.
Sosa applied for legalization under IRCA and received a temporary resident card in May 1987, authorizing her to work. The law forbids any form of job discrimination against temporary residents.
Puerto Rican firms. The move was made because there was no effort to network with mainland companies despite past promises of change, said Jesus Chavarria, the magazine’s publisher. With the removal of these corporations the directory shows an $1.8 billion drop in sales over 1986.
Forty-eight slots became available to mainland companies with the exclusion of Puerto Rico from the list
Almost 40% of the top 500 are in sales,
continued on page 2
On Feb, 1, after a series of preliminary tests and training, Sosa was told to report to work on Feb. 16. The offer of employment was rescinded when it was later discovered that Sosa is a temporary legal resident.
In a Feb. 10 letter to Sosa, the Postal Service stated ita policy is that an employee must be “either a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien."
MALDEF attorney Francisco Garcla-Rodriguez commented, "It Is indeed ironic that, on the one hand, the federal government tells private employers they cannot discriminate against temporary residents; yet on the other hand, an agency of the same federal government engages in just such a discriminatory practice.”
The Office of Special Counsel must determine whether it will pursue the case within 120 days.
- Diana Padilla
California’sli.S. Reps. Win in State Primary
In California's congressional Democratic primary June 7, U.S. Reps Edward Roybal of Los Angeles and Esteban Torres of Norwalk ran unopposed Rep.TonyCoelhowonanother term with 90% of the vote.
U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez of Montebello captured 73% of the electorate against former Monterey Park Mayor Lily Lee Chen, who garnered 27%, in a much-publicized contest. Martinez now faces a Hispanic Republican, Ralph Ramirez, who picked up 45% of the vote against two competitors.
In the Republican primary in San Diego's 44th Congressional District, Luis Acle, with 42%, lost to Rob Butterfield, 58%. Acle spent a year as associate director, 1985-86, for public liaison at the White House.
Dade County Selects Avino
Cuba-born Joaquin Aviho succeeds Sergio Pereira as Metro-Dade County manager following a 5-4 vote by the nine-member county commission June 2. Aviho will head the largest local government in the Southeast, with a staff of 22,000 and a$2 billion budget.
His selection follows Pereira’s Feb. 10 resignation amid pressure for his involvement in ethically questionable land deals.
Aviho, 37, moves into the pressure-laden spot with three years experience as assistant county manager. He is a civil engineer by trade.
His election comes despite opposition from Hialeah Mayor Raul Martinez, who has come under fire from much of the Cuban community for lobbying against a fellow Cuban. Hialeah is located within Dade County.
The mayor expressed displeasure with Aviho for not courting his support. “The guy never had the courtesy to pick up the phone,” Martinez told The Miami Herald. “Why should I give him my support?”
Latino Joblessness Drops
The Hispanic unemployment rate for May fell to 9% from 9.3% in April, said the U.S. Department of Labor June 3. The rate still leaves 801,000 Latinos jobless.
The national rate rose to 5.5% from April’s 14-year low of 5.4%.
TOP 10 COMPANIES IN 1987 SALES
BUSINESS LOCATION TYPE OF BUSINESS SALES’
Bacardi Imports Miami Fla Import/Distr. $500
Goya Foods Secaucus, N.J. Food Mfg. 275
Handy Andy San Antonio, Texas Retail Groceries 170
Sedano’s Miami, Fla. Food Mfg. 154
Van Dyke Dodge Warren, Mich. Auto Sales 133
Gus Machado Enterprises Hialeah, Fla. Auto Sales 133
Kaufman and Roberts Miami, Fla. Retail Appliances 123
El Chico Dallas, Texas Restaurant Chain 111
Frank Parra Chevrolet Irving, Texas Auto Sales 109
Northwestern Miami, Fla Meat/Seafood Distr. 108
* Sales in millions
Source: Hispanic Business Magazine
Hispana Alleges Postal Service Bias


Calif. Schools’ Toughening Falls to Help Minorities
California’s toughened education standards have had little positive impact on minority students, according to a report released May 25. Black and Latino students remain years behind Anglo students following reforms instituted in 1983, it found, with drop-otS rates for all groups up.
The Achievement Council, a non-profit organization established in 1984, assessed the status of minority students over a three-year period. It reported theise dropout rates by race/ethnicity.
1984 1987
Blacks 43% 48%
Hispanics 43% 45%
Whites 25% 27%
Asians 15% 17%
Though test scores and most other edu-
cation indicators were up, the report found
achievement gaps between predominantly minority schools and white schools unchanged.
The study showed that as early as the third grade, Latino and black students performed about six months behind. By the sixth grade, they fell behind by a year. In the eighth grade, they lagged behi nd by two years and by 12 th grade, there was a three-year gap.
,, Ray Cortices, San Francisco Unified School District superintendent and member of the Achievement Council, told Weekly Report “These students never had a chance to make up for what they missed the previous year.
“They just fall through the cracks.”
Four of the Achievement Councifs 13 members are Hispanic. Vilma Martinez, former chair of the University of California
Board of Regents, is chairperson.
Cortines supported the tougher standards, urging that additional help and support be given to students with problems “We need a benevolent dictatorship In the schools” he said. “It had been too permissive”
Only about one in 10 black and Latino students who do graduate are eligible to enter four-year colleges and only one in 50 obtain degrees, the report said.
Among the report’s recommendations
• intensive retraining of teachers during the summer;
• assistance in low-achieving schools i
from a principal or other leader who has already improved conditions at another school; j
and
• establishing the same curricula at all schools.
- Darryl Figueroa
Top 500 Latino Firms Employ 64,000
continued from page 1
either wholesale or retail. Some of the other well-represented industries are service, 18.5%, food, 14%, and manufacturing, 11%.
Auto dealerships appear frequently on the list. At the top is Van Dyke Dodge, Warren, Mich. In combination with its sister dealership, Galeana Chrysler-Plymouth in Fort Myers, Fla, it generated $133,180,089 in sales last year. The Florida dealership reaped greater profits than any other Dodge-Chrysler dealership in the country.
The owner, Frank Galeana is a Mexican American born in New York. At a time when some dealers are reducing the size of their lots, he just added four acres to the Florida location and plans to purchase a third dealership.
Michigan, bolstered by an economic upswing, made its debut this year on the list of top 10 states, moving into the number six position.
Francisco Vega, state chairman the His-
Double Life Discovered
Eva Luz Aguilar, an administrative assistant at the Downtown Legalization Project in Los Angeles, discovered she had been leading a double life when a legalization applicant came into her office bearing a social security card that identified her as Aguilar.
The real Aguilarfound herself facing 328-year-old with a similar life history, with one major difference- Aguilar is a legal resident, the woman was not The social security card had been in a wallet stolen four years ago. The applicant, who asked not to be identified, said she found it on the street a year ago and used it to find work in a garment factory to support her three children.
After the shock wore off, Aguilar finished processing the woman’s paperwork, suggesting she apply for a new card under own name.
panic Chamber of Commerce of Michigan, traced some of this success to a tough winnowing process that requires potential entrepreneurs to have strong skills.
“I’ve always felt we’re not the kind to come in and push our way in, but if weire invited -watch out - we'll compete,” said Vega
Top Firms by State
California 126 New Jersey 18
Florida 118 Michigan 16
Texas 72 Arizona 11
New York 38 New Mexico 10
Illinois 22 Colorado 8
Source: Hispanic Business Magazine
Overall, large U.S. companies have trimmed their employee rolls since 1982, yet the number of new jobs has risen by 15 million because the small business sector has grown, Hispanic Business pointed out. Latino-owned businesses made a sizable contribution to that explosion, according to the article.
- Sophia Nieves
Council Majority Gained
Hispanics in Cockrell Hill, Texas, gained the majority on the City Council after a J une 4 run-off, bringing the number of newly elected Hispanics on the city’s governing body to three.
In the June5 election, Tony Hinojosa drew 227 votes and the incumbent, C.W. Martin, 270. The other new council members, Patricia Aguilar and Rachel Rodriguez, were sworn in May 13. Delores Singleton took office as mayor last month with the backing of the Latino community.
Hispanics represent half of the 3,500 residents in Cockrell Hill, near Dallas. A voter registration drive conducted by Chicanos Actively United for Social Advancement and the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project signed up about 400 Latino voters. The Latino councilors are the first in the city’s history,
Improvements in Math Limited to the Basics j
Hispanic and black students’ improvement in basic math skills were tempered with a poor showing in higher levels of math, such as algebra, according to a nationwide study released June 7 by the Educational Testing Service. The study was titled“The Mathematics Report Card, Are We Measuring Up?”
“One-third of one percent of the black kids and barely one percent of Hispanic kids have ; achieved the higher level. Such modest < improvement that there is, has been at lower levels,” said Chester Finn, an assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Education. Finn was among several educators present | at the release of the report.
The profile, released in Washington, D.C., is based on four national surveys and covers a 13-year period, 1973 to 1986. It ranks students j on their level of mathematical ability, ranging from 150 for simple arithmetic facts to 350 for multi-step problems and algebra.
Although gains were made by 9-, 13- and 17-year-olds in both groups, achievement was still well below Anglo students. The H ispan ic students’ gains came as a result of a greater focus on minority education and better educated parents, said Finn.
In 1985-86, 58% of 9-year-old Hispanic students were proficient in math requiring beginning skills and understanding; 27% of Hispanic 17-year-olds were able to function at a level requiring moderately complex procedures and reasoning.
Changes in student and parental attitudes toward math and the development of a curriculum emphasizing practical application were some of the solutions cited by experts.
Although the report showed improvement in proficiency levels, it did not demonstrate students were ready for the demands of college and the work place. One of the statistics most troubling for experts showed half of all 17-year-olds are functioning at a junior high math level. - Sophia Nieves
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


John Rosales, guest columnist
A Father Remembered
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS - The tightrope many fathers walk these days-“Should I be a friend or a disciplinarian?” - didn’t exist with Guadalupe Mendez. Being responsible for his children precluded being a friend.
Period.
“If any of your daughters get pregnant before marrying,” he once told his wife, “I’ll squeeze their necks and bury them standing up.”
In the Old World way, his six daughters kept honorable the family name. As wedding gifts, Mendez gave each of them a house.
Mendez made his way to San Antonio from Coahuila, Mexico, in 1914. He was illiterate and barely able to speak English. He rose at 5 a.m., worked hard all day, and never missed church on Sunday.
When he died in October 1986 at the age of 96, he left behind a legacy of family businesses that still thrives.
Just4 feet 11 inches, the man with intense blue eyes, brick-hard chest and muscular arms also bestowed another type of wealth upon his children: pride and identity.
His 10 children, 24 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild were the center of his universe.
Until his death, M6ndez was still getting up at dawn to visit the businesses he helped them establish.
WAITED 52 YEARS FOR A HUG
He was driving his station wagon until he was 90. Then he depended on one of his grandchildren to chauffeur him.
“He didn’t smoke or drink or curse and didn’t allow us to, either,” said Lupe, the oldest of his four sons.
Mendez’s manner was restrained, his children agreed in understatement.
“I waited 52 years to get a hug. I got it right before he died,” Lupe said. “ Dad said he was sorry for not having shown more affection, but it wasn’t the kind of man he’d grown to be. I understood.”
M6ndez often spoke of honor, loyalty and being true to your friends and family. He looked askance at those who were late for appointments and who didn’t pay their debts on time.
He was successful enough growing and selling produce to most of the stores and restaurants on the West Side of San Antonio that he was able to give credit, especially to needy families in the neighborhood.
By the end of the 1950s, he had $150,000 of unpaid credit.
“Twenty and 30 years later people I didn’t even know would come to my store asking for my dad so they could pay him the money they owed,” Lupe said. “Fathers would die and their children would come in and pay.”
LA CASA FUERTE
The respect for the man was so great, his influence within the family so firm, that one of his grandsons named his business after one of his grandfather's sayings.
“He’d tell everybody: ‘Esta es la casa fuerte,’ referring to his family,” said Joseph Aguilar, who owns three La Casa Fuerte downtown retail fruit stores. “For having so many children, he knew how to handle each one as an individual and bring them together as a family.”
He was as concerned in the 1980s about the dating habits of his granddaughters as he was in the 1940s about those of his daughters.
“When we brought boyfriends to meet him, he’d ask: What do you do for a living? Where is your family from? When are you going to marry her?” said Ali M6ndez, his granddaughter and one of three sisters who own Los Padrinos nightclub and the Green Eggs and Ham catering service.
Grandsons didn’t have it any easier.
Once Aguilar was late, by just one day, paying back a $200 loan from his grandfather. Mendez became indignant.
“When I tried to pay him, he threw it back,” Aguilar recalled.“He told me, It’s not the money I cared about. It's your word.’”
(John Rosales is a reporter for the San Antonio Light.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
IF YOU CAN’T SAY SOMETHING NICE about a person, then at least say something entertaining. From a batch of clips sent in from here and there, I offer
EDDIE MARTINEZ, a wide receiver on the Miami High School football team, offers this assessment of the status of fellow wide receiver lliana Tejera (5 feet 6 inches, 125 pounds), who suited up for spring practice, hoping to become the first girl to play varsity football in Dade County:
“At the beginning everyone taunted and teased her. They would say things like‘you’re not man enough to play and‘you don’t have the guts.’ But everybody thought she would be good. What surprised me the most is that she wasn’t good. Once everyone found out she wasn't good, they didn’t worry about her ”
Tejera, 18, who reached Miami with herfamily in the 1980 Mariel boatlift, shared some of her own feelings in the same Miami Herald article.
Among them: She cries when the Miami Dolphins lose, and she broke up with her boyfriend when he objected to her trying out for the team. “I know I will get hurt, but it doesn’t matter... If it’s my destiny to die on a football field, I will die there.”
As Vince Lombardi once philosophized: “Owe sera sera.”
STANLEY DIAMOND, chairman of U.S. English-California, expresses his displeasure in a letter to The Los Angeles Times over the city school district’s encompassing new bilingual education plan.
He complains: “The victory is historic for the bilingual education power body. They salivate at the useless jobs the program creates...
“Personally, on five telephone requests to testify, I was told ‘hearing dates and times are not certain’ - ‘call back next week’-‘you may, but it’s questionable, get on for3 minutes’... etc. etc. And the responses were laced with venom.
“The feelings of parents and teachers range between being angry and damned mad.”
Calmate, Estanley.
YOUR FRIENDLY INS AGENT: When Robert Kelleher, senior judge of the U.S. District Court, Central District of California, wrote his inspired decision May 24 instructing INS agents to stop strip* searching juveniles in their custody on admission or following visitations, he pointed out that of 7,300 such strip searches of juveniles last year, the only “contraband” found was a piece of a broken mirror on a teenage girl, and there was no indication that she planned to use it for anything other than to look at herself.
His decision added this revealing insight
“Defendants (INS) claim that because the vast majority of the plaintiff class are from Central American countries where they may have had little or no rights analogous to those afforded under our Constitution, they carry no actual or subjective expectation that they would not be subjected to unreasonable intrusions into their privacy when they enter the United States.
“We disagree. It is true that many of these plaintiffs may come from unfortunate situations where their lives and liberties had little protection. However, they have come to the United States by more than mere happenstance. Many carry with them the expectation of liberty, opportunity and a better life, the embodiment of which is our Constitution. They had reason to expect its protections.”
INS believes that if they had no rights back home, why should they have any here? _ Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
JOHN ROUSAKIS, mayor of Savannah, Ga, commenting on the U.S. Census Bureau’s refusal to adjust the 1990 census to compensate for projected black and Hispanic undercounts:
“I’m a little flabbergasted. It seems that when the feds want to find you, they find you. Listening to this, when they want to lose you, they lose you.”
June 13, 1988


COLLECTING
CALIFORNIA SCHOOLS: A 40-page study focusing on the effects of California educational reforms on Latino and black students is available free. “Unfinished Business” can be obtained by calling or writing: The Achievement Council, 1016 Castro St., Oakland, Calif. 94607 (415)839-4647.
STUDENT MATH PROGRESS: “The Mathematics report card: Are We Measuring Up?” gives information on math proficiency levels of students nationwide from 1973 to 1986. It can be obtained for $14, including shipping and handling, from The Nation's Report Card, P.O. Box 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710. A 50% discount will be applied to orders of three or more copies.
HISPANIC BUSINESS SUCCESSES: The 1988 directory of the nation’s top 500 Hispanic businesses has been compiled by Hispanic Business magazine. The profile, which appeared in the June 1988 issue, ranks businesses according to sales, number of employees and other measures. For a copy of the June 1988 issue, send $3.50 with your request to Hispanic Business, 360 S. Hope Ave, Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105.
LITERARY COMPETITION: The third Letras De Oro Literary Competition for works written in Spanish in the United States is accepting entries until Oct. 12. For more information and a copy of the first Letras De Oro Collection, contact Letras De Oro, University of Miami, P.O. Box 248123, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124.
MARITAL STATUS AND LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: A final, 73-page report, containing detailed data by racial and ethnic origin, titled “Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1987,” has been issued by the Census Bureau. Copies (specify Series P-20, No. 423) are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402(202)783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
READING SKILLS: “Who Reads Best?,” a 60-page National Assessment of Educational Progress study, finds that on the average minority students and those from disadvantaged urban communities perform poorly relative to the national population at each grade level. The study is available for $12.50 fromThe Nation’s Report Card,P.O. Box 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710.
HISPANIC FAMILY CONSUMPTION: A 15-page study, “The Hispanic Family- Consumer Research Issues,” tracks the significant differences in the Hispanic American family when compared to other families. Requests for reprints should be sent to Lisa Penaloza Alaniz, Graduate School of Management, University of California, Irvine, Calif. 92717.
CONNECTING
THIRD CLASS GRADUATING
The third graduating class of The National Hispanic University, based in Oakland, Calif., will participate in commencement exercises June 18.
Included among the seven-year-old university’s 15 graduates this year will be the first to come out of its Master of Business Administration program.
NHU is a non-profit, four-year institution with an enrollment of 300. It offers degrees in business, health science and education. Some 420 students have been graduated since 1981. The institution has 35 faculty members, 20 of whom are adjunct.
CONGRESSIONAL INTERNS PLACED
Sixteen Hispanics who graduated from high school this year will begin working June 13 in Washington, D.C., with elected officials in the 1988 McDonalcfs/Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute High School Summer Internship program.
The program, which is in its third year, will have the interns work in congressional offices as well as attend seminars put on by media representatives, trade associations and other organizations.
Texas has the largest contingent of students, with four, followed by California, with three, and New Mexico, two. New York, Colorado, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia and Oklahoma each have one.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Carmen Garcia Rosado, of Hato Rey, Puerto Rico, completes her weeklong participation in the Congressional Senior Citizen Intern Program. Sponsored by Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster, Garcia participated in seminars with congressional members on issues topical to the elderly. Garcia is a teacher... Joseph Fernandez, superintendent of Dade County public schools, joins 19 other U.S. educators on a committee that will study the restructuring of schools. Funding for the Holmes Group comes from a$200,000 Ford Foundation grant. . . The National Council of Hispanic Women elects Elia Mendoza, with the U.S. Department of Labor, as new chairwoman at the groups June 2,3 annual conference... Adolph Coors announces the appointment of Carlos Soto, a native of Puerto Rico, as its national program managerfor community relations in Golden, Colo... The League of United Latin American Citizens announces it will give $3,000 to Knapp Elementary School in Denver to update its library. The school has a 62% Hispanic enrollment...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SPRING RECEPTION Washington, D.C. June 14
Ayuda, an organization that provides free legal services to the Latino community of the nation’s capital, will hold afund-raising reception to highlight its 1987 accomplishments.
Rebecca Cusic (202) 387-4848
MINORITIES AND LUNG DISEASE Los Angeles June 15-17
A national leadership forum on respiratory disease in minority populations will be held by the American Lung Association. Participants will plot a national strategy for fighting lung disease. They will also address the impact of tobacco advertising and discuss lung disease In the work place.
Vinneah Reid (212)315-8718
PUERTO RICAN CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. June 15-17
The National Puerto Rican Coalition will hold a conference examining the partnership between nonprofit organizations and the public and private sectors. Republican and Democratic presidential candidates have been invited to speak. The conference willalso explore ways of increasing Puerto Rican political involvement.
Ram6n Daubon (202) 223-3915
EMPLOYER SANCTIONS Washington, D.C. June 17
A seminardesigned to help employers cope with the 1986 Immigration Act’s employment provisions will be held by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. It will cover possible sanctions for violations and the fine line between proper screening of potential employees and compliance with the law’s anti-discrimination provisiona Ann Ashbum (202) 628-4074
TESTING-REFORM CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. June 17, 18 Fairtest, the National Center for Fair and Open Testing, will hold a conference focusing on how to reduce inequities caused by standardized tests given to students and workers. U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) will talk about test bias and June 13,1988
reforms.
Monty Neill (617) 864-4810
HISPANIC ENGINEERS Los Angeles June 18
The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold its installation and awards banquet Both professional engineers and student members will attend. Lourdes Arce (213) 725-3970
LATINA LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles June 18
Jamie Sepulveda Bailey, California Gov. George Deukmejian’s liaison to the Hispanic community, will be the keynote speaker at the H ispanic Women’s Council conference titled “Meeting the Challenge: A Woman’s Agenda for Success II.”
Ernestina Madriles (213) 725-1657
NOTICE
HEARINGS POSTPONED: The U.S. Equal Employ ment Opportunity Com mission has postponed until the next fiscal year its Washington, D.C., hearings, originally set for June 15-17, on the advancement of minorities and women in the corporate work force. Budget constraints were cited as the reason.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATIONAL ISSUES
New Jersey Department of Higher Education
The Assistant Director assists in the process of overseeing all program and project development, proposal review and the disbursement of funds with respect to bilingual education programs and English as second language programs. Assists in developing recruitment and retention policies pertaining to minorities in higher education.
REQUIREMENTS: Master's degree required; doctorate preferred. Three years of experience in developing, administering and/or evaluating ESL programs in the higher education sector is preferred. Familiarity with urban and bilingual education preferred. Familiarity with recruitment and retention policies pertaining to minorities in higher education and familiarity with New Jersey issues helpful.
SALARY: $33,743 - $47,246. Resumes must be postmarked on or before July8,1988. Submit resumes to Personnel Office - Bl #22.
NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION 20 West State St CN 542 Trenton, New Jersey 08625 Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
PUBLIC INFORMATION DIRECTOR
National Hispanic organization seeks a Public Information Director. Experience in working with national and local media. Excellent writing and editing skills, experience in layout and publication design. Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred. Formal training plus practical experience, Master's degree helpful
Position available immediately, salary based on experience* Send resume and writing samples to:
National Council of La Raza 20 F Street NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Att Lupe Lemus
QRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483*7755.
DIRECTOR, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute seeks a director for its research and documentation division to join its management team. Responsible for designing, developing, and providing research on issues affecting the Latino community with priority in the areas of Education, Political Empowerment Health, and Economic Development. Requirements include: Master's degree in a social research related field, minimum of three years research experience, minimum one year supervisory experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills in Spanish/English. Bicultural preferred. Salary: $30,000-$40,000.
Send cover letter and resume by July 1, 1988, to:
Jos6 C. Matos-Real Executive Director Latino Institute 228 South Wabash Room 600 Chicago, III. 60604 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
The Latino Institute is a not-for-profit organization which promotes Hispanic pro-, gress through research, training and advocacy. Service area is limited to Chicago.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National nonprofit highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management background needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, reliability, loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 110114th St. NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005.
MINORITY STUDENT RECRUITMENT
University of Vermont Office of Admissions
The University of Vermont seeks an individual interested in an admissions career whose duties will include recruitment travel, review, and special programming related to minority applicants. Other responsibilities involve general University admissions activities, including high school visits, application review, and on-campus admissions presentations. Strong interpersonal skills and clear and effective writing and speaking abilities are a must. Evening and weekend work is required.
Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree; a Master's degree and/or 1-2 years’ experience in admissions or related area with prior experience in minority student recruitment preferred. An equivalent combination of education and experience from which com parable knowledge and experience can be acquired will be considered. Salary and title commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Please submit resumes by June 3Q, 1988 to:
Kathie S. Weibust Associate Director of Admissions 194 So. Prospect Street Burlington, VT 05401-3596
The University of Vermont is an EEO/AA Employer. Women end minorities are encouraged to apply.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publicetion or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (E7) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
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Jl y j=ELIX REMEMBERED:
ONE BEGINS, THE OTHER ENDS: Latin American superstar singer Julio Iglesias has launched his 1988 U.S. tour with sold-out appearances in Atlantic City, New York and Washington, D.C., while Mexican great Emmanuel has concluded his national tour.
Emmanuel is due back in Mexico this week, after a brief stint in Spain to promote his Entre lunas album. The singer concluded his tour May 29 in Salinas, Calif. The Entre lunas tour began in February in Miami.
Iglesias reportedly stopped traffic in Manhattan last month when he visited a midtown record store to promote his new English-language album Non Stop.
While in New York, Iglesias taped a one-hour segment on Phil Donahue’s syndicated TV show. He is booked for a three-month tour across the country, and his publicity machine hopes the crooner will now cross over into a younger market.
Mexico’s Maria F6lix - one of Latin |vorite actresses of all time- is given a retrospective this month on the Galavisidn cable channel.
Still to be seen this month are La diosa arrodillada (on June 16); Enamorada, in which F6lix co-starred with Pedro Armenddriz (June 18); and Sonatas (June 23). Check local listings for times.
ONE LINERS: Mexican scholar Miguel Angel Corzo has resigned as director of special projects of Los Angeles? J. Paul Getty Museum to become president of the city’s new, non-profit The Friends of Mexican Culture... ISP/West presents a case study on the making of Stand and Deliver with director/writer Ram6n Men6ndez and star Edward James Olmos June 14 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel... Trini Lopez is featured on the CBS special Seaworlcfs All-Star Lone Star Celebration, taped in San Antonio and airing June 18... And an abridged children’s version of Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Cien ahos de so/edad is now a pop-up book. Some 10,000 issues of Los cuentos de mi abuelo coronet were distributed by publisher Smurfit Cart6n de Colombia to libraries, cultural groups... _ Ant0nio Mejias-Rentas
dresses Hispanics directly. And that doesn’t mean dubbing an English-language ad.”
LOOK IT UP: The Hispanic Media and Markets directory is the latest of the steady stream of source books on Hispanics. First published by Standard Rate& Data Service in March, the 202-page book lists Hispanic media outlets and Hispanic market data It costs $145.
APPLAUSE: Daisy Exposito was promoted to senior vice president of Young & Rubicam in New York. Exposito started at Y&R in 1981 as creative supervisor of Bravo, their Latino ad branch, and became general manager in
1985. She was previously Hispanic market specialist at Conill Advertising.
NOTES: • Avon Products became the first major cosmetics company this year to hire a Hispanic marketing agency and run a commercial on Spanish-language TV. • Porsche Cars is placing its first Spanish-language spots this year, in Miami. • Adolph Coors, the third largest advertiser to Hispanics, increased its Latino ad budget in 1987 by 145% from
1986. _ ....
- Darryl Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 Street NW • ~ '
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 2340737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves* Diana Padilla, Angela Walker Graphics' Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias
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Media Report
HISPANIC MARKETING: The long-held belief that Hispanics are more brand loyal than other consumers may be due to nothing more than a lack of choices, according to a report released June 1.
San Diego-based Market Development Inc. concludes that while Hispanic consumers may be more brand loyal than others, it is not for the usually cited reasons, nam^y something inherent in the Latino culture.
Rather, the report says, this loyalty may be due to a lack of exposure to competing brands, resulting from, among other things, the fact that fewer products are available in bodegas and fewer are advertised on Spanish-language stations.
Vice President/Media Director Leon Pota-finski of Bermudez Associates, one of the top Latino ad firms in Los Angeles, tends to agree that Hispanics were probably not as brand loyal as it may seem.
He says advertisers have often looked at
this credo as a reason not to advertise to Hispanics, thinking that they cannot compete with those who already have a large share of the market. “But you can introduce new products,” Potafinski said. “We’ve found that those who advertise in Spanish are being paid attention to.”
Jackie Hernandez, media plannerforConill Advertising, gives the question another dimension. She cites a study conducted by the Strategy Research Corp. of Miami which shows Hispanics do not buy products with generic ‘ labels. “They would rather spend more money and get something they know,” she says.
She disagrees that there is a lack of exposure to different brands among Hispanics. “Both in the Spanish-language media and in Latino stores, Hispanics do have a choice.”
The San Diego researchers counseled advertisers not to rely on brand loyalty to hold onto current consumers and advised companies not in the market that new consumers might be found if brand awareness were raised.
Hernandez agrees with this conclusion. “The question is not exposure but who ad-
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Making The News This Week President Reagan signs into law a bill that allows the children of Secret Service Agent Manuel Marrero to continue their education at a federal school in Puerto Rico. Marrero died at the 1986 Dupont Plaza Hotel fire while conducting an investigation ... U .S. Commission on Civil Rights Chairman Clarence Pendleton, often at odds with civil rights advocates because of his stances against comparable worth , federal set-aside contracts and other issues, dies at age 57 of a heart attack in San Diego while exercising ... Willie Velilsquez, founder of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project , leaves the M . D . Anderson Hospital in Houston to return home to San Antonio after beginning treatment for cancer . . . Some 700 pages of secret FBI documents on the alleged activities of Orlando Bosch when he jumped parole and left the United States lead to the decision of a district judge to reject his plea for release while he undergoes exclusion proceedings. Bosch, an anti-Castro militant, came illegally to the United States in February .... The Milwaukee Brewers! choose Alex Fernilndez as their first-round draft pick in the amateur draft of professional baseball. Fernandez, an 18-yearold pitcherfrom Miamrs Pace High School, was the 24th pick overall. . . A Denver jury clears United Blood Services, a blood bank , of liability in the case of Susie Quintana. Quintana charged that the company was liable for her contracting AIDS from a tainted blood transfusion ... Voi.6No.23 HISPANIC LINK WEE Firms Tally$8 Billion in Sales The top 500 Hispanic-owned businesses generated more than $8. 1 billion in sales in 1987, according to Hispanic Business magazine's June issue. The sixth annual directory indicated these businesses employ more than 64 ,000 people . "We're seeing growth in gross sales and personnel," said Julia Kilgore, a Hispanic Business magazine associate editor . "They're maturing and making the transition to larger companies. " This is the first year the directory excluded Puerto Rican firms. The move was made because there was no effort to network with mainland companies despite past promises of change, said Jesus Chavarria, the magazine ' s publisher . With the removal of these corpora tions, the directory shows an $1.8 billion drop in sales over 1986. Forty-eight slots became available to mainland companies with the exclusion of Puerto Rico from the list Almost 40% of the top 500 are in sales, continued on page 2 TOP 10 COMPANIES IN 1987 SALES LOCATION Miami Fla Secaucus, N .J. TYPE OF BUSINESS lmport/Distr. Food Mfg . SALES* BUSINESS Bacardi Imports Goya Foods Handy Andy Sedano's San Antonio, Texas Miami, Fla . Retail Groceries Food Mfg. $500 275 170 154 133 133 123 111 109 108 Van Dyke Dodge Gus Machado Enterprises Kaufman and Roberts El Chico Frank Parra Chevrolet Northwestern • Sales in millions Warren , Mich. Hialeah, Fla . Miami, Fla. Dallas, Texas Irving , Texas Miami , Fla . Source: Hispani c Bus i ness Magazine Auto Sales Auto Sales Retail Appliances Restaurant Chain Auto Sales MeaVSeafood Distr. Hispana Alleges Postal Service Bias A U . S . Postal Service job applicant was denied employment in spite of being authorized to work under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, charged a complaint filed in San Francisco June 1 . The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed the complaint with the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Special Counsel on behalf of Leticia Sosa , claiming it was the first such suit against a federal govern ment agency. The Justice Department told Weekly Report that it had received four or five similar corn plaints against the Postal Service, the Depart ment of Agriculture and INS in recent weeks. Sosa applied for legalization under IRCA and received a temporary resident card in May 1987, authorizing her to work. The law forbids any form of job discrimination against temporary residents . On Feb . 1 , after a series of preliminary tests and training, Sosa was told to report to work on Feb. 16. The offer of employment was rescinded when It was later discovered that Sosa is a temporary legal resident. In a Feb . 10 letter to Sosa, the Postal Service stated Its policy is that an employee must be "either a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien. " MALDEF attomey Francisco Garcia-Rodriguez commented, "It Is indeed ironic that, on the one hand, the federal government tells private employers they cannot discriminate against temporary residents; yet on the other hand, an agency of the same federal government en gages in just such a discriminatory practice." The Office of Special Counsel must determine whether it will pursue the case within 1 20 days. Diana Padilla California's U.S. Reps. Win in State Primary In California's congressional Democratic primary June 7, U.S. Reps. Edward Roybal of Los Angeles and Esteban Torres of Norwalk ran unopposed Rep . TonyCoelhowonanother term with 90% of the vote. U.S. Rep . Matthew Martinez of Montebello captured 73% of the electorate against former Monterey Park Mayor Lily Lee Chen, who garnered 27% , in a much-publicized contest. Martinez now faces a Hispanic Republican , Ralph Ramirez , who picked up 45% of the vote against two competitors. In the Republican primary in San Diego ' s 44th Congressional District, Luis Acle, with 42%, lost to Rob Butterfield, 58%. Acle spent a year as associate director, 1985-86, for public liaison at the White House. Dade County Selects Aviiio Cuba-born Joaquin Avii'lo succeeds Sergio Pereira as Metro-Dade County manager follow ing a 5 vote by the nine-member county commission June 2. Avii'lo will head the largest local government in the Southeast, with a staff of 22,000 and a $2 billion budget. His selection follows Pereira ' s Feb. 10 re signation amid pressure for his involvement in ethically questionable land deals. Avii'lo, 37, moves into the pressure-laden spot with three years experience as assistant county manager . He is a civil engineer by trade . His election comes despite opposition from Hialeah Mayor Raul Martinez, who has come under fire from much of the Cuban community for lobbying against a fellow Cuban. Hialeah is located within Dade County . The mayor expressed displeasure with Aviiio for not courting his support. " The guy never had the courtesy to pick up the phone," Martinez told The Miami Herald. " Why should 1 give him my support?" Latino Joblessness Drops The Hispanic unemployment rate for May fell to 9% from 9.3% in April , said the U . S . Department of Labor June 3 . The rate still leaves 801,000 Latinos jobless . The national rate rose to 5 .5% from April 's 14-year low of 5 . 4% .

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Calif. Schools' Tougheni. ng Fails to Help Minorities California's toughened education stand ards have had little positive impact on minor ity students, according to a report released May 25. Black and Latino students remain years behind Anglo students following re forms instituted in 1983, it found, with drop out rates for all groups up. The Achievement Council, a non-profit organization established in 1984, assessed the status of minority students over a three year period. It reported these dropout rates by race/ethnicity: 1984 1987 ... Blacks 43% 48% Hispanics 43% 45% Whites 25% 27% Asians 15% 17% Though test scores and most other edu cation indicators were up, the report found achievement gaps between predominantly minority schools and white schools un changed. The study showed that as early as the third grade, Latino and black . students per formed about six months behind. By the sixth grade, they fell behind by a year. In the eighth grade, they lagged behind by two years and by 12th grade, there was a three year gap . . . Ray " . Cortines, San Francisco Unified School District superintendent and member of the Achievement Council, told Weekly Report "These students never had a chance to make up for what they missed the previous year. "'Theyjust fall through the cracks." Four of the Achievement Councirs 13 meml;>ers are Hispanic. Vilma Martinez, former chair of the University of California Top 500 Latino Firms Employ 64,000 continued from page 1 either wholesale or retail. Some of the other represented industries are service, 18.5%, food, 14%, and manufacturing, 11%. Auto dealerships appear frequently on the list. At the top is Van Dyke Dodge, Warren, Mich. In combination with its sister dealership, Galeana Chrysler-Plymouth in Fort . Myers, Fla, it generated $133,180,089 in sales last year. The Florida dealership reaped greater profits than any other Dodge-Chrysler dealer ship in the country. The owner, Frank Galeana, is a Mexican American born in New York. At a time when some dealers are reducing the size of their lots, he just added four acres to the Florida location and plans to purchase a third dealer ship. Michigan, bolstered by an economic upswing, made its debut this year on the list of top 10 states, moving into the number six position. Francisco Vega, state chairman the His-Double Life Discovered Eva Luz Aguilar, an administrative assistant at the Downtown Legalization Project in Los Angeles, discovered she had been leading a double life when a legalization applicant came into her office bearing a social security card that identified her as Aguilar. The real Agu ilarfound herselffacing a28 year-old with a similar life history, with one major differenceAguilar is a legal resident, the woman was not The social security card had been in a wallet stolen four years ago. The applicant, who asked not to be identified, said she found it on the street a year ago and used it to find work in a garment factory to support her three chil dren. After the shock wore off, Aguilar finished processing the woman's paperwork, sug gesting she apply for a new card under own name . 2 panic Chamber of Commerce of Michigan, traced some of this success to a tough winnow ing process that requires potential entre preneurs to have strong skills. "I've always felt we're not the kind to come in and -push our way in, but if were invited watch outwell compete," said Vega Top Firms by State California 126 New Jersey 18 Florida 118 Michigan 16 Texas 72 Arizona 11 New York 38 New Mexico 10 Illinois 22 Colorado 8 Source : Hispanic Business Magazine Overall, large U.S. companies have trimmed their employee rolls since 1982, yet the num ber of new jobs has risen by 15 million because the small business sector has grown, Hispanic Business pointed out. Latino-owned businesses made a sizable contribution to that explosion, according to the article. -Sophia Nieves Council Majority Gained Hispanics in Cockrell Hill, Texas, gained the majority on the City Council after a June 4 run off, bringing the number of newly elected Hispanics on the city's governing body to three. In the June5 election, Tony Hinojosa drew 227 votes and the incumbent, C.W. Martin, 270. The other new council members, Patricia Aguilar and Rachel Rodriguez, were sworn in May 13. Delores Singleton took office as mayor last month with the backing of the Latino community. Hispanics represent half of the 3,500 re sidents in Cockrell Hill, near Dallas. A voter registration drive conducted by Chicanos Actively United for Social Advancement and the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project signed up about 400 Latino voters. The Latino councilors are the first in the city's history. Board of Regents, is chairperson. Cortines supported the tougher standards, urging that additional help and support be given to students with problems. "We need a benevolent dictatorship in the schools," he said "It had been too permissive." Only about one in 1 0 black and Latino students who do graduate are eligible to enter four-year colleges and only one in 50 obtain degrees, the report said. Among the report's recommendations: • intensive retraining of teachers during the summer; • assistance in low-achieving schools from a principal or other leader who has already improved conditions at another and • establishing the same curricula at all schools. Darryl Figueroa Improvements in Math , Limited to the Basics Hispanic and black students' improvement in basic math skills were tempered with a poor showing in higher levels of math, such as algebra, according to a nationwide study released June 7 by the Educational Testing Service. The study was titled"The Mathematics Report Card, Are We Measuring Up?" "One-third of one percent of the black kids and barely one percent of Hispanic kids have , achieved the higher level. Such modest improvement that there is, has been at lower levels," said Chester Finn, an assistant secre tary at the U.S. Department of Education. Finn was among several educators present . at the release of the report. The profile, released in Washington, D.C., is based on four national surveys and covers a 13-year period, 1973 to 1986. It ranks students on their level of mathematical ability, ranging from 150 for simple arithmetic facts to 350 for multi-step problems and algebra. Although gains were made by 9, 13 and 17-yearolds in both groups, achievement was still well below Anglo students. The Hispanic students' gains came as a result of a greater focus on minority education and better educated parents, said Finn. In 1985, 58% of 9-yearold Hispanic students were proficient in math requiring beginning skills and understanding; 27% of Hispanic 17-yearolds were able to function at a level requiring moderately complex pro cedures and reasoning. Changes in student and parental attitudes toward math and the development of a curricu lum emphasizing practical application were some of the solutions cited by experts . . Although the report showed improvement in proficiency levels, it did not demonstrate students were ready for the demands of college and the work place. One of the statistics most troubling for experts showed half of all 17-yearolds are functioning at a junior high math level. Sophia Nieves Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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John Rosales, guest columnist A Father Remembered SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS-The tightrope many fathers walk these days"Should I be a friend or a disciplinarian?"didn' t exist with Guadalupe Mendez. Being responsible for his children precluded being a friend. Period. "If any of your daughters get pregnant before marrying," he once told his wife, " I ' ll squeeze their necks and bury them standing up . " In the Old World way, his six daughters kept honorable the family name . As wedding gifts, Mendez gave each of them a house . Mendez made his way to San Antonio from Coahuila, Mexico, in 1914. He was illiterate and barely able to speak English . He rose at 5 a.m., worked hard all day, and never missed church on Sunday. When he died in October 1986 at the age of 96, he left behind a legacy ot" family businesses that still thrives. Just4 feet 11 inches, the man with intense blue eyes, brick-hard chest and muscular arms also bestowed another type of wealth upon his children: pride and identity. His 1 0 children, 24 grandchildren , 30 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild were the center of his universe . Until his death, Mendez was still getting up at dawn to visit the businesses he helped them establish . WAITED 52 YEARS FOR A HUG He was driving his station wagon until he was 90. Then he depended on one of his grandchildren to chauffeur him . "He didn't smoke or drink or curse and didn't allow us to , either, " said lupe, the oldest of his four sons. Mendez' s manner was restrained , his children agreed in under statement. "I waited 52 years to get a hug. I got it right before he died ," Lupe said. "Dad said he was sorry for not having shown more affection , but it wasn't the kind of man he'd grown to be. I understood. " Mendez often spoke of honor, loyalty and being true to your friends and family . He looked askance at those who were late for appointments and who didn't pay their debts on time . He was successful enough growing and selling produce to most of the stores and restaurants on the West Side of San Antonio that he was able to give credit, especially to needy families in the neighborhood. By the end of the 1950s, he had $150,000 of unpaid credit. "Twenty and 30 years later people I didn't even know would come to my store asking for my dad so they could pay him the money they owed," Lupe said." Fathers would die and their children would come in and pay . " LA CASA FUERTE The respect for the man was so great, his influence within the family so firm, that one of his grandsons named his business after one of his grandfather's sayings. "He'd tell everybody: ' Esta es Ia cas a fuerte,' referring to his family," said Joseph Aguilar, who owns three La Casa Fuerte downtown retail fruit stores. " For having so many children, he knew how to handle each one as an individual and bring them together as a family . " He was as concerned in the 1980s about the dating habits of his granddaughters as he was in the 1940s about those of his daughters. " When we brought boyfriends to meet him, he'd ask: What do you do for a living? Where is your family from? When are you going to marry her? " said Ali Mendez, his granddaughter and one of three sisters who own Los Padrinos nightclub and the Green Eggs and Ham catering service . Grandsons didn ' t have it any easier. Once Aguilar was late, by just one day , paying back a $200 loan from his grandfather. Mendez became indignant. "When I tried to pay him , he threw it back," Aguilar recalled. "He told me, 'lfs not the money I cared about. lfs your word.'" (John Rosales is a reporter for the San Antonio Light.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua IFYOUCAN'TSAYSOMETHING NICE about a person, then at least say something entertaining. From a batch of clips sent in from here and there, I offer. EDDIE MARTINEZ, a wide receiver on the Miami High School football team , offers this assessment of the status of fellow wide receiver lliana Tejera (5 feet 6 inches, 125 pounds), who suited up for spring practice, hoping to become the first girl to play varsity football in Dade County: "At the beginning everyone taunted and teased her. They would say things like 'you're not man enough to play' and 'you don ' t have the guts.' But everybody thought she would be good. What surprised me the most is that she wasn't good. Once everyone found out she wasn't good, they didn't worry about her." Tejera, 18, who reached Miami with her family in the 1980 Marie I boat lift , shared some of her own feelings in the same Miami Herald article. Among them: She cries when the Miami Dolphins lose , and she broke up with her boyfriend when he objected to her trying out for the team. " I know I will get hurt, but it doesn't matter ... If ifs my destiny to die on a football field , I will die there.'' As Vince Lombardi once philosophized : "Que sera sera" STANLEY DIAMOND, chairman of U.S . English-California, ex presses his displeasure in a letter to The Los Angeles Times over the city school districfs encompassing new bilingual education plan . He complains : "The victory is historic for the bilingual education power body . They salivate at the useless jobs the program creates. .. " Personally , on five telephone requests to testify, I was told 'hearing dates and times are not certain''call back next week'' you may, but ifs questionable, get on for3 minutes' .. . etc. etc. And the responses were laced with venom . "The feelings of parents and teachers range between being angry and damned mad . " Calmate, Estanley. YOUR FRIENDLY INS AGE NT: When Robert Kelleher, senior judge of the U.S . District Court , Central District of California , wrote his inspired decision May 24 instructing INS agents to stop strip searching juveniles in their custody on admission or following visitations, he pointed out that of 7 ,300 such strip searches of juveniles last year, the only "contraband' found was a piece of a broken mirror on a teenage girl , and there was no indication that she planned to use it for anything other than to look at herself. His decision added this revealing i nsight: "Defendants (INS) claim that because the vast majority of the plaintiff class are from Central American countries where they may have had little or no rights analogous to those afforded under our Constitution, they carry no actual or subjective expectation that they would not be subjected to unreasonable intrusions into their privacy when they enter the United States. "We disagree . It is true that many of these pla i ntiffs may come from unfortunate situations where their lives and liberties had little protection. However, they have come to the United States by more than mere happenstance. Many carry with them the expectation of liberty, opportunity and a better life , the embodiment of which is our Constitution. They had reason to expect its protections." INS believes that if they had no rights back home, why should they have any here? -Kay Barbaro Quoting • • • JOHN ROUSAKIS, mayor of Savannah, Ga., commenting on the U.S. Census Bureau's refusal to adjust the 1990 census to compensate for projected black and Hispanic undercounts: " I'm a little flabbergasted . It seems that when the feds want to find you , they find you. Listening to this , when they want to lose you, they lose you." Hispanic Li n k Weekly R e p o rt June 13, 1988 3

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COLLECTING CALIFORNIA SCHOOLS: A 40-page study focusing on the effects of California educational reforms on Latino and black students is available free. "Unfinished Business" can be obtained by calling or writing: The Achievement Council, 1016 Castro St., Oakland, Calif . 94607 ( 41 5) 839-464 7 . STUDENT MATH PROGRESS: "The Mathematics report card: Are We Measuring Up?" gives information on math proficiency levels of students nationwide from 1973 to 1986. It can be obtained for $14, including shipping and handling, from The Nation's Report Card, P.O. Box 671 0, Princeton, N.J. 085416710. A 50% discount will be applied to orders of three or more copies. HISPANIC BUSINESS SUCCESSES: The 1988 directory of the nation's top 500 Hispanic businesses has been compiled by Hispanic Business magazine. The profile, which appeared in the June 1988 issue, ranks businesses according to sales, number of employees and other measures . For a copy of the June 1988 issue, send $3.50 with your request to Hispanic Business, 360 S. Hope Ave., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif . 93105. LITERARY COMPETITION: The third Letras De Oro Literary Competition for works written in Spanish in the United States is accepting entries until Oct. 12 . For more information and a copy of the first Letras De Oro Collection, contact Letras De Oro, University of Miami, P.O . Box 248123, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124. MARITAL STATUS AND LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: A final, 73page report, containing detailed data by racial and ethnic origin, titled "Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1987," has been issued by the Census Bureau . Copies(specify Series P-20, No.423) are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time. ) READING SKILLS: "Who Reads Best?," a 60page National Assessment of Educational Progress study, finds that on the average minority students and those from disadvantaged urban communities perform poorly relative to the national population at each grade level . The study is available for $12.50 from The Nation's Report Card,P.O. Box 671 0, Princeton, N .J. 08541-671 0. CONNECTING THIRD CLASS GRADUATING The third graduating class of The National Hispanic University , based in Oakland, Calif., will participate in commencement exercises June 18. Included among the seven year-old university's 15 graduates this year will be the first to come out of its Master of Business Administration program . NH U is a non-profit, four-year institution with an enrollment of 300. It offers degrees in business, health science and education. Some 420 students have been graduated since 1981. The institution has 35 faculty members, 20 of whom are adjunct. CONGRESSIONAL INTERNS PLACED Sixteen Hispanics who graduated from high school this year will begin working June 13 in Washington, D.C., with elected officials in the 1988 McDonald's/Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute High School Summer Internship program. The program, which is in its third year, will have the interns work in congressional offices as well as attend seminars put on by media representatives, trade associations and other organizations. Texas has the largest contingent of students, with four, followed by California, with three, and New Mexico, two. New York, Colorado, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia and Oklahoma each have one. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Carmen Garcia Rosado, of Hato Rey, Puerto Rico, completes her weeklong participation in the Congressional Senior Citizen Intern Program. Sponsored by Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster, Garcia participated in seminars with congressional members on issues topical to the elderly. Garcia is a teacher. . . Joseph Fernandez, superintendent of Dade County public schools, joins 19 other U.S. educators on a committee that will study the restructuring of schools. Funding for the Holmes Group comes from a $200,000 Ford Foundation grant. . . The National Council of Hispanic Women elects Elia Mendoza, with the U .S. Department of Labor, as new chairwoman at the group's June 2, 3 annual conference . .. Adolph Coors announces the appointment of Carlos Soto, a native of Puerto Rico, as its national program managerforcommunity relations in Golden, Colo ... The League of United Latin American Citizens announces it will give $3,000 to Knapp Elementary School in Denver to update its library. HISPANIC FAMILY CONSUMPTION: A 15-page study, "The Hispanic FamilyConsumer Research Issues," tracks the significant differences in the Hispanic American family when compared to other ' families. Requests for reprints should be sent to Lisa Penaloza Alaniz, Graduate School of Management, University of California , Irvine, Calif. 92717. . The school has a 62% Hispanic enrollment. . . Calendar THIS WEEK SPRING RECEPTION Washington, D.C. June 14 Ayuda , an organization that provides free legal services to the Latino community of the nation's capital, will hold a fund-raising reception to highlight its 1987 accomplishments. Rebecca Cusic (202) 387-4848 MINORITIES AND LUNG DISEASE Los Angeles June 15-17 A national leadership forum on respiratory disease in minority populations will be held by the American Lung Association. Participants will plot a national strategy for fighting lung disease. They will also address the impact of tobacco advertising and discuss lung disease in the work place. Vinneah Reid (212) 315-8718 PUERTO RICAN CONFERENCE Washington, D .C. June 15-17 The National Puerto Rican Coalition will hold a conference examining the partnership between non profit organizations and the public and private sectors. Republican and Democratic presidential candidates have been invited to speak. The conference will also explore ways of increasing Puerto Rican political involvement. Ramon Daub6n (202) 223-3915 EMPLOYER SANC TIONS Washington, D . C . June 17 A seminardesignedto help e mployers cope with the 1986 Immigration Acfs employment provisions will be held by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund . It will cover possible sanctions for violations and the fine line between proper screening of potential employees and compliance with the law's anti-discrimination provisions. Ann Ashburn (202) 628-4074 TESTING-REFORM CONFERENCE Washington, D .C. June 17 ,18 Fairtest, the National Center for Fair and Open Testing , will hold a conference focusing on how to reduce inequities caused by standardized tests given to students and workers. U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) will talk about test bias and June 13, 1988 reforms. Monty Neill (617) 864-4810 HISPANIC ENGINEERS Los Angeles June 18 The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold its installation and awards banquet. Both profes sional engineers and student members will attend. Lourdes Arce (213) 725-3970 LATINA LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles June 18 Jamie Sepulveda Bailey, California Gov. George Deukmejian's liaison to the Hispanic community, will be the keynote speaker at the Hispanic Women's Council conference titled "Meeting the Challenge: A Woman's Agenda for Success II." Ernestina Mad riles (213) 725-1657 NOTICE HEARINGS POSTPONED: The U.S. Equal Employ ment Opportunity Commission has postponed until . the next fiscal year its Washington, D.C .. hearings. originally set for June 15-17, on the advancement of minorities and women in the corporate work force. Budget constraints were cited as the reason . Hispanic Link Weekly Repo rt

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CORPORATE CLASSI .FIEDS ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OFFICE OF Bl Ll NGUAL EDUCATIONAL ISSUES New Jersey Department of Higher Education PUBLIC INFORMATION DIReCTOR The Assistant Director assists in the process of overseeing all program and project development, proposal review and the disbursement of funds with re11pect to bilingual education programs and English as second language programs. Assists in developing recruitment and retention policies pertaining to minorities in higher education. National Hispanic organization seeks a Public lnformjltion Director. Experience in •orking with national and local media . Ex eellent writing and editing skills, experience in layout and publication design . Bilingual (english/Spanish) strongly preferred. Formal training plus practical expj!rlence, degree helpful Posltil;>n available immediately, salary based .on experlencj!. Send resume and writing samples to : REQUIREMENTS: degree required; dOCtorate preferred. Three years of experience in developing, administering and/or evaluating ESL programs in the higher education sector is preferred. Familiarity with urban and bilingual education preferred. Familiarity with recruitment and retention policies pertaining to minorities in higher education and familiarity with New Jersey issues helpful. National Council of La Raza 20 F Street NW Wa!lhington, D .C. 20001 Att Lupe Lemus SALARY: $33,743-$47,246. Resumes must be postmarked on or before JulyS, 1988. Submit resumes to Personnel Office-Bl #22. NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: e Design • Typesetting e Lay out e Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483. 20 West State St CN 542 Trenton, New Jersey 08825 Affirmative ActiorVEqual Opportunity Employer DIRECTOR, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute seeks a director for its research and documentation division to join its management team. Responsible ford& signing, developing, and providing research on issues affecting the Latino community with priority in the areas of Education, Political Empowerment, Health, and Economic Develop ment. Requirements include: degree in a social research related field, minimum of three years research experience, minimum one year supervisory experience ; excellent verbal and written communication skills in Spanish/English . Bicultural preferred. Salary: $30,000 $40,000. Send cover letter and resume by July 1, 1988, to: Jose C. MatosReal Executive Director Latino Institute 228 South Wabash Room 600 Chicago, Ill . 60604 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. The Latino Institute is a notfor-profit organization which promotes Hispanic pro. gress through research, training. and advocacy. Service area is limited to Chicago. MINORITY STUDENT RECRUITMENT University of Office of Admissions The University of Vermont seeks an in<;tividual interested In an admissions career whose duties will include recruitment, travel, review, and special programming related to minority applicants. Other responsibilities Involve general University admissions activities, including high school visits, application review, and on-campus admissions presentations. Strong interpersonal skills and clear and effective writing an(! $peaking abilities are a must. Evening and weekend work Is required. Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree; a degree and/or 1 years' experience In admissions or related area with prior experience in minority student recruitment preferred. An equivalent combination of ed11catlon and experience from which comparable knowledge and experience can be acquired will be considered. Salary and title commensurate with qualifications and experience. Please submit resumes by J11ne 3(), 1988 to: Kathie S. Weibust Associate Director of Admissions 194 So. Prospect Street Burlington, VT 05401 The University of Vermont Is an EEO/AA Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and _____________ _,attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic L,ink, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National nonprofit, highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking. fund raising skills, grass roots Involve ment experience, and good management back ground needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, Initiative , relia bility, loyalty, orderlinessareessentlal. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 1101 14th St. NW, Suite61 0, Washington, D .C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Ordered by Organization Street------------DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) City, State & $45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone 5

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